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Full text of "The Film Daily (Jul-Sep 1933)"

FEDERAL TRADE 
COMMISSION 




LIBRARY 

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Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 



AUDIO-VISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The LIBRARY of CONGRESS 




Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 




The Daily N 
Of Motion 
Now Fifteen 


ewspa per 

Pictures 

Years Old 



^w 



£^v 



VOL. LYIII. NC. 1 



W yOCI\, SATLCDAy, JLLy 1, 1933 



<S CENTS 



Educational 



52 Two-Reelers, 66 Singles 



ANTI-DUAL FEATURE CLAUSE OUT OF INDIE CODE 






Allied Leaders Reported Indirectly Working on Code 



Reported in Co-Operation 

With Pete Harrison's 

Indie Association 

Although so far Allied States 
Ass'n has officially declined to par- 
icipate in work of drafting an in- 
ustry code, it is understood that 
the organization, through various 
of its national leaders, will indirect- 
ly have a hand in the proceedings 
through the National Association of 

(Continued on Page 3) 



SGHENCK WITHDRAWS 
U. A. FROM ASS'N 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Due to differences 

I with another company-member of 
the Associated Picture Producers, 
Joseph M. Schenck last night sub- 

i mitted the resignation of United 
Artists studios from the organiza- 

J tion. B. B. Kahane, Winfield Shee- 

! han and Emanuel Cohen comprise 
the committee considering the resig- 
nation. 



Publix-Cooper Company 
Taking Five Theaters 

Denver — Publix has formed a 
partnership with J. H. Cooper and 
is expected to take over five houses 
in this vicinity for operation by this 
company. Theaters acquired so far 
are: Rialto, Colorado Springs; Ava- 
lon, Grand Junction, and Sterling, 
Greeley. Deals are under way to 
take over the Mesia at Grand Junc- 
tion and the Rex at Greeley. 

Houses were formerly operated by 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Three From Brit.-Gaumonr 

Atlantic City — Three pictures pro- 
duced by British-Gaumont, supervised 
by Eric Pommer, are included in the 
Fox 1933-34 program. Their titles are: 
"Good Companions," "Constant Nymph" 
and "I Was a Spy." 



Expect Appeal from Erpi-Warner Decision 

Although the defendant companies have not officially as yet indicated their 
intentions in the matter, A. T. & T., Western Electric and Electrical Research 
Products are expected to file an appeal with the Circuit Court of Appeals, Phila- 
delphia, from the U. S. District Court decision at Wilmington finding illegal restric- 
tive clauses in the Erpi leasing contract. Judge Joseph P. Nields of the District 
Court will sign an order this week in connection with his decision, handed down in a 
joint suit brought by Stanley Co. of America, General Talking Pictures and Duovac 
Radio Corp. 



Brandt Exhibitor Association Invites 
T. O. C. C. To Help Draft Code 



A resolution inviting Charles J. 
O'Reilly and the T. 0. C. C. to join 
in drafting of an exhibition code 
was passed yesterday at a meeting 
of the Independent Theater Owners 
Association of New York, held at 
the Hotel Astor. The committee 
named to investigate conditions and 
form the code will include William 
Small, Jack Springer, Louis F. Blu- 
menthal, Harry Brandt, Leo Brecher, 



Joe Fleisler and additional owner- 
exhibitors who represent individual- 
ly-operated houses and circuits of 
less than four houses. 

Association dues were reduced 
one-half and now call for $2.50 a 
week for operators of theaters seat- 
ing up to 600, $5, from 601 to 1,200 
and $7.50 from 1,201 up. Another 
meeting of the organization will be 
held Wednesday at the Astor at 
1:30 P. M. 



Arbuckle's Death Not 
To Halt Three Releases 

Death of Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle, 
whose funeral will be held today, 
will not affect Vitaphone release of 
his last three comedies. They are 
titled: "Tomalio," "Close Relations" 
and "In the Dough." Arbuckle had 
just finished work in the last-named 
two-reeler when his death occurred 
early Thursday morning. 



Hays Confers With 

Three Coast Executives 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Immediately upon his 
arrival yesterday, Will Hays went 
into conference with Louis Mayer, 
Adolph Zukor and B. B. Kahane in 
connection with code of fair prac- 
tices, which is to be drafted. Hays 
will confer with all production heads 

(Continued on Page 2) 



52 Two-Reelers, 66 Singles 

on Educational 9 s Program 



Atlantic City — Fifty-two two- 
reelers divided into eight series 
and 66 one-reelers in seven se- 
ries comprise Educational's short 
subject line-up for 1933-34. "Kra- 
katoa," a three-reeler, will also be 
included for late season release. 
The two-reel set-up consists of six 
Star Comedies, six musical com- 
edies, eight Andy Clyde comedies, 



six Moran and Mack shorts, six Tom 
Howard sketches, six Frolics of 
Youth releases, eight Mermaid com- 
edies and six Coronet releases. The 
one-reelers include 26 Terry-Toons, 
six Baby Burlesks, six Song Hit 
stories, 10 Treasure Chest sketches, 
six "As a Dog Thinks" releases, six 
Battle for Life dramas and six Ro- 
mantic Journeys. 



N. A. M. P. I. Decides That 

Exhibs Ought to Set 

Their Own Policies 

With unanimous consent the anti- 
double feature clause inserted in the 
code being drafted by the National 
Association of the M. P. Industry 
has been stricken out. Move is based 
on the theory that the organization 
should not interfere with theater 
policies, which must be exclusively 

(Continued on Page 3) 



ASK GUILD WRITERS 
TO QUIT ACADEMY 



By RALPH WILK 
West Coast Manager, The Film Daily 

Hollywood — Characterizing the 
Academy of M. P. Arts and Sciences 
as "an employers' union," the 
Screen Writers' Guild has adopted 
resolutions recommending that its 
members resign from the writers' 
branch of the Academy. Resolutions 
were offered by the Guild Executive 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Warners Sign Paul Muni 
To Five- Year Contract 

Paul Muni has been signed by 
Warner Bros, for an exclusive five- 
year starring contract. Muni starts 
work soon in "The World Changes" 
previously announced as "America 
Kneels." His next assignment will 
be "Massacre." 



To Analyze Decision 

"A sweeping victory for independent 
exhibitors" is the way Robert Robins, 
executive secretary of the American 
Society for the Protection of Motion 
Picture Theaters, yesterday described 
the Wilmington District Court decision 
finding certain restrictive clauses in 
the Electrical Research Products leas- 
ing agreement illegal. He said his as- 
sociation will hold a special meeting 
soon to analyze the decision, which 
"stops encroachments on She part of 
the electrics." 



THt 



■Z&>*, 



DAILV 



PN/<? 



Saturday, July 1, 193 




VtLlXIII.Ntl SilJ.li 1.1933 Pnci 5 Cuts 



JOHN w AL ICO* 1 f 



(diiir Hi Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
at 1650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk. Inc. J. W 
Alicoate. President, Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M Mrrsereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
and Genera] Manager; Arthur W. Eddy. Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
Mav 21, 1918, at the post-office at N«w York, 
N ' Y.. under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terrm I Pottage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Addros all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, H>50 Broadway. New York, N. Y., 
Phone. Circle 7-4736. 7 4737. 7-4738. 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood. California— Ralph Wilk. 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London- 
Ernest W. Fredman. The Film Renter. 89-91 
Wardour St.. \V. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse. 225. Paris 
— P. A. Harle, I-a Cinematographic Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues. 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 



High Low Close 

Am. Scat 5'i 5Vi 5Vi • 

Columbia Picts. vtc 18 18 18 — 

Con. Fm. Ind 4 3% 3% + 

Con. Fm Ind. pfd. 11% 11 Vi l'Vi + 

East. Kodak 83' 8 80 82'/ 2 — 

Fox Fm. "A- 3Vi 3'/g 3» 8 + 

Loews. Inc 23% 22% 23% + 

Paramount ctfs. . ... 1% 1% 1 ' s — 

Pathe Exch 1% 1% 1% — 

do "A- 5% 5V'2 5% - 

RKC 4 33 4 4 - 

Warner Bros. 6' 8 5% 6 — 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Technicolor 8 8 8 — 

Tnns-Lux 2% 2% 2% • 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 43 4 4% 43 4 

Gen Th. Eq6s40ctfs. 3% 3% 33 4 + 

Keith A-0 6s 46 .. 46 Vi 43% 463 8 — 

Par. By. 5' 2 s51 28 27 28 

Par. 5' 2 s 50 13V4 12 ,2 — 

Pafhc 7s 37 75 75 75 — 

Warner s 6s 39 .36 343 4 343 4 — 
NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE 

Para. Publ.x ... 1 >/« 1% 1 '/« + 



Net 
Chg. 



2 
1 

Va 



Publix-Cooper Company 
Taking Five Theaters 

itinutd from I'anc 1) 

Mountain States Theaters, now in 
bankruptcy. J. L. Finske, former 
Publix district manager, is in charge. 
I a expected that the J. J. Gold- 
stein houses in Pueblo, the Rialto 
and Palm, will also be acquired. 



Want "Say" on Code 

The National Association of the M. P. 
Industry has written to General Hugh 
Johnson. Administrator under the Indus- 
try Control Act askmc him to advise it 
when he receives film industry code 
drafts so the organization may register 
it> jpproval or disapproval. 



Sees Need of Exploitation Pictures 

Exhibitors arc angling for box-office releases that have strong exploitation possi- 
bilities. Charles L. Glett. vice-president of Monarch Pictures said yesterday following 
a tour of the company's exchanges. Glett predicted a decided increase in business 
before the new year and said "Coupled with the opening of a large number of closed 
houses, the prospect for the independents, in particular is very enrouraging." 



150 ATTENDING RKO SCHAEFER DISCUSSES 

CHICAGO SALES MEET PARA, SALES POLICY 



Chicago — About 150 delegates to 
the RKO regional convention will 
attend the opening session at the 
Drake Hotel today. Mayor Edward 
J. Kelly will welcome the salesmen. 
Following the roll call by A. A. 
Schubart and opening addresses by 
Jules Levy and Ned Depinet, the 
feature "India Speaks" will be dis- 
cussed by J. H. Goldberg represent- 
ing Walter Futter, producer of the 
film. Al Mertz, short subject sales 
manager will announce and discuss 
the new line-up of shorts and will 
be followed by Fred J. McConnell 
of the Van Beuren Corp. Talks by 
Sol G. Newman, managing direc- 
tor of Radio Pictures in the United 
Kingdom, and Ambrose Dowling, 
head of the RKO export department 
will end today's activities. 

Those attending the meeting in- 
clude: 

Home Office contingent — Ned E. Depinet, 
Jules Levy, K. I.. McEvoy, Sol G. Newman. 
Ambrose Dowling, Al Mertz. Robert F. Sisk, 
S Barret McCormick, A. A. Schubart. Mich- 
ael J. Poller, J. P. Skelly. Leon J. Bam- 
berger. \Villi;rm Dahler, Frank Kennedy, 
Lou Miller. Lou Gaudreau. 

Chicago — Walter Branson, district man- 
ager; J. Osserman, branch manager; M. 
Kassel, office -manager; S. Decker, S. Gore- 
lick, R. Greenblatt, J. V. Nolan. Cincinnati 

S. C. Jacques, branch manager; G. J. 
Boudet, office manager. R. Kinsler, A. L. 
Sugarman, L. Rosenfeld. Cleveland — H. Sil- 
verberg, branch manager; A. F. Braeuning. 
office manager; A. Goldsmith. X. II. Gerson. 
Dallas — L. E. Harrington, branch manager ; 
R. Sachs, office manager; J. II. Gruben. E. 
A. Phelps, L. M. Sachs, J. Brecheen. Des 
Moines — B. J. McCarthy, branch manager; 
T. Evans, office manager; R. F. Crawford. 
M. A. Raymore. 

Detroit — Nat Levy, branch manager; E. 
Loye, office manager; E. C. Murphy, F. 
Bonnem, Herman Cohen. Omaha — A. M. 
Avery, branch manager; T. R. Ferrand, of- 
fice manager; O. Hanson. \V. J. Foley. El- 
mer llucnke. Sioux Falls — S. W. Fitch, 
branch manager; E. J. Frace. Indianapolis 

R, E. Churchill, branch manager; C. W. 
McKean, office manager; C. E. Penrod, C. 
i Wallace, R. L. Brentlinger. Kansas Cits 

I K. Thompson, branch manager; J. B. 
Wangberg, office manager; E. L. Dyson, J. 
Lewis, A. A. Renfro. K. G. Howe. Mem- 
phis 1'. M. Baker, branch manager: R. V. 
. office manager; N. J, Colquhoun. 
Milwaukee A. N. Schmitz, branch manager; 
W. .V Blaney, office manager; M. Anderson. 
I Ambrose, II Melcher. 

Minneapolis I. K. < loblhammer, branch 
manager; ('. I. DreSSell, office manager; W. 
i Winters. S. Frank, A. I.. Zacherl. Eph 
•'-leans -G, C. Brown, branch 
manager; J. R. I.amantia, office manager; 
i Pfeiffer, II. F. Cohen. Oklahom., Citj 

H. It. Williams, branch manager; M . I 
Dowling. office manager; P. Fielding, (. D. 
Burton Si I Buis L. Elman. branch man- 
R. G. Taylor, office manager; T. C. 
Tobiii. II. Sanders. W. F. De Frenne. Cal- 
J. T. Droy. Winnipeg— L. II. W. it- 
Traveling Representatives — Jack De 
Raj O'Brien, Elmer Sedin. 

HOLD FOR FOURTH WEEK 

Milwaukee — "Gold Diggers of 
1933" continues for a fourth week at 
the Warner Theater here. 



Chicago — Sales policies and new 
season product were discussed by 
George J. Schaefer, general man- 
ager of Paramount, at the company's 
local sales meeting which closed 
yesterday at the Drake. Others who 
spoke to the gathering of nearly 170 
were: Neil Agnew, Joe Unger and 
Stanley Waite. The home office dele- 
gation leaves today to participate in 
the coast sales meeting which opens 
at Los Angeles Wednesday. 



Ask Guild Writers 

To Quit M. P. Academy 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Committee. All but seven of the 
144 members of the Academy's 
writers' branch are also members of 
the Guild, which has a total mem- 
bership of 388. 

Guild leaders declared that the 
Academy's new constitution favors 
employers. In defense of the Acad- 
emy, Frank Woods asserted that 
only one per cent of conciliation 
matters considered by this organiza- 
tion went against employees. 

John Frances Natteford, John 
Meehan and Harvey Thew have been 
elected members of the Guild execu- 
tive board. 



.oming a 



nd G 



oing 



WALTER CAMP, Jr. sailed from New Yl 
on the "Reliance" yesterday bound for 
cruise to the North Cape. 

AL ALTMAN of M-G-M returns to N 
York Wednesday from Chicago. 

ZOE AKINS left New York last night 
the Coast to cast a new play. 

JEANNE COHEN leaves New York FricI 
for the Coast. 

AL JOLSON leaves New York early ne 
week for California. 

MILTON DIAMOND sails from New Yc|j 
Monday en route for Paris. 

JOHN E. OTTERSON sailed yesterday f 
his annual trip abroad. 



Action-Family Films 

New Monarch Plan 

Although Monarch has not as ytJ 
decided upon the exact number <fl 
films to be produced on its 1931 
1934 schedule, the regional meeting 
which have been concluded in tV ; 
east, mid-west and now on the wev 
coast, have determined that the pr< 
gram shall comprise action films di 
signed for family consumption. 



Hays Confers With 

Three Coast Executive 

(Continued from Page 1) 

in his organization. The date ha 
not yet been set for his conferenc 
with the Academy of Motion Pic) 
ture Arts and Sciences. 



Riesenfeld, Diamond 

To Make Film at Paris 

Production of a feature in both 
English and French is planned by 
Dr. Hugo Riesenfeld and Milton 
Diamond. Diamond sails Monday for 
Paris, where the picture will be 
made. Dr. Riesenfeld was formerly 
conductor of the Seventh Ave. Roxy 
orchestra and previously managing 
director for Paramount Broadway 
houses. Diamond has been engaged 
in the distribution of foreign pic- 
tures. 



tMIIMlfMiM 
HOLLYWOOD 

PLAZA 



i~0 



'»3 S-:a „:g 



]"0 Bli 



\m 



D"C 



CENSORS INSTALL RCA SOUND 

Baltimore — The Maryland State 
Board of Censors has had the latest 
RCA Victor High Fidelity sound re- 
producing equipment installed in its 
reviewing room. 



\V° n«Q 0"3 



A. REMINDER 

We purchase American product for Europe. 
We supply European product to America. 
We cover Europe FROM Europe since 1923. 



6 RUE LAMENNAIS 



i 



SUMMER 
RATES, Now 

$2 per day single! 
$2.50 per day double! 

Special weekly and monthly rates 

All rooms with bath and 

shower. Every modern 

convenience. 

Our dining room now 

serving Al Levy's famous 

food — breakfast 25 -45 c. 

Luncheon 35c. Dinner 60c 

Look for the "Doorway of Hospitality" 

ChaiDanyyenMyi. GtaemSietttPAiX-t 



VINE AT HOLLYWOOD BLVD. 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



THE 



Saturday, July 1, 1933 



■X&l 



DAILY 



RKO Radio Chicago 
Convention Squibs 



"COLKS are warned to keep a good 
distance from Stan Jacques of 
Cincinnati. It seems that he's been 
taking ventriloquism rather serious- 
ly and if you're seen in his company 
somebody may take you for a dum- 
my. 



H. Silverberg seems to be well 
taken up with a true Rotarian spirit. 
We've never heard anyone shout the 
praises of Cleveland as strongly or 
as effectively as he does. He sounds 
like he means it, to. 



Earl Harrington has gone in for 
measures of economy these days. His 
only indulgence is in three-for-a-half 
cigars and is never without one — 
except when someone else wants one. 



s 
19! 

"!| Bernie McCarthy is sure to panic 
; the boys again this year if he gives 
1 his swell imitation of two small-time 
\ exhibitors. 



Nat Levy of Detroit says that his 

golf has improved. Just shows you 

what perseverance will do — last year 

iv^he admitted he was the world's 

worst golfer. 



n We've discovered what the easiest 
f 1 job in the world might be. Remind- 
ing Al Avery when it's time to eat. 
There'd be nothing to do — he always 
knows. 



Lord Churchill of Indianapolis 
still retains his U. S. bonds — but 
that's all. 



Tommy Thompson seriously con- 
sidered bringing his favorite nag 
from Kansas City. He's pretty keen 
on horses, and missed his riding last 
year. 



So energetic is Page Baker from 
Memphis that shortly after he ar- 
rived here he went to the admin- 
istrators at the Century of Progress 
Exposition to try to sell "Melody 
Cruise" for a long run. 



Art Schmitz, one of the original 
FBO men, should be able to give us 
^ome authentic information on that 
'beer that made Milwaukee famous." 



G. C. Brown is impatiently await- 
ing the first showing of the new 
Gulbertson shorts. He's quite a 
bridge enthusiast and he wants to 
(pick up some more fine points. 



1A 



If 1= 



Regains "Sportlights" Title 

Grantland Rice has re-acquired the 
title of "Sportlights" for his sports reel 
which has been released during the past 
year by Paramount under the title 
"Sports-eye-view." The former title was 
originally held by Van Beuren for RKO 
release. "Sportlights" will be distrib- 
uted by Paramount this season. There 
will be 13 in the series. Jack Eaton 
remains as producer. 



J to 




IOHCthe 

■ .l;jAjrfT»,,.,i.^J.,M-.,^^ ■.... 



PHIL M. DALY 



• • • ABOUT THE last word in the new season's product 

announcement is that of Paramount a massive volume 

that covers your entire desk when it's opened it is 

bound with that new tricky French wire patent that gives it a 
very modern effect every page opens up on a new color 

harmony a nifty combination of art work, photographs 

and copy and incidentally that copy is worth 

reading every word of it it's Showman Language 

done without blah but with loads of Class everyone who 

had a hand in its preparation can feel mighty proud 

• © • THEY WERE testing a raft of beau-ti-ful show 

gals at the M-G-M stude for "Dancing Lady" all were 

dressed in bathing suits and practice "scanties" Jimmy 

Durante wandered on the set "Boy," chirps "Schnozzle," 

"I sees a lotta 'new faces' this year'" 

* * * * 

• • • ANOTHER USHER has been discovered for the 
pix, the same being Lester Arnold picked by De Mille for "This 

Day and Age" the lad was known as Lester Salkow 

when he ushered at the Rivoli Bernice Stern is the lady 

treasurer for Astor Pictures Albert Howson, director 

of Warners' Censorship Dept., will recite the Declaration of In- 
dependence at the Fourth of July celebration at Forest Hills 

for the tenth consecutive year he recites it by heart, 

with gesticulations and every thin' ..They tell us that 

Warners' "I Am A Fugitive" is going so strong in Europe that 
it is sure to surpass the gross of "The Singing Fool," which 
holds the record for all American releases on the Continent. 



Jean Harlow and Clark Gable in 

"HOLD YOUR MAN" 

M-G-M 89 mins. 

GETS OVER STRONG WITH INTEREST- 
ING PLOT AND FINE EMOTIONAL 
CLIMAX. 

The team of Jean Harlow and Clark 
Gable score easily with a story made to 
order for them. It is pretty hard-boiled 
and sophisticated, recounting as it does the 
experience of these two "wise" young peo- 
ple who earn their livelihood by preying 
en society in a petty larceny sort of way. 
Jean Harlow's racket is to get some fall- 
guy to fall in love with her and then 
work him for the necessaries of life. But 
when she meets Gable, another slick artist, 
she falls for him strong. He wakes up to 
a realization that he really loves her, and 
they take out a marriage license. Mean- 
while a drunk he has socked dies from the 
fall, and Gable makes his getaway. The 
girl is sent to a reformatory. There is a 
baby on the way, and no marriage cere- 
mony. From here on the picture takes on 
real emotional and dramatic value with a 
lot of human interest in the sincerity of the 
tragic situation. It works out to a happy 
ending in a very logical way, with some 
fine atmosphere in the reformatory se- 
quences. 

Cast: Jean Harlow, Clark Gable, Stuart 
Erwin, Dorothy Burgess, Muriel Kirkland, 
Garry Owen, Barbara Barondess, Paul Hurst, 
Elizabeth Patterson, Theresa Harris, Blanche 
Friderici, George Reed. 

Director, Sam Wood; Author, Anita Loos; 
Adaptors, Anita Loos, Howard Emmett Rog- 
ers; Editor, Frank Sullivan; Cameraman, 
Harold Rosson. 

Direction, Expert. Photography, Excellent. 



Constance Bennett in 

"BED OF ROSES" 

with Joel McCrea, John Halliday 
Radio 67 mins. 

STEREOTYPED AND ARTIFICIAL YARN 
RATES JUST AVERAGE ENTERTAINMENT 
WITH SOME GOOD LAUGHS. 

The principal comment on this picture 
is that Constance Bennett appears very 
much miscast m the role of a hard-boiled 
girl. Deprived of her usual opportunity 
to wear fine gowns, in every sequence, 
most of her glamor is gone and she moves 
through her part without any distinction. 
In fact, Pert Kelton scores the hit with 
her comedy lines and actions as the pal of 
Miss Bennett. She fits the hard-boiled 
role perfectly, and scores repeatedly with 
hearty laughs. The plot is pretty thread- 
bare and unrelieved by anything that savors 
of originality. Constance does a term in a 
reformatory, and then starts out to make 
society pay for everything she has suffered 
determined to get hers in the form of 
life's luxuries and create for herself a 
"bed of roses." She is befriended by a 
young cotton barge captain (Joel McCrea), 
but forsakes him with his dough, and gets 
herself a rich boy friend in John Halliday, 
who puts her up in a sumptuous apart- 
ment. Then back to true love with the 
young captain who knows everything and 
forgives all. Sophisticated fare that is out 
for family trade. 

Cast: Constance Bennett, Joel McCrea, 
John Halliday, Pert Kelton, Samuel Hinds. 

Director, Gregory La Cava; Author, Wan- 
da Tuchok; Adaptor, same; Dialoguers, 
Wanda Tuchok, Eugene Thackrey; Editor, 
Basil Wrangle; Cameraman, Charles Rosher. 

Direction, good Photography, fine. 



ANTI-DUAL CLAUSE 
OUT OF INDIE CODE 



(Continued from Page 1) 
decided by exhibitors. It was de- 
clared that desire of major compa- 
nies to eliminate dual bills is in- 
spired by efforts to secure more 
playing time for their short sub- 
jects. 

Next meeting of the association 
has been deferred until Monday, 
July 10. The organization commit- 
tee meets Thursday night, also at 
the Park Central. 



Report Allied Heads 

Working on Film Code 

(Continued from Page 1) 

the M. P. Industry. Abram F. 
Myers, chief counsel, is reported to 
be working with P. S. Harrison on 
the codes which the independent 
producer-distributor unit is develop- 
ing. Myers addressed the associa- 
tion meeting held at the Park Cen- 
tral last Wednesday night. 



WARNERS BUY DARK HAZARD' 

Warner Bros, has acquired screen 
rights to "Dark Hazard," new novel 
by W. R. Burnett, who will adapt 
the story. Deal was made via 
American Play Co. 



"SAVAGE GOLD" FOR MAYFAIR 

"Savage Gold," released by Hol- 
lywood Film Exchanges, Inc., goes 
into the Mayfair July 13. 



SET 'EASY MILLIONS' RELEASE 

June 30 has been set as the na- 
tional release date of Monarch's 
"Easy Millions" featuring "Skeets" 
Gallagher, Dorothy Burgess, Johnny 
Arthur, Merna Kennedy, Noah 
Beery, Pauline Garon, Bert Roach 
and Arthur Hoyt. 



RELEASE "BABY FACE" TODAY 

Warner Bros.' "Baby Face" will 
be nationally released today. 



MANY UAPPY P-ERJt 



■est wishes ire extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
Industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 



July 1-2 



M. A. Schlesinger 
William Wyler 
Waldemar Young 



Don Eddy 

Irving Kahal 

Charles D. Brown 



George Folsey 



^m 



on 



' 



The book that's 

bringing rousing 
L cheers from the 
FOX sales staff 

... now convening 
l in Atlantic City 






3 






With more downright 
showmanship packed be- 
tween its covers than any 
previous announcement 
in FOX history. Being 
distributed through FOX 
Exchanges. 






timate in Character 
ernational in Scope 
dependent in Thought 




-■:;.: : 



The 


Dai 


ly N 


ewspaper 


Of M 


t i o n 


Pict 


ures 


Now 


Fi ft 


een 


Years 


Old 



L. LXIII. NC. 2 



RK, MONDAY, JULY 3, 1933 



.5 CENTS 



urvey Urges 



ogratns For More B. O. Hits 



COMEBACK FOR COLOR FEATURES IN '33-34 

iboratory Association Organized; Election this Week 



If. Yates Is Acting as 
'res. — To Formulate 
Laboratory Code 

permanent organization to be 
n as the Motion Picture Labo- 
tes Association of America is 
being formed as a result of a 
ng held Wednesday at which 
sentatives of all local labora- 
attended. The members will 

(Continued on Page 2) 



V DEL. EXHIB UNIT 
ANS MEET AUG. 23 



mington — ■ The newly - formed 
endent Motion Picture Theater 
rs Association of Delaware 
he Eastern Shore of Maryland 
old its first convention Aug. 23 
4 at the Hotel Henelopen, Re- 
h. Committee in charge of 
gements comprises: A. J. De- 
Wilmington, who is president 
unit; 0. L. Gray and Charles 
Reese Harrington will con- 
exhibitors *.n Delaware and 
the eastern shore to secure 
erships. 



P. E. Board Meets 
July 14 in New York 

[ meeting plans will be pro- 
|i at a meeting of the S. M. P. 
a.rd of governors scheduled for 
14 at the Hotel Pennsylvania, 
York. Officers will be elected 
i fall gathering. 



o Argue Receivership Plea 

motion for a temporary receivership 
Fox Film Corp. brought by James 
Geary, a minority stockholder, will 
argued this morning before Judge 
lard L. Shientag in the New York 
e Supreme Court. In the meanwhile 
is sending a "further explanation" 
irding its reorganization plan to its 
kholders. 



n years is a long time in pictures, corn- 
covered in the forthcoming "New Deal" 
of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



Calls Attacks on Code Drafts Unfair 

Attacks on drafts of an exhibition code by certain exhibitor leaders are unfair and 
inspired by ignorance, declared Ed Kuykendall, president of the M. P. T. 0. A., yester- 
day prior to his departure tor his home, Columbus, Miss. 

"The code is only in a formulative state at present and as far as the M. P. T. 0. A. 
is concerned, we have made no commitments to any parties. As we work on the 
code the independent exhibitor is foremost in our mind." 



WRITERS BAN SALES 
TQ'UNFAIR'PRODUCERS 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Under an agreement 
just reached between the Screen 
Writers' Guild and the Dramatists' 
Guild, subject to the approval of the 
boards of both organizations, "un- 
fair producers" will not be sold any 
plays and no members of the latter 
guild will step into a Screen Writers' 
Guild man's place. A similar agree- 
ment will be made with the Authors' 
Guild. 



Expect Stanley Houses 
To Raise Price Scale 

Philadelphia— That Stanley-War- 
ner plans to restore admission price 
cuts is a local report generally cred- 
ited. Impetus has been given the 
story by the fact that both the 
Stanley and Boyd are back on a 65- 
cent policy. 



COCHRAN AND SELWYN 
NAMED FOX PRODUCERS 



Charles B. Cochran, English stage 
producer, and Archibald Selwyn, 
American stage producer, have been 
named associate producers for Fox 
by Winfield Sheehan. Both Cochran 
and Selwyn will continue their ac- 
tivites in the theater abroad and 
here in association with Fox. Shee- 
han is expected to come to New 
York shortly and proceed with Sel- 
wyn to England, where they will 
confer with Cochran, and the three 
subsequently return to Hollywood. 



Morris Landres Resigns 

From Ideal Pictures 

M. J. Kandel, president of Ideal 
Pictures, announced the resignation 
Saturday of Morris M. Landres, 
vice-president, who has been asso- 
ciated with Ideal for the past 13 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Coast Survey Urges Larger 
Programs for More B. O. Hits 



4 New Season RKO 

Pictures Are in Work 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — All features now in 
production on the RKO lot are 1933- 
34 product. The last on the past 
season's line-up, "Morning Glory," 
starring Constance Bennett, is being 
edited for early release, as are 
"Double Harness," with Ann Hard- 
ing, "Flaming Gold," "Headline 

(Continued on Page 2) 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — A substantial increase 
in the number of pictures produced 
and exhibited "will automatically in- 
crease the number of box-office 
successes, with which to attract the 
public back to the empty theaters." 

This recommendation is made in 
a survey presented recently to the 
Motion Picture Employees' Code 
conference, concerned with drafting 
a production code, and has been re- 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Only One New Picture in 

Color for RKO 

Distribution 

Color features will not stage a 
comeback during the 1933-34 sea- 
son, according to a survey made 
Saturday by The Film Daily, which 
indicates that only one Technicolor 
picture of this length is planned. It 
will be made by Pioneer Pictures for 
RKO release. Universal is planning 
to re-issue "King of Jazz," in color. 

Major companies which so far 
have no intention of reviving color 
features are: United Artists, Para- 
mount, Columbia, M-G-M, Fox and 
Warner Bros.-First National. Color 
will find its greatest importance in 
shorts scheduled for distribution by 
first line organizations. 



40 MONOGRAMMERS 
DUE ATN. Y. MEET 

At least 40 Monogram franchise 
holders and representatives will be 
on hand when W. Ray Johnston 
opens the Monogram regional con- 
vention at the Park Central July 8. 
Delegates scheduled to attend are: 

Home office executives — W. Ray 
Johnston, J. V. Ritchey, Norton 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Hollywood Exchanges to 
Open Washington Office 

Hollywood Film Exchanges, Inc., 
will open its fourth branch at Wash- 
ington in September, Jack Bellman 
states. Company is now operating 
exchanges in New York, Philadel- 
phia and Buffalo. 



No Paper Tomorrow 

Tomorrow being July 4th, a legal 
holiday, there will be no issue of THE 
FILM DAILY printed. 



Fifteen years of production, distribution andi 
exhibition completely covered in the "New 
Deal" number of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



THE 



■a&a 



DAILV 



Monday, July 3, 1933 




»o! LXIII No ? 



JOIN W IIICUHE 



"Kong" Strong in London 

Chicago— Ned E. Dcpinct read a cable to the RKO convention delegates in 
assembly here Saturday in which it was stated that RKO'S "King Kong" is now 
in its 11th week at the Coliseum, London, and will stay another three weeks. 



(Mir «(• PnWishur 



Pnblishcd inlv except Sutuliyj and Holidays 
»»y, New Vork, V Y.. 

i , u ; Inc J. W. 

• i. Editor tod Pnl 
\l Meraert ■'?■ Treasurer 

%XA G« 

trie Gillette Managing 
a< second class matter, 
N«w York. 
N Y., un.lrr the act I M 11 h 

Term* V itage free) United Statei outside 

York $10.00 one year; 6 

■math J months, si. oo. Foreign, 

n ihould remit with order. 

, to Till". FILM 

lull v H ; Broadway, New York, N. Y.. 

I'tv.Ne. Circle M736, M737, M738. 7-4739 

iddress: Filraday, New York. Holly 

|ph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 

ne Granite 6607. London — 

Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter. 8991 

Wai I hi St., W. 1. Berlin— Karl WolfTsohn, 

Lichtbildhuehne, Kricdrichstras-r, 225. Paris 

— P. A. Il.irle, I .a Cinematographie Francaise, 

Kue <le l.l t QUI deS NOUCS, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

I ! URDAY) 

Net 
High Low Close dig. 
Am SeDt. SU 5S 3 55 8 + Vs 

Columbia Picts. vtc. 19 185 s 185 B + 5/g 

Con Fin Ind 4 4 4+ Vs 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. HSg 1 1 " 4 ll 5 / 8 + Vs 
Eur Kodak 84 83 84 + 1V4 

Fox Fm. "A" 3% 3l/ 4 3'/ 4 — 'a 

Loews. Inc 24 235 a 233 4 + % 

Paramount ctfs. 1 'A 1 Va 'Vi 

Pathc Exch H 3 13 8 1 3 8 

do "A" 5% 5% 5's 

RKO 4 4 4 

Warner Bros. 6' 4 6 6'/ 4 + '/ 4 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. pfd. 5 9 S 8 5 g 

Technicolor 8' 2 8' 4 8> 2 + Vi 
Trins-lux 2% 2% 2' 8 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 
Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 4% 4' 3 4' 8 + '/g 

Par. By. 5' 2 s51 28 28 28 

Par. 5' 2 s50 12% 12' 8 + 7 /s 

Warners 6s39 36 35> 2 35' 2 — >/4 

NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE 
Para. Pubhx P 4 1 Us — !'s 



GERMANY BARS JEWS FILM LABORATORIES 
FROM ALL PRODUCTION FORM ORGANIZATION 



Berlin (By Cable) — Jews are ex- 
cluded from any part in German film 
product inn under a new film law 
announced Saturday by the Minis- 
try of Popular Enlightenment and 
Propaganda. This applies to Amer- 
ican picture companies working in 
Germany. 

The law specifies that pictures 
given exhibition permits as German 
pictures must have been produced 
by "Germans of German descent 
and nationality" or, under conditions, 
"foreigners of German descent." 
One exception is under a provision 
which authorizes Dr. Paul Goebbels, 
Reich Minister of Popular Enlight- 
enment and Propaganda, to issue, in 
individual cases, permits for "for- 
eigners" to work in German produc- 
ti ;ns "for cultural or artistic rea- 
sons." 



SOVIET 'PATRIOTS' PREPARING 

Amkino is preparing the Ameri- 
can version of "The Patriots" for 
early release. 



PILGRIMAGE' OPENING JULY 12 

World premiere of Fox's "Pil- 
grimage" has been set for July 12 
Gaiety. 



Signed for 4 Each 

Hollywood — Directors Ernest B. Scho- 
edsack and John Cromwell have been 
signed by RKO to each direct tour fea- 
tures for the 1933-34 program. Among 
the four for Schocdsack will be "Fugi- 
tive from Glory." starring John Barry- 
more. First for Cromwell will be "Ann 
Vickers." 



RKO Chicago Meeting 
Ends Today; L. A. Next 

Chicago — This is wind-up day of 
the three-day RKO regional sales 
convention at the Drake Hotel. Jules 
Levy will discuss the company's 
sales policy, Robert F. Sisk and Bai - - 
ret McCormick will discuss general 
promotion plans for the new season, 
and Walter Branson, mid-west dis- 
trict manager will speak on Radio 
Pictures activities in his district and 
will conclude the morning program. 
In the afternoon Ed. L. McEvoy. 
eastern and Canadian sales manager. 
A. A. Schubart contract department 
head, and visiting home officers will 
hold the floor. 



MAKE 2 NON-THEATRICALS 

Two talking pictures have just 
been completed in the studios of 
Chicago Film Laboratory, Chicago. 
One is "Financing the American 
Family," produced for the House- 
hold Finance Corp. The second pro- 
duction, "Good Hospital Care," was 
produced for the Petrolagar Labora- 
tories in cooperation with the Amer- 
ican College of Surgeons. 



MADE RKO BKLYN. MANAGER 

J. J. Franklin assumes manage- 
ment of the RKO Albee, Brooklyn, 
replacing Marvin Park, who has 
been granted a leave of absence by 
Herschel Stuart. Park leaves today 
for California and will return 
Aug. 1. 



FOX MUSICAL FOR ROXY 

Fox's "It's Great to Be Alive" has 
been booked to open at the original 
Roxy starting Friday. The film is 
a musical and was directed by Al- 
fred Werker. 



{Continued from Page 1) 
meet next week, possibly Thursday, 
to elect officers, directors and for- 
mulate 1 by-laws. H. J. Yates is 
acting president of the organization. 
The committee named to formulate 
a laboratory code is not expected to 
return a full report for several 
weeks. Meanwhile, Al Fiedler, chair- 
man of the committee will call sev- 
eral meetings at which time the 
code will be discussed and drafted 
in part. 



4 New Season RKO 

Pictures in Work 

(Continued from Payc I) 

Shooters," "Fool's Gold" and "In the 
Fog," all 1932-33 releases. Films 
on the new schedule that are in pro- 
duction are "Glory Command," with 
Bruce Cabot; "Son of Kong," with 
Robert Armstrong; "Ace of Aces," 
with Richard Dix; "Little Women," 
starring Katherine Hepburn and 
"Rafter Romance," with Ginger 
Rogers and Norman Foster. In 
preparation for the new program 
are "Romance in Manhattan," star- 
ring Francis Lederer; "Blonde 
Poison"; "Ann Vickers," w T ith Irene 
Dunne and Walter Huston; "Sweet 
Cheat," with Ginger Rogers, and 
"Aggie Appleby," with Charles Far- 
rell and Helen Mack. 



ARBUCKLE FUNERAL HELD 

Funeral services for Roscoe "Fat- 
ty" Arbuckle were conducted Sat- 
urday at the Campbell funeral 
.much by the B. P. O. Elks. Honor- 
ary pallbearers were: Bert Lahr, 
_.ert Wheeler, Leo Carrillo, Gus 
Edwards, Roy McCarey, Joe Rivkin, 
Johnny Walker and William LaHiff. 
Cremation followed ac Fresh Pond 
crematory, Maspeth, Queens. Mrs. 
Arbuckle will leave for the coast 
.n is week with the ashes of the late 
.omedian. 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



Today: RKO central sales meeting, Drake 

Hotel, Chicago. 

July 5-6: Paramount regional sales convention, 
Los Angeles. 

July 7-9: RKO western sales meeting, St I 
Francis Hotel, San Francisco. 

July 8: Monogram eastern sales meeting, New | 
York. 

July 10: M. P. T. 0. A. executive committee 
meeting, Hotel Congress, Chicago. 

July 10: Meeting of National Ass'n of M. P. In- 
dustry at Park Central Hotel. 

July 1 1 : Meeting of Allied Theaters of New 
Jersey at 2 P. M. 

July 13-14: Monogram central sales meeting, 
Chicago. 

July 17: United Artists sales convention, Chi- 
cago. 

July 18: Meeting of M. P. T. 0. of Arkansas, 
Mississippi and Tennessee, Jackson, Miss. 

Juiy 20-2! : Monogram southern sales meeting 
New Orleans. 

July 21-24: Fox Film Corp. special stockholders' 
meeting, home office, New York. 

July 25: Meeting of Allied Theaters of New 
Jersey at 2 P. M. 

July 28-29: Monogram western sales meeting, 
San Francisco. 

Aug. 2-3: Monogram Canadian sales meeting, 
Tororto. 

Aug. 23-24: First annual convention of Inde- 
pendent Motion Picture Owners Association 
of Delaware and Eastern Shore of Maryland 
at Hotel Henelopen, Rehoboth, Del. 



Sept. 13: A. M 
officers 



P. A. holds annual election of 



BUY "SONG OF LIFE" RIGHTS 

Principal Pictures has acquired 
"Song of Life" from Mayflower Pic- 
tures for California, Arizona, Nev- 
ada. Archie Mayers, general sales 
manager of Mayflower closed the 
deal. 



NEW UNION AGREEMENT 

Wilkes-Barre — Comerford Amuse- 
ment Co. and Local 325 of the Mo- 
tion Picture Projectionists have 
reached an agreement for the fiscal 
year ending Aug. 31, 1934. New 
wage scale and a revision of work- 
ing conditions are in the agreement. 



Ward Wing Set to Make 
Two Jungle Features 

Ward Wing, who directed "Sam 
arang," has organized Ward Wing 
Pictures, Inc., and has made definite 
plans for producing two jungle fea- 
tures for release during 1933-34. 
First is titled "Jungle Love" and 
will be made in Malacca. "Rerao! 
Remo!" ("Tiger! Tiger!"), will be 
the second and will be produced both 
in Malacca and Sumatra. Wing and 
his wife,, Lori Bara, leave New York 
within three weeks for Malacca. 



Neufeld and Heenon to 
Open Philly Exchange 

Philadelphia — Oscar Neufeld and 
Bill Heenon will open a new ex- 
change here within the next few 
weeks. Their product will include 
Harold Lloyd comedies, synchron- 
ized and with new effects. 




B. J. HYNES, of RKO Theaters, returns Thurs- 
day from Bermuda. 

MARVIN PARK, manager of the RKO-Albee, 
leaves for the coast today. 

MARLENE DIETRICH will return from Europe 
July 18 in time to attend the premiere of her 
Paramount picture, "Song of Songs," at the 
Criterion. 






THE 



Monday, July 3, 1933 



-2&*l 



DAILY 



RKO Radio Chicago 
Convention Squibs 



}OB SISK still doing a Bob Wool- 
sey — puffing a perfecto at all ses- 
ons. 



Barrett McCormick hit it up with 

'hurchill's gang from Indianapolis. 

[ac once ran the Circle in the In- 

ana city and make a rep for his 

ne ad campaigns. 



Several games of Culbertson sys- 
■m bridge developed on the Twen- 
eth Century on the way to Chi- 
'igo. Maybe RKO's champ will 
lallenge their star — even for the 
ere sake of publicity. 



Joe Goldberg is representing Wal- 
r Futter here. Walter didn't want 
i wend westward until he can go 
\ through to Hollywood. 



Fred McConnell, general manager 
' the Van Beuren Corp., did a con- 
nuous handshaking job for Fred 
'lows all the boys. 



1 Walter Branson assembled a gang 
his keenest branch managers to 
iswer that sales challenge wire 
ished from New York by Bob 
olff, H. T. Dixon and Frank Mc- 
simee. 



ol|iMayor Kelly of Chicago made a 
j hit with the visiting Radiomen 
cause of his hearty welcome and 

niality. 



Ed McEvoy, now eastern district 
les manager, held his usual re- 
ion with the gang in this part of 
2 woods which used to be his do- 
jcile when western division man- 
ler for Mister Pathe's talkies. 



orris Landres Resigns 
From Ideal Pictures 

{Continued from Page 1) 

nths. Ideal Pictures and Gen- 
ii Film Library offices have been 
ved from the ninth floor of 729 
/enth Aye. to larger quarters on 
17th floor of the same building. 
? or the coming season Ideal will 
iduce and release six three-reelers 
1 13 one-reel novelties titled 
"hat-nots." The first three-reeler, 
lie Next War," will be completed 

;J:t week. The second will be an 

iiskan adventure film. 



: 



DROP VAUDEVILLE 

'rovidence — Vaudeville will be dis- 
tinued at the RKO Albee on July 
The house will play straight 
tures. 



U. A. Still in Hays Ass'n 

President Joseph M. Schenck has not 
indicated any intentions of withdrawing 
United Artists from membership in the 
Hays organization, it was stated Satur- 
day at the association's New York head- 
quarters. Schenck on -Friday submitted 
Mie United Artists resignation from the 
Association of M. P. Producers at the 
oast. 





MGIth* 

WITH 

PHIL M.DALY 



LejbvubJ 



• • © WHILE ATTENDING the Midwest regional con- 
vention at Chi Paramount execs and salesmen were 

guests at a party given in their honor at the Hollywood 

exhibit at the World's Fair 

• © • HEADED BY George S'chaeffer the "visit- 
ing firemen" included Neil Agnew, Charles Reagan, Allan 

Usher and Bob Gillham they were treated to a spiffy 

floor show headed by Chaz Chase and Roscoe Ates. 

augmented by a courtesy appearance of Harry Richman, who 
opened at the Chicago theater for B. & K. last Friday 

• 6 • DIRECTED BY George Jeske and Jack Sullivan 

Ates and a company are making a series of shorts in 

the concession with the crowds permitted to watch the 

"shooting" Several of the Paramount execs expressed 

themselves as being highly enthusiastic over the conduct of 
the Exhibit and also the fact that authentic demonstra- 
tions of sound-picture making are given without benefit of the 

ole circus ballyhoo it looks as if the Fair offers a grand 

opportunity for producers to grab off some fine publicity 

with millions of sightseers from all over the country 

• • • MEET THE new playwright, Mary Pickf ord 

she has written her first play, which will be turned into an 
operetta and Grace Moore will appear in it this fall 

Elza Maxwell is working on the music The Mills 

Musical Playboys will hold a Composers and Arrangers nite this 
Friday over WJZ and the NBC network they will broad- 
cast a complete program comprising songs composed by mem- 
bers of the orchestra 



"TERROR ABOARD" 

with 
John Halliday, Charlie Ruggles, Shirley Grey 
Paramount 69 mins. 

TALE OF WHOLESALE MURDER ON 
THE HIGH SEAS IS OVERDONE AND 
MISSES. 

Evidently they intended to make this a 
sensational shocker, but the long list of 
murders grows unconvincing and gives a 
distinct impression of being vastly over- 
done. Can't see how it can appeal to 
women, and is certainly out for the kiddies. 
John Halliday is the owner of a yacht on 
a trip to Australia where he plans to marry 
one of his guests, Shirley Grey. A wireless 
is received telling Halliday that the authori- 
ties are after him for crooked stock deals, 
and his arrest has been ordered when he 
lands. So the suave criminal starts on a 
campaign of wholesale murder, planning to 
destroy the entire crew and all his guests 
one by one and escape with the girl to 
some deserted island. One after another 
the people on board are done away with 
by various devices, and the audience is let 
in on the murderer's operations. It's a 
wild tale, and the fact that it is done with 
class and a good cast doesn't alleviate the 
morbid theme and overdone melodramatics. 

Cast: John Halliday, Charlie Ruggles, 
Neil Hamilton, Shirley Grey, Verree Teas- 
dale, Jack La Rue, Leila Bennett, Morgan 
Wallace, Thomas Jackson, William Janney, 
Paul Hurst, Stanley Fields, Frank Hagney, 
Clarence Wilson, Paul Porcasi. 

Director, Paul Sloane; Authors, Harvey 
Thew, Manuel Seff; Adaptors, same; Cam- 
eraman, Harry Fishbeck. 

Direction, Good. Photography, Fine. 



Ken Maynard in 

"TOMBSTONE CANYON" 

Fox 62 mins. 

EXCITING WESTERN HAS KEN MAY- 
NARD DOING HIS STUFF IN A WAY TO 
PLEASE THE FANS. 

This is a shocker western, with plenty 
of murder atmosphere in a mystery plot 
concerning the Phantom Killer. Ken May- 
nard comes to Tombstone Canyon to learn 
from a rancher what his real identity is. 
He is soon engulfed in a whirl of exciting 
events and mystery. The Phantom Killer 
is abroad, and Ken becomes the suspect 
due to a chain of circumstances. Still the 
killings of the Phantom proceed, with the 
sheriff one of the victims. The man who 
was to reveal his real identity is shot, and 
the killer is being forced by Ken to tell 
what all the mystery is about, when he is 
forced to flee to escape the gang he is 
embroiled with. The mystery is finally 
cleared up when the Phantom Killer re- 
veals himself to the hero as his father, who 
all these years had been planning revenge 
on his own brother who stole his baby boy, 
Ken. It finishes with a wild and hectic 
double battle between the two fathers and 
sons opposing each other to a death strug- 
gle. Maynard is victorious in his fight, but 
his father dies. Plenty of plot, action and 
excitement. 

Cast: Ken Maynard, Cecelia Parker, Shel- 
don Lewis, Frank Brownlee; Jack Clifford, 
George Gerwing, Lafe McKee, Edward 
Peil, Sr. 

Director, Alan James; Author, Claude 
Rister; Adaptor, same; Cameraman, not 
listed. 

Direction, Fast. Photography, Good. 



BIGGER PROGRAMS 
MEAN MORE HITS 



(Continued from Page .1) 
ferred to seven organizations identi- 
fied with production activities. 

Other recommendations are as fol- 
lows: 

Prevent in whatever manner pos- 
sible, in large studios, the interfer- 
ence of non-creative executives in 
story writing and creative work, 
except so far as economy warrants. 

Eliminate excessive and unneces- 
sary salaries for unproductive ex- 
ecutives. 

Limit to a reasonable extent over- 
bidding for talent. 

Establish standard compensations 
for skilled labor and craftsmen 
without lowering existing scales. 

Encourage the royalty system, 
whereby author, star and director 
shall receive a percentage of the 
actual profits, thus minimizing the 
excessive salary evil. 

Abolish for the time being, the 
importation of foreign talent, which, 
at best, is experimental. 

Adopt and enforce, with govern- 
ment aid if necessary, a code of de- 
cency to govern the production of 
pictures for the primary purpose of 
bringing back to the picture thea- 
ter the millions of former patrons 
who have been alienated by the 
trend towards what has been de- 
signed as ultra-sophistication." 

Encourage the rental of studio 
space and service for independent 
productions, especially with new and 
untried ideas. 



RKO THEATER ASSIGNMENTS 

Frank Hines has been appointed 
manager of the RKO Palace, Cleve- 
land, with Bert Hansen, formerly 
manager of the Proctor, Troy, will 
handle publicity for all Cleveland 
houses. Harry Schlinker has been 
transferred from the management 
of the Grand Albany, to Proctor's 
Troy. Lou Golding will supervise 
the Grand in addition to managing 
the Palace, Albany. 



fei 



MANY HAPPY mm 



Best wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
Industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 



July 3-4 



Leon Errol 



Wynne Gibson 



Luther Reed 



Louis B. Mayer Joe C. Hornstein 

Goerge M. Cohan Ed Savin 

Harvey Thew Henry Armetta 

Mrs. Thomas Meighan Mary Patricia Alicoate 



■ «• r 




DAILV 



Monday, July 3, 1933 



A LITTLE from "LOTS 



►// 



By RALPH W1LK 



HOLLYWOOD 
J-^UGH HERBERT, Warner con- 
tract player, has just completed 
a story of his experiences in vaude- 
ville, a period of 25 years of "hoof- 
ing." Two major studios are nego- 
tiating for the yarn. 

* * * 

Edward Sutherland has been un- 
usually successful in directing screen 
teams. He made "Behind the Front" 
and other comedy features of the 
series starring Wallace Beery and 
Raymond Hatton. In "Close Har- 
mony" he introduced the comedy 
tern of Jack Oakie and Richard 
"Skeets" Gallagher, whom he is now- 
directing in "Too Much Harmony," 
for Paramount. 

* * * 

Director Robert Wyler is in New 
York, shooting backgrounds for 

Universal's "One Glamorous Night." 

* * * 

Sandra Ravel, who played one of 
the leads in "Three French Girls," 
now has a starring contract with 
the fines company in Italy, at a 
salary said to be the highest ever 
paid a movie star in that country. 

* * * 

Simile — As lonesome as a Malibu 
beach resident on Sunday. 

* * * 

As soon as Willard Mack com- 
pletes direction of "The March of 
Time," for M-G-M, he will undertake 
a featured role in the Jean Harlow- 
Lee Tracy picture, "Bombshell." 

* * * 

Paramount has signed Marcel 
Vallee, French comedian, to assume 
Edward Everett Horton's role in the 
French version of the Chevalier pro- 
duction "The Way to Love," now 
in production. Vallee sailed from 
Havre yesterday on the He de 

France. 

* * * 

Alex Troffey has finished editing 
"My Lips Betray" for Fox. 

* * * 

One of the principal feminine 
roles in "The World Changes," Paul 
Muni's next Warner Bros, starring 



picture, has been assigned to Jean 
Muir. 

* * * 

David Lewis has been signed by 
Merian C. Cooper, executive pro- 
ducer of RKO Radio Pictures, to 
supervise the production of "Hide in 
the Dark," filming of which will be- 
gin about the middle of July with 
Bruce Cabot in the principal male 
role. 

* * * 

"Mrs. VanKleek," novel by Elea- 
nor Mordaunt, has been purchased 
by M-G-M as a starring vehicle for 
Marie Dressier. 

Wells Root will write for RKO 
Radio the screen play of "Hide in 
the Dark," adapted from the novel 

by Frances Noyes Hart. 

* * * 

Barbara Stanwyck will next star 
for Warner Bros, in "Ever in My 
Heart." The film will be based upon 
a story by Bertram Milhauser and 
Beulah Marie Dix. 

* * * 

Spring Byington, New York stage 
actress, arrived in Hollywood recent- 
ly to appear in RKO Radio's "Lit- 
tle Women." 

* * * 

Richard Barthelmess's next star- 
ring vehicle for First National, 
"Shanghai Orchid." will go into pro- 
duction within the next 10 days. 
"Shanghai Orchid" is from the story 
by Gene Towne and C. Graham 
Baker and is to be directed by Wil- 
liam Dieterle. It will be the 52nd 
starring picture in which Barthel- 
mess has appeared. 



Jack Dugger, of Dallas, a former 
newspaperman who made good in 
the film business, worked on "To- 
peka State Journal," then with the 
Associated Press. 



A dozen years ago Paul Wilson 
was film inspector in Los Angeles. 
Now he's branch manager of a 
Memphis exchange. 



START MUSICAL JULY 20 

Rowland - Brice resume feature 
production July 20 when they start 
work on the musical, "Take a 
Chance," at the Eastern Service 
Studio, Astoria. Work on their 
shorts series, also for Universal, is 
temporarily held up awaiting the 
return to New York <,( Walter Win- 
chell. who is now at the coast, and 
Morton Downey, who is abroad. 



HIGH FIDELITY PRESS BOOK 
A complete press book of advertis- 
ing and publicity material on its 
Hifrh Fidelity sound reproducing 
equipment, has been prepared by the 
Photophone division of the RCA 
Victor Co. for distribution to all ex- 
hibitors who have contracted for 
new installations. 



SIGNS PICKENS SISTERS 

The Pickens Sisters, NBC Har- 
mony Trio, have signed a con- 
tract with Charles R. Rogers to ap- 
pear in a feature for Paramount 
Pictures. They are to report in 
Hollywood at some time between 
Aug. 15 and Sept. 15 to begin work. 
This will be at the end of their 
present tour of personal appearances 
to which two additional RKO thea- 
ters have been added. These are 
Keith's, Boston, and the Albee in 
Providence. 



VELAS AGAIN AN EXHIB 

tt heeling, W. Va.— The State the- 
ater has been reopened with James 
\ elas, a former operator, again in 
charge. Velas operated the Liberty 
and Lyric here several years ago. 



40 Monogrammers Due 

At New York Meet 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Ritchey, Edward Golden, J. P. Fried- 
hoff, J. S. Harrington; New York 
Division — Harry Thomas, Budd Rog- 
ers, Otto Lederer, Dave Sohmer, 
Jules Chapman, Dick Perry, Mike 
Thomas, William Benson, Bert 
Freese, Al Friedlander, Miss M. 
Shear; Philadelphia — Al Blofson, 
Moe Sherman, Miss E. Segal; Bos- 
ton — Herman Rifkin, E. H. Morey, 
Charles Wilson, Bob Cobe, Steve 
Broidy; New Haven — Harry Gold* 
man; Albany — Bernard Mills, Sam 
Milberg, E. M. Loew, Miss M. Haw- 
kins; Buffalo — Jack Berkowitz, H. 
Berkson, N. R. Sodikman; Pitts- 
burgh — J. H. Alexander, S. A. Fine- 
berg, H. M. Wheeler, C. A. Molte, 
A. R. Cherry; Washington, D. C— 
Sam Flax, Jake Flax. 

Two other Monogram regionals 
are scheduled to be held as follows: 
July 10, Jung Hotel, New Orleans, 
and July 15, Chicago. 



SHORT SUBJECTS 



LESLIE SWAEBE MARRIED 

Boston — Leslie Swaebe, manager 
of the Strand in Peabody and the 
Uptown in Lynn, is receiving con- 
gratulations on his marriage last 

week. 



Bobby Jones in 
"How to Break 90" 
(No. 6— Fine Points) 
Vitaphone 10 mins 

For Golfers 
Last of this series of golf sub- 
jects has J. Farrell MacDonald anc 
Edmund Breese as stooges foij 
Jones, with a bit of Pullman comedy 
in the action. Subject matter for 
the most part will interest golfers 
only. 



"Sing, Sister, Sing" 

Paramount 9 mins 

Novelty Cartoon 

A Max Fleischer song cartoon 
featuring the Three X Sisters. This' 
trio does several songs in costume 
at the piano while the lines are 
thrown on the screen with the danc-, 
ing white ball marking the time 
The cartoon end is clever, with the, 
setting a department store and all 
the animals doing their bits with 
the mouse and the cat as hero an 
villain, respectively. Lively an 
diversified with the injection of the 
human actors. 







^ijjjjpm 



urn, i 



charge for a restful view of entire Central 
Park and a refreshing breeze . . . "Amer- 
ica's only truly Continental hotel . . . de- 
lightful . . . different . . . convenient to thea- 
tres, shops and business. 
• 

Dinner and supper dancing nightly in the 

SKY GARDEN, New York's intimate and 

popular Roof . . . entertainment. Luncheon 

or tea at . . . RUMPELMAYER'S. 

Rates: Single $3.50-55; double $5-$7; suites from $8 
ATTRACTIVE WEEKLY AND MONTHLY CONCESSIONS 

Moderately priced apartments furnished or 
unfurnished available NOW or October 1st. 



DIRECTION . . S. GREGORY TAYLOR 



Inti mate in Cha raci 
'International in Sco 
Independent in Thougl 



an j_ 




Wr^wti^4 



The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Now Fifteen Years Old 



VOL. LYIII. N€.3 



NEW YCCr, WEDNESDAY, JLLY 5 , 1933 



5 CENTS 



Outlines the Industry Code Ratification Procedure 

NEW BOOKING DEMANDSJLANNED BY INDIES 

few Ohio Houses Affected by New Admission Tax Law 



The Cinema 



. . . on-a-string 
; By JACK ALICOATE- 



UUITH EVERYBODY doing it the indus- 
"' try is being KILLED with codeness 

. . ARTHUR loew would rather FLY to 
iollywood than take a TRAIN to Glen 
Cove . . . The ROXY presentations at RA- 
)IO CITY are the most CONSISTENTLY 
pectaeular put on by any theater any- 
where ... No one on earth pays as many 
DIFFERENT taxes as the theater owner 

. . NICK schenck is the strong SILENT 
ian of pictures . . . The latest Mickey 
/louse opus is a RIOT . . . That old medi- 
ine man WELFORD beaton and his SPEC- 
ATOR are again doing business at the old 
tand . . . Only a LAST minute complication 
ept that DICK rowland big announcement 
rom breaking last week. 



[TWENTIETH CENTURY at least is get- 
;' ting talked afcout PLENTY within the in- 
lustry . . . NOTHING has done so much to 
REVIVE business as BEER ... The LIE 
vas passed between two BIG shots last 
jveek and a duel is in the offing . . . WE 
;now 'em both, HORATIO, and suggest 
IPONGES at sixty paces . . . ADMIRAL 
ranklin of Long Island Sound and points 
vest is taking SWIMMING lessons . . . 
There's a decided SNAP to the way that 
idvertising feller GILLHAM is doing things 
it PARAMOUNT . . . That Wilmington 
LECTRICS decision will be more IMPOR- 
TANT than most folks realize . . . THREE 
eature productions are in production HERE 
n New York with more on the schedule. 



MO one has taken the place of HARRY 
^ reichenbach. His widow is in Spain . . . 
^ BIG film outfit can be had and SAM 
katz came near owning it . . . Hollywood- 
at-the-Chicago-Fair is ANYTHING but a 
iuccess . . . We know at least ONE demo- 
crat that has rather ambitious ideas . . . 
■The most frequent CRITICISM we hear 
From the patron folks is LACK of comedy 
■ . CHILLED theaters are doing a rusti- 
ng business these DOG days . . . There's 
ARGUING plenty going on amongst the 
josses, which shows the boys are ON their 
toes. 



Greater Part of Revenue 

Will Be Produced by 

Sporting Events 

By J. W. LEHMAN 
Film Daily Staff Correspondent 
Columbus — Indications are that 
only approximately 12 Ohio houses 
will be affected by the new state ad- 
mission tax law which applies to 
charges of more than 40 cents. The 
greater part of the revenue will 
come from various sporting events. 
It is believed that Gov. White will 
not sign the measure but instead 
allow it to become a law without his 
signature. 

JOE SEIDER CIRCUIT 
TO BUILDJ HOUSES 

Construction of six theaters, four 
on Long Island and two in Connecti- 
cut, is planned by Prudential The- 
aters during the coming season. Jo- 
seph Seider said Monday. The cir- 

(Continued on Page 4) 

Warners Have Seven 

Ready for Release 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — With seven produc- 
tions that were completed previous 
to the recent closing of the Warner 
studios, awaiting release, shooting 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Roach Spending $1,600,000 

West Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — More than $1,600,000 
will be spent by the Hal Roach studios 
on their 42 comedies and two features 
for M-G-M release during the new sea- 
son, according to Henry Ginsberg, vice- 
president and general manager. 



COLUMBIA PLANS 48 
FEATURES IN '33-34 



Atlantic City — Columbia's pro- 
gram for 1933-34 will consists of 48 
features, including 36 to be known 
as "The March Forward Group" and 
12 as "Action Western Melodramas," 
supplemented by 130 short subjects 
comprising seven single-reel series 
and 26-two-reelers. 

The program announcement was 
made by Jack Cohn as follows at the 

(Continued on Page 5) 

Foreign Dept. Execs 

Study German Problem 

Study of the German situation 
from the angle of withdrawal by 
major company foreign department 
officials has been given additional 
impetus by the Hitler Government 
ban on Jews identified with the in- 
dustry in that country. John Hicks 
of Paramount sails July 20 in com- 
(Continued on Page- 2) 



Procedure for Ratification 

Of Industry Code Outlined 



Four Classifications 
For Unemployed Survey 

W'St Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — In connection with 
Hollywood's part in the drafting of 
a production code, its personnel has 
been divided into four classifications 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Fifteen years of production, distribution and 
exhibition completely covered in the "New 
Deal" number of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



By WILLIAM SILBERBERG 
Film Daily Staff Correspondent 

Washington — Procedure to be fol- 
lowed in the final drafting and rati- 
fication of an industry code for the 
film and other industries was out- 
lined by General Hugh B. Johnson, 
administrator, here yesterday. 

Following drafting of a code by 
industry elements themselves, a 
hearing will be held with the ad- 
ministrator presiding at which dis- 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Want Major Co. Features 

Day-and-Date 2nd Run 

With Big Circuits 

Day-and-date bookings of major 
company product, second-run with 
all large circuits will be demanded 
by the smaller metropolitan New 
York independent circuits for the 
coming season. For the past year 
local circuits have been forced to 
play pictures fourth and fifth-run 
following the national circuit houses, 
according to an executive of one of 
the groups. 

Loew houses will not be expected 
(Continued on Page 2) 

DENY WARNER-KOPLAR 
DEALJNJT, LOUIS 

A persistent report in St. Louis 
film circles has Harry and Samuel 
Koplar planning to acquire the St. 
Louis Amusement Company's circuit 
of neighborhood and suburban 
(Continued on Page 2) 

Schuyler Grey Buried 
In Woodlawn Cemetery 

Burial in Woodlawn Cemetery 
yesterday followed funeral services 
Monday night for Schuyler Grey, 
technical director and writer who 
died early Monday morning at the 
(Continued on Page 5) 



To Analyze Decision 

"A sweeping victory for independent 
exhibitors" is the way Robert Robins, 
executive secretary of the American 
Society for the Protection of Motion 
Picture Theaters, yesterday described 
the Wilmington District Court decision 
finding certain restrictive clauses in 
the Electrical Research Products leas- 
ing agreement illegal. He said his as- 
sociation will hold a special meeting 
soon to analyze the decision, which 
"stops encroachments on the part of 
the electrics." 



Fifteen years is a long time in pictures, com- 
pletely covered in the forthcoming "New Deal" 
number of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



-. ■£&* 



OAILV 



Wednesday, July 5, 1933 




Vol. IXIII. No. 3 Mil. JriT 5.H33 Prici5Cnb 



JOHN W IIICDME 



Editor tod Publisher 



hrd daily except Sundays and Holidiys 
at I6S0 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
by Wids'o Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoatr. President, Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
ml Cciirr.il Manager; Arthur W. F.ddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor: Don Carle Gillette. Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1 1 S. at the post-office at N«w York, 
NY., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
A I !-css all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY. H.50 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
Phone. Circle 7-4736. 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London — 
Ernest W. Fredman. The Film Renter, 89-91 
Warlour St.. \V. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
— P. A. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



'QUOTATIONS AS OF MONDAY) 

NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 6V4 6 6'4 + % 

Columbia Picts. vtc. 20 19'/ 4 19'/ 2 + % 

Con. Fm. Ind 43{, 4 4% + % 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. 12 11% H 3 4 + Vs 

East. Kodak 863$ 84'/i 85 + 1 

Fox Fm. •'A" .... 3'' 2 3' g IVl + Va 

Loews. Inc 247'g 23S 8 243j + % 

Paramount ctfs. ... 1% 1 1/4 1% + % 

Pathe Exch V/ 2 1% 1% 

do "A" 6% 53/4 6V4 + 3 /s 

RKO 4V4 4 4 

Warner Bros 63 4 6'g 63< 4 + Vi 

do pfd 21 '4 2P/ 8 217/g -f % 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 
Columbia Pets. vtc. 20' g 20' g 20'/g + Va 
Gen Th. Eq. pfd ...11-16 5j, 11-16 +1-16 

Technicolor 8% 8'/g 8'/g — % 

Trans-Lux 3 27g 2% 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40. 5 4% 4% 

Gen. Th. Eq.6s40ctfs. 4 4 4 4- % 

Keith A-0 6s 46 . 49 49 49 + 2% 

Locw 6s 41ww... 80Vi 80 80'' 2 

Paramount 6s 47 18' 2 13'g I8V2 + °>Vl 

Paramount 6s 47cffs. 15 15 15 +1 

Par. By. 5' 2 s 51.. 27'g 2'g 27>g — % 

Par. 5', 2 s 50 173; 13 17 + 4'/ 8 

Par. 5' 2 s 50 ctfs . 16 14 16 2 

Pathe 7s 37 75 75 75 

Warners 6s 39 .... 36'i 35'g 36 -f % 

NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE 
Para. Publix 1% 1 1 3 8 -f 1/4 



Hand in Hand 

Milwaukee — Prohibition was described 
as the "best friend the motion picture 
industry ever had" by Miss Maud 
Aldnch. director of motion picture ac- 
tivities for the Women s Christian Tem- 
perance Union, "because money which 
would have been used to buy liquor 
was spent for recreation for the entire 
family." She also rapped pictures for 
exerting "a derogatory influence." 



CODE RATIFICATION 
PROCEDURE OUTLINED 



(Continued from Page 1) 

senting minorities will have a voice. 
Present will be the Industrial Re- 
covery Board and labor representa- 
tives as well as industry delegates. 
All statistical data will be supplied 
by the Administration and will not 
be acceptable from outside sources. 
After the code has been completed 
it will be studied by the industrial 
recovery organization and finally 
goes to the President for his ap- 
proval. 



Foreign Dept. Execs 

Study German Problem 

(Continued from Page 1) 

pany with Eugene Zukor and among 
other matters, will survey conditions 
in Germany. Arthur W. Kelly of 
United Artists sails today to attend 
to European matters, including the 
German situation. Clayton P. Shee- 
han of Fox is sailing from Europe 
for New York immediately, follow- 
ing a tour of the Continent. 



Deny Warner-Koplar 

Deal in St. Louis 

(Continued from Page 1) 

houses, controlled by Warner Bros. 
The story was emphatically denied 
in New York Monday by Warner 
theater executives. 

The Metropolitan Theaters Corp., 
'•^ntrolled by the Koplars. Emil 
Strauss and the estate of the late 
David Sommers, as the holder of a 
-pcond mortgage for $640,000 on the 
St. Louis at Grand and Delmar 
Boulevards, St. Louis, has forced a 
foreclosure of the property, which 
•vill be put on sale July 22. It is 
believed that the Koplars will buy 
; n the house. 



N. 



L. Godwin Operating 
Associated at K. C. 

Kansas City, Mo. — Associated 
Film Distributors. Inc.. has taken 
on nine Goldsmith productions for 
distribution in Western Missouri and 
Kansas. M. L. Godwin now owns 
this distribution unit, having recent- 
ly purchased the interest in it of 
Russell Borg. 

Bill Byrd. formerlv wth Fox-Edu- 
cational-Tiffany at Dallas, Tex., has 
joined Associated. 

R. R. Jersey, formerly covering 
Western Kansas for the company, 
has been transferred to the office 
here. 



LICHTMAN LEAVING FOR W. C. 

Al Lichtman leaves New York to- 
day for the coast to confer with 
Joseph M. Schenck, Darryl Zanuck, 
Samuel Goldwyn and other United 
Artists officials concerning the 1933- 
34 production program. He will jro 
direct from the coast to Chicago to 
attend the company sales convention 
at the Drake July 17. 



N. Y. INDIES PLAN 
BOOKING DEMANDS 



(Continued from Page 1) 

to share M-G-M product second-run 
with the smaller circuits but the 
local operators now demand that all 
other major company product, 
played in the Loew houses shall be 
shared with the local circuits. The 
system will work the same for all 
circuit houses and all major prod- 
uct. 

Following the current reorganiza- 
tion of the Manhattan Playhouses, it 
is expected that a statement cover- 
ing booking demands will be issued. 
A similar statement will be issued 
by Lee Ochs, it is understood. 



Warners Have Seven 

Ready for Release 

(Continued from Page 1) 

has started on four new features 
with seven others prepared and 
ready for early production. Release 
dates for the pictures on hand are 
as follows: "Narrow Corner" July 
8, "She Had to Say Yes" and "The 
Man from Monterey" July 15, "Good- 
bye Again" July 22, "Captured" 
July 29 and "Voltaire" tentative 
date Aug. 5. Those in production 
now are "Footlight Parade," "Red 
Meat," "Bureau of Missing Persons" 
and "Wild Boys of the Road." Four 
features are scheduled for produc- 
tion within the next three weeks. 
They are "Female," "Ever in My 
Heart," "Shanghai Orchid" and 
"America Kneels." Others ready for 
early production are "The Kennel 
Murder Case," "Convention City" 
and "Son of the Gobs." 



"Jack and Bean Stalk" 

New Cartoon Series 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — "Jack and the Bean 
Stalk," the first of a new series of 
cartoons in Technicolor, will be 
ready for release in September. This 
new series of famous old fairy tales 
in color will be produced by UB 
Iwerks under the screen title of 
"Once Upon a Time." Scenarios 
have been prepared on the follow- 
ing stories for future production: 
"Tom Thumb," "Cinderella," "Jack, 
the Giant Killer," "Little Red Riding 
Hood," "The Three Bears," "The 
Snow Queen," and "The Little Tin 
Soldier." 



RESIGNS FROM F.P.L. BOARD 

Toronto — Victor Ross has resigned 
from the board of directors of Fa- 
mous Players Canadian Corp., Ltd. 
It is understood that Ross, who is 
the third vice-president of the Im- 
perial Oil, Ltd., will become first 
vice-president of Imperial Oil. 



NEW RICHMOND HOUSE 

Richmond — Work will begin this 
week on the §30,000 theater to be 
built at 406 North 25th St. The 
new house will seat about 900 and 
will be owned and operated by a 
P. and G. Corp. 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



Today: Paramount regional sales convention. 

Los Angeles. 
July 7-9: RKO western sales meeting, St. 

Francis Hotel, San Francisco. 
July 8: Monogram eastern sales meeting, New 

York. 

July 10: M. P. T. O. A. executive committee 
meeting, Hotel Congress, Chicago. 

July 10: Meeting of National Ass'n of M. P. In- 
dustry at Park Central Hotel. 

July 11: Meeting of Allied Theaters of New 
Jersey at 2 P. M. 

July 12: World Premiere of "Pilgrimage" at 

Gaiety, New York. 
July 13-14: Monogram central sales meeting, 
Chicago. 

July 17: United Artists sales convention, Chi- 
cago. 

July 18: Meeting of M. P. T. O. of Arkansas, 
Mississippi and Tennessee, Jackson, Miss. 

July 20-21 : Monogram southern sales meeting, 
New Orleans. 

July 21-24: Fox Film Corp. special stockholders' 
meeting, home office, New York. 

July 25: Meeting of Allied Theaters of New 
Jersey at 2 P. M. 

July 28-29: Monogram western sales meeting, 
San Francisco. 

Aug. 2-3: Monogram Canadian sales meeting, 
Toronto. 

Aug. 23-24: First annual convention of Inde- 
pendent Motion Picture Owners Association 
of Delaware and Eastern Shore of Maryland 
at Hotel Henelopen, Rehoboth, Del. 

Sept. 13: A. M. P. A. holds annual election of 
officers 



48 St. Louis Theaters 
Holding "Family Nights" 

St. Louis — Forty-eight neighbor- 
hood houses are cooperating with 
the Better Films Council of St. Louis 
and St. Louis County in the giving 
of "family night" programs, it is 
shown by the annual report of the 
council's review committee. Out of 
564 pictures reviewed during the 
past year the committee found 91 
suited for "family nights." 



ANOTHER FOR HARRIS 

Oil City, Pa.— The Harris Amuse- 
ment Co. will take over the Lyric 
in Oil City July 9, Senator Frank J. 
Harris, president, has announced. 
This is the second Harris theater in 
this city, others being located in St. 
Mary's, Pa., Youngstown, Detroit, 
and Huntington. 



THEATRE OWNERS 
ATTENTION! 



We have in stock 

over 50,000 yards 

CRESTWOOD & 

PREMIER CARPETS 

Largest variety of 

THEATRE PATTERNS 

ever assembled 



Greater N. Y. 
Export House, Inc. 

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Theatre Carpets Our Specialty 




GETTING NEW 
YORK HOT AND 
BOTHERED! 

A teaser ad series used by the 
Capitol Theatre. Try it! 




DAILY 



Wednesday, July 5, 1933 



TIMELY TOPICS 

The Director's I'lace 
In the Picture 

f AN the director contribute 
one single constructive and 
original idea to give the author 
a lead to follow? He cannot. 
His mind, in one word, is purely 
interpretative. * * * He at- 
tempts to tell the author how to 
construct plots, which is just as 
impertinent as if the bricklayer 
tried to "direct" the architect, 
or the caster in bronze the 
•^•ulptor, or the printer started 
telling the novelist how to write 
books. He calls in other au- 
thors to write over the original 
author's work, and then hands 
it to beautiful scenario writers 
with boy friends but no brains. 
He adds characters, dialogue 
and situations, and he invariably 
underestimates everybody's in- 
telligence but his own, including 
the public's. The result is the 
familiar hotch potch of legs and 
absurdity, and the ungainly 
spectacle of the film industry 
lying on its back with its spats 
in the air. One of two things 
has got to happen. Either the 
director has got to learn how 
to WTite stories or the story 
teller has got to learn how to 
write pictures, and the director 
must content himself with in- 
terpretation. The only man I've 
heard of who can do the first is 
Rene Clair. 

— Anthony Gibbs, 
"N. Y. American." 



RKO Home Office Execs 
En Route to Third Meet 

Chicago — RKO home office execu- 
tives en route to the company's third 
and final regional sales meeting 
opening Friday in San Francisco 
are: Ned E. Depinet, Jules Levy, Al 
Mertz, Robert F. Sisk, A. A. Schu- 
bart and Michael Poller. Meetings 
will take place at the St. Francis 
If tel Saturday and Sunday. 



.oming a 



nd G 



oing 



AL LICHTMAN leaves today for the coast. 

FRANCES AGNEW. writer, arrives in Holly- 
wood from New York. Saturday. 

HERBERT MARSHALL sails for New York 
from England today. 

SALLY EILERS. THELMA TODD and CHARLES 
LAUGHTON have arrived in New York from 
Europe. 

ARTHUR W. KELLY sails from New York 
today on the Aquatanla. 

JOHN HICKS and EUGENE ZUKOR, both of 
Paramount, sail July 20 for Europe. 

STANLEY WAITE and J. J. UNGER. Para- 
mount divisional managers, returned to New 
York Tuesday from Chicago, after attending 
the Paramount regional sales convention. 





NGthe 
R I ALTO 



WITH 

PHIL M. DALY 



• • • QUITE A nifty stunt that one pulled by 
George Bilson, Warners' studio publicity man at Grau- 

man's Chinese theater, where "Gold Diggers" is showing. 

as the patrons came out, a radio announcer with a miniature 
"mike" concealed in his coat lapel, asked them how they liked 

the show they didn't know it but their remarks 

went over station KFWB ,. when the radio columns car- 
ried the story the next day the patrons mobbed the 
radio gent the next evening he pulled the stunt in front of the 
theater all eager to crash as radio "entertainers" 

* * * * 

• • • THE WAY the stunt came to be originated is sim- 
ple George sez he was sick of listening to movie stars 

tell the public at premieres what they thought of their parts 

and the pix so he decided it was about time that the 

public got a chance to tell the stars what the customers think 

about THEM not a bad idea, say we Vicki 

Baum, author of "Grand Hotel," will be the honor guest Thurs- 
day nite at the Gala Supper Dance in the Sky Gardens of the 

St. Moritz 

* * * * 

• • • A VERY fine and sincere tribute was paid to Win- 
field Sheehan at the Fox convention in Atlantic City 

by Sidney Kent who stated that he had over 100 per 

cent confidence in his head of production and that 

coming from Mister Kent ought to settle several things. 

* * * * 

• • • LAST FRIDAY eve Joe Seider head of 

Prudential Theaters opened his West Hampton Beach 

theater with none other than ex-Governor Al Smith as 

the guest speaker 

* * * * 

• • • OVER AT Universal N. L. Manheim is cele- 
brating his 10th anniversary as the head of that company's 
Export Department Pat Garyn is just "Walter" to his 

two rich maiden aunties in Memphis IN Joan Crawford's 

"Dancing Lady," 24 gals who are dead ringers for Joan are 

being trained for a special dance routine in the pix 

Sol G. Newman, managing director in the United Kingdom for 
RKO Radio, will visit a movie studio for the first time when 
he goes to Hollywood after attending the third sales convention 

in San Francisco Ambrose Dowling, general manager 

of RKO Export Corporation, will accompany him 

* * * * 

• • • IT IS our privilege to cast a bouquet of nasturtiums 

or make it hollyhocks or hyacinths as you choose at 

Rutgers Neilson and his compact publicity dep't of 3 over at 
Radio's home office for the swell job they did in cover- 
ing the company regional sales conventions for the trade and 

popular press they swamped the film editors with lively 

and chatty news Rutgers is an old hand at this conven- 
tion reporting it did our heart good to observe the 

showmanship way in which he covered every angle 

* * * * 

• • • THAT VETERAN Fox director, John Blystone 

has started on "Shanghai Madness," his sixty-first pro- 
duction Jawn has been with Fox continuously for 15 
years . Mae West has originated a new dance, "The Mid- 
way," for her next Paramount pix, "I'm No Angel" let 

Mae describe it "Not a dance of the hands and feet, 

but of the Mid- Way. I throw discretion to the winds, my hips 

to the North, East, South and West" and how Mae can 

do it! Columbia still leads the M. P. Baseball League 

with 8 wins and only 1 lost RKO is the runner-up 
Fox in the cellar with 6 zero 



EXPLOITETTES 

Novel Advertising 
Campaign on "Gabriel" 

A NOVEL and effective cam- 
paign was given "Gabriel 
Over the White House" in ad- 
vance of and current with its 
showing at the Criterion. Ob- I 
taining the names of the city's I 
leading citizens, ads were placed I 
in the "Times" showing pictures I 
of these men and women and I 
identifying them as far as the I 
reasons for their civic fame was I 
concerned. Advertisement copy I 
began: "If I were — " and went I 
on to urge the people to see 
"Gabriel." On the morning after 
the midnight opening of the film, \ 
a good break was received in 
the front page, first column po- 
litical news. At the start of 
the film's second week the 
"Times" carried a large adver- 
tisement quoting over 20 differ- | 
ent statements from Senators, 
Congressmen and leading citi- 
zens. 

— Criterion, Oklahoma City I 

Four Classifications 

For Unemployed Surve; 

(Continued -from Page 1) 

for the survey covering the unerr 
ployment situation. Following ar 
the classifications: creative talen 
skilled crafts whose work is peculia 
to the industry, skilled crafts whos 
work is not peculiar to the industr 
and semi-skilled and unskilled labo: 



« « « 



» » » 



Joe Seider Circuit 

To Build Six House 

(.Continued from Page 1) 
cuit is taking over the Huntingto 
Station at Huntington Station Jul 
15 from Morris Markowitz, th 
house seating 780. Another theate 
was added to the group last Frida 
night when the new West Hampto 
Beach was opened at West Hampto 
Beach, L. I. 



FIRE DAMAGES STUDIO 

Newton, Mass. — Fire recently de 
stroyed the interior of the stone stu 
dio of the Atlas Film Co. in New 
ton Highlands, causing damage o 
some $18,000. 




THE 



Wednesday, July 5, 1933 



&2H 



DAILY 



RKO Radio Chicago 
Convention Squibs 



TACK DROY, newly appointed 
J branch manager at Calgary, was 
[the recipient of congratulations and 
; .welcoming handshakes in the Drake 
Jobby. Jack has been engaged in 
Canadian film circles for well nigh 
15 years. Coming up from the ranks 
[he's been salesman, office manager 
and now branch chief. 



The boys who couldn't get time 
off to take in the World's Fair con- 
gregated in Walt Branson's projec- 
tion room and Jack Osserman show- 
ed 'em Pathe News' special two-reel 
trip through the Century of Prog- 
ress. 



." Short subject specialist Al Mertz 

held old home-week sessions with 

" -the Cleveland gang whom he desert- 

[ "ed to assume his present position 

' at the home office. 



Eph Rosen's natty panama head 
piece made him the "flour" of the 
Minneapolis man-power. 



That traveling trio, O'Brien, De 

Waal and Sedin, were looking for 

¥ another partner to improve their 

harmony and graduate into the 

1 "quartette class. 

j ; 



e: ?■ 



Page Baker from Memphis town 
|( is growing more like Paul Whiteman 
j .. . . in weight. 

| 

N. J. Colquhoun was offering two- 
big cigars (he bit 'em) to the boys 
who could pronounce his name . . . 

MjMemphis men ineligible, of course! 



Ye hosts, Walt Branson, district 
manager and Jackie Osserman, Chi 
branch chief, came through 100 per 
•cent, making everything "ducky" 
for the boys at the Drake. 



! B. J. McCarthy of Des Moines was 
seen looking around the Chicago 
Boulevard for a "Free Beer" sign. 
Not having any luck, he finally per- 
suaded one of the luckier RKO gents 
;o shell out for his ale. 



Nat Levy of Detroit told of buy- 
ing a new car just before he left for 
.the confab. Nat was sorry he had 
"fio leave the boiler behind, but Mrs. 
| Levy thought it would be best. 

Sherm Fitch longs to sell the big 
' ihime. His advocation of Fitch's 
Shampoo warrants it, he believes. 



Levy Awards Watches 

Chicago — Jules Levy made personal 
awards of gold golf watches to the 
three leading RKO branch managers in 
the recent Jules Levy Anniversary Tes- 
timonial Eight Weeks Collection Drive. 
Those who received the watches at 
Monday's session of the company's sales 
meeting were: Ralph Williams, Okla- 
homa City; Sherman Fitch, Sioux City; 
and Nat Levy, Detroit. 



NEWS OF THE DAY 



Buffalo — Marvin Kempmer, for- 
mer branch manager for Paramount, 
has joined the Fox selling force. 
Emmet Dickman and William Row- 
ell also are covering western New 
York for Fox. 



Buffalo — George Rosing now is 
operating the Roosevelt which was 
purchased by his father from the 
Shea interests. 



Buffalo — With the showing of 
"Gold Diggers," the Buffalo Hippo- 
drome has changed from a double 
to single feature. The "Gold Dig- 
gers" is now in its second week. 



Atlanta — E. A. Rambonnet of 
Charlotte, N. C, has been added to 



the sales force of Arthur C. Brom- 
berg Attractions, Inc. 



Kansas City, Mo. — Homer Ellison 
has installed RCA High Fidelity 
sound equipment in his State theater 
at Garden City, Kan. 



Uhrichsville, O.— E. E. Bair, until 
recently manager of the State and 
American theaters in East Liver- 
pool, formerly identified with thea- 
ters here, has assumed charge of 
the State and Ohio here which he 
has leased. 



New Cumberland, W. Va. — Regis 
Duddy, new manager of Keith's 
105th theater, Cleveland, and Miss 
Collette McGinty, also of Cleveland, 
were married here recently. 



Columbia Plans 48 

Features in 1933-34 

(Continued from Page 1) 
company's sales convention yester- 
day: 

Three roadshow specials to be directed by 
Frank Capra, Frank Borzage and Lewis Mile- 
stone. "Lady for a Day" (tentative title) 
a Frank Capra production including Warren 
William, May Robson, Glenda Farrell, Wal- 
ter Connolly, Guy Kibbee and Jean Parker. 
"The Party's Over," stage comedy drama. 
"Man's Castle," a Frank Borzage produc- 
tion featuring Loretta Young and Spencer 
Tracy. Another Frank Borzage production, 
"Most Precious Thing in Life," from Tra- 
vis Ingham's "McCall's Magazine" serial. 
"World's Fair," starring Jack Holt. "The 
Ninth Guest," from the play by Owen Davis. 
"The Lady Is Willing," from the stage com- 
edy drama by Louis Verneuil. Leslie How- 
ard is the star and Gilbert Miller is the di- 
rector. Two Lewis Milestone Productions. 
"Shadows of Sing Sing." "Whom the Gods 
Destroy," with Walter Connolly. "Black 
Moon," starring Jack Holt in the "Cosmo- 
politan Magazine" serial by Clements Ripley. 
"The Hell Cat." "Twentieth Century," Broad- 
way comedy drama hit, by Ben Hecht and 
Charles MacArthur. "Men Need Women.'' 
"Let's Fall in Love," musical. "The Crim- 
inal Within." "Too Tough to Kill," from 
the story by J. D. Newsom, starring Jack 
Holt. One other Jack Holt production. 

"Once to Every Woman," from the "Cos- 
mopolitan Magazine" story "Kaleidoscope in 
K" by A. J. Cronin. "Above the Clouds," 
George B. Seitz story. A Carole Lombard 
production (untitled). "Fog," from the 

"Saturday Evening Post" serial by Valen- 
tine Williams and Dorothy R. Sims. "Blind 
Date." Another Frank Capra production, 
with Robert Montgomery. "The Lineup." 
"Hello Big Boy 1" musical comedy-drama. 
"Produce the Body." "Take the Witness," 
from the novel by Alfred Cohn and Joseph 
Chisholm. "Sisters Under the Skin," from 
the play by Courtenay Savage. "Among the 
Missing." "King of the Wild Horses," star- 
ring Rex, the Wonder Horse and William 
Janney and Dorothy Appleby, under the di- 
rection of Earl Haley. Four features of the 
police adventure drama type. 12 Outdoor 
Western Action Melodramas presenting Buck 
Jones and Tim McCoy. 26 Two Reel Com- 
edies (untitled) featuring star groups, two 
of which will be a Mickey McGuire series 
and a Smith & Dale series. "Krazy Kat 
Kartoons" produced by Charlie Mintz. 
"Scrappy," animated cartoons, produced by 
Charlie Mintz. "March of the Years," a one 
reel series. "Minute Mysteries," Detecto- 
grams, Produced from H. A. Ripley's mys- 
tery dramas by Bray Pictures. "A World 
of Sport," produced by Bray. "Screen Snap- 
shots." Walter Futter "Travelaughs" with 
John P. Medbury dialogue. 



Schuyler Grey Buried 
In Woodlawn Cemetery 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Stamford Hospital, Stamford, Conn., 
of peritonitis which developed after 
an operation two weeks ago. Grey 
was an authority on military and 
naval procedure and was technical 
director for "The West Pointer," 
"Gold Braid," "Men Without Wo- 
men" and "Casey of the Coast 
Guard." He also wrote a play 
"Love Your Body" which was pur- 
chased by Paramount. 

His widow, Mrs. Sally Muller 
Grey and a two-year-old son, Schuy- 
yer Grey, Jr., survive Grey, who 
lived at Sound Beach, Conn., was 
a native of New York and a gradu- 
ate from Cooper Union Institute in 
1917. He served in the Intelligence 
Corps of the U. S. Army Aviation 
service during the World War. 



42 Attending Paramount 
L. A. Sales Meeting 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Forty-two Paramoun- 
teers will participate in the com- 
pany's Los Angeles sales meeting 
tomorrow and Friday at tne Hotel 
Embassador. Following is the list: 
George J. Schaefer, Neil Agnew, A. 
J. Dunne, Robert Gillham, F. Leroy, 
K. Haddow, Al Wilkie and J. Ham- 
nell. 

From the exchanges are: Los An- 
geles: C. N. Peacock, I. G. White, 
H. Haas, M. C. Buries, H. Goodwin, 
J. Haas, B. F. Albertson; San Fran- 
cisco: M. H. Lewis, J. M. Betten- 
court, J. P. Meyers, A. R. Taylor, 
H. W. Haustein, C. L. DuRyk; Seat- 
tle: H. N. East, D. L. Spracher, M. 
Segel, G. H. Haviland, R. C. Brown; 
Portland: F. C. Clark, E. I. Hudson, 
L. G. Stang, H. L. West; Denver: 
H. W. Braly, W. P. Weins, C. 
J. Duer, E. I. Reed, J. Voe; Salt 
Lake City: J. J. Donohue, C. G. 
Epperson. F. H. Smith, W. M. Wil- 
liams, A. Heid, K. Lloyd, H. M. 
Glanfield. 



SHORT SUBJECTS 



"The Barber Shop" 

(Mack Sennett Comedy) 

Paramount 20 mins. 

Real Laugh Number 

W. C. Fields is featured as the 
barber in a small town who has dif- 
ficulties with a cranky wife while 
his manicure girl goes sentimental 
over him. A bad bandit is loose in 
town, and comes into the barber 
shop to be transformed so that the 
cops can't recognize him. Fields de- 
livers a good line of comedy in his 
own individual style, and the film is 
well gagged and moves along at a 
lively and laughable pace. It got 
more real hearty laughs from a 
Broadway audience than most of the 
comedy shorts seen for weeks. A 
safe bet any place. 



Charlie Chase in 

"His Silent Racket" 

M-G-M 20 mins. 

Snappy 

Plenty of the old Chase comedy 
antics in this one. Charlie gets 
hooked by Jimmy Finlayson, who is 
running a broken down cleaning es- 
tablishment and is being threatened 
by racketeers to blow up his shop 
if he doesn't kick in. So Mr. Chase 
becomes a partner for 300 smackers, 
and receives a package containing 
a bomb that the racketeers deliver 
addressed to his partner. The fun 
revolves about Charlie's efforts to 
deliver the package, and his panic 
when he learns what is inside. Fast 
and well gagged. 



"Hollywood On Parade" 

(No. 13) 

Paramount 12 mins. 

Entertaining 

Has a strong novelty angle with 
Buster Keaton acting as master of 
ceremonies and introducing the old 
family album. The characters come 
to life as he turns the pages. They 
are various well known screen celebs 
dressed in the costumes of the early 
90's, appearing in couples and 
groups, and going through some 
chatter, and then fading back into 
the album photo pose at the close 
of their bits. The dialogue of Kea- 
ton is in rhyme, and the reel shows 
plenty of care in production. 



"MADE ON BROADWAY" SET 

"Made on Broadway," production 
featuring Robert Montgomery and 
Sally Eilers, will be open at the 
Rialto Friday. There will be a pre- 
view on Thursday evening. 



$23,957 Saenger Loss 

New Orleans — A net loss of $23,- 
957.86 had resulted from the opera- 
tion of the Saenger Theaters Inc. 
from January 27 to April 29 of this 
year, E. V. Richards, receiver for the 
chain, has reported to the Federal 
court. During the period in question 
receipts for the enterprise in Louis- 
iana, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida 
were $261,560.25. Expenditures were 
$285,518.11. 



With the Temperature Over 93° 
ATTENDANCE GOES OVER 100% 
AT RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL! 



House average unshaken during 
the most devastating torrid blast 



in years! 



With Broadway theatres wilting 
at high pressure, 16,064 paid 
admission on opening day to see 



CONSTANCE \K 





the 9 ,d t u e P r,tfl 

shor pa* ••;...„ to 

'° 5 Jot - 10 
Ace " erSe 






n>a' 



BEDO 



With >y 

JOEL McCREA 

JOHN HALLIDAY 

Pert Kelton, Samuel Hinds 

Directed by Qregory La Cava, A Pandro 
Berman Production. MERIAN C. 



An RKO 
RADIO 
Picture 



-X .- 



w 



THE 



Wednesday, July 5, 1933 



&&% 



DAILV 



A LITTLE from "LOTS" 



By RALPH WILK 



HOLLYWOOD 
JTENRY CRONJAGER, ace cam- 
eraman, handled the photogra- 
hy on "No Marriage Ties," starring 
lichard Dix. He will also photo- 
raph the next Dix picture, as yet 
ntitled. He did the camera work 
a numerous Thomas Meighan, Bebe 
laniels and Mary Pickford produc- 

ons. 

* * * 

Edwin Maxwell, noted heavy, will 
lay the menace in "Car Number 
7," the newest Tim McCoy picture. 

e has just completed an important 
jle in the Cecil B. De Mille pro- 
uction, "This Day and Age." 

* * * 

John Darrow has returned from 
nnapolis, where he spent three 
eeks on location with the RKO 
31ory Command" company. During 
le filming of one of his scenes at 
nnapolis, spectators applauded so 
)udly that the young actor was 

»rced to stop and take a bow. 

* * * 

Jane Murfin, the scenarist, has 
gned a new long term contract 
ith RKO Radio. The new agree- 
ent continues a professional rela- 
onship, which has already lasted 
>r five years, one of the longest 
udio-writer associations on record. 

* * * 

When Frederick Burton, noted 
age actor, arrived in Hollywood 
cently he brought with him a rare 
ate, 100 years old, which had been 
ven to his first wife by his grand- 
other. When Burton was in Indi- 
la last week, the first Mrs. Burton, 
om whom he is divorced, gave him 
is plate to present to the new 
rs. Burton, who is in Hollywood. 

* ♦ ■ ♦ 

Lloyd Knechtel has sailed for 
jigland, where he will be associated 
th Randall Terraneau at the 
orge Humphries laboratories, Lon- 
n. He will do free-lance trick 
mera work in England and will 
50 be available to furnish Euro- 
an process backgrounds for Amer- 
in producers. 



Ernest Pagano, for several years 
th the M-G-M and Educational 
mario staffs, cut short his vaca- 
n to join the Warner Bros.' writ- 
r department. 

* * * 

With the signing of Jean Parker 
play the role of Beth, the family 
cle of "Little Women," RKO Ra- 
► picture, is now completed. 



Typewriter News 

"I'll take your typewriter away from 
you if you don't stop squawking about 
rental prices," wrote Harry Buxbaum, 
' Fox New York manager, to Jack Spring- 
er, circuit operator. 

And the next day Bux received a 
broken-down, antedated typewriter vol- 
untarily from Springer, who for once, 
gave in easily. 



Frank Conroy was signed yester- 
day to play a part in "Ace of Aces," 
the John Monk Sanders story now 
filming at RKO Radio Pictures' stu- 
dios with Richard Dix as its star. 

* * * 

B. P. Schulberg has purchased 
the Arthur Davis play, "Reunion," 
as the first of the eight productions 
he will make independently for 
Paramount's coming season release. 
Sylvia Sidney will be starred in 
"Reunion," and Herbert Marshall, 
who sails on Wednesday (5th) from 
London, will have the leading male 

role. 

* * * 

When Norman McLeod finishes 
the direction of W. C. Fields and 
Alison Skipworth in "Tillie and Gus" 
he will have one of Paramount's 
prize directorial assignments of the 
season awaiting him, in "Alice in 

Wonderland." 

* * * 

"British Agent," Leslie Howard's 
first starring picture under his new 
long-term contract with Warner 
Bros., will go into production during 

September. 

* * * 

Marguerite Churchill, absent from 
the screen for eight months while 
appearing on Broadway stage in 
"Dinner at Eight," will return to 
Hollywood for a featured role in the 
"Golden Harvest," which Charles R. 
Rogers is to produce for Paramount. 



C. REID ARRIVES IN CHICAGO 

Cliff Reid, RKO Radio producer, 
arrived in Chicago Monday for the 
closing sessions of the RKO region- 
al sales convention, as special envoy 
from Merian C. Cooper, vice-presi- 
dent in charge of production. 

Reid will address the convention. 
From Chicago he will go to San 
Francisco to attend the third reg- 
ional convention there and will then 
return to his duties at the studio in 
Hollywood. 



"LILLY" BROOKLYN PREMIERE 

First National's "Lilly Turner," 
starring Ruth Chatterton, which re- 
cently completed its run at the Ri- 
voli, New York, has its Brooklyn 
premiere at the Strand tomorrow 
night. 



CENSORS OKAY "CAPTURED" 

Warner Bros.' "Captured!" has 
been passed by the New York Board 
of Censors without a single change 
of elimination ordered. "Captured!" 
is set for a two-a-day opening at 
the New York Hollywood Theater in 
the Fall. 



ENG. HOUSES BAN. GER. FILMS 

London (By Cable) — Three Man- 
chester houses have banned German 
pictures at the request of Jews in 
that city. Several halls in the 
Cheetham and Broughton neighbor- 
hoods have also excluded these pic- 
tures. 



Short Shots from Eastern Studios 



i By CHARLES AHCOATE 



A SERIES of musical shorts to be 

made in color is being planned 

by M. B. Martino. "Fast Money" is 

the title of the first with production 

scheduled to start within the week. 

• 

Lee Stuart, casting director of the 
Vitaphone studio, and his able as- 
sistant, Milton Singer, are like two 
peas in a pod when it comes to cast- 
ing for a picture. Unknown to each 
other both had selected same three 
people for parts in a recent Vita- 
phone production. 

One of the most elaborate sets tc 
be built in an eastern studio is the 
jungle scene constructed for the 
Krimsky-Cochrane feature, "Emperor 
Jones," now in production at the 
Astoria plant of the Eastern Service 
Studios. Over two carloads of trop- 
ical plants, trees, shrubs and vines 
were shipped direct from Florida in 

order to obtain realistic settings. 

• 

"The Unknown Venus," the first 
of the series of six features to be 
produced by Starmark Pictures, Inc., 
and now in production at the Met- 
ropolitan Sound studio, Fort Lee, 
N. J., will be completed this week. 
Ernest Truex, Jean Arthur and 



Herbert Rawlinson head the cast 
with Grover Lee doing the directing. 

Herman Ruby, head of the Brook- 
lyn Vitaphone writing staff, return- 
ed hale and hearty with a load of 
new ideas for shorts, after a two 

weeks' vacation. 

• 

Cutting of the feature, "Mid- 
night," recently produced by All 
Star Productions, is being done un- 
der the supervision of Leo Zochling. 
Work is expected to be finished in 
about two weeks. 
• 

"Damaged Lies," a Beacon pro- 
duction, has been dubbed in Spanish 
at the Standard Sound recording 

studio. 

• 

Paul Lorenx, dance director at 
the Warner Bros. Brooklyn studio, 
is anxiously awaiting the completion 
of the new rehearsal hall now being 
constructed for the training of the 
chorus for their appearance in the 
series of Vitaphone musicals. 

Sam Kopp is now handling pub- 
licity for William Rowland-Monte 
Brice Productions. 



"New Deal" 
Number 



Now In Work 



Will Be Published On The 
Fifteenth Anniversary Of 

Film Daily 



* 



& 



YOUR 



t4r ^TRIHC 

o0T Fo * *t znr 




MAM 



/re /Iras greaf 



nei^5 /or jow 

He's on his toes . . . burst- 
ing to tell you about what 
he heard and saw at the 
Atlantic City Convention. Is 
he happy! Who wouldn't 
be, ..with the swellest line- 
up in FOX history (to be 
modest about it). You'll 
congratulate him! 



Watch next week's trade papers for 
a striking announcement from FOX 




Intimate in Character 
nternational in Scope 
ndependent in Thought 



S*4 



The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Now Fifteen Years Old 



r€KI\.THlJC$DAr,JIJLy6, i<£33 



c5 CENTS 



Kohn Tes 



a. Has Wiped Out Big Deficit 

ORGANIZED GROUPS' CODE CONFAB LATE IN JULY 

Stuart Resigns As General Manager of RKO Circuit 



Experience 

shorts, and other things 
=By JACK AUCOATE-^^^ 



"HE stronghold of most every industry 
is its executive manpower. Brains are 
easured more than any other element. 
ir industry and its inherent ability of ac- 
mplishment is no stronger than the know- 
g hands that guide it. In this tre- 
endous business-art-industry of entertain- 
g the public via the cinema, this process 
j established business practice seems to 
i reversed. New banking brooms sweep 
it old heads for no reason whatsoever, 
id executives, upon change of administra- 
)n, are knocked over like tenpins. It is 
ear-tragedy, this discarding of so many 
our experienced men. 



I'TEP right up and meet the latest out- 
fit to enter the independent ranks, 
:soiute Pictures, and its sponsor and 
esident, Herbert Ebenstein. We had 
jnch with President Ebenstein yesterday 
id know whereof we speak when we say 
e company will produce eight pictures 
ithin the next twelve months, that it is 
nply financed, that the first two pic- 
res will be in production within the next 
ree weeks and that first release for the 
dependent market is scheduled for Sept. 
ith. Just another straw that shows the 
inds of picture progress again blowing 
'ward prosperity. 

• 
JOW that the double feature mirage is 
^ fading and that sensible production 
hedules have written finis to overproduc- 
•n, the door is wide open for the short 
bject to again take its colorful and im- 
'rtant place in the field of exhibition, 
is elemental that the success of the 
usic hall, vaudeville and pictures, has 
ien wholesome, diversified amusement at 
price within the reach of all. No field 
n offer so broad a variety of screen en- 
rtainment as the short subject. Its 
Jwsreels, cartoon comedies, travelettes 
id novelties are compellingly and charac- 
ristically its own. Now that the short 
bject is back it will be hard to dislodge 
from its rightful place in the scheme of 
ings in the theater. 



Executive Ending Duties 

Saturday — Post to 

Be Abolished 

Herschel Stuart, general manager 
for RKO Theaters, has resigned, it 
was announced yesterday by Harold 
B. Franklin, who stated that the 
position held by Stuart will be abol- 
ished. Plans are now being worked 
out for the division of Stuart's 
duties and it is likely that B. J. 

(Continued on Page 8) 



PUBLIX - NEBRASKA 
GUT TO 4 HOUSES 



Omaha — A. H. Blank, trustee for 
Publix-Nebraska, Inc., has cut the 
circuit of 15 houses down to four, 
three of which he is at present op- 
erating. These include the World 
in Omaha and the Majestic and Cap- 
itol at Grand Island, Nebr. The 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Commerce Dept. Drops 

Special Film Service 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Effective July 15, 
the U. S. Department of Commerce 
is discontinuing its special service 
covering the world film industry and 
it is probable that the Motion Pic- 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Lab Men to Talk Code 

Second meeting of the Motion Pic- 
ture Laboratories Association of Amer- 
ica will be held Friday at the Hotel 
Aslor at noon when plans will be made 
for a meeting at which officers will be 
elected and formation of the laboratory 
code discussed. Incorporation of the 
association will be announced Friday by 
H. J. Yates, acting chairman. 



FOX N. E. DEAL STILL 
REMAINS UNFINISHED 



Deal under which the Fox New 
England circuit, approximating 17 
former S. Z. Poli houses, is reported 
passing to Loew control so far has 
not been closed, it was understood 
yesterday. Harry Arthur, who is 
operating the group, has indicated 
his willingness to continue in charge. 

N. L. Nathanson and A. C. Blum- 
enthal, through whom the deal is 

(Continued on Page 6) 



12 "Newsreel Cameraman" 
One-Reelers for Fox 

A series of 12 one-reel films to be 
known as "Adventures of the News- 
reel Cameraman" will be made by 
Fox under the supervision of Tru- 
man Talley for the 1933-34 season. 
First episode will be "Following the 
Horses," with "Motor Mania" sec- 
ond. The third will be "Conquest of 
the Air." 



Paramount Has Wiped Out Big 
Deficit, Ralph Kohn Testifies 



McCracken to Produce 
Three African Pictures 

Harold McCracken, who has gone 
to Cuba and the West Indies to pro- 
duce a picture, plans to later go 
to Africa to make three exploitation 
productions. He returns to New 
York from the West Indies in about 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Paramount has wiped out a deficit 
of more than $1,000,000, Ralph A. 
Kohn, treasurer, testified at a meet- 
ing of creditors of the corporation 
yesterday at the office of Referee 
Henry K. Davis. As of April 1, 
the deficit had been reduced to $400,- 
000, he said. 

Kohn stated that the company 

(Continued on Page 2) 



N. A. M. P. I. Plans Meet 

in N. Y. — Committee 

Meets Tonight 

A convention of representatives of 
all organized groups will be held by 
the National Association of the Mo- 
tion Picture Industry in New York 
late in July, probably the last week, 
with purpose of unifying an indus- 
try code for submission to General 
Hugh Johnson, Administrator of the 

(Continued on Page 11) 



PARA. MAKING TEN 
FEATURES WITH MUSIC 



Paramount will include not less 
than 10 feature comedies with musie 
in its 1933-34 production schedule, 
it was announced yesterday. The 
players will include Four Marx 
Brothers, Charlie Ruggles, Mary 
Boland, George Burns, Grade Allen, 
W. C. Fields, Alison Skipworth, 
Bing Crosby, Jack Oakie, Jack Ha- 
ley, and Skeets Gallagher. 



Pittsburgh Meeting 

To Seek Price Boost 

Pittsburgh — Local exchangenren 
are planning to call an exhibitor 
meeting here soon in an effort to 
bring about a general admission 
price increase, thus eliminating the 
10 and 15 cent houses. Low-scale 
theaters are causing both Warner 
Bros, theaters and national distribu- 
tors much concern. So far double 

(Continued on Page 11) 



Air- Minded Conventioneers 

San Francisco — The advance guard of 
RKO executives has arrived here for 
the three days sales convention to be 
held at the St. Francis Hotel, Friday, 
Saturday and Sunday. Those who took 
to the air were Ned E. Depin?t, Jules 
Levy, Ambrose Dowling, Robert F. 
Sisk, Fred. McConnell, Cliff Reid, Wal- 
ter Branson and Jack Pegler. 



-. &JW, 



DAILV 



Thursday, July 6, 19: 




Vol L X III No 4 Thus July 6. 1933 Price 5 Cents 



JOHN W WICrHTF 



Editor and Publisher 



Pulil -hr I I • \ rxcept Sundays and Holidays 
it I- New York. N. ?., 

bj V. Folk, Inc. J. \V. 

President, Editor and Publisher: 
Meraereau, Srcretary-Treasurer 
an! Genei I Manager; Arthur W. Eddy, Asso 

ciatr I ale Gillette. Managing 

Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at New York, 
N. Y.. under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Term- P United States outside 

of Greater New Y"rk $10.00 one year; 6 
months. $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
| icriber >hnulil remit with order, 

munications to THE FIT-M 
Ii Ml V, r ty, New York, N. Y., 

le M736, 7 4737. 7-4738, 7-4739. 
ess: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood. California— Ralph Wilk. 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone O.inite 6607. London — 
Ernest \V. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
ur St., W. I. Berlin — Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
* — P. A. Marie, I. a Cinematographic Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 



Am. Seat 6 ] 2 



Col. 

Con. 
Con. 
East 



Ptc. vtc 19' 8 

Fm. Ind 4% 

Fm. Ind. pfd 12 

Kodak 85 



6'/ 8 
191/4 

4% 
ll's 



6'/ 2 + l/ 4 

1914 

41/z + Va 

Hi/a — % 

81 1/4 82 — 3 

31/4 31/4 — 1/4 

23i/ 2 — % 

1% + V4 

11/2 + Va 

6% + Va 

4 

61 2 — 1/4 

20 — 1% 



23 

1% 
1% 
5% 

4 

6% 
20 



Fox Fm. "A" 3V2 

Loews. Inc 243j 

Paramount ctfs. ... 1 5'g 

Pathc Exch 1 Vi 

do •A" 6% 

RKO 41/4 

Warner Bros 6% 

do pfd 20 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 
Gen. Th. Eq. pfd. 11-16 11-16 11-16 

Technicolor 8l/s 8Vs 81/g 

Trans-Lux 2% 2% 2% 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 
Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 5 43 4 5 + Ve 

Gen. Th. Eq.6s40cffs. 4 3% 4 

Keith A-0 6s 46 . 48' 2 48 
Paramount 6s 47 . 21 Vi 20 
Par. By. 5' 2 s 51 361/4 

Par. 5'2S 50 21% 

Par. 5' 2 s 50 ctfs. 20' 2 18% 20Vi + 4'/ 4 
Pathc 7s 37 76 76 76 + 1 

Warner's 6s 39 36' j 35*., 36 — 1/4 

NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE 
Para. Publix 1% 1 1 Vi + V* 



48 — 1 
2H/4 + 3 
35 Vi 361/4 + 31/4 
19% 2U/4 -f- 3y 4 



CHESTERFIELD'S 

THIRD RELEASE 
"Notorious But Nice" 

with 

MARIAN MARSH 

BETTY COHPSON 

DONALD DILLOWAY 



1540 B'wav. 



N. Y. C. 



PARA. WIPES OUT 
BIG DEFICIT— KOHN 

(.Continued from Pa 

does not plan to borrow money for 
action scheduled for the next 
six months. Production costs have 
been cut, he said. Attorneys Saul 
E. Rogers and Sol Rosenblatt had 
an exchange of words over the ques- 
t inning by the former. 

The meeting was adjourned until 
Sept. 7. 



80 Features Slated 

For Empire Release 

Toronto — Empire Films, Ltd., will 
distribute approximately 60 features 
throughout the Dominion during 
1933-34, states Oscar R. Hanson, 
president. Through its six branches 
the company will handle the product 
of Majestic Pictures, British Inter- 
national and Twickenham Produc- 
tions. 



STARTING WINDSOR PICTURE 

St. Petersburg — With the comple- 
tion of the first picture, "Chloe," 
Kennedy Productions announces that 
work will begin immediately on a 
second picture, "Playthings of De- 
sire," in which Claire Windsor will 
star. Miss Windsor has arrived by 
plane from New York. Buster Kea- 
ton is also on the lot ready for the 
"Fisherman," in which he is to star. 
Other pictures under way include 
several Ford Sterling comedies. 



SELLING SHENANDOAH CO. 

St. Louis, Mo. — By virtue of an 
order issued by the St. Louis Circuit 
Court, Barney Rosenthal and Henry 
P. Schroeder, receivers for the New 
Shenandoah Amusement Co., 2227 
South Broadway, will sell the prop- 
erties of that corporation at a re- 
ceiver's auction sale at 10:30 A. M. 
today. 



CHARGE EXPLOSION PLOT 

Pittsburgh — Three men were ar- 
rested by Allegheny County detec- 
tives on July 4 in connection with 
an alleged attempt to blow up Mat- 
ty's theater in Wilmerding. The 
tiny picture house, seating about 60 
persons, is insured for $4,500, the 
detectives said. 



TORONTO CONFAB JULY 19 

Toronto — Annual convention of 
Associated Theaters, Ltd., originally 
scheduled for July 12, has been post- 
poned until July 19. Postponement 
was because first date fell on anni- 
versary of the Battle of the Boyne. 



Paramount Bonds Up 

All of the Paramount bond issues 
closed up from 3 to 4i 4 points yester- 
day. The 6s47's closed at 21 V4. a net 
change of plus 3 points. Paramount 
Broadway 5i/is51 closed at 361/4, a net 
change of plus 3'/4 points; Paramount 
5Vis50 closed at 21 1/4, a gain of 3V4, 
while the 5]£s50 certificates closed at 
201/2, a net change of 414. 



Plan Feature, Shorts 

On Mediterranean Trip 

With plans for a featui-e in addi- 
tion to a series of travel shorts, the 
staff of Arcturus Pictures is en 
route to the Mediterranean Sea from 
New York. F. Herrick Herrick is 
director and the expedition includes 
James Boring, world traveler. It 
returns to New York in September. 



I.T.O.A. BOARD MEETS TODAY 

A meeting of the board of direc- 
tors of the Independent Theater 
Owners Association of New York 
will be held this afternoon at the 
Globe theater at which time several 
matters regarding the exhibitors' 
code will be discussed. A general 
meeting of the association was held 
yesterday at which 100 members at- 
tended. 



WESTINGHOUSE RAISES WAGE 

An increase in wages of five per 
cent has been given all employees 
of Westinghouse Electric & Manu- 
facturing Co. It is retroactive to 
July 1. 



HOW GOOf 



Is You r 



M 




emory 



1. What two executives, now identificl 
with the Paramount Publix interest 
were in the circus business about . 
years ago? 

2. What was the first big patents litig 
tion in the industry? 

3. When did the original Roxy theat 
open? 

4. How much money did the indust 
pledge in the Fourth Liberty Lo. 
Drive? 

5. Who were the leading players in "B 
Hur?" 

(For Answers See Page 10) 



HOOT GIBSON IMPROVED 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAL 

Hollywood — Hoot Gibson, who w 
injured when his plane crashed la 
Monday, is improving, but will ha 
to stay in bed for a month, accor 
ing to his doctor. 



ROXY INCREASES PRICES 

The Roxy, Seventh Ave., yeste 
day increased its week-day even 
admission prices from 35 to 55 cer 
for all seats. 



Film Daily 

Will Be 15 Years Old This Summe 

• 
CELEBRATING ITS 

CRYSTAL ANNIVERSARY 

WITH A 

"New Dear 
Number 






WARNER BROS/ 
YEAR-BOOK IS 
PRINTED ON 

CELLULOID 

You can read it today 

at any Warner Bros. 

Exchange ! 



J 
] 

fa 



Last year Warner Bros, smashed precedent with 
the first advance trade showing of new-season 
product. You came — you saw — you bought 
solely on the basis of the production quality 
those first great 1932-'33 shows demonstrated. 



1 



We promised you nothing then about later re- 
leases . . . But we gave you everything. We 
didn't even mention "42nd Street" or "Frisco 
Jenny," or "Working Man" or "I Am A Fugi- 
tive" or "Little Giant" or Cagney . . . You got 
these and many other great properties without 
a syllable of obligation on our part. 



: 



So now again we invite you to give Warner 
product an eyewitness test. Come to your ex- 
change and see the last of the 1932- , 33 pictures 
that you bought on FAITH IN WARNER 
BROS. See "CAPTURED!"- see "GOODBYE 
AGAIN"-see "MARY STEVENS, M. D."-see 
"VOLTAIRE" and "NARROW CORNER" and 
"MAYOR OF HELL." See for the first time in 
your experience a summer line-up without a 
let-up . . . See whether your faith in Warner 
Bros, was justified! 

Then let that decision guide you when it's 
time to buy for next year. Throw out all the 
reams of praise others have showered on War- 
ner Bros, for reviving theatre prosperity. Dis- 
card the judgments of hundreds of exhibitors 
and trade observers as to Warner Bros.' "lead- 
ership" and "highest consistent quality." BE 
YOUR OWN JUDGE! 



If these pictures convince you that we have 
dealt fairly with you this year, you will 



probably want to deal with Warner Bros, 
next year. 

If you are impressed by the way we are finish- 
ing this season, you can judge for yourself 
how we will start the next. 

For we unhesitatingly submit these final 
1932- '33 releases as samples of the product 
we will give you in 1933-'34. We don't prom- 
ise you that on some arbitrary date on the 
calendar there will be a sudden magical step-up 
in our production quality. We honestly don't 
believe we need a shot in the arm or a new 
lease on life. 

We've been in there trying every minute on 
every production, and we're going to keep 
on trying to make every new picture just a 
little better than the last. 



pa*-..:-. "^ 



Our pictures for next year won't be much 
better than the ones we have to show you 
now . . . But we do promise you they'll be just 
as good. For Leadership is the sharpest spur 
to human effort . . . And next year's Warner 
Bros. Pictures will be produced by 4,000 hu- 
man beings who are grimly determined to 
retain this title . . . 

WARNER BROS. 

THE NO. 1 COMPANY 

VITAGRAPH, INC., DISTRIBUTORS 



THE 



-ZtJW 



DAILV 



Thursday, July 6, 193 



SCHAEFER OUTLINES 
PARA. SALES POLICY 



I u n.ti.i.) 

II tlywood Sales and distribu- 
tion poli i rning Paramount 
product for the coming season of 
1933-34 wile outlined here yester- 
day by General Manager George 
i. Schaefer before the Paramount 
Western Division sales personnel, in 
the first of the two-day meeting held 
at the Ambassador Hotel. 

Neil F. Agnew, assistant general 
sales manager, opened the meeting, 
followed by Schaefer. Robert M. 
Gillham, director of advertising and 
publicity, Al Wilkie, eastern pub- 
licity manager and John Hanimell 
from the Paramount New 
York office. 

Studio executives attending the 
meeting included Emanuel Cohen, 
vice-president in charge of produc- 
tion; Merritt Hulburd, story depart- 
ment; William Wright, Tom Baily, 
.1. II. Lazarus and Bill Pine of the 
studio advertising council, and Fred 
Leahy, studio production manager. 

Sale> personnel, including branch 
managers, sales managers, salesmen, 
booking managers and ad sales man- 
agers were present from Los An- 
geles, San Francisco, Seattle, Port- 
land, Denver and Salt Lake City ex- 
changes. 

The afternoon session of the meet- 
inn was devoted to the outlining of 
the new product for the coming year, 
which includes 65 feature produc- 
tions and 229 short subjects. 



Fox N. E. Deal Still 

Remains Unfinished 

(Continued from Pane 1) 

being negotiated, are reported to 
have offered financing amounting to 

.000 to take care of current ex- 
penses, as one phase of their propo- 
sition. Nathanson started the deal 
before he returned to Famous Play- 

< anadian as its president. 



< \PITOL HOLDS OVER SHOW 
Both the feature "Hold Your 
Man" starring Jean Harlow and 
('lark Gable, and the stage show at 
the Capitol will be held over a sec- 
ond week starting Friday. 



.oming a 



nd G 



omg 



REGINA CREWE and HERBERT CRUIKSHANK 
have returned to New York from Europe. 

HAROLD McCRACKEN has gone to Havana 
from New York. 

HARRY KALWINE Warner theater 2onc man- 
ager, is in New York from Pittsburgh for home 
office conferences with Joe Bcrnhard. 

LEO MORRISON is in New York from the 
Coast. 

JOSE MOJICA. Fox Spanish player, has ar- 
rived in New York on the S S Garfield after 
a personal appearance tour in Central and 
South America. He leaves for the Coast within 
a few days. 





NGthe 

WITH 

PHIL M. DALY 



■^^■JMirir.y/Ja,! 



• • • IN A recent analytical newspaper article on the 
legitimate theater the Broadway producer, Brock Pem- 
berton, takes a lusts Bwat at the film industry he speaks 
of Bollywood as "the arch consumer and destroyer of talent" 

he complains that as soon as a new playwright appears 

on Broadway he is abducted to the cinema city where 

his confidence is destroyed by the conference method 

his spirit is extinguished by the solitary confinement system 

and his judgment is warped by cinema life on and off 

the screen 

* * * * 

« O • HE ALSO notes a radical change in taste on the 

part of the customers toward stage plays which have 

veered away from the old artificial patterns a success- 
ful play today must be grounded in Reality characters 
must be reasonably real, and do moderately believable things, 
states Mister Pemberton 

* * * * 

• • • AND IF you add all these reflections up 

what do they signify? that Hollywood must some day 

come to rely on Original Screen Writers lads who think 

in terms of the Screen and not the Stage writers who 

ignore stage formulas and write about Life as it is 

lived in Ashtabula and Peoria sure, folks want plays 

grounded in Reality whether stage or screen 

the vast proportion of screen plots are based on racketeer's 
molls gold-digging janes chorus gals skyrocket- 
ing to musical comedy stars or a Park Avenoo apartment 

types as far removed from the average American home as an 
Eskimo from the Equator some producer is gonna get 

wise make productions about genuine Home Folks 

and Clean Up 

• • • WHEN WE reflect on those star salaries in Holly- 
wood our mind goes back to the good old days 

when Essanay took Chaplin away from Keystone in 1914 

when Charlie got 25 smackers a day when he worked 

with Mabel Normand and Essanay almost gave 

Charlie heart failure by offering him the munificent sum of 

$250 a week work or loaf Henry Walthall was 

drawing .$200 per Francis X. Bushman was top, with 

$300 with Beverly Bayne Beverly got 75 berries 

a Pathe newsreel and a Chaplin two-reeler was the program 

in those days in hundreds of theaters store shows 

Bill Fox and Carl Laemmle built their success on such shows 
as foundation 

* * * * 

• • • WHEN YOU are down Greenwich Yillage way 

and want to see a house operated with courtesy and 
efficiency drop in at Loew's Sheridan which 

draws about the most discriminating audience of any in town 

assistant manager Ray Simons is invariably on hand 
in the evening here, there and everywhere look- 
ing after the comfort of all the customers 

* * * * 

• • • THEY* USED a double for a cockroach in Joan 

Crawford's "Today We Live" the substitute had to act 

as a stand-in. as the original roach claimed the usual M-G-M 

star's privilege of having a stand-in Buddy Cantor will 

interview Harry Davenport Saturday eve over WRNY 

Davenport appears in Starmark Pictures' first production "Un- 
wanted Venus," directed by Grover Lee, featuring Ernest Truex 

and Jean Arthur Eugene Eloy David of the RKO office 

and Lilian Okun have completed a play, "A Broadway Broad" 

Robert Montgomery once played for 72 weeks in a 
stock company portraying nothing but old men Marje 

Dresslei was laughed off the stage at the age of 14 in Lindsay, 

'anada. while appearing in amateur theatricals so Mai-ie 

started out to show 'em and how! 



// 



I 

REMEMBER 
WHEN 



By ELMER J. McGOVERN 

as told to 

JACK HARROWER 

of The Film Daily Editorial Staff 

"IN 1913 I was assistant to Adam Kes 

' sel, president of the Keystone Filrr 
Co. In the latter part of that year ; 
major company raided our preserves anc 
got away with Ford Sterling and a couple 
of lesser lights or comedians, as you will 

"Mack Sennett in California and we ir 
New York weren't any too happy ovei 
this course of events, and just as thing; 
looked their bluest Mack wrote on thai 
he was giving a young fellow a tryoul 
for five weeks at a hundred a week, anc 
that he was shipping on to us in New 
York a print of his first effort, and for 
us to look at it and if we liked him we 
were to wire the studio immediately as 
he could be signed up for a year at $17" 
a week. 

"When the print came in Mr. Kessel 
delegated me to take it to the projection 
room and look at it and bring back a' 
report. In looking at it I saw the young 
fellow playing with Fanny Davenport, Mabel 
Normand and 'Pathe' Lehman who also 
was the director. 

"The young comic wore an English top-i 
hat and frock coat. He also wore a cane 
upon which his detachable cuffs were con-h 
stantly sliding down, and he was adorned 
with a dropping mustache. 

"The picture entitled 'Making a Living' 
wasn't much, a semi-industrial but the 
comic showed promise. I brought back a 
favorable report to the boss and he told 
me to wire Sennett to sign him up. I 
did, and soon Sennett had in his office 
safe a contract with the signature of 
Charlie Chaplin." 



McCracken to Produce 
Three African Pictures 

(Continued from Page 1) 

one month. McCracken, who until 
recently was associated with H. H. 
Rogers, Jr., still retains the title of 
vice-president of Standard Motion' 
Pictures, Inc., but is making the i': 
West Indian film on his own. 



*,&j 



MANY happy mm 



■est wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
Industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 



« « « 



» » » 



July 6 



Don Mersereau 
Frank E. Garbutt 



Why DID THE BEACHES 
7 LOOK LIKE THIS? 



Why DID BROADWAY 
LOOK LIKE THIS? 





Exploitation 



IS THE ANSWER! 



A campaign modeled after the Rivoli's will enable YOU to turn the crowds 
from the hot-weather spots in your town to the box-office of your theatre ! 



Directed by 
WARD WING 



m Windows everywhere! Three on Fifth Avenue. Black, Starr 
8C Frost, world famous jewelers, Nippon Yusen Kaisha steam- 
ship window, Southern Pacific display halts crowds. And 
more than 100 key spot locations all ballyhoo "Samarang"! 

O Samarang Club. " Permit us. to strip to the waist " — that 
slogan started a furore that crashed the front pages of the 
New York dailies. Arrests on the beach, petitions to Mayor 
Frankel of Long Beach, 8,000 Samarang Club members 
signed in four days — all started as a gag, now seriously 
becoming a national organization ! 

O King Features Syndicate full page feature story on shark- 
octopus battle appears in 200 coast - to • coast top spot 
newspapers ! 



M Radio air waves plug "Samarang"— Abe Lyman, Rudy Vallee 
play Samarang Love Song. Director Ward Wing describes 
exploits over WOR. R. H. Macy's Boys Club endorses 
picture. 

B Startling 24-sheets blanket city. Vivid 1-sheets plastered all 
over big circulation subway boards. 50,000 tabloid newspa- 
pers attract the natives. Elliot Service plants more than 
18,000 shark-octopus photos in merchants' windows. 



6. 



Stunts attract attention. Marathon sitter on marquee arouses 
curiosity. N. T. G. Paradise beauties stage hot Samarang 
Dance. Ward Wing lassoes python as reporters cover story. 
And many other exploitation highlights that kept the crowds 
flowing steadily into the Rivoli ! 




Produced by B. F. ZEIDMAN 

RELEASED BY UNITED ARTISTS 



THE 



-c&H 



DAILY 



Thursday, July 6, 1935 



Commerce Dept. Drops 

Special Film Service 

ture Division will be absorbed by 

the Bureau of Foreign and Domes- 
tic- Commerce. C. J. North, head of 
the M. P. Division, and his assis- 
tants, are completing their duties 
July 1"' Nate Golden is remaining. 




DIRECTION: S. GREGORY TAYLOR 



These Celebrated Film Stars 
Make 

THE ST. MORITZ 

On-the-Park 
Their New York Home 



Greta Garbo 
Joan Blondell 
Joan Crawford 
Estelle Taylor 
Racquet Torres 
Gilda Gray 
Judith Anderson 
Gloria Stewart 
Alice White 
Lil Dagover 
Edith Fitzgerald 
Edith Roake 
Philip Cook 
Phillips Holmes 
George Givot 
Monroe Owsley 
Nancy Carroll 
Gloria Swanson 
Ruth Roland 
Laura La Plante 
Lita Grey Chaplin 
Helen Twelvctrees 
June Clyde 
Billie Dove 



James Kirkwood 
Walter Slezak 
Douglas Montgomery 
Pat O'Brien 
Philip Lord 
Lotti Loder 
Cliff Hall 
Lanny Ross 
Maurice Chevalier 
Fifi D'Orsay 
Blanche Sweet 
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. 
Marion Marsh 
Borah Minnevitch 
Georges Carpentier 
Alexander Kirkland 
J. C. Flippen 
Richard Cromwell 
Chester Hale 
Lawrence Gray 
Jose Rubin 
Owen Moore 
Benny Rubin 
Ben Bard 



A WIRE WILL EFFECT A RESERVATION AND 

YOU WILL BE MET AT THE TRAIN ON YOUR 

ARRIVAL IN NEW YORK. 



Paramount Los Angeles 
Convention Notes 



'pHIS is the first glimpse the Holly- 
wood studios have had of George 
Schaefer since he became Para- 
mount's general manager. 



It's "Old Home Week" for Al 
Wilkie. He's a veteran of the Para- 
mount Hollywood studios and began 
his film work here. 



H. N. East, Seattle exchange man- 
ager, came down from the north 
with a top coat and was nearly run 
out of town by the native sons. 



H. W. Braly, Denver district man- 
ager, has designs on the Paramount 
stars. He's getting an autographed 
photo of each to decorate his office 
back there in the hills. 



D. L. Spracher of the Seattle ex- 
change and E. I. Hudson of the 
Portland branch, were seen way over 
on Sunset Boulevard window-shop- 
ping during the lunch hour. How 
did they get there, and will the taxi 
be on the expense account? 



Neil Agnew takes in the view of 
Los Angeles from the hotel roof 
during his spare time. 



J. Vos, ad sales manager of the 
Denver exchange, caught standing 
out in front of Grauman's Chinese 
muttering to himself. Admitted 
later he was spotting places to plant 
accessories, "sort of decorate the 
place up a little," he explained. 
"Those palm trees don't sell any 
tickets." 



W. M. Williams, salesman from 
the Salt Lake City exchange, also 
found in the same spot, trying to 
fit his shoe in Charlie Chaplin's foot- 
prints in the cement at the entrance. 



A. R. Taylor of the San Francisco 
exchange, saw Jack Oakie steaming 
by on a bicycle, and a half hour later 
was renting one himself, barging 
down Wiltshire Boulevard to the dis- 
may of traffic. 



A girl in the Ambassador Hotel 
hailed C. L. DuRyk, San Francisco 
ad sales manager, and asked for his 
autograph. He solemnly gave it to 
her, and she went away happily, 
without a question. 



San Francisco exchangemen, head- 
ed by M. H. Lewis, district manager, 
keep looking at the sky and predict- 
ing rain, by way of making friends 
with the boys here on the home 
grounds. 




STUART RESIGNS AS 
RKO CIRCUIT MGR. 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Hynes of Stuart's staff will take 
over various important phases. 

Stuart is expected to leave his 
desk by Saturday. His future plans 
have not as yet been set. Previous 
to being with RKO, Stuart operated 
Fox-Poli, was identified with Fox 
West Coast and other circuits. 
Stuart has been with RKO the past 
14 months. 

Stuart last night said that in leav- 
ing the RKO organization, he ends 
a pleasant association but takes with 
him deep renewed admiration for 
the ability of Franklin. 



ANOTHER STENCH BOMBING 

Council Bluffs, la.— The Strand 
was stench-bombed this week. The 
house has been operated with non- 
union projectionists since the lease 
was reverted a few weeks ago by 
A. H. Blank to Morris Cohen, build- 
ing owner. 



Publix-Nebraska 

Cut to Four Houses 

(Continued from Pane 1) 

State in Omaha is dark for the sum- 
mer. 

Blank's subsidiary company, the 
Iowa-Nebraska Theater Operating 
Co., is now in active management of 
the Paramount and World in Omaha, 
and also the Orpheum here, which 
was recently acquired from the RKO 
and Orpheum circuit interests. 

For the period of his receivership, 
Jan. 26 to Mar. 13, for Publix- 
Nebraska, Inc., Blank filed expendi- 
tures totaling $72,469. Of this 
amount, an item of $15,119 for film 
rentals was temporarily held up by 
Herman Aye, referee. He subse- 
quently decided that film rentals do 
not constitute "new merchandise," 
and accordingly Blank will receive 
the statutory receiver's fee on the 
full amount. Aye slashed Blank's 
attorneys' fees from $5,000 to $3,000. 



CRESSON SMITH AT 'FRISCO 

Vancouver, B. C. — ■ Cresson E. 
Smith, western and southern dis- 
trict sales manager for RKO Radio 
Pictures, after arriving on the Em- 
press of Japan from a year's so- 
journ in the Orient and Australia, 
where he was handling RKO film 
problems, has gone to San Francisco 
to attend the RKO regional sales 
convention. 



BLOCK "WALKATHON" MOVE 

Omaha — Organized efforts of the 
Omaha's established amusement en- 
terprises have been successful in 
preventing the removal of a "walk- 
athon marathon," now in progress, 
from Carter Lake, la., to the Ak- 
Sar-Ben coliseum here. Stanley 
Brown, manager of the Orpheum 
theater, w r as the leader of the group. 



CREDITORS MEET JULY 11 

Next Paramount Publix creditors' 
meeting is scheduled for July 11 at 
10:30 o'clock at the office of Referee 
Henry K. Davis. 



SHORT SHOTS from 
EASTERN STUDIOS 



=^By CHAS. AI_ICOATE^= 

QLGA ANSON appears in "Tr | 

Unwanted Venus," initial Sta 
mark feature for Regent which 
now being cut under supervision c| 
Grover Lee, its director. Miss Anso 
has starred in various Continem 
successes. 



One of the "Easy Aces" sketch'. 
comic radio program, will be offr 
ed as a Vitaphone short. A de< 
has been closed by Sam Sax, pr< 
duction manager of the Vitaphon 
studio in Brooklyn, whereby th. 
original cast of the program ui 
appear in a one-reel film which wi 
be produced at the studio within 
fortnight. Joseph Henabery will di 
red. 



Stanley Bergerman, productio 
supervisor on the Rowland-Bri< 
musical, "Moonlight and Pretzels, 
plans to preview the picture som 
where in Westchester within th 
next 10 days. Robert Snody is no\ 
cutting the musical at the Easter 
Service studio. 



Lillian Roth has been signed t 
a contract by Sam Sax, productio: 
manager, to make a musical shor 
subject. She will be featured in on 
of the series of miniature revu 
called "Broadway Brevities," whicl 
are produced at the Brooklyn plant 



Molly O'Day flew from Florida 
where she has been making featu 
pictures, to join the cast of "T< 
Unwanted Venus," which Starma. 
is making at the Metropolitan stv. 
dios for Regent release. 



Hans Hanson, Continental stagi 
star, makes his movie debut in "Tht 
Unwanted Venus," now nearing com- 
pletion at the Metropolitan studios 
Fort Lee, N. J. Grover Lee is di- 
recting. 

Jack Aichele, formerly assisted 
director with the Rowland-Brio 
Productions and recently with 
Star Productions, has joined 
Eastern Service Studios in the ca j 
pacity of transportation manager \ 
with headquarters at the Astoria 
plant. 



3 Warners on Broadway 

With the opening today of "Private 
Detective 62," at the Radio City Music 
Hall. Warners have three of their pic- 
tures playing on Broadway simultane- 
ously. The other two of the com- 
pany's films are, "The Mayor of Hell," 
which enters its second week at the 
New York Strand today; and "Gold 
Diggers of 1933," which is lodged in 
the Hollywood for what looks like an 
all Summer run. 



(9^6) 



(f^g) 



// 



// 



// 



// 



e 



ERE at the beginning 
of the new show year, the season of 1933-34 
comes Motion Picture Almanac, the big stand- 
ard reference book of the industry — out in new 
dress and format. It appears to be a hit. For in- 
stance, among the many press clippings and let- 
ters bearing pleasant words, is one from a most 
competent reader, Mr. James O'Shaughnessy 
of Outdoor Advertising, Incorporated, in 
which he says: 

II It is a complete library of the motion picture industry. 

II It is many volumes in one, and any of them would be 
entitled to a place in a worth while collection of business 
books of reference. 

II As I have been going through its pages, I realize for the 
first time the gigantic proportions and tremendous signifi- 
cance of the motion picture industry — and I thought I 
knew a lot about it before. 



I am amazed at the comprehensiveness and the completeness 
of its ramifying detail and the vast amount of work the 
almanac represents. 

This book will do more to truly dignify the motion picture 
industry than a street of rococo palaces. 

If it could be in every home in the country, it would re- 
move the impression that the motion picture industry 
consists of nothing but sex and savagery. 

Such a worthy and useful book as this must undoubtedly 
have a good effect on the industry itself. It should give 
them a better appreciation of its inherent dignity and its 
limitless obligation to public ethics. 



// 



at five dollars, the copy 



Motion Picture Almamac 



AQUIGLEYPUBLI CAT I ON 



1790 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



10 




DAILV 



Thursday, July 6, 1933 



A "LITTLE" from HOLLYWOOD TOTS 



//- 



By RALPH WILK 
A L BOASBERG has completed the 
direction of "The New Deal," a 
musical comedy for Bryan Foy Pro- 
ductions, for release by Universal. 
Boasberg, who, in the future, will 
concentrate on direction, also wrote 
the dialogue for "The New Deal." 
His cast included Myrt and Marge, 
radio stars, Eddie Foy, Jr., Grace 
Hayes, Tommy Jackson, Trixie Fri- 
ganza, J. Farrell MacDonald, and 
Ted Healy and his stooges. 

* * * 

Paul Cruger, veteran screen writer, 
and William Owens have completed 
"Robes of Redemption," an original 
dealing with reforestation. Refores- 
tation and the vast army of young 
unemployed men going to the 19 
forest camps in the California forest 
region have supplied several major 
studios with up-to-date stories. 

* * * 

Frank Borzage spent the week- 
end at Arrowhead Hot Springs, 
working on the final script of "A 
Man's Castle," in which he will di- 
rect Loretta Young and Spencer 

Tracy. 

* * * 

Harry Langdon and Vernon Dent 
have started their first comedy for 
Paramount release under the direc- 
tion of Arvid Gilstrom, who is pro- 
ducing a series of 12 two-reelers, six 



KmmumMiimmin 

HOLLYWOOD 

PLAZA 



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SUMMER 
RATES, Now 

$2 per day single! 
$2.50 per day double! 

Special weekly and monthly rates 
All rooms with bath and 
shower. Every modern 
convenience. 
Our dining room now 
serving Al Levy's famous 
food — breakfast 25 -45c. 
Luncheon 3 5 c. Dinner 60c 

lookforthe"Doorway ol Hoipitalitv" 
OuiiDanyaviMax. Siting SletnThed.i 



33 Writers at Warner Bros. -First National 

The latest personnel list from the Warner Bros. -First National studios in Burbank. 
Calif., contains thirty-three writers' names, four of which belong to composers and 
lyricists. The affiliated companies' 33 writers are Charles Kenyon, Edward Chodorov, 
Al Cohn. Peter Milne. Sam Engel, Kathryn Scola, Rian James, Paul Gerrard Smith, 
Sidney Sutherland, L i I lie Hayward, C. Graham Baker, Walter Donaldson, Louis Stevens, 
Ben Markson, David Boehm, Robert N. Lee, Manuel Seff, Carl Erickson, Niven Busch, 
James B. Wharton, Gus Kahn, William Rankin, Paul Green, Maude T. Howell. Gene 
Towne. Pierre Coliings, Earl Baldwin, Houston Branch, Gene Markey, Sheridan Gibney, 
Brown Holmes, Al Dubin and Harry Warren. 



VINE AT HOLLYWOOD BLVD. 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



of which will be with Langdon and 
Dent and a like number with Bing 
Crosby. "No More Money" is the 
title of the current comedy and it 
was written by Frank Griffin and 

Dent. 

* * * 

Loretta Young will take her next 
vacation in England and on the Con- 
tinent. She had planned to go to 
England to make two pictures, but 
these plans were set aside when she 
signed to appear in "A Man's Cas- 
tle." 

* * * 

Our Passing Show: B. B. Kahane, 
Eddie Cantor, Phil L. Ryan, Sam 
Jaffe, Felix Young, Wallace Mac- 
Donald, Maxwell Arnow at the pre- 
view of "Double Harness." 

William Rankin has completed 
"Hell's Bells," an original, for War- 
ner Bros. He is writing the screen 
play and dialogue, in collaboration 
with Carl Erickson. 

s|c jjc $ 

Instead of "Napoleon: His Life 
and Loves," Edward G. Robinson will 
appear in "Dark Hazard," by W. R. 
Burnett, following completion of "I 
Loved a Woman" at the First Na- 
tional studios. 

* * * 

Aline MacMahon, Warner Bros.' 
featured player, has been assigned 
an important role in "The World 
Changes," which will star Paul 

Muni. 

* * * 

"Mrs. Van Kleek," novel by Elea- 
nor Mordaunt, has been purchased 
by M-G-M as a starring vehicle for 
Marie Dressier. 

* * * 

For the first of a series of six 
musical shorts to be made by Hal 
Roach for M-G-M release, Henry 
Ginsberg, vice-president and general 
manager, has assigned Billy Gilbert 
to direct "Blow Me Down." Gilbert 
will also be co-featured with Billy 

Bletcher. 

* * * 

Laurel and Hardy have started 
work on their first comedy for the 
new season, "Calling All Cars," un- 
der the direction of Lloyd French. 



The third production on Chestei - - 
field Pictures' program starts today, 
titled, "Notorious But Nice." The 
cast includes Marion Marsh, Betty 
Compson and Donald Dilloway and 
will be directed by Richard Thorpe. 
George Batcheller is supervising the 
production. 



Raul Roulien, who recently scored 
in his English talking picture, "It's 
Great to Be Alive," has been signed 
to a new long term contract by Fox 
Films. 

* * * 

Casting for First National's film 
"Female" has started despite the 
illness of Ruth Chatterton who will 
be starred. Miss Chatterton who 
suffered a severe attack of bron- 
chitis is recovering rapidly. 

* * * 

Ann Hovey, one of Warner Bros, 
junior stars, has been assigned an 
important role in "Wild Boys of the 
Road," the Danny Ahearn story 
which is now before the cameras at 
the Warner Bros, studios. 

* * * 

Laurence Olivier has been signed 
for one of the leading roles in 
"Queen Christina," Greta Garbo's 
next starring picture, according to 
announcement by M-G-M. Olivier's 
last screen appearance was in "Per- 
fect Understanding." 

* * * 

Arline Judge has been borrowed 
by Monogram from RKO to com- 
plete the cast of "Sensation Hun- 
ters" which goes before the cameras 
Saturday on board the Panama- 
Pacific inter-coastal liner "Cali- 
fornia" at Los Angeles Harbor. 
Other stars in the picture are 
Marion Burns, Preston Foster, Ken- 
neth McKenna, Finis Barton, Nella 
Walker, Creighton Hale, Harold 
Minjer, Juanita Hansen and Cyril 
Chadwick. 

* * * 

Marcia Ralston, brunette, who 
played the night club vamp in M- 
G-M's "Night Flight" was yester- 
day given a contract by that com- 
pany. 

* * * 

Dorothy Burgess, who has just 
completed an important role in 
"Hold Your Man," for M-G-M, is 
playing a featured part in "Park 
Avenue Ladies," which E. A. Du 

Pont is directing for Universal. 

* * * 

In a letter received by M. C. 
Levee, Doug Fairbanks, Jr., writes 
of the marvelous time he is having 
in England. An enormous crowd 
greeted him upon his arrival in Lon- 
don. Golf, dinner parties and plays 
are keeping him busy. 

* * * 

Ben Yerschleiser assembled a pop- 
ular cast for "The Devil's Mate," 
which he is producing for Mono- 
gram, with Phil Rosen directing. As 
soon as she completes work in the 
picture, Peggy Shannon will join 



M-G-M. Preston Foster has an as- 
signment writing at Fox, while Ho- 
bart Cavanaugh will go to Warner 
Bros. 



Because of the seriousness of his 
illness, Dick Powell, Warner player, 
will be unable to play the juvenile 
lead in the company's all-star musi- 
cal, "Footlight Parade," which is now 
before the cameras. Stanley Smith 
has been signed to replace Powell. 

* * * 

Complete cast of "Bureau of Miss- 
ing Persons," now in production at 
the Warner Burbank studios under 
the direction of Roy Del Ruth, in- 
cludes: Bette Davis, Pat O'Brien, I 
Lewis Stone, Glenda Farrell, Gor- 
don Westcott, Allen Jenkins, Ruth j 
Donnelly, Marjorie Gateson, Wallia J 
Clark, Hugh Herbert, Noel Francis, ' 
Charles Wilson, Adrian Morris, Cloy 
Clement, Ted Alexander. 

* * * i 

Carole Lombard will replace 
Myrna Loy opposite Adolphe Men- 
jou in Fox's "The Worst Woman in ! 
Paris." Miss Loy has been ordered t 
by her doctors to take a complete r 
rest before resuming film work. In , 
the same production John Boles will 
have the part previously announced 
for Harvey Stephens. Monta Bell ' 
will direct. 

* * * 

Phil L. Ryan has signed Chic Sale 
for the first and Sidney Toler for l 
the second of the series of six two- 
reel comedies which he will make 
for the Paramount short subject 
program during the coming season. 
Del Lord will direct. 



Boots Mallory and June Vlasek, \ 
Fox players, have been signed to 
new contracts by Fox following 
their work in several Fox produc- 
tions. Both will next be seen with 
Lilian Harvey in "My Weakness." 

* * * 

Edgar Norton, veteran valet of 
the screen, has been signed to por- 
tray another lackey in "The Worst 
Woman in Paris?" with Adolphe j 
Menjou and Carole Lombard. 

* * * 

Ruth Chatterton's next starring f 
picture, "Female," will begin pro- I 
auction at the First National Bur- I 
bank studios on Monday. 



ANSWERS 

to 
"HOW GOOD IS YOUR 
MEMORY" QUESTIONS 

1. George J. Schaefer and E. V. Richards. 

2. Case involving Thomas Edison and Biograph 
in 1917. 

3. March 11, 1927. 

4. One billion dollars. 

5. Ramon Novarro, Betty Bronson, May Mc- 
Avoy, Carmel Myers and Francis X. Bushman. 



THE 



(Thursday, July 6, 1933 



iSBtl 



DAILY 



11 



NEWS OF THE DAY 



I Atlanta, Ga. — John Thomas of the 
.£. J. Sparks booking office here has 
rl >een transferred to Orlando, Fla., 
l-elieving M. J. Sparks as manager 
If the Ritz, Rialto and Baby Grand, 
jVinter Park theaters. Mr. Sparks 
^aves for a three-month vacation. 



Fort Worth, Tex. — The Palace, one 
f the house operated by Karl Hob- 
izettle, has reduced prices. Matinee 
n-ices are scheduled at 15 cents and 
light prices at 25 cents. House 
lso makes a change from weekly 
s o twice weekly films. 



St. Louis. Mo. — The Garrick the- 
ter, 513 Chestnut St., the last of 
he burlesque houses here, is to be 
old under a foreclosure of the pres- 
nt leasehold on July 15. 



Boston — J. L. Cronan, Maine sales- 
man for Columbia, is the father of 
jhe recently arrived Joan Doris. 


East Weymouth, Mass. — The Jack- 
;on has been darkened by A. Me- 
mory. 



I Boston — George Kraska has held 
Maedchen in Uniform" for its 
ourth week of a return showing at 
he Fine Arts. 



Boston — Tom Jennings, who re- 
ently left sales duties at Fox, has 
■ecome a salesman for Columbia 
ere. 



j Cleveland — "I Cover the Water 
front," now in its third week at the 
illen, has caused the Allen man- 
gers to drop duals for a single fea- 
ture policy. The Allen was the first 
jcal house to offer two first-run f ea- 
ures on the same bill. 



Portland, Me. — RKO will open the 
[eith for two weeks starting today. 
Ifter July 14 the house will close 
or the summer season. William 
'reiday is manager. 



Omaha — The Orpheum, former 
iKO house, now operated by States 
''heaters of Omaha, a subsidiary of 
fhe Central States Theaters Corp. 
ircuit, has replaced its sound equip- 
ient with complete new RCA Vic- 
Dr High Fidelity apparatus. 



Randolph, Mass. — Stetson Hall 
^as been closed until further notice 
y McMahon and Brady. 



Kahane, Cooper RKO Speakers 

San Francisco — B. B. Kahane and 
Merian C. Cooper will address the RKO 
three-day sales convention here. These 
executives did not attend the Chicago 
meetings. Exchange managers attend- 
ing the convention here are from Den- 
ver, Los Angeles, Portland, Salt Lake 
City, San Francisco, Seattle and Van- 
couver. 



Cleveland — The Hippodrome plans 
to offer vaudeville as regularly as 
possible. Following the success of 
the George White "Scandals" at 55 
cents top, William Watson, man- 
ager, has booked Bill Robinson as 
headliner of a vaudeville bill to be 
presented next week. Gene and 
Glenn, radio entertainers who hold 
the Palace house record, are also 
booked for a week later in July. 



Sandusky, O. — The State, operated 
by Warner Bros., has been turned 
back to the owners, the Seitz Thea- 
ter Co., according to William F. 
Seitz, president. 



Cleveland — Monogram of Ohio and 
Standard Film Service Co. has 
moved to larger offices in the Film 
Exchange Bldg. They now occupy 
the fourth floor space formerly util- 
ized by Educational. 



Akron, 0. — C. E. Prinsen has been 
appointed manager of the Palace 
here, recently acquired from RKO 
by Chatfeld Theaters. Prinsen pre- 
viously had charge of the Publix 
theaters in this district. 



Cleveland — Regis Duddy, manager 
of Keith's East 105th St., surprised 
his friends recently by the announce- 
ment of his marriage. 



Kansas City, Mo. — Before leaving 
on a hurried visit to his wife, 
daughter, and new twins in Tennes- 
see, Don R. Davis completed ar- 
rangements for the installation of 
RCA High Fidelity equipment in the 
Armour, North Kansas City, Mo. 

Salt Lake City— The RKO Orph- 
eum averted a panic when a $25,000 
fire broke out next door, by refusing 
to allow anyone to enter the theater 
to spread the news of the nearness 
of the flames, inasmuch as there 
was no danger. 



Richmond, Va. — Leon Stepanian, 
formerly with a local theater, has 
taken over the management of the 
Sky Lite Bowl, following the resig- 
nation of W. T. Stone. George Marr 
will remain as business manager. 



Boston — Annual outing of Warner 
Bros.' employees in Boston will be 
feature, "I Loved You Wednesday," 
tel in Plymouth. 



Bridgton, Me.— C. W. Millett has 
closed the State. 



HOLD CODE CONFAB 
LATE THIS MONTH 



{Continued from Page 1) 

Industry Recovery Act. Arrange- 
ments for the mass meeting, which 
will occupy at least two days, will 
be made tonight at a session of the 
organization's executive committee 
at the Park Central. 

Among other groups the Academy 
of M. P. Arts and Sciences will be 
invited to participate. Whether or 
not the Hays association will be 
asked to take part has not as yet 
been decided, P. S. Harrison said 
yesterday. 



Fall River, Mass. — The Plaza has 
been darkened by J. W. Bredham. 



Middletown, Conn. — Joseph Boren- 
stein, formerly manager of the 
Broadway, Springfield, Mass., has 
succeeded Louis Olshan as manager 
of the Capitol here, owned by Mid- 
dletown Enterprises, Inc. 



Pittsburgh Meeting 

To Seek Price Boost 

(.Continued from Page 1) 
feature bills have made little or no 
impression upon this territory and 
there is nothing to indicate that they 
will develop during 1933-34, ex- 
changemen say. 



HOEFER NOW HOUSE MGR. 

Sheboygan, Wis. — Ernst Hoefer 
secretary-treasurer of the Rex Thea- 
ter Corp., operators of the Fox here, 
has succeeded E. J. Benjii as man- 
ager of the Fox. Benjii has gone 
to Manitowoc, Wis., to become as- 
sociated with the Mikadow in that 
city. 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



July 7-9: RKO western sales meeting, St. 
Francis Hotel, San Francisco. 

July 8: Monogram eastern sales meeting, New 
York. 

July 10: M. P. T. O. A. executive committee 
meeting, Hotel Congress, Chicago. 

July 10: Meeting of National Ass'n of M. P. In- 
dustry at Park Central Hotel. 

July 11: Meeting of Allied Theaters of New 
Jersey at 2 P. M. 

July 12: World Premiere of "Pilgrimage" at 
Gaiety, New York. 

July 13-14: Monogram central sales meeting, 
Chicago. 

July 17: United Artists sales convention, Chi- 
cago. 

July 18: Meeting of M. P. T. O. of Arkansas, 
Mississippi and Tennessee, Jackson, Miss. 

July 20-21 : Monogram southern sales meeting, 
New Orleans. 

July 21-22: Fox Film Corp. special stockhold- 
ers' meeting, home office, New York. 

July 25: Meeting of Allied Theaters of New 
Jersey at 2 P. M. 

July 28-29: Monogram western sales meeting, 
San Francisco. 

Aug. 2-3: Monogram Canadian sales meeting, 
Toronto. 

Aug. 23-24: First annual convention of Inde- 
pendent Motion Picture Owners Association 
of Delaware and Eastern Shore of Maryland 
at Hotel Henelopen, Rehoboth, Del. 

Sept. 13: A. M. P. A. holds annual election of 
officers 



* * * 



BUILDING BIGGER BUSINESS EXTRA 



* * * 



ITHE 



GOES 
EVERYWHERE 




COVERS 
EVERYTHING 



BP^tFDAILY' 



LONDON 



HOLLYWOOD 



NEW YORK 



PARIS 



BERLIN 



EARLY TO BED 

EARLY TO RISE 
WORK LIKE HELL 

AND ADVERTISE 

IN THE 

FILM DAILY 

. . . that is, of course, if you wish to take advantage of the 
fact that the door of opportunity is again wide open in this 
industry. The fortunes of tomorrow are to come from the 
plans of today. This business will have a bang-up come-back. 
You can reach the buying power of the industry through the 
columns of this publication. 



/ 




GATEWAY 
GREATER BOX-OFFICE 
for 1933 1934 






The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Now Fifteen Years Old 



b o t\ NEW TCKK. FKIDAy, JULT 7, 1333 



.5 CENTS 



Stuart Rep 



Join Famous Players Canadian 

INDIE SUPPLY DEALERS CALL CHICAGO IDE MEET 

Important Changes Pending in Broadway Theater Setup 



Grand Opera 

. . . at grind show prices 

=By JACK ALICOATE^-^-^ 



IF THERE is any doubt in your young 
' mind that grand opera will pack a 5,000- 
;eat house night after night, at prices from 
i dollar top to two-bits for the balcony, try 
o edge your way into the New York Hip- 
jodrome one of these bright summer eve- 
lings at about eight-thirty. The operas 
)re conventional, the artists second-string, 
he productions just so-and-so but still they 
Iraw 'em by the train loads. And so what? 
t only proves, Horatio, that once again the 
lear populace wants good amusement, in- 
expensively priced, and that all this indus- 
ry needs to continue merrily along Pros- 
perity Avenue is showmen at the helm and 
(steady flow of good product, produced 
pon a basis of sound economics. 

• 

IA/E are not particularly in a squawking 

™ ™ mood but it does seem to us that a 
lomewhat definitely wider box-office appeal 
vould be given leads of proven drawing 
>ower if their roles were more diversified. 
To make ourself somewhat clearer, why 
s it that once a lady makes a hit by being 
leurotic or naughty upon the silversheet 
|he is thereby and to-wit neurotic and 
laughry ever after. At least as far as her 
screen career is concerned. Seldom do 
ve find a great screen characterization that 
as not full audience sympathetic reaction. 
)h well. Perhaps we're just getting soft. 



QOME weeks ago Don Carle Gillette, man- 
"^ aging editor of this publication, took his 
ypewriter in hand, and typewrote a few 
veil chosen and poignant remarks anent 
vhat he considered the proper or improper 
nethod of film reviewing by newspaper 
critics. Being an embryonic critic our- 
felves we don't know yet whether we are 
[or Mr. Gillette or the extreme left wing 
)f the critics' party. We do know, how- 
ever, that the remarks of Mr. Gillette have 
een picked up and discussed freely 
hroughout the length and breadth of these 
p-and-coming United States and that a 
goodly portion of these written reflections 
omewhat slyly admit that perhaps Mr. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Reported Policy Switches 

Will Affect Ziegfeld, 

Carroll and Garden 

More important changes are 
pending in the Broadway exhibition 
situation. Loew's Ziegfeld, which 
opened with a second-run picture 
policy over a month ago, is reported 
switching to summer stock. A 
weekly change policy is contem- 
plated with guest stars in leading 
roles. 

Providing negotiations now under 
(Continued on Page 12) 

CODE CONFATpLANS 
TO STUDYPRACTICES 

By RALPH WILK 
West Coast Manager, The Film Daily 

Hollywood — ■ "Monopolistic trade 
practices within the industry" will 
be studied by the Motion Picture 
Employees' Code Conference, which 
has decided not to submit a code but 

(Continued on Page 2) 

Court Denies the Petition 
For A Fox Receivership 

Justice Bernard L. Shientag in 
the New York State Supreme Court 
yesterday denied an application for 
receivership against Fox brought by 
James M. Cleary, a stockholder. 
Shientag announced his decision af- 

(Continued from Page 12) 



Ban Auto Handbiliing 

Richmond — Local theaters can no 
longer distribute handbills, cards and 
other advertising matter in automobiles 
parked on the city streets. A new or- 
dinance, just signed by the Mayor, pro- 
hibits the practice. 



FRANCE CONSIDERING 
BAN ON U. S. FILMS 



Paris (By Cable) — The French 
Government, urged by a group of 
French producers, is considering 
plans for an embargo on American 
pictures or subsidizing the domestic 
industry. Either plan might result 
providing the World Economic Con- 
ference over stabilization collapses, 
it is indicated. In recommending 
the governmental aid plan, French 
producers claim that the inferior 
quality of their product is due to 
lack of financing. 



Edward Kealey, Former 
Fox Vaude Booker, Dies 

Funeral services will be held to- 
morrow for Edward F. Kealey, su- 
perintendent of the Fox Movietone 
building and former vaudeville 
booker for William Fox. Kealey, 
who died Wednesday following an 
appendicitis operation, will be buried 

(Continued on Page 11) 



Stuart Reported as Joining 

Famous Players Canadian 



Claims Exhibs Will Stop 
Paying Service Charges 

Many members of the American 
Ass'n for the Protection of the Mo- 
tion Picture Theater plan imme- 
diately to discontinue further pay- 

(Continued on Page 12) 



Fifteen years is a long time in pictures, com- 
pletely covered in the forthcoming "New Deal 
number of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



Negotiations are reported under 
way between Herschel Stuart and 
N. L. Nathanson whereby Stuart 
may become head of operations for 
the Famous Players Circuit in Can- 
ada, the Film Daily learned yes- 
terday. Stuart, who resigned Wed- 
nesday as general manager of the 
RKO Theaters, will trke a short 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Ass'n to Contact MPTOA 

and Allied States Towards 

Co-Relating Drafts 

Chicago — Latest group to join the 
procession of code drafters is the 
Independent Theater Supply Deal- 
ers' Association which will hold a 
meeting at the Stevens Hotel, Chi- 
cago, July 28-31, to prepare a set 
of trade practices. The M. P. T. 0. 
A. executive committee which holds 
a session in Chicago July 10, will be 
contacted regarding the co-relating 

(Continued on Page 2) 

unit gives¥yers 
code action power 

Milwaukee — The Allied Wisconsin 
unit has authorized Abram F. 
Myers, Allied States Ass'n execu- 
tive, to represent it in drafting an 
industry code. Fred S. Meyer, presi- 
dent of the M.P.T.O. of Wisconsin, 
yesterday emphatically denied to 
The Film Daily that he has en- 
trusted any matters to Myers. His 
regional association is working with 
the M.P.T.O. A., with which it is 
affiliated. 



Independent Code Meet 
Set for July 24 and 25 

The industry code .convention 
which will be held under auspices 
of the National Association of the 
M. P. Industry will take place July 
24 and 25 at the Hotel Astor, ac- 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Sentenced To See Film 

Shreveport, La. — A novel sentence was 
imposed by Judge S. C. Fullilove in 
the Juvenile Court here recently when 
he ordered two first offenders to at- 
tend a picture show, "The Mayor of 
Hell," playing at the Majestic. The 
order was part of their probation 
punishment. 



Fifteen years of production, distribution and) 
exhibition completely covered in the "New 
Deal" number of the FILM DAILY.— Advt, 



' 



—3&>* 



DAILY 



Friday, July 7J933 




Vol. [XIII, No. 5 fri., July 7, 1933 Price 5 Cents 



JOHN W. SLICOATE 



Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
at 1650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk. Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
and General Manager; Arthur W. Eddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at N«w York, 
N. Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 1-650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
Phone, Circle 7-4736, 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph _ Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London — 
Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedriehstrasse, 225. Paris 
— P. A. Harle, La Cinematographie Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 6% 6% 63/ 4 + i/ 4 

Columbia Picts. vtc. 21% 195/ 8 21% + V/t 

Con. Fm. Ind 4% 4Vi 45/ 8 + y g 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd.. 12'/ 4 11% 117/ 8 4. 34 

East. Kodak 83 Vi 81% 83 1/2 + 1 Vi 

Fox Fm. "A" 31/2 31/4 3% + Va 

Loew's, Inc 24% 23% 24% + 1 

Paramount ctfs. ... 2% 1% 2% + % 

Pathe Exch 1 7/ g 1% 1 % + % 

do "A" 73/ g 63/ 4 73/ g + 1 

RKO 41/4 4 4% + % 

Warner Bros 6% 6V4 6% + % 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 
Columbia Pets. Vtc. 22% 19% 21% + 1% 
Gen. Th. Eq. pfd... 3 4 11-16 3/ 4 +1-16 

Technicolor 8% 7% 8%+ % 

Trans-Lux 23,4 23/ 4 234 — % 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40... 5 4% 5 

■Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 ctfs. 47/ 8 4% 4% + % 
Keith A-0 6s46... 48 V 4 48 48 1/4 + V 4 

Loew 6s 41ww 81 80 1/4 81 + % 

Paramount 6s 47.... 25 22% 2434 + 3% 

Par. By. 5%s51 38 36 3734 + 1% 

Para. By. 5%s51 ctfs. 32 32 32 — % 

Par. 5%s50 25% 21 % 24% + 33/ g 

Par. 5%s50 ctfs.... 24% 22% 24% + 4 

N. Y. PRODUCE EXCHANGE 
Para. Publix 2 13/ g 2 + % 



MAURY M. COHEN'S 
"By Appointment Only" 

NOW READY 
THE SECOND 

INVINCIBLE 

IN PREPARATION 

Chesterfield Pictures 

1540 B'way N. Y. C. 



Grand Opera 

... at grind show prices 

(.Continued from Parte 1) 
Gillette is right. And by-the-by Mr. Gil- 
lette, who holds the long distance review- 
ing championship, having reviewed some 
550 pictures last year is now on his annual 
vacation. It's 6, 2, and even that if we 
needed him in a hurry we would find him 
in the audience of one of the Broadway 
picture houses. 



Stuart Reported Joining 
Famous Players Canadian 

(Continued from Page 1) 

vacation at his New Haven home, 
following which a definite announce- 
ment as to his future plans will be 
released. 



Independent Code Meet 
Set for July 24 and 25 

(Continued from Page 1) 

cording to plans made last night at 
a meeting of the organization's ex- 
ecutive committee at the Park Cen- 
tral. 

Committees were named as fol- 
lows: membership, chairman, Jack 
Bellman, Lester Adler and one more 
to be appointed; finance, chairman, 
Phil Meyer; Bob Savini and Frank 
D. Ferrone; publicity, chairman, 
Frank C. Wilson; Al Mannon, Pete 
Harrison, Charles Glett and Cy 
Barynstyn. The executive commit- 
tee consists of the chairmen of the 
previously-named committees and 
Pete Harrison, P. A. Powers and 
Frank Wilson. Members of the 
steering committee so far named 
are: Pete Harrison, P. A. Powers. 
Jack Bellman, Al Mannon, Pop Kor- 
=;nn. Bob Savini, Frank D. Ferrone, 
William Pizor and Frank C. Wilson. 



Goldsmith Prod. Plans 
To Produce 6 Features 

Six Goldsmith features, to be pro- 
duced for the 1933-34 season, will be 
distributed in New York, Philadel- 
phia, Buffalo, Washington by Holly- 
wood Film Exchanges, Jack Bellman 
announces. The pictures are tenta- 
tively titled, "Carnival Kid," "Work- 
ing Wives," "Bargain Day," "No- 
body's Children," "Taxi Dancer," and 
one feature as yet not titled. 



PARA. BONDS AGAIN ADVANCE 

Paramount bonds continued their 
upward trend yesterday. Para- 
mount's 6s47 bonds gained 3% 
points, 6^ for the two days; Para- 
mount Broadway B^sSl gained 
1% points, 4% for the two days; 
Paramount S^sSO gained 3% points. 
7% for the two days. The 5%s50 
certificates were up 4 points, 8 x /4 
points for the two days. 



DOUG, JR., LEAVES HOSPITAL 

Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., who is re- 
covering from an attack of pneu- 
monia, has left for the country 
where he will convalesce after being 
discharged from the Doctors Hospi- 
tal Tuesday. 



E SUPPLY DEALERS 
GALL A CODE MEETING 



(Continued from Page 1) 

its code with the supply dea'ers' 
code and it is expected that Allied 
States Ass'n officials will be com- 
municated with in connection with 
the matter. 

Simon Libros, as chairman of the 
association's executive committee, is 
in charge of convention arrange- 
ments. 



Code Conference Plans 
To Study Film Practices 

(Continued from Page 1) 

instead work in close cooperation 
with the Administration in coordinat- 
ing interests of all employee groups, 
organized and unorganized, so that 
each may have fair consideration in 
the fixing of a minimum wage and 
maximum hours. 

Conference officials point out that 
under normal conditions there were 
about 3,000 accredited players in 
Hollywood, of which not more than 
10 per cent ever had regular or 
steady part-time employment at any 
time. Seventeen thousand registered 
extras had average daily employ- 
ment of 800. These averages and 
those in labor groups have been 
radically reduced in recent months. 



Ferrone Is Releasing 

One Feature Monthly 

One feature per month will be re- 
leased by Frank D. Ferrone for the 
season 1933-34. First of the 12 is 
"The Double Crosser," which will be 
released Sept. 15. The next two 
will be titled "The Ghost Ship" and 
•"Helen Hunts a Job," respectively. 
Casting for the "Double Crosser" 
starts on the coast immediately up- 
on arrival of Richard Kahn, produc- 
cion manager, irom Mew York. 



Nathan Golden Heads 
Gov. Film Service Unit 

By WILLIAM SILBERBERG 
Wasliington Correspondent, FILM DAILY 

Washington — Nathan Golden, 
identified with the now defunct Mo- 
tion Picture Division of the Dept. 
of Commerce, has assumed charge 
of handling of film marketing in- 
formation in the Specialties Divi- 
sion, with two of the former M. P. 
Division staff aiding him. He will 
carry on his work with limited funds 
and personnel for the time being, at 
least. 



DEFER LAB MEETING 

Second meeting of the Motion 
Picture Laboratories Association of 
America scheduled to be held yes- 
terday was postponed indefinitely 
and will be held as soon as the or- 
ganization committee's report is 
completed. Date for the next meet- 
ing will be announced next week by 
Al Fiedler, of the Empire Labora- 
tories, chairman. 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



July 7-9: RKO western sales meeting, St 
Francis Hotel, San Francisco. 

July 8: Monogram eastern sales meeting, New 
York. 

July 10: M. P. T. O. A. executive committee 
meeting, Hotel Congress, Chicago. 

July 10: Meeting of National Ass'n of M. P. In- 
dustry at Park Central Hotel. 

July 10: Monogram southern sales meeting, 
Jung Hotel, New Orleans. 

July 11: Meeting of Allied Theaters of New 
Jersey at 2 P. M. 

July 12: World Premiere of "Pilgrimage" at 

Gaiety, New York. 
July 15: Monogram central sales 
Blackstone Hotel, Chicago. 

July 17: United Artists sales convention, Chi- 
cago. 

July 18: Meeting of M. P. T. O. of Arkansas, 
Mississippi and Tennessee, Jackson, Miss. 

July 21-22: Fox Film Corp. special stockhold- 
ers' meeting, home office, New York. 

July 25: Meeting of Allied Theaters of New 
Jersey at 2 P. M. 



meeting, 



July 28-29: Monogram western sales meeting, 

San Francisco. 
July 28-31: Meeting of Independent Theater 

Supply Dealers' Association at Stevens 

Hotel, Chicago. 

Aug. 2-3: Monogram Canadian sales meeting,' 
Toronto. 

Aug. 23-24: First annual convention of lnde-| 
pendent Motion Picture Owners Association 
of Delaware and Eastern Shore of Maryland 
at Hotel Henelopen, Rehoboth, Del. 

Sept. 13: A. M. P. A. holds annual election of 
officers 



6 Features Are Listed 
By Tower Productions 

Tower Productions Inc., will make 
six features for the 1933-34 season 
it was stated yesterday by Joe Sim- 
monds, president. Work on the last 
four of this season's eight Tower 
features will be started as soon as 
Simmonds reaches the coast early 
next month. 



ARNOLD ALBERT PROMOTED 

Arnold Albert, formerly connected' 
with Warner Bros, home office ad- 
vertising department, has been pro- 
moted to the Warner Metropolitan; 
theaters' advertising and publicity 
department where he will act as I 
assistant to Arthur Jeffery and Irv-] 
ing Windisch. 



THEATRE OWNERS 
ATTENTION! 



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over 50,000 yards 

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MARLENE DIETRICH in "The Song of Songs", with 
Brian Aherne, Lionel Arwill and Alison Skipworth. 
Directed by ROUBEN MAMOULIAN. 

Those who have seen this picture say it is the finest 
"Dietrich" ever made — and you can believe it! 




CHEVALIER, with Sylvia Sidney, in "The Way to Love". 
Sweet, appealing Sylvia playing opposite dashing 
Maurice in a down-to-earth romance decorated 
with some of the most tuneful music ever written. 

• You will know that happy days are 
here again when you play this one! 





IDkxr loxnJUUct utdcuwu 
vl&A loMl crpe^L aAsiuA ! . . 

MAE WEST, that curvacious Diamond 
Lady who does right by every box office. 



^^ 



^^£s r 



«^Vj~ ,. "- * ,*l -••- :;;:■ *-* '" , ;: .-<•■ .. 



a HMJttUuJl! The FOUR MARX BROTHERS 

in "DUCK SOUP"... their funniest picture, 

embellished with girls, bright with music. 

Directed by Leo McCarey. 



turn to the nex 



_ 




\ 




"ALICE IN WONDERLAND." Backed by reams of publicity on 
The Search for Alice, this picture released during the 
Yuletide season becomes the greatest natural holiday 
attraction ever produced. 

DIETRICH. ..the one and only MARLENE in TWO MORE PICTURES. 
Directed by Josef von Sternberg. 

"DESIGN FOR LIVING"... Noel Coward's smash hit— play of the 
year, with Fredric March, Miriam Hopkins, Douglas 
Fairbanks, Jr. Directed by Ernst Lubitsch. 

"50 YEARS FROM NOW" . . . one of the biggest exploitation 
pictures ever conceived. 

"THE SEARCH FOR BEAUTY"... already the newspapers of the 
country are flooded with publicity on this picture. It means 
money, money, money to every exhibitor. 

"CHRYSALIS"...with Miriam Hopkins, Fredric March, George Raft, 
and Frances Fuller. Another big smash hit play. A sure-fire 
success as a screen entertainment. 

"ONE SUNDAY AFTERNOON". . . with Gary Cooper, Fay Wray, 
Neil Hamilton, Frances Fuller, Roscoe Karns. The runner-up 
for the Pulitzer Prize. One of the most delightful and 
human entertainments of the year, with a sock ending. 



jHI 




turn to the next page for more! 



% 



t) 



'FUNNY 

with 

W.C. Fields, Charlie Ruggles, 
Jack Oakie, Wynne Gibson. 
Directed by Leo McCarey — 
75,000,000 people waiting 
for this picture. 

"YOU NEED ME" 

with SYLVIA SIDNEY and 
GEORGE RAFT... The 

combination that coined 
money for you in "Pick Up" 
will go to work for you again. 

"HONOR BRIGHT" 

with Gary Cooper and 
Claudette Colbert. A great 
team in a great story. 

"CRADLE SONG" 

with 

Dorothea Wieck, star of 
"Maedchen in Uniform" in 
a picture that promises to 
be even more sensational. 

"Death Takes a Holiday" 

with 

Fredric March, Claudette 
Colbert, Sir Guy Standing. 
Sure to be another "Dr. 
Jekyll &Mr. Hyde"! 

The END of the WORLD 

Directed by Cecil B. DeMille. 
A great DeMille spectacle. 



. . . Look at this shower of leaves! 
They will shower down gold for you! 





QMXX UU&lJL . 



Get th 
PARAMOUNT PRODUC 
ANNOUNCEMENT BOOK 

for 1933-34 NOW ... and 
see all the good things that 
are coming to YOU ! 




Friday, July 7, 1933 



// 



// 



I 

REMEMBER 
WHEN 

As told to 

JACK HARROWER 

of the Film Daily Editorial Staff 

"IN the year of 1913 Herb Sanborn, now 
' owner of the Brown Derby in Holly- 
wood, was a film salesman for us out of 
Syracuse and Rochester. While he was 
a good film salesman he was not up on 
nachine parts which we also sold in those 
Jays. 

"In making his rounds to the theater 
owners then in business he called on Dave 
Cohn in Binghamton. Dave at that time 
vas not interested in any films that San- 
>orn had to sell, but he wanted a 'lower 
ake-up' for his machine so he listened to 
erb's strong salesmanship and then said: 
Well, you can send me a lower take-up.' 
"Herb did not know what a lower take- 
jp was, but he rose magnificently to the 
mergency: "Dave, that picture has already 
een shown here, and we can't sell it to 



15 Directors Working 

At Warner-F. N. Lot 

'est Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Fifteen directors are 
low under contract to Warner Bros. 
[The list comprises Alfred E. Green, 
JLloyd Bacon, William Dieterle. Roy 
Del Ruth, Ray Enrght, Busbv 
Berkeley, Stanley Logan, Archie 
jMayo, Michael Curtiz, Mervyn Le- 
JRoy, William A. Wellman, Howard 
Hawks, Robert Florev, William 
jKeighley and Arthur Greville Col- 
llins. 

LeRoy is at present immersed ir> 
the details of "The World Changes." 
first announced as "America Kneels," 
which will be Paul Muni's nex star- 
ring vehicle. Dieterle has been as- 
s ; gned as director of "Shanghai Or- 
chid," in which Richard Barthel- 
mess will star. 



REFUSE THEATER PERMIT 

Richmond, Va. — The board of zon- 
ing appeals has refused to grant an 
appeal of J. W. Atkinson for per- 
mission to erect a two-story brick, 
steel and concrete theater building 
at 406 North 25th Street without 
the required rear yard. 



KING GETS POST 

Akron, 0. — Frank King, manager 
of the Colonial theater here, an in- 
dependent house, has announced the 
arrival of Stephen Walters of New 
Haven, Conn., who will serve as 
assistant manager of the theater 
throughout the summer. 



PUBLIX CLOSES HOUSE 

Rockland, Me. — After running a 
week after its reopening, the Part 
hase been again closed by Publix. 




'rtU^*W'Vf,->Uf 




HONG THE 

MALT® 



PHIL M DALY 



• • • FIFTEEN YEARS is a long time in Pictures 

that is the record of this li'l ole paper so pretty soon 

we are gonna celebrate our birthday just a kid in actual 
years but an old veteran in film experience and back- 
ground we can remember a lotta things that have trans- 
pired in those 15 years so in our Anniversary Issue we 

are going to review them for your delectation and information 

and mighty interesting reading it will make 

for oldtimers and newcomers alike 

© • • GOING BACK 15 years just to cite a few 

what were some of the film celebs doing? 

Clara Bow was attending the Bay Ridge High School in Brook- 
lyn Ronald Colman was preparing for a stage career 

after discharge from the British army following wounds at 

Ypres Gary Cooper was a cowpuncher in Ontario 

Roy Del Ruth was directing Ben Turpin for Mack Sennett 

Harold B. Franklin was managing Shea's Hippodrome 

in Buffalo D. W. Griffith was directing Lillian Gish in 

"Hearts of the World" Al Jolson was playing in "Sin- 
bad" on the New York stage Rowland V. Lee was shar- 
ing a hallroom with John Gilbert while trying to break into 

the directorial game Ernst Lubitsch was directing Pola 

Negri in Berlin for Ufa Louis B. Mayer was operating 

theaters in New England Mary Pickf ord was working 

in "Amarilly of Clothesline Alley" for Artcraft ZaSu 

Pitts made her screen debut in Rudolph Valentino's first film, 

a Universal release Terry Ramsaye was doing publicity 

for Mutual "Roxy" was making Government pix in 

Florida Richard A. Rowland was prexy of Metro Pic- 
tures Corp and Irving Thalberg was secretary to Carl 

Laemmle 

# * * * 

• • • SO IF you are a film celeb not according to 

your own appraisement but the consensus of opinion of 

the industry send along the dope on yourself 15 years 

ago we will be glad to have it so will our 

readers. .... 

• • • OUR ANNIVERSARY issue will hit the highlights 
of the entire panorama of the Motion Picture for the past de- 
cade and a half nothing will be overlooked of any con- 
sequence it will represent a compendium of valuable 

data and interesting information that you will want to preserve 

and hand down to your children so they can 

see what a great guy you were IF you happen to be 

mentioned 

• • • FIFTEEN YEARS from now we can hear mugs in 

the film game saying "Yes, yes, these are Great Days, 

but I can remember when the 'Film Daily' published its Fif- 
teenth Anniversary Issue — and what a Sensation that was! 
I'd like to show you my copy, but I have it in my safety deposit 
vault with my other Valuables." 

• • 9 BUT CASTING aside the airy persiflage 

we are proud of this Anniversary Number to come it 

marks the New Deal in Pictures we firmly believe that 

the industry is entering a new era along with President 

Roosevelt's New Deal that the old order is in the ash- 
can great days are ahead for all who strive, and plan, 

and do their bit in shooting the film biz forward to new heights 

today it is Initiative Ability Ideas 

that come into their own it's Anybody's Opportunity 

YOURS — if you make it and that is the mes- 
sage the Anniversary Issue will strive to put over 

what others have done in the past, YOU can equal or top To- 
morrow for that's the kind of a biz we are in 

a Game of Opportunities 



« « « 



» » » 



TIMELY TOPICS 

Cycles in Pictures 
and What They Mean 

WE hear a great deal about 
"cycles" of pictures. If 
two or three gangsters pictures 
are made in a row, everybody 
says "there's a gangster trend 
starting." Then producers either 
trip over each other trying to 
make gangster pictures, or pass 
up perfectly good stories from a 
fear of getting too many of this 
type. In quite a few years in 
the film business, I have learned 
at least one important thing 
about it, and that the public 
doesn't care what you do or how 
you do it, within the bounds of 
good taste, just so you enter- 
tain them. Therefore "trends" 
or "cycles" should mean noth- 
ing. Only one thing counts when 
you come upon a piece of likely 
material and that is, "Will it 
hold the public interest?" If 
you use that criterion it doesn't 
matter if there have been a 
thousand backstage, or mother 
love, or prison stories ahead of 
it. You just can't worry about 
"trends" and make good pic- 
tures. Good stories don't come 
in layers, like chocolate cake. 
They are where you find them 
and when you find them. You 
may find several of similar back- 
ground together; you may find 
them separately. However that 
may be, if they are good stories 
they should be put on the screen 
with no inhibitory thoughts as to 
whether the idea may be "too 
old" or "too new." 

— Clarence Brown. 



M-G-M Has 4 Features 

Ready for Release 

M-G-M has four features com- 
pleted and ready for release, their 
titles being: "Storm at Daybreak," 
"The Stranger's Return," "Dinner 
at Eight" and "Tugboat Annie." In 
production are: "Another Lan- 
guage," "Bride of the Bayou," "Es- 
kimo," "Night Flight," "The Danc- 
ing Lady," "The March of Time," 
"Penthouse" and "Turn Back ths 
Clock." 



FORM IOWA COMPANY 

Sioux City, la. — The Interstate 
Amusement Co. recently incorpo- 
rated here has these officers: A. B. 
Friedman, president; Sol Shulkin, 
vice-president, and Nathan Dax, sec- 
retary-treasurer. The capitalization 
is listed at $10,000. 



INSTALLS HIGH FIDELITY 

Detroit — Tom Lancaster, mid- 
western theater operator, has ar- 
ranged for the installation of the 
RCA Victor High Fidelity equipment 
in the Great Lakes. High Fidelity 
sound has already been put into the 
Lancaster, in the same city. 



THE 



-c&H 



DAILY 



Friday, July 7, 1933 



Tabloid Reviews of 

FOREIGN FILMS 



"HEUTE NACHT-EVENTUELL" ("To- 
night — Maybe" i, musical comedy in Ger- 
man, with Jenny Jugo, Fritz Schulz, Jo- 
hannes Riemann, Siegfried Arno and Otto 
Wallburg; directed by E. W. Emo; an Al- 
lianz production. At the 79th Street The- 
ater. 

Pleasing musical with several light airs 
by Robert Stolz. Jenny Jugo is the at- 
tractive wife of a physician who spends 
his time in research, while the wife makes 
a secret living writing music. The doctor 
becomes suspicious because of a telegram 
offering a sum of money for her latest tune, 
which is the same as the picture title but 
he soon learns the truth. 



What the National Recovery Act Means 
To t he Picture and Other I ndu s tries 



"ALMAS ENCONTRADAS" ("Souls in 
Conflict"! — a romance in Spanish, with 
Jean J. M. Casado, Amparo Arozamena and 
Joaquin Bousquets; directed by Rafael J. 
Sevilla; produced by the Industrial Cinema- 
tografica of Mexico, D. F. At the Teatro 
Variendades. 

Smooth moving sentimental romance 
which seemed to please a Spanish speak- 
ing audience in spite of the antiquity of 
the scenario. Story concerns the redemp- 
tion of "bad" women and drunken men 
through true love, but moves rapidly 
enough to keep from moralizing. 



Progressive Pictures 

Sells Nine Territories 

Nine state rights exchanges have 
signed to handle the Progressive 
Pictures' line-up for the season of 
1933-34. They are: Hollywood Film 
Exchanges, New York, Philadelphia, 
Washington, Buffalo; B. N. Judell, 
Inc., Chicago, Indianapolis, Milwau- 
kee, St. Louis; Cameo Screen Attrac- 
tions, Boston; Standard Film Ser- 
vice, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh; Adams, 
Film Exchange, Dallas; All Star 
Features Dist., Los Angeles, San 
Francisco; Monarch Pictures Corp., 
Detroit; Square Deal, Oklahoma 
City; Elliott Film Exchange, Minne- 
apolis. 

First picture of the series, "Her 
Splendid Folly," is completed and 
work will begin on the second as 
soon as Willis Kent finishes shooting 
the talking version of "Road to 
Ruin," which will be released as a 
roadshow special. 



CANTON HOUSE DARK 

Canton, 0. — Double feature policy, 
inaugurated a week ago, at the 
Grand Opera House, after stage 
shows which were offered for more 
than six months, failed to attiact 
and the house went dark this week. 
House will remain dark until fall, 
when it is planned to revive the 
same policy. The Grand is the only 
dark Canton house. 



MIDLAND CHANGES POLICY 

Kansas City, Mo. — Loew's Midland 
will change its week's program on 
Saturdays instead of Sundays, start- 
ing with the new picture Saturday. 



Hundreds of letters are being received by the National Recovery Act 
Administration at Washington concerning the mechanics and scope of 
this revolutionary law as it applies to the motion picture and other indus- 
tries. Here is a list of the inquiries which predominate among the many 
received at the Administration office: 



Prices 

the recovery program 



i fleet 



_Q.- Hov, 

prices ? 

A. — In the long run it probably will mean 
higher prices. The Administration, however, 
will endeavor to prevent immediate price in- 
ii i ases. 

Q. — What means does the Administration 
have at its disposal for preventing price in- 
creases? 

A. — It has no legal powers hut intends to 
use full weight of persuasion and public opin- 
ion. 

Q. — Why does the Administration object to 
price increases? 

A. — General Hugh S. Johnson, Administra- 
tor, expla ns that an increase in prices par- 
alleling the expected increase in purchasing 
power would nullify the effects of the new 
purchasing power. 

Q. — Will fixing of minimum prices be per- 
mitted? 

A. — Price fixing in the initial stages will 

DAILY SIX 

tition may carry a provision that no one will 
sell below cost of production, thus preventing 
cut-throat competition. 

_ Q. — If the recovery program results in 
higher prices in this country, how will pro- 
ducers be protected against low-priced im- 
ports 

A. — The President has the power to raise 
duties to equalize any increase in cost of pro- 
duction of American goods. 

Q. — Do price agreements which may be 
written into codes apply to foreign trade as 
well? 

A. — Not necessarily; this is a matter of 
discretion with the industries. 

Wages 

Q. — What effect is the program to have on 
wage ? 

A. — The two immediate objects of the pro- 
gram are shorter working hours and higher 
wages. As stated by General Johnson, the 
plan is to "split up the existing work and 
put more men on the pay roll and raise the 
wages for the shorter working shift so that 
no worker is getting less than a living wage." 

Q. — Does the program call for the setting 
of wages ? 

A. — General Johnson explains that by hav- 
ing the codes stipulate a minimum wage for 
the lowest class of laborers, it is hoped the 
whole wage structure will be affected without 
minute regulation. 

Q. — What should the minimum wage be? 

A. — No hard and fast rule has been laid 
down or will be laid down because of differ- 
ing conditions between regions and industry, 
but the average for the lowest paid workers 
should be not less than 45 cents an hour. 
The general aim is a living wage in fact. 

Q- — What should the shorter work week be? 

A. — Here again no hard and fast rule is 
being laid down, but the lowest class of labor 
ought not to have to work more than 32 
hours a week on an average. 

Q. — Will the Administration recognize re- 
gional differences in living costs and wage 
scales ? 

A. — Yes: all the codes submitted thus far 
allow a differential between the North and 
South on these grounds. While regional dif- 
ferentials will not be upset, they will not be 
tolerated to the extent of exploitation. 

Q. — Will the Administration deal with ex- 
ploitative labor costs at both extremes, that 
is. unjustifiably high and unjustifiably low 
wages ? 

A. — Yes. 

Codes 

Q- — What should the codes of fair competi- 
tion contain? 

A. — The Administration is urging that they 
l>e confined to stipulating wages, working 
hours, and means for protecting the industry 
from unfair competition. 

Q— Is there any definite time limit on the 
submission of codes? 

.A. — General Johnson is urging all indus- 
tries to get in their codes as rapidlv as pos- 
sible so that there can be a united movement 



toward greater purchasing power, but no 
lime limit has been set. Hanging back will 
be discouraged by persuasion and public opin- 
ion. 

Q. — How can a member of a group begin 
preparing for the enforcement of a code? 

A. — By starting to figure out ways of di- 
viding up his work between more employes 
and shorter shifts at a living wage. 

Q. — How wide a grouping should the code 
represent ? 

A. — The Administration would like to deal 
with as large sections as are possible, but it 
is willing to take the groupings as they come 
to it. Trade associations are the nuclei 
around which the work is starting. 

Q. — If an employer belongs to two or more 
trade associations with conflicting points of 
view, should he resign from one? 

A. — There is no necessity for him to do 
so; the conflicting points of view can be 
brought out at the public hearing and he 
may take either side he wishes. 

Q. — Does an employer have to join a trade 
association? 

A. — There is no compulsion except that co- 
operation is easier in groups. 

Q. — Are labor and consumers to be repre- 
sented when the codes are being drawn up 
by industries? 

A. — The Administration has no authority 
over the drafting of codes before they are 
submitted. 

Q. — How are the consumers and laborers 
to be represented ? 

A. — At the public hearings, which the Ad- 
ministration will hold on each code, labor, 
consumer and industrial advisory boards will 
be present and anyone demonstrating his in- 
terest in the problems will be accorded a 
hearing. 

Q. — May retailers, wholesalers and impor- 
ters present codes? 

A. — It is considered highly desirable that 
they do so; the recovery plan will work best 
if all branches of business cooperate. 

Q. — If a group of laborers, such as de- 
signers in the textile industry, organize and 
present a code, what action will the Admini- 
stration take? 

A. — It has no authority to deal with such 
codes. 

Q. — Will company unions be acceptable as 
representing labor? 

A. — Each code must insure to labor the 
right to organize and be represented by per- 
sons of its own choosing, and company unions 
will be acceptable if they fulfill this require- 
ment. 

Q. — How can a trade association bring in 
non-member industries which do not cooper- 
ate in drafting the code? 

A. — A code presented by any association 
representing 75 per cent of the industry, after 
being subjected to hearings and being ap- 
proved, becomes binding on the whole industry. 

Q- — If. a member of the association dis- 
agrees with the majority opinion, need he 
form a separate association? 

A. — Minorities within any association and 
non-member industries will both be given 
hearings when the Administration takes up 
the code. 

Q- — Will the President force a code on an 
industry? 

A.- — He has the power to do so, but the 
Administration feels that the program must 
work spontaneously to be successful. 

Q. — What if the code interferes with exist- 
ing sales agreements? 

A. — Congress has the power to pass laws 
abrogating private contracts, and the Ad- 
ministration will ask that contracts be re- 
laxed if necessary. 

Q. — How about intrastate businesses? 
A. — Any industry affecting interstate com- 
merce is included, and this provision is re- 
garded wide enough to embrace almost all 
cases, but purely intrastate businesses are, of 
course, outside Federal laws. 

Q. — What about state anti-trust laws which 
may conflict with the Administration's pur- 
poses? 



WORDS 
WISDOM 

from within and without 
the film industry 

"QUR success depends upon the 
public's willingness to vote in- 
telligently for the type of entertain- 
ment it wants."— EDWARD KUY- 
KENDALL. 



"The great confidence that the 
Government has reposed in industry 
under the Industrial Recovery Act 
must not be abused." — ABRAM F 
MYERS. 



"I recommend the (Mohammedan) 
religion to all American business 
men."— REX INGRAM. 



"Picture work is drudgery al- 
though we can't complain as long 
as the drudgery is pretty profit- 
able."— LESLIE HOWARD. 



"The world is sick of sophistica- 
tion. It likes a briskly tossed pie, 
a trip and fall, the collapse of the 
chandelier."— HAL ROACH. 



"A comedian is one actor who 
never has to fear the age limit"— ■ 
CHARLES RIESNER. 



4 in Work, 11 Preparing 
At Paramount Studios 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Twenty-two produc- 
tions are now in various stages of 
oroduction oi A preparation at the 
Paramount studios. Seven films are 
in the cutting rooms for final edit- 
ing. They are: "The Song of Songs," 
"This Day and Age," "Mama Loves 
Papa," "One Sunday Afternoon," 
"Gambling Ship," "Her Bodyguard" 
and "Man of the Forest." Four pic- 
tures now in production are: "Mid- 
night Club," "Three Cornered Moon," 
"Big Executive" and "The Way to j 
Love." In preparation are 11 fea- 
tures, they are: "Chrysalis," "Torch i 
Singer," "To the Last Man," "White 
Women," "Design for Living," "Duck 
Soup," "I'm No Angel," "Lone Cow- 
boy," "Too Much Harmony," "Gol 
den Harvest" and "Swift Arrow." 



A. — Some enabling legislation may be nec- 
essary in some states, but Federal laws super- 
sede state laws where there is a conflict. 

Enforcement 

■ Q. — How will adherence to an accepted 
code be insured? 

A. — As far as possible policing of an indus- 
try will be left to the trade group, and the 
agreement, once it is approved, becomes a 
"law merchant" for the industry enforceable 
in courts. 

Q. — What if violations become widespread 
in any industry? 

A. — The Administrator has the power to 
license all industries and forbid the operation 
of any to which a license is not granted. 

Q. — Will the licensing power be used 
widely? 

A. — The Administration hopes it will have 
to use it only to prevent the breaking down 
of a code. 

Q. — What other enforcement powers does 
the Administration have? 

A.— The President may modify any code 
or withdraw it, depriving the industry of the 
benefits under it. 



THE 



Friday, July 7, 1933 



■a&m 



DAILV 



11 



RKO San Francisco 
Convention Squibs 



D EGARDLESS of what Joe Ashby 
may forget to bring to the con- 
tention, you can bet he'll have a 
>ocket fulf of cigars. 



When asked, Herb Mclntyre will 
explain how necessary earthquakes 
ire in serving to clean up delinquent 
iccounts in record time. 



We're informed that Mark Cory 
■f Portland was recently seen pur- 
hasing an automatic comb guaran- 
teed to keep his curly locks plastered 
'[own. Demonstration on request. 



Tom (Casanova) Walsh admits 
hat the Salt Lake femmes think 
Ws a greater guy than the great 
tuy he professes to be. 



Bill Wolf is the official welcoming 
'ommittee of the 'Frisco exchange — 
| de luxe host. 



Eddie Lamb of Seattle has won 
,he title, "The Ancient Mariner." 
{[We'd like to know the story be- 
l&ind it. 



"Big Bill" Jones of Vancouver, 
3. C, occasionally has to travel 

three whole days to sell one account. 

Mew York City salesmen take no- 
ice. 



SIGNED FOR KENNEDY FILM 

:{ Linda Watkins, Josephine Dunn, 
fames Kirkwood and Molly O'Day 
iave gone to St. Petersburg, Fla., 
jo work in "Playthings of Desire" 
dor Aubrey Kennedy. Miss Watkins 
'replaces Claire Windsor, who was 
iriginally slated for the leading role, 
flayers were signed through Mike 
Connelly, acting for the Jenie 
acobs office. 



Coming and Going 



GRADWELL L. SEARS left New York yes- 
Iferday for a week's visit to Chicago on busi- 

ess. 

J. SIMMONDS, head of Tower Productions 
2aves New York for the coast today via the 
anama Canal. 

") WALTER ABEL, stage actor, left for the 
' oast yesterday to join Paramount. 

I JAKE WILK, story editor for Warners, ar- 
rives in New York from the coast Monday. 

Q JAMES R. GRAINGER is en route to the 
:oast from New York. 

RICHARD C. KAHN, production manager for 
I 'rank D. Ferrone is en route to the coast from 
lew York. 

i| WINFIELD R. SHEEHAN is due in New York 
ate this month from the Coast, en route to 
grope. 

I ED WYNN will arrive in Hollywood Sun- 
lay from New York. 

I NAT KARSON has returned to New York 
irom Chicago after doing murals for the ex- 
position. 

| AUBREY KENNEDY and MARSHALL NEILAN 
^re due in New York next week from St. 
Petersburg, Fla. 



J. LEVY WILL REVIEW 
MIDSUMMER RELEASES 



San Francisco — A review of past 
season and midsummer releases will 
be given by Jules Levy, general 
sales manager, Al Mertz, short sub- 
ject sales manager, and Fred J. Mc- 
Connell, general sales manager of 
Van Beuren Corp. at the opening 
session today of the RKO regional 
convention here at the St. Francis 
Hotel. Major A. J. Rossi will wel- 
come the convention, at which Ned 
E. Depinet, vice-president in charge 
of distribution, will assemble his 
branch managers, office managers 
and salesmen of the western dis- 
trict. 

B. B. Kahane, president, who 
makes his headquarters at the stu- 
dio, will address the meeting. Merian 
C. Cooper, vice-president in charge 
of production, will address Sunday's 
session. 

Saturday the delegates will at- 
tend screenings. 

Courtesy cards to all RKO and 
Fox theaters will be given all the 
visitors and there will be a special 
broadcast in their honor from KPO. 
Cliff Work is cooperating with Bill 
Wolf on this and other entertain- 
ment. 

Those attending include: Denver — 
J. H. Ashby, branch manager; R. 
Bluck, office manager: F. J. Lee, F. 
B. Brown, J. A. Hughes. Los An- 
geles — J. H. Mclntyre, branch man- 
ager; Harry Cohen, district man- 
ager; N. Newman, office manager; 
N. P. Jacobs, S. W. Whitehead. 
Portland — M. E. Cory, branch man- 
ager; S. S. McFadden, office man- 
ager; B. R. Keller; Salt Lake City— 
T. J. Walsh, branch manager; E. S. 
Winward, office manager; H. C. Ful- 
ler, C. Boulet, F. S. Gulbransen. 
San Francisco — G. William Wolf, 
branch manager; H. M. Hollands- 
worth, office manager; J. Burk, W. 
B. J. Kelly. Vancouver — W. S. Jones. 
Traveling Representative — Ned 
Clarke. 

Home Office Contingent — Ned E. 
Depinet, Jules Levy, A. A. Schubart, 
Al Mertz, Robert F. Sisk, Michael 
Poller. RKO's Hollywood Studio 
Group — B. B. Kahane, president of 
RKO Radio Pictures; Merian C. 
Cooper, executive vice-president in 
charge of production; Cliff Reid, as- 
sociate producer; Eddy Eckels, pub- 
licity department. 

Ambrose Dowling, general man- 
ager of RKO Export Corp.; Walter 
Branson, mid-western district man- 
ager; Jack Pegler, Lord and Thomas 
Agency. 



2 WARNER-F. N. RELEASES SET 

First National's "She Had to Say 
Yes" will have its national release 
July 15 and "Goodby Again," War- 
ner picture, on Sept. 2. 



"MAYOR OF HELL" HELD OVER 

"The Mayor of Hell," holds over 
for a second week's run at the New 
York Strand, beginning last night. 



Paramount Los Angeles 
Convention Notes 



J^L WILKIE has promoted himself 
a Chrysler coupe for the dura- 
tion of the convention out here. 



Studio advertising and executive 
offices a veritable deserted village, 
with all personnel sitting in on 
George Schaefer's sales talks at the 
meetings. 



W. M. Williams, salesman of the 
Salt Lake City exchange, all set to 
go to Malibu last evening after the 
convention session closed, but 
changed his mind on finding out the 
place had no night life. 



H. L. West, Portland ad sales man- 
ager, plans to take a small potted 
palm tree back with him to show 
the folks. 



R. M. Gillham, publicity director, 
flew in yesterday from Kansas City, 
where he stopped off to see his folks. 



Jack Pegler, Lord & Thomas guid- 
ing genius on the Paramount 
advertising campaigns, sitting in on 
the meetings during the daytime, 
conferring with studio heads after 
hours. 



J. Vos, Denver exchange ad sales 
manager, persists in telling the na- 
tive sons here that the climate 
doesn't hold a candle to that of the 
old home town. 



J. P. Myers and A. R. Taylor, 
salesmen from the San Francisco 
exchange, raving about the view of 
Los Angeles from the nearby hills, 
where they became lost en route — 
or say they did. 



Neil Agnew taking short walks 
around the hotel between sessions of 
the convention. 



George Schaefer trying to get a 
score of details cleared away in ad- 
dition to his big job of conducting 
the sales meetings. 



C. C. Epperson and F. H. Smith 
of the Salt Lake City exchange 
walking along Sunset Boulevard, 
spotting the stars as they pass. 



Edward Kealey, Former 
Fox Vaude Booker, Dies 

(Continued from Page 1) 

in Calvary cemetery following ser- 
vices at Rockaway. 

The deceased was in the late six- 
ties and had worked for Fox since 
his pioneering days. He is survived 
by a son, Joseph, who is a camera- 
man at the coast. Mrs. Kealey died 
some years ago. 



"GAMBLING SHIP" FOR RIVOLI 

"Gambling Ship," a Paramount 
picture, opens at the Rivoli, Wed- 
nesday. 



Ready Reference Directory 

With Addresses and Phone Numbers of 
Recognized Industry Concerns 



What To Buy And 
Where To Buy It 



Distributors 



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THE 



12 



-%&! 



DAILV 



Friday, July 7, 1933 



A LITTLE from "LOTS 



►// 



By RALPH WILK 



HOLLYWOOD 
According to word received by M. 
C. Levee, manager of Douglas Fair- 
banks, Jr., the young actor will not 
return to Hollywood until next Oc- 
tober. He leaves for Switzerland 
just as soon as it is possible for him 
to travel. He is recovering from 
an attack of pneumonia. 

# ♦ ♦ 

Otto Yanoka, Oriental character 
actor, was signed yesterday for a 
role in the new musical featurette 
which will star Ruth Etting at RKO 
Radio Pictures' studios. The mus- 
ical will be filmed under the super- 
vision of Louis Brock, associate pro- 
ducer. 

sf: $ $ 

Lucille LaVerne, character actress, 
has been engaged for a part in "The 
Last Trail," Zane Grey story now in 
production at Fox. 

Reginald Mason has been added 
to the cast of "Shanghai Madness," 
Fox film production starring Spen- 
cer Tracy. 

RKO Radio Pictures' option on 
the services of Otto Brower, direc- 
tor, was exercised this week for an- 
other contractual period. 
* * * 

Brigadier Constant Franke, Bel- 
gian hero of the world war, has 
been signed by Merian C. Cooper to 



act as technical advisor on the new 
picture which Constance Bennett 
will soon begin for RKO Radio. 

* * * 

George R. Batcheller has started 
production in the third of the eigh- 
teen features to be made by Ches- 
terfield and Invincible for 1933-34. 
The title is "Notorious But Nice" 
and will feature Betty Compson and 
Donald Dilloway. Richard Thorpe 
is directing. 

* # * 

"Music in the Air," Jerome Kern- 
Oscar Hammerstein stage opertta, 
will be filmed by Fox and included 

in the 1933-34 line-up. 

* * * 

His Majesty's Consul, Wentworth 
Martyn Gurney, has presented a 
Manx cat of pedigreed lineage, the 
gift of the Governor-General of the 
Isle of Man, to Walter Disney. Dis- 
ney has named the animal, "World 
Economic Conference," because he 
believes that the conference will be 
cut short like the cat's tail. 

Our Passing Show: Charlie Mur- 
ray, John Miljan, Jean Hersholt, 
Alan Dinehart, Onslow Stevens, Tom 
Brown, Hobart Bosworth, Anita 
Louise, Kane Richmond, Marion 
Burns, Abram Robert Simon, Bill 
Newberry, Buster Crabbe, Mozelle 
Britton, at the reopening of T. L. 
Tally's Criterion. 



Asserts Exploitation 

Para. Product Keynote 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Los Angeles — Exploitation will be 
the keynote in marketing the new 
season's product and in aiding the 
individual exhibitor to excite public 
interest, George J. Schaefer told 
delegates to the Paramount conven- 
tion here yesterday. Exploitation 
compaigns will be started with the 
writing of the scripts and carried 
throughout the production of the 
pictures, Schaefer said. Schaefer's 
speech wound up the final day of 
the regional meeting here. 



fc&s 



MANY PAPPY RtTUM 



■est wishes are extended by 
THE FI-LM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
Industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 



July 7 



George Cukor Richard Carle 

Raymond Hatton Jackie Searl 

Ricardo Cortez 



Notre Dame Glee Club 
Attends "Gold Diggers" 

The Notre Dame University Glee 
Club attended in a body one of the 
performances of "Gold Diggers of 
1933'" at the Hollywood Theater 
last night. The Glee Club has 
come East to make a Vitaphone 
short subject for Warner Bros, at 
the Brooklyn studio under the direc- 
tion of Joseph Henaberry. "Gold 
Diggers of 1933" is beginning its 
fifth week on Broadway, the picture 
having been moved from the Strand 
to the Hollywood after the second 
week. All box office records have 
been broken by this musical hit, in 
which appear Warren William, Joan 
Blondell, Ruby Keeler, Dick Powell, 
Guy Kibbee, Aline MacMahon, Gin- 
ger Rogers and many other well 
known players. 



GILMORE JOINS "POST" 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Eddy Gilmore, for- 
merly publicity man with Loew's 
theaters and more recently in charge 
of Loew's Grand as manager, has 
joined the staff of "The Washington 
Post." 



HORLACHER EXPANDS 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Horlacher's delivery 
service has been expanded to cover 
the entire zone. 



Ann Harding Re-Signs 

West Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Ann Harding has signed a 
new RKO Radio contract. She has one 
picture, "Beautiful," to make under her 
old Radio agreement. Miss Harding first 
achieved screen fame through "Holiday" 
with the same company. 



Claims Exhibs Will Stop 
Paying Service Charges 

(Continued from Page 1) 

ment of service charges to Erpi or 
RCA and will begin purchasing re- 
placement parts in the open market, 
according to Robert Robins, execu- 
tive secretary, yesterday. "They 
will use service only when, as and 
if necessary and on competitive 
terms," he said. 

Robins further declared that plans 
are under way whereby members of 
his association will institute suits 
against Erpi and RCA to seek to 
recover damages allegedly sustained 
by the leasing agreement which the 
Wilmington District Court, in grant- 
ing a temporary injunction, found 
illegal. 



BROADWAY THEATER 
SETUP CHANGES PEND 



(Continued from Page 1) 

way are closed, M. Shapiro & Son 
will take over the Earl Carroll and 
install a picture policy, thus remov- 
ing the house from the legit class. 
The Winter Garden, which War- 
ner Bros, dropped several months 
ago upon expiration of its lease, 
will be reopened by the Shuberts, 
who' own the property, with legiti- 
mate productions, musical in na- 
ture. The Shuberts have been shop- 
ping around for pictures but ap- 
parently have been unable to buy 
the type of product they feel the 
house requires. 



HOLDING BALTIMORE MEET 

Baltimore — The Theatrical Mutual 
Association, which succeeded the 
Theatrical Mechanical Ass'n, will 
holds its annual convention at the 
Lord Baltimore beginning Sunday. 

CAMEO HOLDING OVER 

"What Price Innocence?" remains 
for a third week at the RKO Cameo j 
starting today. 



Court Denies the Petition 
For A Fox Receivership 

(Continued from Page 1) 

ter several Fox executives who arc- 
underwriting the re-organization 
stock issue had signified their will- 
ingness to withdraw their demands 
for release of obligations and re- 
sponsibility of acts performed since 
April, 1930. 



SCHMELING WEDS ACTRESS 

Berlin — Max Schmeling, German 
heavyweight pugilist, and Anny On- 
dra, actress were married here yes- 
terday at a registry office. 



* * * 



BUILDING BIGGER BUSINESS EXTRA 



* * + 



GOES 
EVERYWHERE 




ilfms 



COVERS 
EVERYTHING 



LONDON 



HOLLYWOOD 



NEW YORK 



PARIS 



BERLIN 



WE KNOW THAT BUSINESS IS GETTING BETTER AND 
THAT INTEREST IS AGAIN RUNNING HIGH BY THE 
GROWING NUMBER OF INQUIRIES FROM ALL OVER 
THE COUNTRY RECEIVED EACH DAY BY THE 

INFORMATION 
DEPARTMENT 

of 

THE FILM DAILY 

. . . if you cannot find it in the latest copy of the Film Daily 
YEAR BOOK of MOTION PICTURES, write, phone or wire 
and we will do our best to dig it up for you. 



i 



, 



Inti mate in Charact 
International in Sco 
independent in Thou 




The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Now Fifteen Years Old 



VOL. I VIII. NCJ. 6 



NEW yCCI\, $ATLCD4y, JLLT 8, 1933 



5 CENTS 






Ray Johnston Sees Scarcity of Independent Product 

PACT LIMITS SHOWS' RUNNING TIME T0 150 MINS. 

Kuykendall Assails Move' To Block Industry Code Work 



I 



M.P.T.O.A. Head Attacks 

"Group of Professional 

Organizers" 

. Columbus, Miss. — Assailing a 
'small group of professional organ- 
izers who have set out to oppose the 
plans of the new Administration," 
President Ed Kuykendall of the M. 
P. T. 0. A., in a statement yester- 
day, declared these men are trying 
'to obstruct the development of a 
code of fair competition for the mo- 
tion picture industry." Although he 
did not refer to the group by name 

(Continued on Page 3) 

50 p.c.¥¥tter 
producing in east 

Walter Futter will transfer half 
if his 1933-34 production activities 
.o New York, he told Film Daily 
Yesterday. Although his eastern stu- 
dios has not been selected, Futter 
,ftas decided to make in the East 13 
•'Travelaughs," featuring John C. 

{Continued on Page 7) 



Loew Is Taking Back 

Great Lakes, Buffalo 

Buffalo — Loew's will soon take 
oack the Great Lakes, which has 
seen operated by the Shea Theater 
Corp. for a number of years. No 
iate as yet has been announced for 
l^the opening. Ralph Schwartz and 
i (William Van Dine are in temporary 
charge of the property. 



Bryson Reorganizing 

London (By Cable)— J. V. Bryson, well 
known in American film circles, is en- 
gaged in reorganizing British Poly- 
chromide Co., color process firm. Plans 
are under way for making of a British- 
French feature entirely in color. The 
company's laboratory in Charlotte St. is. 
being re-equipped. 



' Fifteen years is a long time in pictures, com- 
pletely covered in the forthcoming "New Deal" 
number of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



Says Every RKO Production Dollar to Show on Screen 

San Francisco — "Every dollar expended on RKO Radio's new program will be re- 
flected in screen values," declared Frank O'Heron, vice-president, in a message to the 
San Francisco regional convention here yesterday. The company's production plans for 
1933-34 will be outlined by Ned E. Depinet this afternoon and Robert F. Sisk will 
speak following his talk. Merian C. Cooper will address the final session tomorrow. 



Wilby-Kincey Houses Drop Union Labor; 

Unfair "Competition" Is Charged By Circuit 



Birmingham — Notice effective to- 
day has been given all union men in 
the Wilby-Kincey houses here that 
because of "unfair competition" fur- 
nished in Birmingham by the unions, 
their services will not be needed. 
The "unfair competition" is the Jef- 
ferson theater where consecutive run 
pictures, an hour stage show and 
several acts of vaudeville are given 
for fifteen cents. The house is run 
co-operatively by stagehands, musi- 



cians and operators thrown out of 
work by houses closing, and aboli- 
tion of stage shows from Birming- 
ham. 

The Jefferson was started last fall 
as a strictly stock company. After 
25 weeks or more, the house was 
wired and pictures put in. Lately 
the house has been doing a turnaway 
business at some shows, yet is re- 
ported not making money because 
of the heavy "nut" and the low price. 



Name Daven Head of New 
Fox Fr. Producing Firm 

Paris (By Cable) — Capitalized at 
6,000,000 francs, Fox has formed 
Societe Anonyme Francaise des Pro- 
ductions Fox-Films, which will pro- 
duce foreign language pictures in 
Paris. A. Daven, who was formerly 
a director for Ufa-A. C. E. produc- 

(Continued on Page 3) 



F. F. Proctor Estate 

Valued at $5,836,697 

The estate of F. F. Proctor, cir- 
cuit owner who died Sept. 4, 1929. 
was valued at $6,200,880 gross and 
$5,836,697 net, it became known yes- 
terday in a tax transfer filed in the 
Surrogate's Court, White Plains. 
The N.V.A. and the Actors' Fund 
each will receive $50,000. 



Scarcity of Independent Films 
Is Seen By W. Ray Johnston 



Court Finds Goebel 

Case Defendants Guilty 

A verdict of guilty was brought 
in yesterday by the Federal jury 
that heard 206 days of testimony in 
the mail fraud case against Otto E. 
Goebel, motion picture producer, and 
eight others connected with the Na- 
tional Diversified Co. The company 
sold about $3,000,000 worth of stock 
to prominent persons, claiming that 
it would make religious films. 



Strong possibility of an alarming 
scarcity of independently - made 
product during the fiscal year will 
be stressed by W. Ray Johnston in 
his address today at the first region- 
al convention of Monogram franchise 
holders at the Park Central. John- 
ston will tell the exchange execu- 
tives that a large percentage of 
independents have this year failed 
to deliver complete line-ups, and 
with reduced schedules for the new 
(Continued on Page 7) 



Wis. Trade Practice Plan 

Set To Operate 

on Aug. 14 

Milwaukee — Under a trade prac- 
tices plan, including a uniform zon- 
ing and clearance schedule which 
distributors and exhibitors in this 
territory are now studying for adop- 
tion, maximum running time of 
shows is limited to 150 minutes. The 
plan, which was exclusively an- 
nounced in The Film Daily of June 
16, is scheduled to become operative 
Aug. 14, when ratified by a majority 
of exhibitors, as expected. 

The agreement was sponsored by 

(Continued on Page 3) 

wis. im.ru okays 

M.PJMC0DEW0RK 

Milwaukee — The board of direc- 
tors of the M. P. T. O. of Wisconsin 
and Upper Michigan, Inc., has rati- 
fied the industry code so far as it 
has been worked out by the execu- 
tive committee of the M. P. T. O. A. 
A vote of confidence has been for- 
warded that committee for the work 
that is being done. 



Bear Mountain Outing 
Planned by M. P. Club 

An up-the-Hudson cruise and out- 
ing at Bear Mountain on Aug. 2 
was planned yesterday by the Mo- 
tion Picture Club through its house 
committee. The day's program will 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Lillian Gish Returning 

Lillian Gish will end her retirement 
from the screen by appearing in a fea- 
ture for RKO which will be her initial 
talking picture. She was last seen in 
pictures in "The Swan." Miss Gish has 
been working in the legitimate theater 
since leaving the screen. 



Fifteen years of production, distribution and 
exhibition completely covered in the "New 
Deal" number of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



ij 



fjg^a 



DAILV 



Saturday, July 8, 193: 




Vol. LXIII, No. 6 Sat.. July 8. 1933 Price 5 Cents 



JOHN W. UICOATE 



Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
it 1650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk. Inc. J. \\ . 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher: 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
and General Manager; Arthur \V. Eddy, Asso 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at New York. 
N' " Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY. 1-650 Broadway, New York, N. Y.. 
Phone, Circle 7-4736. 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood. California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London- 
Ernest \V. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin — Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 

p. A. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise, 

Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

High Low Close 

Am. Seat 6 3 A 6% 65/s — 

Columbia Picts. vtc. 22l' s 21 Vi 213/4 + 

Con. Fm. Ind 47/ 8 41/ 2 47/ 8 + 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. 12' 8 1 1 Vi 12 + 

East. Kodak 85*4 83!i 84 + 

Fox Fm. "A" 35/ 8 33's 3V 2 + 

Loew's. Inc 25% 24 V 8 245 8 -f 

do pfd 71 Vi 71 Vi 71% — 

Paramount ctfs 2y 4 2 2Vs . . 

Pathe Exch 1% 1% 1 3 A — 

do "A" 75/ 8 6% 73/ 8 .. 

RKO 43/ 8 4i/ 8 4V4 + 

Warner Bros 7 6V2 6 % + 

do pfd 2OV2 20 20i/ 2 + 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Columbia Pets. Vtc. 23 22! 2 22Vi + 

Gen. Th. Eq. pfd. . . 3 /4 34 % • • 

Technicolor 8% &Va 8% + 

Trans-Lux 234 234 2% - . 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40. . 53 s 5 5% + 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 ctfs. 4% 4V 2 4l/ 2 . . 

Keith A-0 6s46 ... 50 49 49 + 

Loew 6s 41 ww 83 81 83 + 

Paramount 6s 47... 26% 25 25 + 

Para. 6s47 ctfs 25 24l/ 2 25 +1 

Par. By. 5i/ 2 s51 ... 39 37% 37*4 .. 

Par?. By. 5i 2 s51 ctfs. 35 35 35 + 

Par. 5' 2 s50 26 1/4 25 25 + 

Par. 5' 2 s50 ctfs 25% 25 25% + 

Warners 6s39 .... 38 36 36 — 

N. Y. PRODUCE EXCHANGE 

Para. Publix 2% 1% 2 



Net 
Chg. 



2% 



Para. Certificates Rise 

Paramount 6s47 certificates staged a 
sensational rise on the New York bond 
market yesterday, closing at 25. a net 
change of 10 points for the day. Para. 
Broadway 5i 2 s51 certificates staged an 
advance of 3 points, closing at 35. 
Para. 51 2 s50 closed at 25, an advance 
of 13 s points, while the certificates of 
that issue were up % of a point. 



Circuit Execs. Discuss Industry Code 

An informal discussion of industry code proposals occurred at a regular meeting 
of circuit representatives yesterday afternoon at the Hays office. Attending were: 
Sam Dembow, Harold B. Franklin, Phil Reisman, Col. E. A. Schiller. Willard Patterson 
and Spyros Skouras. 



Ohio Pays $315,000 

Tax in 10-Mo. Period 

Columbus — Under the Federal ad- 
mission tax law, the Government col- 
lected a little more than $315,000 
from Ohio theaters during the 10 
months' period ended last May 1. ac- 
cording to figures obtained by P. J. 
Wood, business manager of the M. 
P. T. O. A. 

A new checkup of the number of 
Ohio houses affected by the recent- 
ly-enacted state tax on amusement 
admissions above 40 cents indicates 
that not more than five picture 
houses will come within the law. 
said Wood yesterday. Of these, two 
are in Cleveland and three in Cin- 
cinnati. 



"CAPTURED" FOR HOLLYWOOD 

"Captured!" Warner Bros.' picture 
"O-starring Leslie Howard and Doug- 
las Fairbanks. Jr., is scheduled to 
follow "Gold Diggers of 1933" into 
the Hollywood about the first week 
in September, as a two-a-day offer- 
ing. 



BECOMES MAYOR MONDAY 

Minneapolis — A. B. "Buzz" Bain- 
bridge. Minneapolis theaterman, 
takes over his duties as mayor Mon- 
day. Exhibitors are also glad to 
hear the report that Herman Miller 
friendly to their interests, may head 
the council. 



LAURA LEE MARRIED 

San Francisco — Laura Lee was 
secretlv married to Louis Payne 
New York broker, June 29, it be- 
came known here yesterday. The 
couple are en route to New York 
bv airplane and will continue to 
Europe where they will spend sev- 
eral months. 



PLANNING MAJESTIC LINEUP 

Majestic Pictures' new season's 
lineup will be announced the first of 
August upon the return of Herman 
Gluckman, president, who is now 7 
on the coast conferring with Phil 
Goldstone. Majestic's production 
head. First four of the new line- 
up will be ready for screening within 
three weeks. 



BARTON AT PALACE 

James Barton, famous funster of 
musical comedy and vaudeville, 
heads the new vaudeville bill at the 
RKO Palace theater starting today. 
"Melody Cruise," RKO Radio Pic- 
tures' newest musical picture, is the 
feature screen attraction. 



BOOK ETHEL BARRYMORE 

Ethel Barrymore w r ill appear in 
person at the Capitol, for the week 
beginning July 21. The actress will 
be seen in Sir James Barrie's play- 
let, "The Twelve Pound Look." 



Receivership Petition 

Filed Against Del. Co. 

Wilmington — A petition for a re- 
ceivership suit was filed in Chan- 
cery Court here yesterday by the 
Industrial Trust Co. against Dia- 
mond State Theater Co., which op- 
erates the Capitol and Temple, both 
at Dover, Del., and the Strand at 
Smyrna, this state. The trust com- 
pany sets forth that it holes the de- 
fendant corporation's promissory 
note for $2,636, payable on demand 
and dated Nov. 14, 1932. 



Pantages at Salt Lake 
To Take Over Orpheum 

Salt Lake City — Alexander Pan- 
fages has arrived here from New 
York in connection with his deal to 
take over the RKO Orpheum. Trans- 
action is completed except for a few 
details. 



PROTESTS RECOVERY CODE 

Dallas— Col. H. A. Cole, president 
of Allied Theater Owners of Texas, 
has issued a call for all members 
and also the general public to meet 
at the Jefferson Hotel Monday to 
protest the new code governing the- 
aters, exchanges and employees 
under the National Recovery Act. 



"I LOVE THAT MAN" OPENING 

"I Love That Man" opened at the 
New York Paramount yesterday. 
Heading the suppoi'ting cast are 
Robei-t Armstrong, Lew Cody, War- 
ren Hymer and Dorothy Burgess. 
Harry Joe Brown directed this 
Charles R. Rogers production for 
Paramount. 



ATLAS NOT CLOSING 

Ben Berke, head of the Atlas 
Sound Studios in Long Island City, 
denies the report that the studio will 
cease operating and close. Berke 
stated that conditions were never 
better for producing and at present 
the latest of the Paul Terry-Toon 
cartoons is now being synchronized. 



INCREASE NEGATIVE COSTS 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Ken Goldsmith an- 
nounced today a 30 per cent increase 
in negative costs over his last year's 
budget for productions. Goldsmith 
will make six features for 1933-34. 



"PILGRIMAGE" AT §1.50 

Price scale for Fox's "Pilgrim- 
age," which opens at the Gaiety 
July 12, will be 50 cents to $1.50. 
plus tax. 



PLAYING RKO ROXY 

"I Loved You Wednesday" is the 
feature attraction for four days 
starting today at the new RKO 
Roxy in Radio* City. "Cocktail Hour" 
will hold forth on the screen as the 
main attraction for three days start- 
ing Wednesday. 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



Today: Monogram eastern sales meeting, Ne 
York. 

uly 7-9: RKO western sales meeting, S 

Francis Hotel, San Francisco, 
uly 10: M. P. T. O. A. executive commits 

meeting, Hotel Congress, Chicago, 
uly 10: Meeting of National Ass'n of M. P. Ii 

dustry at Park Central Hotel, 
uly 10: Monogram southern sales meetin; 

Jung Hotel, New Orleans, 
uly 11: Meeting of Allied Theaters of Ne' 

Jersey at 2 P. M. 

uly 12: World Premiere of "Pilgrimage" i 

Gaiety, New York, 
uly 15: Monogram central sales meetin 
Blackstone Hotel, Chicago. 

uly 17: United Artists sales convention, Cfi 
cago. 

uly 18: Meeting of M. P. T. O. of Arkansa 

Mississippi and Tennessee, Jackson, Mis 

uly 21-22: Fox Film Corp. special stockholc 

ers' meeting, home office, New York. 

uly 24-25: Code convention at Hotel Ast' 

under auspices of National Association 

the Motion Picture Industry. 

uly 25: Meeting of Allied Theaters of Ne 

Jersey at 2 P. M. 
uly 28-29: Monogram western sales meetin 

San Francisco, 
uly 28-31: Meeting of Independent Theat- 
Supply Dealers' Association at Stevei 
Hotel, Chicago. 
Aug. 2: Outing at Bear Mountain under air 

pices of Motion Picture Club. 
Aug. 2-3: Monogram Canadian sales meetin 

Toronto. 

Aug. 23-24: First annual convention of lnd« 
pendent Motion Picture Owners Associatie 
of Delaware and Eastern Shore of Marylan 
at Hotel Henelopen, Rehoboth, Del. 
Sept. 13: A. M. P. A. holds annual election i 
officers 



Monogram Is Moving 

To Radio City Bldg 

Monogram has leased extensiv 
floor space in the RKO Building ii 
Radio City and will move from it 
present quarters early next montl 
Richie Export Corp., Monogram 5 
foreign affiliate, will also move t 
the RKO building under the least 
which covers five years. Both cow; 
panies have been situated at 72! 
Seventh Ave. since their inception. 




'■uaerL^q^ 



^President 



ATLANTIC CITY'S 

NEWEST BOARDWALK 

HOTEL 

Five Hundred Rooms with Sea Water 
Baths — American and European Plans. 
Also Beautiful Furnished Housekeeping 
Apartments with Complete Hotel Service 
by the Week, Month or Year. 

SEA WATER SWIMMING POOL 

MARINE SUN DECK 

TURKISH BATHS 



151 Saturday, July 8, 1933 



!,l 



IMITS RUNNING TIME 
IFSH0WST0150MINS. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

ie M. P. T. 0. of Wisconsin and 
fpper Michigan, headed by Presi- 
ent Fred S. Meyer. It bans double 
'•features, including "added" westerns 
n Sundays or other matinees. 
The plan provides against give- 
ways, coupon and thrift cards or 
3oks, etc., and against all mention 
njf price in newspaper advertising 
?cept in announcements of changes 
1 admission prices when prices may 
i mentioned for not more than seven 
msecutive days. Maximum running 
jme of a show is limited to 150 min- 
tes with units limited to total of 
*» sve and three in case of a stage 

How policy. 
hi J Under the schedule, first-run 
•puses playing at 50-cent admissions 
ire given 45 days' clearance over 
lbsequent houses charging 35 cents, 
'' '§9 days over houses charging 30 
ents, 59 days over houses charging 
p cents and 73 days over theaters 
fith a 20-cent admission. The ad- 
lission classification is determined 
:cording to the lowest adult admis- 
on after 6 P. M. 

The plan provides that no subse- 
uent house shall advertise any 
jming attraction until the comple- 
'on of the first-run showing in Mil- 
aukee and likewise in an outlying 
me where more than 14 days' clear- 
rice prevails, no picture shall be 
dvertised until the completion of 
revious runs. Institutional adver- 
sing used at the beginning of the 
uying season is exempt from this 
ause. 

Directly competitive situations are 
rictly denned under the plan which 
ivides the city into zones and a 
rastic penalty has been provided 
r any violations. The plan be- 
Dmes effective as adopted Aug. 14, 
abject only to such revisions as may 
||e embodied in a code under the 
! rational Recovery Act. Unfair 
rade practices as outlined in the 
plan become effective immediately, 
jewever. It becomes binding upon 
J fie signature of a majority of the 
Inhibitors in Milwaukee county. 

A continuing zoning and clearance 
i jmmittee consisting of four inde- 
Jendent exhibitors, two circuit repre- 
sentatives and two distributors will 
|e named. Independent exhibitors 
fsrving on the committee include B. 
I. Fischer, R. J. Patterson, E. 
f.angemack and L. K. Brin. Affili- 
ate representatives are Sol Hankin 
(nd H. J. Fitzgerald, while the two 
j istributors are yet to be named. 
j The plan is now being submitted 
p the distributors. 



Hanson's Bow-Wow Wins 

Toronto — Oscar R. Hanson swept the 
beards in the Dachshund Class at the 
recent annual dog show at Hamilton, 
Ont., the final canine exposition of the 
season in Canada, when he captured 
the silver plate and seven ribbons with 
entries of his own breeding. 




DAILY 




lONCfHt 

WITH 

PHIL M. DALY 



© • • IT IS fundamental in human nature .... a normal 

trait in every human being with ambition to strive to 

attain that degree of independence financially where they can 
run their own business and feel that they are free and 
untrammeled : beholden to no overlord 



• © • THAT IS a rather tough attainment in the film 

biz where the average individual is so dependent on 

others yet this position of Freedom and Independence 

has been achieved to a remarkable degree by 37 men in this 

industry and their associates referring to the franchise 

holders of Monogram Pictures 



• • © AND EVERY one of these 37 will gladly admit that 
his present fortunate status in the economic scheme of the films 

is largely due to one man W. Ray Johnston 

president of Monogram whose organizing genius banded 

them together whose executive ability, keen judgment 

and shrewd business sense has kept them moving forward 
through the toughest times the biz has ever known 



® © © SO TODAY the first regional sales convention of 

Monogram at the Park Central starts off auspiciously 

bringing together a group of men who each controls his own 

little world known as a film exchange runs it absolutely 

independently secure in the knowledge that he is a unit 

in a nation-wide organization that is consistently moving for- 
ward furnishing 100 per cent co-operation sup- 
plying him with a high standard of product under arrangements 

that allow him to make his full share of the profits 

so this Monogram Bunch are a reasonably happy and contented 

group of individuals they have come to attend THEIR 

convention. . involving a company of which they are Part 

Owners they have a full voice in every decision 

the future of Monogram can be as great as these individuals 
choose to make it by Co-operative Effort 



9 • © IN THIS spirit the year that confronts the Mono- 
gram franchise holders looks rosy to say the least 

there is no confusion no guess work they have 

clicked together the past year the machine is running 

more smoothly than ever with production decreased from 

last year's 32 to the current program of 20 which allows 

increased production cost on a tight program that is bound to 

result in superior product setting a New Standard in 

the independent field here is an organization spending 

MORE dough for production when most other companies are 
pruning is it any wonder they are a supremely Optimis- 
tic Gang? . 



® 9 9 AND WE have a hunch that most of these 37 co- 
ops will be with Monogram 10 years from now if they 

are still alive it is a Johnston tradition to hold 

his men even the office porter has been with him 13 

years and it would take some inducements to grab such 

men as Eddie Golden, John Harrington and Pete Friedhoff away 

from Ray as for the franchise holders, the following 

have been buying from him for 15 years Harry Thomas, 

Herman Rifkin, Jack Jossey, Irving Mandel, Sam and Jake 
Flax, Bill Underwood, Jack Berkowitz, Bernard Mills, Bob 

Withers, Jim Alexander, J. T. Sheffield, Floyd St. John 

such Confidence must be deserved Hail, Monogram! 

all the best from everybody on this paper's staff and 

from the Heart 



« « « 



» » » 



ASSAILS BLOCKING OF 
INDUSTRY CODE WORK 

(Continued from Page 1) 

it is understood that he meant cer- 
tain leaders of Allied States Ass'n. 
Said Kuykendall, in part: 
"These men thrive on controver- 
sies and dissention and are consis- 
tently unwilling to permit the set- 
tlement of industry disputes. This 
new law calls for a show-down. 
Those who honestly desire to remove 
unfair trade practices and wild cut- 
throat competition have an opportu- 
nity to sit down with the rest of the 
industry and our Government and 
work out a practical plan to do so. 
The impudent and misleading asser- 
tions of this group of professional 
organizers that they, and they alone, 
speak for all of the theater owners 
in the country is just a brazen hal- 
lucination. The actual owners of the 
country's theaters are perfectly com- 
petent to speak for themselves." 



Name Daven Head of New 
Fox Fr. Producing Firm 

(Continued from Page 1) 

tions, is in charge of the concern, 
organized under the supervision of 
Clayton P. Sheehan, head of the Fox 
foreign department. Mr. De Regnier 
is general secretary. 



Bear Mountain Outing 
Planned by M. P. Club 

(Continued from Page 1) 

include a schedule of athletics. All 
persons identified with the industry 
are eligible to participate. 

Committees in charge of the event 
comprise: program, William Fran- 
kel, Jack Alicoate, Louis Nizer and 
Robert Wolff; tickets, Leo Kleba- 
now, Arthur W. Stebbins and Jos- 
eph Bernat; prizes, Hank Linet, 
George Morris and Harry Brandt; 
publicity, Hank Linet and Maurice 
D. Kann. 



MANY HAPPY RETURNS, 




Best wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
Industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 



July 8-9 



Bradley King 



Lon Young 



Eugene Pallette 



S. L. "Roxy" Rothafel Claude C. Ezell 

Frank Namczy 




MONG 

Proudly As 



GIGANTIC 



PRC 



Plain English 
For Plain Facts! 



An increased budget for each neg- 
ative ... in these times means 
Monogram is going big time . . . 
that it will pay you to "March on 
with Monogram." 



TALK IS CHEAP! 
. . . but money talks ! 



That's why MONOGRAM is being 
recognized as the leader . . . there's 
no depression around the Mono- 
gram Studios or the Monogram 
Exchanges. GET GOING WITH 
MONOGRAM. 



Tremendous Iner 

"Monogram II 

—WITH THESE 20 "NEW 

"KING KELLY OF THE U. S. A." . 

"THE WOMAN IN WHITE" .... 

"BROKEN DREAMS" 

"JANE EYRE" 

"THE MOONSTONE" By Wilkie Collins. Con 
"THE SWEETHEART OF SIGMA CHI" . 

"THE AVENGER" 

"MONEY MEANS NOTHING" 

"MYSTERY LINER" 

"BEGGARS IN ERMINE" .... 
"WOMAN'S MAN" . . From Adela R 

"NUMBERS OF MONTE CARLO" . 

"16 FATHOMS DEEP" 

"THE LOUD SPEAKER" .... 

"DERBY DAY" 

"HAPPY LANDING" 

"MANHATTAN LOVE SONG" 
"SENSATION HUNTERS" . A Charles V 
"HE COULDN'T TAKE IT" .... 
"CITY LIMITS" 



13 One Reel Port O'Call Novelties— Se| 

"It Will Pay You to Ke 

There Are 37 Monogram Exchanges 



GRAM 

t ,Mces Us 

lAM 1933-34! 



In Negative 
Cost Over 



Last Year! 

Right Idea" 

SPECIALS FOR 1933-34 

leal production from the famous stage play. 

Wilkie Collins' famous novel. 

An original by Olga Prinzlau. 

ost widely read of Charlotte Bronte's books. 

wf the greatest detective stories of all time. 

The famous song in a popular picture. 

By John Goodwin, with Ralph Forbes. 

By William Anthony McGuire. 

tor Wallace's Saturday Evening Post Story. 

By Esther Lynd Day. 
ohn's famous story, "Great God Four flush". 
Phillips Oppenheim's story of Monte Carlo. 
. An undersea story by Eustace Adams. 
. An original story by Tristram Tupper. 
. County Fair Days are Pay Days. 
Stuart Anthony's air story. 
By Cornell Woolrich. 
tion, with Arlene Judge and Preston Foster 
Albert Payson Terhune's comedy drama. 
By Jack Woodward. 

World Through The Camera's Eye 

[Ijuth With Monogram!" 

£erve You — Get 



Monogram Is 
Going Places! 



Not only was MONOGRAM the 
first company to announce next 
year's product . . . but MONO- 
GRAM is the only company an- 
nouncing an increase in its 
Budget! 



A big increase over last year's 
negative cost is something to 
shout from the house tops! 



MONOGRAM is going into First 
Place this year . . . with the out- 
standing Product . . . the out- 
standing Stars. 

CLASS A PRODUCTION FOR 
CLASS A HOUSES. 



Your Contract Now! 



THE 




DAILY 



Saturday, July 8, 1933 



A Little 

from "Lots" 

— By RALPH WILK ^— 



HOLLYWOOD 
"jy[Y WEAKNESS," the preten- 
tious musical production which 
Buddy DeSylva is producing for Fox, 
is already in rehearsal and will go 
before the cameras on Monday. Be- 
sides Lilian Harvey and Lew Ayres, 
the cast will include Harry Langdon, 
Charles Butterworth, Sid Silvers, 
Boots Mallory, Barbara Weeks, 
Marcelle Edwards, Susan Fleming, 
Mary Blake, Shirley Lloyd, Marjorie 
King, Gladys Blake, Jean Allen and 

Dixie Francis. 

* * * 

Harry Joe Brown, back from Eu- 
rope, is full of pep and rarin' to go. 
He is an associate producer with 
Chas. R. Rogers Productions, and 

also a director. 

* * * 

Frank Gay, veteran scenarist, is 
busy, to say the least. In collabora- 
tion with Charles R. Condon, he has 
written "Buy America." He has also 

written "City Guy." 

* * * 

Jimmy Durante has been added to 
the cast of "The March of Time," 
which Willard Mack is directing for 

M-G-M. 

* * * 

Florine McKinney has been signed 
to a long term contract by M-G-M 
and will have a role in "The Dancing 
Lady," starring Joan Crawford. 



IHSI1I1IH 
HOLLYWOOD 

PLAZA 






"0 U' 



nooQ 



SUMMER* 

RATES, Now 8 

$2 per day single] 
$2.30 per day double! 

Special weekly and monthly rates 

All rooms with bath and 

shower. Every modern 

convenience. 

Our dining room now 

S serving Al Levy's famous 
food— breakfast 25 -45c. 
Luncheon 35c.Dinner 60c 

I Look for the"Doorway of Hospitality" B 

VINE AT HOLLYWOOD BLVD. 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



"I LOVE THAT MAN" 

with Nancy Carroll, Edmund Lowe 
Paramount 65 mins. 

RAMBLING YARN WITH EPISODIC 
TREATMENT RATES AVERAGE ENTER- 
TAINMENT. 

Another of those yarns about a gent 
who lives beyond the law by his wits 
at the expense of others, and gets a girl 
to believe in him and sacrifice all for 
his sake. A very unbelievable and arti- 
ficial story at best, that carries no sym- 
pathy for the principals and gets no 
place in particular. Edmund Lowe is a 
confidence man who loses all his ill- 
gotten gains at the roulette wheel as soon 
as he gets his hands on a pile. He meets 
up with a perfectly nice girl in Nancy 
Carroll, who learns to love him so much 
that when she discovers he is a racketeer 
and not a wealthy society man as she 
supposed, it makes no difference. She 
just becomes his partner in semi-crime. 
So the tale wanders along without build- 
ing any particular suspense. Then the 
pay-off when Lowe is fatally shot by a 
criminal he double-crossed, and marries 
the girl on his death-bed. 

Cast: Edmund Lowe, Nancy Carroll, Lew 
Cody, Robert Armstrong, Warren Hymer, 
Dcrothy Burgess, Susan Fleming, Walter 
Walker, Inez Courtney, Harvey Clark, 
Grant Mitchell, Belle Mitchell, Luis Al- 
berni, Lee Kohlmar, Leon Holmes, Esther 
Muir. 

Director, Harry Joe Brown; Authors, 
Gene Towne, Graham Baker; Adaptors, 
same; Dialoguers, same; Cameraman, Mil- 
ton Krasner. 

Direction, Satisfactory Photography, 
Good. 



"IT'S GREAT TO BE ALIVE" 

with Raul Roulien, Gloria Stuart, 

Edna May Oliver 

Fox 69 mins. 

BRIGHT, SNAPPY ENTERTAINMENT 
WITH LAUGHABLE DIALOGUE, CATCHY 
TUNES AND PRETTY GIRLS. 

The plot of this comedy with music is 
hilariously nonsensical but it provides a 
capable cast with a wealth of clever dia- 
logue and many situations that will please 
the most sedate. Raul Roulien makes his 
American screen debut as a real heart- 
throb hero who can sing his way into 
feminine affection. A galaxy of glorious 
girls brighten up the musical numbers. The 
story concerns a young man-about-town 
who becomes engaged to "the one and 
only" girl but who runs into considerable 
difficulty ridding himself of his old 
"flames." The past loves manage to 
break up his new romance. He winds up 
by attempting a trans-Pacific flight but 
is forced down on an uninhabited island. 
An unheard-of malady wipes out all the 
male population of the world and being 
the only man left, he demands the re- 
turn of his former fiancee. To save the 
world from utter ruin, the other women 
consent. 

Cast: Raul Roulien, Gloria Stuart, Edna 
May Oliver, Herbert Mundin, Joan Marsh, 
Dorothy Burgess, Emma Dunn, Edward Van 
Sloan, Robert Greig. 

Director, Alfred Werker; Author, John 
D Swain; Adaptor, Paul Perez; Dialoguer, 
Arthur Kober; Cameraman, Robert Planck; 
Recording Engineer, Alfred Bruzlin. 

Direction, Good. Photography, Good. 



William Powell in 

"PRIVATE DETECTIVE 62" 



Warner Bros. 



67 mins. 



MILD ENTERTAINMENT PEPPED UP 
BY GOOD SUSPENSE AND DRAMATIC 
SITUATIONS. 

William Powell in a typical role that 
gives him plenty of chance, but the plot 
is of the stereotyped order relieved by 
some dramatic situations that hold the in- 
terest. As a detective in the American 
diplomatic service he gets in a jam, and 
takes a job as partner with a crooked de- 
tective agency. Margaret Lindsay plays 
the role of a society girl who nicks a gam- 
bling casino for fifty grand which she 
leaves with them on credit. So the crooked 
detective and his pal, the casino owner, 
try to frame something on the girl to keep 
her from collecting. Powell is assigned the 
job, without knowing what is in back of it. 
When he learns the truth he quits the job. 
Developments then come rapidly, with the 
girl's visit to the apartment of the casino 
proprietor to collect, and a frame-up to 
make it appear she killed him. He is actu- 
ally killed by a hireling of the crooked de- 
tective. Powell clears the case with some 
exciting happenings, and so to the happy 
ending. 

Cast: William Powell, Margaret Lindsay, 
Ruth Donnelly, Gordon Westcott, James 
Bell, Arthur Byron, Natalie Moorhead, Sheila 
Terry, Theresa Harris, Renee Whitney, Ann 
Hovey, Irving Bacon, Arthur Hohl, Hobart 
Cavanaugh. 

Director, Michael Curtiz; Author, Raoul 
Whitefield; Adaptor, Rian James; Dialoguer, 
same; Cameraman, Tony Gaudio. 

Direction, Adequate Photography, Very 
Good. 



Many Ownership Changes 
Occur in Buffalo Area 

Buffalo — Recent switches in thea- 
ter ownership and management in- 
clude the following: 

Harold Raives, formerly manager 
of the Regent and Century, Roches- 
ter, is now manager of the Rialto. 
He also has taken on the manage- 
ment of the Temple, Fairport. These 
houses formerly belonged to the 
Schine interests. 

George A. Ver Valin has closed 
the Lincoln at Rochester. The Star, 
Addison, operated by B. S. Newman, 
is now open on Sundays and Mondays. 
Mrs. Bessie B. Blair has taken over 
the Laurel, Binghamton, from D. 
Conklin. N. E. Wood is now man- 
ager of the Park, Hammondsport. 
J. Propis is now managing the Avon, 
Buffalo, alone. F. G. Hahn formerly 
was associated with him. Leaven- 
worth Steele has purchased the 
Variety, Baldwinsville, and reopened 
it under the name of Steele's Para- 
mount. Steele has operated the 
Steele's, East Syracuse, for the past 
20 years. 



"NELL GWYNN" IN SOUND 

London — A sound version with 
music of "Nell Gwynn" will be pro- 
duced by Herbert Wilcox, production 
head of B. and D. films. A silent 
version of the story was made eight 
years ago with Dorothy Gish in the 
title role. 



Canadian Buying Co-Op 
Opens Alberta Branch 

Toronto — Expanding Associated 
Theaters, Ltd., Oscar R. Hanson has 
organized an Alberta branch of the 
buying co-operative and appointed 
H. T. Long as manager. The office 
will cover western Saskatchewan as 
well as Alberta. 

At a general meeting at the York 
Hotel, Calgary, directors for the Al- 
berta federation were elected as fol- 
lows: W. J. Long, Edmonton; R. J. 
Grant, Wetaskiwin; D. B. Free, 
Stettler; W. H. B. Sharp, Didsbury, 
and M. Beatty, Red Deer. 



FIXTURES FOR RADIO CITY 

Westinghouse Electric and Manu- 
facturing Co. has received an order 
from the Radio City Group of Rocke- 
feller Center for interior lighting 
fixtures for buildings No. 1 and 9. 
The initial order includes an allot- 
ment of 10,000 fixtures. It is ex- 
pected that a total of 20,000 will be 
required. 



W. E. EXECUTIVES RETURNING 

London — Three Western Electric 
executives who have been associates 
with the British company since the 
early days of sound are en route to 
the United States. They are S. E. 
Hawkins, R. C. Meeker and Lincoln 
Weld. 



Para. Is Building Big 

Theater in Glasgow 

Glasgow — Paramount will likely 
resume activities in the construction 
of a new "super" here on the "is- 
land" site at Renfield St. A company 
may be formed late this summer to 
operate the house. Earl St. John, 
supervisor of Paramount theaters 
here, will control the new house. 
Pictures and stage show will be the 
policy. 



SETTLE PASS DISPUTE 

Richmond — Settling a dispute, lo- 
cal theater managers have agreed 
to admit one censor board inspector 
for each picture shown. Arrange- 
ment was reached with the Division 
of M. P. Censorship, after an attor- 
ney for the managers' association 
had protested against the number 
of inspectors visiting local theaters. 



SUN. SHOWS FOR FROSTBURG 

Frostburg, Md. — Sunday shows 
are allowed under a new ordinance 
just adopted by the City Council 
and signed by the Mayor. Theaters 
may keep open from 2 to 6 p.m., 
and from 8:30 to 11 p.m. A tax 
of five cents for charity is imposed 
on each admission. 



LYCEUM, MINNEAPOLIS, DARK 

Minneapolis — With the temporary 
closing of the Lyceum, independent 
house, the Minnesota Amusement 
Co. (Publix), is left without Twin 
City first-run opposition. Lyceum is 
scheduled to open early in August. 



THE 



Saturday, July 8, 1933 



-%&! 



DAILV 



RKO San Francisco 
Convention Squibs 



'pRISCO'S branch manager, Bill 
Wolf, was kidded by Augie 
Schubart for being more economical 
with "F's" than Bob Wolff of New 
York, who doubles up on his last let- 
ter. 



W. S. Jones of Vancouver is the 
lone Canadian at the 'Frisco fanfare 
— you'll recall the other Dominion- 
eers heard their 1933-34 story in 
New York and Chicago. 



Did Cress Smith get the glad hand 
from Ned Depinet, Jules Levy et al? 
■ — You bet he did. Cress spent the 
1 past 10 months in Australia but now 
{ he's back on the old job in the 
: States. 



"Big Bill" Kelly, Portland sales- 
man, admits that his sobriquet has 
been tacked to his Irish monicker 
because it is the direct antithesis of 
his diminutive stature. 



Mike Lee, that Wyoming cowboy 

salesman working out of the Denver 

branch, threatened to gallop through 

! the St. Francis lobby to prove that 

i his cowboy ability is not of the drug 

i store brand. 



Norman Newman, of Herb Mcln- 
tyre's Los Angelans, has the looks of 
an actor and since Merian C. Cooper 
will be at the convention Norman 
has hopes of being discovered. 



W. J. Kelly, Seattle salesman, is 
an ex-Yale fullback and his pals say 
he's still a great team-mate. 



George Seach is dog-minded since 
his wire-haired terrier, the pride of 
'Frisco film row, won a prize. 



HELBER'S NEW SALES HEAD 

Howard Hummell, who has joined 
Helber Pictures Corp. in charge of 
sales to independent distributors, 
was formerly with Universal. Pre- 
viously he was associated with Se- 
lect Pictures as assistant general 
sales manager and also opened vari- 
ous Columbia exchanges throughout 
the country. 



Coming and Going 



S. E. HAWKINS, R. C. MEEKER and LINCOLN 
WELD, all connected with Western Electric, 
are en route to New York from London. 

BETTY GARDE has returned to New York 
from Bermuda. 

S. FOWLER WRIGHT, writer, leaves New 
York today for the Coast to attend the pre- 
view of his filmed novel, "Deluge," made by 
KBS. 

EDDIE GOLDEN of Monogram leaves New 
York tonight for New Orleans. 



INDIE FILM SCARCITY 
SEEN BY JOHNSTON 



(Continued from Page 1) 

season a scarcity of product may 
be the result. 

Eddie Golden, general sales man- 
ager, will ask for an increase of 
35 per cent in gross sales for the 
coming year in face of the fact that 
Monogram will make 12 features 
less than it produced this year. He 
will announce a 100 per cent in- 
crease in negative costs on all new 
season pictures. 

Monogram's next regional meet- 
ing will be held Monday at the 
Jung Hotel, New Orleans, with the 
following present: 

Atlanta — Arthur C. Bromberg, J. 
W. Mangham, P. H. Savin; Tampa — 
Carl Floyd, E. A. Dorsey; Charlotte 
— H. H. Everett, J. H. Dillon, Jack 
London; New Orleans — L. V. Seich- 
snaydre, G. J. Broggi; Dallas — 
Claud Ezell, W. G. Underwood, Les- 
lie Wilkes, Doak Roberts; Oklahoma 
City— Sol Davis, J. A. Smith, W. J. 
Cammer, Thelma Rhodd; Little Rock, 
Ark. — B. F. Busby. Home Office — 
Edward Golden. 

Attending regional sales conven- 
tion July 15, at the Blackstone 
Hotel, Chicago, will be: Home Office 
— W. Ray Johnston, Trem Carr, Ed- 
ward Golden; Chicago — Irving Man- 
del, Maurice Godshaw, Max Dreifuss, 
Jack Barry, Frank Nardi, W. Drake, 
Harry Lorch; Milwaukee — J. G. 
Frackman, John Bates; Indianapolis 
— L. W. Marriott, E. A. Sipe, Rus- 
sell Bleeke; Detroit — Sam Seplewin, 
Wm. Hurlbut, Harry Hondorf, Fred 
Strubank, Jack Saxe; St. Louis — Nat 
Steinberg, Barney Rosenthal, James 
Gateley, Miss M. DeVinney; Min- 
neapolis — Edward Walton; Cleve- 
land — Nat Lefton, J. S. Jossey, S. 
P. Gorrel, R. A. Novisch, F. E. Bel- 
las, Milton Lefton; Cincinnati — Wm. 
Onie, L. P. Hudson, R. J. Burns, G. 
H. Kirby, H. M. Albrinck, V. S. 
Levine; Kansas City — Robert With- 
ers, Chas. Lewis, John Scott, L. 0. 
Ringler, L. F. Durland; Omaha — 
C. M. Parkhurst, Joe Smith, I. W. 
Johnson, L. Von Dollen, R. H. Bark : 



LATE SHOWING AT ROXY 

The Roxy, 7th Ave., tonight will 
present a late showing of its new 
Fox musical, "It's Great to Be 
Alive." Prices for all seats will be 
reduced tonight to 25 cents after 
10 P. M. 



BOOKS "SLEEPLESS NIGHTS" 

Arthur Mayer, managing director 
of the Rialto, has signed a contract 
with Jack Bellman and Ira Simmons 
for the American premiere of 
"Sleepless Nights," a musical com- 
edy starring Polly Walker and Stan- 
ley Lupino. The opening will take 
place July 30. Exploitation and pub- 
licity on "Sleepless Nights" for the 
showing will be handled by Joe Lee. 



Fox Renews 2 Contracts 

New contracts awarded Fox person- 
nel includes that to Henry King, who 
has been re-engaged to direct "The 
House of Connelly," the Paul Green play 
in which Janet Gaynor will have the 
leading role. Sammy Lee, dance direc- 
tor, is another who has been rewarded 
with a new contract following his stag- 
ing of the ballet sequences in "I Loved 
You Wednesday." 



10 Vitaphone Shorts 

Set For July Release 

Ten Vitaphone short subjects, in- 
cluding two double reels and eight 
of one reel length, are scheduled for 
national release during this month, 
announced Norman Moray. 

The two reelers for July release 
are Ruth Etting in "Crashing The 
Gate," and Russ Columbo in "That 
Goes Double," both part of Vita- 
phone's "Broadway Brevities" ser- 
ies. The eight one reelers include 
"Costumes of the World," one of 
the E. M. Newman's "World Adven- 
tures" numbers; "Beau Bosko," a 
"Looney Tune" comedy cartoon; 
"Shuffle Off To Buffalo," a "Merrie 
Melodies" song cartoon; "The Audi- 
tion," a "Melody Masters" band 
number with Hannah Williams and 
Phil Emerton's Band; "Fishermen's 
Holiday," a "Pepper Pot" novelty 
reel; "Bosko's Mechanical Man," a 
"Looney Tunes" comedy cartoon; 
and the fifth and sixth of the Bobby 
Jones' "How To Break 90" golf reels 
entitled, "Down Swing," and "Im- 
pact." 



50 P. C, OF FUTTER 

PRODUCING IN EAST 



(.Continued from Page 1) 

Medbury, whom he re-signed yester- 
day for the new series which will 
be released by Columbia. 

Futter will make his headquar- 
ters in New York and visit the coast 
three or four times during the year. 
Two features, as yet untitled, will 
be made at the Futter Hollywood 
studios for 1933-34. 



BURNS-ALLEN AT PARAMOUNT 

George Burns and Gracie Allen 
have been booked for a week's ap- 
pearance at the Paramount theater 
prior to starting for Hollywood for 
their next Paramount picture. They 
will offer their own original revue 
at the Paramount entitled "Where's 
My Brother?" 



NAMED MONTREAL MANAGER 

Toronto — Appointment of Maurice 
Davis, veteran film exchange official 
of Montreal, as manager of the 
Montreal branch of Empire Films, 
Ltd., is announced by President 
Oscar R. Hanson. 



PARA. SIGNS IDA LUPINO 

Ida Lupino, 17-year-old daugh- 
ter of Stanley Lupino, British com- 
edian, has been signed to a long 
term contract by Paramount. Miss 
Lupino, who is now in England, will 
report at the coast in August. 



New Deal 

15 YEARS 

* 

Film Daily 



YOU'LL HEAR MORE ABOUT THIS 

BEFORE THE SUMMER IS OVER!!! 



r 



THE SILENT FACTOR IN 

SOUND 



BEHIND every talkie stands 
your original sound record... 
unknown, unseen, unheard by 
the public, but arresting in its im- 
portance. For clear superiority . . . for 
highest fidelity under all conditions 
of variable-area and variable-density 
recording... use Eastman Sound 
Recording Film. It is a vital though 
silent factor in today's sound suc- 
cesses. Eastman Kodak Company. 
(J. E. Brulatour, Inc., Distributors, 
New York, Chicago, Hollywood.) 



EASTMAN 



SOUND RECORDING FILM 




rrzt 



The 


Dai 


y N 


ewsp < 


i per 


Of 


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Now 


F.ft, 


sen 


Years 


Old 



DL. LYIII. NO. 7 



JUL 1 l iq-^E^YCEK, MONDAY, JULY 1 C, 1933 



<5 CENTS 



VewChecku 



MajorsPlanning386Features 



1LLIED WILL URGE EXHiBS TO GET ERPI REFUNDS 

iays Too Much Attention Paid to Theater Decorations 



That Code 

. . . too many cooks, etc. 

^=^By JACK ALICOATE^^= 



/E ARE not unmindful of the rather 
' dominant fact that any completed in- 
I try code, under which this business is 
work in harmony in its march back to 
sperity, must reflect the thoughts of 
flicting elements in the motion picture 
'jstry. This, obviously, must mean the 
tration of aims, ideals and desires. It 
;t mean sacrifice, here and there, for 
d of all. It must mean facing the prob- 

from the broad standpoint of the in- 
I try as a whole. It is to be regretted 
i that certain meddling elements, under 
it of the code, are already seeking sim- 
to further only their own selfish inter- 
Any code relating to this business 
j Id come from the recognized headquar- 

of the industry. 

• 
IERE is no questioning the fact that the 
office of the Motion Picture Producers 
, Distributors of America, presided over 
Will Hays, is the recognized fountain 
i of this splendid industry. We some- 
;s wonder where this business would 
headed without the matured, efficient 
comprehensive service rendered the 
re industry by Will Hays and his ener- 
|c group over on 44th Street. This talk 
trustification is so much balmy apple- 
:e. This business was never more wide 
i. It needs all the help Washington 
U give it and in going to Washington it 
t do so with clean hands and a united 
t. 

• 
IE Hays office then, and no where else, 

is the logical place for any industry 
: to be drafted, and then when ready, 
lly presented to Washington. The inter- 
iiate steps, of course, are another mat- 
l Every element must be consulted and 

proposals of conflicting aims carefully 
ghed. The success or failure of a code 
! motion pictures will not depend upon 
draft or presentation to the administra- 

but upon its honesty of purpose, fair- 
and workability after being put in 

tice. Its success, therefore, becomes 

matic. If it is honest it will follow 

ugh successfully. If it be dishonest 

ill fall of its own accord. 



More "Warmth," Comfort 

Needed, Declares 

John Eberson 

In their rush to build theaters, ex- 
hibitors have paid too much atten- 
tion to decorations and too little to 
warmth and comfort of their houses, 
declared John Eberson in an inter- 
view: Saturday. Architects, said 

(Continued on Page 15) 



ALLIED ASS'N BOARD 
PLANS CODE DRAFT 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Definitely indicating 
that Allied States Ass'n will not re- 
main aloof from participating in 
drafting an industry code, a state- 
ment issued here Saturday says that 

(Continued on Page 15) 



Harry Thomas Suggests 
Co-Op Advertising Plan 

A co-operative advertising plan 
involving producer, distributor and 
exhibitor was presented by Harry 
H. Thomas, head of First Division, 
to delegates to the Monogram re- 
gional convention held at the Park 
Central Hotel, Saturday. Stressing 
the theory that the public is becom- 
ing more "picture-wise" each year, 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Texas to Draft Code 

Dallas — Suggestions for what they term 
an "equitable code" will be dratted by 
Allied Theater Owners of Texas at a 
mass meeting to be held at the Jeffer- 
son Hotel today. They will forward the 
draft to the M. P. T. O. A. president, 
Ed Kuykendall, for consideration by his 
executive committee, which convenes 
today in Chicago. 



NOBLE PLANS SERIES; 
REPORT ERPI BACKING 



Jack Noble, who is reported to 

have Electrical Research Products' 
backing, is planning a series of 10 
features to be made at the Eastern 
Service Studio, Long Island. 

William Bach, who heads a new 
subsidiary which has been organized 
by Erpi interests, yesterday said he 
had not decided whether or not his 
company will engage in theatrical 
picture production. 



Camden Anti-Trust Case 
Resumes in Court Today 

Camden, N. J. — Hearing on the 
Victoria Amusement Company's 
anti-trust action against major dis- 
tributors will resume today in the 
District Court before Judge Avis 
when a preliminary hearing will be 

(Continued on Page 15) 



Eight Majors Plan 386 Features 
For '33-' 34, New Survey Shows 



N. A. M. P. I. Committee 
Moves to Simplify Code 

In an effort to simplify the indus- 
try code draft being prepared by the 
National Association of the M. P. 
Industry, its code committee on Sat- 
urday eliminated provisions for an 
enforcement setup. It had been 
planned to recommend a National 
Control Council to handle this phase 
of the code with the assistance of 
a committee. 



Latest checkup of 1933-34 feature 
plans of eight major companies in- 
dicate that they will offer at least 
386 pictures during the new season. 
With lineups of six of these organi- 
zations already formally made pub- 
lic, two are yet to be officially heard 
from. Warner Bros.-First National 
are expected to list 40 features 
while United Artists is understood 
to be announcing 35 at its Chicago 
sales convention July 17. 



Bases Recommendation on 

Wilmington Ruling on 

Leasing Pact 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Confident that the 
Wilmington District Court ruling 
granting a temporary injunction 
against certain restrictive clauses in 
the Electrical Research Products 
agreement after finding them illegal, 
Allied States Ass'n will advise its 
members to protest further en- 
forcement of the clauses in question 
and to demand the refund of all 
money paid Erpi under these provi- 
sions. 

"Forms for carrying out these 

(Continued on Page 6) 



SCORE CHARGES NOT 
TO BE DISCONTINUED 

No junking of score charges are 
planned by distributing companies 
during the new season, according to 
a checkup made Saturday. Various 
exhibitor organizations, including 
the two national associations, the 
M. P. T. 0. A. and Allied States 
Ass'n, have repeatedly sought elimi- 
nation of the assessment. 



Goebel and Eight Aides 
Are Given Prison Terms 

Prison sentences and fines have 
been imposed on Otto E. Goebel and 
eight others convicted of mail fraud 
in connection with the proposed pro- 
duction of religious films. Sentence 
was passed by Federal Judge John 
W. Woolsey. Goebel was sentenced 
to a term of five years and a fine 
if $41,000. Irene C. Flautt will go 
to prison for four years and pay a 
(Continued on Page 6) 



Buffalo Optimistic 

Buffalo — With business showing gains 
in all lines, local film people are look- 
forward to much improvement for the 
last half of the year as compared with 
recent months, a checkup made by THE 
FILM DAILY indicates. 



THE 



■%£1 



DAILY 



Monday, July 10, 1933 




Vol. LXIII, No. 7 Mon., July 10, 1933 Price 5 Cents 
JOHN W. ALICOATE ■ Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holiday? 
»t 1650 Broadway, New York, N. Y , 
Ijj Wids's Films and Film Folk. Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau. Secretary-Treasurer 
»nd General Manager; Arthur W. Edily, Asso 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at New York. 
V. Y., under the act of March 3, 1879 
Terms (Postage free) United Stales outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, S3. 00. Foreign, 
515.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
\ddress all communications to THE FTI.M 
DAILY. 1-650 Broadway, New York. N. Y„ 
Phone, Circle 7-4736, 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London — 
Ernest \V. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
VVardour St., \V. I. Berlin— Karl YVolffsohn 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
-P. A. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

(QUOTATIONS AS OF SATURDAY) 

Net 

High Low Close Chg. 

Columbia Picts. vtc. 21% 21% 21% + % 

Con. Fm. Ind 5 4% 4% — U 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd... 123g 11% 12% + % 

East. Kodak 85% 83% 84 

Fox Fm. "A" 3% 3% 3% + % 

Loew's, Inc 25% 243/ 8 243/ 4 + % 

do pfd 70 70 70 — 1% 

Paramount ctfs 2% 2 2% 

Pathe Exch 1% 1% 1%+ % 

do "A" 7% 71/4 75/ 8 + 1/4 

RKO 434 4% 4% + % 

Warner Bros 7 6% 6% 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 
Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 ctfs. 4% 4% 4% + % 

Technicolor 8% 81/4 8% — 1/4 

Trans-Lux 2% 2% 27/ 8 + % 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 
Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 ctfs. 5% 4% 4% + % 

Keith A-0 6s 46 50 49 49 

Loew 6s 41 ww 83 83 83 

Paramount 6s 47 25% 25 25 

Paramount 6s47 ctfs. 25 25 25 

Par. By. 5%s51 37% 373/ 8 37% + % 

Par. 5%s50 257 8 25 25—1 

Pathe 7s37 75 75 75 

Warner's 6s39 373 4 37l/ 4 37% + 1% 



6 PREPARING AT M-G-M 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — M-G-M has six fea- 
tures ready for production soon. 
They are "Bombshell," "Cat and the 
Fiddle," "Christopher Bean," "Queen 
Christina," "The Big Liar" and an 
Ed Wynn story as yet untitled. The 
company now has four fea cures 
ready for release, and eight pictures 
in production. 



M-G-M 

Max Baer, < 
weight boxing 
a contract to 
picture for M 
and the Lady. 


Signs Max Baer 

hallenger for the heavy- 
championship, has signed 
appear in at least one 
-G-M, "The Prizefighter 



The Itroatlwsiv Parade 



FIRST RUNS 

Distributor 



Theater 



Warner Bros Music Hall 

Columbia "!KO Roxy 

RKO Radio Palace 

M-G-M Capitol 

Warner Bros Strand 

Paramount Paramount 



Picture 

Private Detective 62 

Ann Carver's Profession!*) 

Melody Cruise! * I 

Hold Your Man (2nd week) 

Mayor of Hell (2nd weekl 

I Love That Man 

Made on Broadway M-G-M. . Rialto 

It's Great to be Alive Fox 7th Ave. Roxy 

Samarang (2nd week) United Artists Rivoli 

ThcSphinx... .» . Monogram Mayfair 

Gol^ Diggers of 1933 (6th week) Warner Bros Hollywood 

(*) Subsequent runs. 

FOREIGN PICTURES 

Poll de Carotte (7th week) Harold Auten Europa 

26 Comissars (2nd week) Amkino Acme 

Das Lockende Ziel Chas. Herri itz Vanderbilt 

A Nous, la Liberte Harold Auten Little Carnegie 

FUTURE OPENINGS 

Pilgrimage I July 12) Fox Gaiety 

Hell's Holiday ( July 14) Superb Pictures Miyfair 

Best of Enemies (July 14) Fox 7th Ave. Roxy 



Economics and Labor 
Expert May Be Code Aide 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — An authority on 
economics and labor problems, some 
uersonality not connected with the 
business, is expected to be the type 
if assistant which Gen. Hugh S. 
Johnson will appoint to handle the 
film industry code. The assistant 
will serve as judge, official and arbi- 
ter. 



U. A. to Distribute 

New "Nell Gwynn" Film 

United Artists will release the 
British & Dominion sound version 
of "Nell Gwynn," which Herbert 
Wilcox is now directing in England. 
\nna Neagle will be starred in the 
title role. 



RELEASING "TOM MOONEY" 

"The Strange Case of Tom 
Mooney," a Brvan Foy two-reel pro- 
duction, will be released by First 
Division early in August. Lou Golder 
arranged the deal. 



LOEW SLIGHTLY INJURED 

Arthur Loew was slightly in- 
iured Saturday afternoon when his 
amphibian plane stalled 30 feet 
above Roosevelt Field and nose- 
dived. Loew was taken to Nassau 
Hospital, at Mineola, with cuts on 
both legs and on the neck. 



GERTRUDE NIESEN FOR ROXY 

Gertrude Niesen, well knowm radio 
star, will make her debut on the 
New T York stage as the headliner of 
the new variety show which begins 
Friday at the Roxy theater, 7th ave. 



NAMED FOX BOSTON MGR. 

Boston — Maurice Grasserreen has 
been appointed manager for Fox in 
Boston. 



Harry Thomas Suggests 
Co-Op Advertising Plan 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Thomas suggested that second-run 
houses will derive the benefit of 
first-run exploitation and publicity 
by co-operative advertising in which 
all theaters playing features from 
Monogram will be mentioned in the 
ads, day and date with the playing 
of the films. Thomas mentioned the 
co-operative ad campaign for "Down 
to the Sea in Ships" as an example. 
The Monogram franchise holders 
w r ere also addressed by Eddie Golden, 
who outlined the new product and 
reviewed Monogram's past records. 
W. Ray Johnston, president, voiced 
his objections to the dual bill clause 
being included in the proposed ex- 
hibitor codes. In the afternoon ses- 
sion, individual franchise holders 
were heard. About 35 delegates at- 
tended. 



SPITALNY TO CONDUCT 

Phil Spitalny, noted conductor 
who recently concluded a week's 
successful engagement at the Capi- 
tol theater with his renowned or- 
chestra, has been engaged by Louis 
K. Sidney to conduct the orchestra 
9t the Capitol during the time that 
Yasha Bunchuk is vacationing in 
in Europe. 



BUYS "MARIE ANTOINETTE" 

Acquisition of picture rights to 
Stefan Zweig's "Marie Antoinette" 
is announced by M-G-M. 



BENITA HUME IN LEAD 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Benita Hume, English 
actress, will have the leading femin- 
ine role opposite Adolphe Menjou 
in Monta Bell's story, "The Worst 
Woman in Paris." Carole Lombard 
was originally selected for the role. 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



Today: M. P. T. O. A. executive committee 
meeting, Hotel Congress, Chicago. 

Today: Meeting of National Ass'n of M. P. In- 
dustry at Park Central Hotel. 

Today: Monogram southern sales meeting, 
Jung Hotel, New Orleans. 

July 11: Meeting of Allied Theaters of New 

Jersey at 2 P. M. 
July 12: World Premiere of "Pilgrimage" a 

Gaiety. New York. 
July 15: Monogram central sales meeting 
Blackstone Hotel, Chicago. 

uly 17: United Artists sales convention, Chi 
cago 

July 18: Meeting of M. P. T. O. of Arkansas. 
Mississippi and Tennessee. Jackson, Miss. 

July 21-22: Fox Film Corp. special stockhold- 
ers' meeting, home office, New York. 

July 24-25: Code convention at Hotel Astor 
under auspices of National Association of 
the Motion Picture Industry. 

July 25: Meeting of Allied Theaters of New 
Jersey at 2 P. M. 

'uly 28-29: Monogram western sales meeting 
San Francisco. 

July 28-31: Meeting of Independent Theater 
Supply Dealers' Association at Stevens 
Hotel, Chicago. 

Aug. 2: Outing at Bear Mountain under aus- 
pices of Motion Picture Club. 

Aug. 2-3: Monogram Canadian sales meeting 
Tororto. 

Aug. 23-24: First annual convention of Inde- 
pendent Motion Picture Owners Associatiof 
of Delaware and Eastern Shore of Marylanc 
at Hotel Henelopen, Rehoboth. Del. 

Sept. 13: A. M. P. A. holds annual election 
officers 



Monogram Sales Policy 
Discussed at Meeting 

Monogram's 1933-34 sales plai 
policies were discussed at the New 
York regional meeting Saturday x 
the Park Central, with President W 
Ray Johnston in charge. Edwarc 
Golden presided as general sales 
manager and Harry Thomas ano 
various franchise holders spoke. Th« 
New Orleans regional meeting take 
place today. 



H. CROSMAN AT PREVIEW 

Henrietta Crosman, star of Fox*; 
"Pilgrimage," will make a persona 
appearance at the Gaiety on tin 
opening night, July 12. 



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» 






11 




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(your box-office will give you. the answer I 



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What happen* to YOUR 

POCKETBOOK M 

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▲ w^ 





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picture? explaining 
the mort discussea 
subject or the day/ 

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READY! Also press sheet 
with practical promotion 
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The showmen of M-G-M have pro- 
duced a timely subject/lNFLATIOR" 
It tells in ten minutes, by entertaining 
pictures and snappy Pete Smith dia- 
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THE STRONGEST 

LINE-UP IN 
FOX HISTORY 

and FOX has enjoyed 
some greaf seasons! 



JUDGE IT... (or star values, story 
strength, superlative direction, 
balanced entertainment. 

COMPARE IT . . . with the 

loudest and most boastful claims 
of any other company. 

WE KNOW . . . you will agree 
that FOX manpower has hit the 
heart of the box office ... as no 
other company has for 1933-34. 




My Weakness 

Lilian Harvey, Lew Ayres, Sid Silvers, Charles 
Butterworth, Harry Langdon. Girls! Girls! Girls! . . . and 
still more beautiful Girls! B. G. DeSylva musical pro- 
duction. Directed by David Butler. 

Pilgrimage 

Henrietta Crosman, Heather Angel, Norman Foster, 
Marian Nixon. Story by I. A. R. Wylie. Directed by 
John Ford. 

Paddy the Next Best Thing 

Janet Gaynor, Warner Baxter. Remember "Daddy Long 
Long Legs"? From Gertrude Page's novel. Directed by 
Harry Lachman. 

Charlie Chan's Greatest Case 

Earl Derr Biggers' Charlie Chan adventure. 
Warner Oland, Heather Angel. Directed by 
Hamilton MacFadden. 

The Good Companions 

Musical romance based on J. B. Priestley's best seller 
and stage smash. With Jessie Matthews. 

Doctor Bull 

Will Rogers, Louise Dresser, Vera Allen, Marian Nixon, 
Ralph Morgan. From the sensational selling novel, "The 
Last Adam" by James Gould Cozzens. Directed by John 
Ford. 

The Power and the Glory 

Spencer Tracy, Colleen Moore, Ralph Morgan, Helen 
Vinson. Jesse Lasky production. Directed by William 
K. Howard. 

Walls of Gold I 

Sally Eilers, Norman Foster. From Kathleen Norris' 
American Magazine serial and popular novel. 

He Knew His Women [Tentative Title] 

Warner Baxter in further adventures of "The Cisco Kid," 
O. Henry's famous character, footloose on the Bowery 
in 90's. 

The Worst Woman in Paris? 

Adolphe Menjou, John Boles. Jesse Lasky production., 
Written and directed by Monta Bell. 

Berkeley Square 

Leslie Howard, Heather Angel, Irene Browne, Beryi j 
Mercer. From John L. Balderston's Broadway smash 
Directed by Frank Lloyd. Jesse L. Lasky production. 

The Mad Game 

Spencer Tracy, Claire Trevor, Ralph Morgan. Directed) 
by Irving Cummings. 

Jimmy and Sally 

James Dunn, Sally Eilers. Story by Mauri Grashin andij 
James Seymour. 

My Lips Betray 

Lilian Harvey, John Boles, El Brendel. From the play) 
sensation by Attila Orbok. Directed by John Blystone.| 

The Last Trail 

Zane Grey story. George O'Brien, El Brendel, Clairei 
Trevor. Directed by James Tinling. 



The World Moves On 

Based on an original screen play by Reginald Berkeley. 
Directed by John Ford. 

Fox Movietone Follies 

Musical super production with every star on the Fox lot, 
and 300 of the world's most beautiful girls. 

Hoop-La 

Clara Bow, Norman Foster. With Chicago World's 
Fair Background. Directed by Frank Lloyd. 

I Am a Widow 

John Boles, Ralph Morgan. From the story by C. N. 
Williamson and Sidney Arundel. 

Frontier Marshal 

George O'Brien. Based on the story by Stuart N. Lake. 

Untitled Picture 

Janet Gaynor, Lew Ayres. Based on the Broadway stage 
success, "The House of Connelly" by Paul Green. 
Directed by Henry King. 

I 

There's Always Tomorrow 

Will Rogers, Zasu Pitts, Florence Desmond. Frank 
Borzage production. From the Saturday Evening Post 
story, "Green Dice," by Anne Cameron. 

Kiss and Forget 

Henry Garat in a spicy, delightful musical romance. 

Musk in the Air 

Broadway's current outstanding musical hit (in its ninth 
month), by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein 2nd 
Watch for important cast announcements. 

David Harum 

Will Rogers. Based on the famous American classic by 
Edward Noyes Westcott. 

In Your Arms 

Lilian Harvey. From the story by Sig Herzig and 
Maurice Hanline. 

Peking Picnic 

Jesse Lasky production. From the novel by Ann Bridge. 
A brilliant cast is being selected. 

I Come from Hell 

El Brendel. Comedy riot by George Marshall and 
Andrew Bennison. 

Dressed to Love 

From the Parisian stage hit, "Dressmaker of Luneville" 
by Alfred Savoir. 

As Husbands Go 

Philip Merivale. From the stage hit that ran for a year 
on Broadway by Rachel Crothers, author of "When 
Ladies Meet." Jesse Lasky production. 

The Favorite 

James Dunn, Sally Eilers. Roaring, rollicking story of 
the race track. 

Woman and the Law 

Preston Foster, Claire Trevor. Story by Judith Ravel and 
Lowell Brentano. 



Odd Thursday 

Warner Baxter. Based on the story by Vera Caspary. 

Orient Express 

Heather Angel, Norman Foster, Herbert Mundin. 
From Graham Greene's novel. Directed by Paul Martin. 

Smoky 

From the Will James story that lives forever in the 
hearts of millions. Directed by Eugene J. Forde. 

Marie Galante 

From the sensational story by Jacques Duval ... A 
tremendous cast is being assembled. 

The Grand Canary 

The story scoop of the year. A. J. Cronin's novel, high 
ranker in all bestseller ratings. 

Untitled Picture 

Lilian Harvey, Charles Boyer. Musical special directed 
by Frederick Hollander. 

Three on a Honeymoon 

An original story built on unusual romantic theme. 
Details will be announced when advisable. 

Nerve 

George O'Brien. Roaring, rousing outdoor drama from 
the story by Peter B. Kyne. 

Sleepers East 

From Frederick Nebel's high-speed, best-selling novel. 
With an important cast. 

The Constant Nymph 

The outstanding best seller and Broadway hit by 
Margaret Kennedy With a cast worthy of its bigness. 

Three Against Death 

Marion Burns, Kane Richmond, Harry Woods. Directed 
by Clyde Elliott. 

I Was a Spy 

Herbert Marshall, Madeleine Carroll, Conrad Veidt. 
Directed by Victor Saville. 



■ 




WATCH this week's 

TRADE PAPERS 

for indisputable proof that 
FOX is the new leader of 
this industry. 



THE 



-<2^ 



DAILY 



Monday, July 10,1933 



SHORT SHOTS from 
EASTERN STUDIOS 



■By CHAS. ALICOATE 



PREPARATIONS on the first of 
the new series of shorts featur- 
ing Tom Howard, to be made by the 
W-K-D Productions, headed by I. N. 
Weber and D. Doran, with headquar- 
ters in the Bond Building, has been 
started with production scheduled in 

an eastern studio within two weeks. 

• 

Shooting on "The Emperor 
Jones," the Eugene O'Neill play 
starring Paid Robeson, being pro- 
duced by Krimsky-Cochrane at the 
Eastern Service studio in Astoria 
for United Artists release, is ex- 
pected to be completed next week- 
Dudley Murphy is directing. 

A Vitaphone short subject which 
features the Notre Dame University 
Glee Club is now in production at 
the Brooklyn studio. Roy Mack is 
directing. 

Jack Henley, staff writer at the 
Brooklyn Vitaphone studio and polo 
player extraordinary, is again play- 
ing the game this summer but is 
found under the horse more than he 
is on top, say those who have wit- 
nessed him in action. 

John T. Doran, stage manager for 
the Eastern Service Studios, left 
Monday on what John claims is his 
first vacation in 12 years. He plans 
to visit the Century of Progress Ex- 
hibition in Chicago. 

Eddie Moran, actor, writer, has 
joined the writing staff at the 
Brooklyn Vitaphone studio. 

Production is under way at the 
Vitaphone studio on a Vitaphone 
short starring Dave Rubinoff and his 
band. Jean Sargent, one of the 
stars in the recent musical hit, "Fly- 
ing Colors," is also featured in the 
cast. Joseph Henabery is directing 
the picture, which will be released 
in the Vitaphone series called "Mel- 
ody Masters." 



CAST OF "EMPEROR JONES" 

Complete cast of "Emperor 
Jones," which is being produced at 
the Astoria studios for United Art- 
ists release, is as follows: Paul Rob- 
eson, Dudley Digges, Frank Wilson, 
Fredi Washington, Ruby Elzy, 
George Haymid, Jackie Maybie, 
Blueboy O'Connor, Brandon Evans 
and Tavlor Gordon. 



Coming and Going 



THELMA TODD has left New York for Holly- 
wood. 

MARCEL MEKLEBERG, president of Century 
Film, Boston, is in New York. 

HARRY ASCHER, head of American Pictures 
of Boston, is in New York. 

A. W. SMITH, JR., Warner Bros, divisional 
sales manager, leaves New York today on an 
;astern tour. 




• • • GOING AFTER the foreign field Warners' 

gang in Gr?at Britain took advantage of the annual conference 
of the exhibitors' association the C. E. A. in 

Glasgow last week to put over "Gold Diggers" 

they had a special trade showing after which they did 

some heavy bookings right on the spot the weekly trade 

paper, "Kinematograph," reproduced the pressbook cover in 
gold, with a four-page insert and back cover also in the gold 
motif and out in Paris, Robert Schloss who handles 
the Warner biz for France, is steamed up over signing an exhib 
for "Gold Diggers" five minutes after he gave him a private 
screening 



• • • IT SEEMS that a printed statement on the lineup 
of officers and directors of AMPA for the coming year that 

recently appeared gave the impression in some quarters 

that these gents underwent some sort of star chamber proceed- 
ings being sentenced to be shot at sunrise without ben- 
efit of clergy or even being consulted tut, tut 

we know all these boys and from president-elect John 

Flinn down they are happy to be associated with AMPA 

and why not? an organization with a glorious 

record so why step out of line to pan a gang of fellers 

who are sincerely trying to do their bit in advancing the inter- 
ests of all in the industry was that a sporting thing 

to do ? 



• • • OVER AT HER Lab Morris Rosenzweig re- 
cently threw a party because his wife had a baby boy 

Morris is doing fine Todd Rollins has started west with 
his orchestra on a ten-week tour of one-nighters and picture 
houses Gordon White is all excited and justifi- 
ably so over the fact that the last 20 Educational re- 
leases played consecutively on Broadway also three new 

Broadway bookings this week which give his company a record 
for consecutive first-run business in New York 



• • • DOWN IN Shreveport, Louisiana Judge S. 

C. Fullilove in the Juvenile Court ordered two boys to see 

"Mayor of Hell" as part of their probation sentence and 

what gives Eddie Selzer of Warners' publicity dep't a kick is the 
fact that he had a similar incident as a stunt suggested in the 
pressbook 



• • • WE CAN remember as far back as the time when 
Director Harry Beaumont was playing in a stock company 

........ before he ever knew about Hollerword and Harry 

useter come out between acts and sing his specialty one 

of those goofy endless-chain songs with oompty verses 

wonder if Harry remembers that? 



•. • • WHEN WE asked Grad Sears why he Lat in the 

Warner home ossif dining room in his shirt sleeves he 

looked at his companion, Mister Skouras, and sez "With 

Spyros all over the place in conversation and what not, you 

HAVE to be in your shirt sleeves." Walquist & Gatteii 

have added John Michael Flick to their technical staff in their 
synchronizing and recording 



« « « 



» » » 



ALLIED URGES EXHIBS 
TO GET ERPI REFUNDS 



(Continued from Page 1) 

suggestions will be sent to Allied 
leaders in a few days," said a state- 
ment issued here Saturday. 

Since the Wilmington decision 
only applies to the complainants, 
which are Stanley Co. of America, 
General Talking Pictures and Duo- 
vac Radio Corp., Allied will petition 
President Roosevelt to have the re- 
lief applicable to all theaters. 

It is further stated that "Allied 
urged that Attorney-General Mit- 
chell bring a suit in behalf of all 
exhibitors similar to that brought 
by the Stanley Co. in behalf of its 
own houses, but he took the position 
that the Government should not 
prejudice the parties to the pending 
litigation." Now Allied will ask the 
President to instruct the Depart- 
ment of Justice to reverse its policy 
in the matter so all exhibitors may 
obtain relief secured by the three 
complainants in the Wilmington suit. 



Goebel and Eight Aides 
Are Given Prison Terms 

(Continued from Page 1) 

fine of $41,000. Elizabeth M. Flautt, 
for whom the jury recommended 
mercy, was given a year and a day 
in prison. Jerome D. Klein, and 
James E. Cassidy were given four- 
year terms and fines of $41,000 each 
and similar fines and two-year terms 
in prison were meted out to Bernard 
J. Flynn, Franklyn Johnson, Robert 
Patterson and John Elder. 



RKO THEATER ASSIGNMENTS 

Effective today, Thomas Meehan 
will be transferred from city man- 
ager for Providence to manage the 
Keith's Memorial, Boston, replacing 
William Raynor, resigned. George 
French, formerly assistant manager 
at the Keith's Memorial, Boston, will 
be transferred to the RKO Albee, 
Providence. French will not be re- 
placed at the Keith's Memorial. Gor- 
don Hughes remains as manager of 
the Victory, Providence. 




MANY PAPPY RETURNS 




■ est wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
Industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 



July 10 




William M. Counselman Sam Wood 

Dudley Murphy Joan Marsh 

John Gilbert 






PRODU 



. NOT PRED 




HIS is an advertisement to call your attention to a book 
advertising the RKO-RADIO Program for 1933-34. 

It will be handed you by the postman or an RKO-RADIO 
salesman. 

It is important that you get a copy for two reasons. 

First, it is the only advance summary of our forthcoming 
product that you will see before the new season begins and 
secondly, it is an answer to a frequent question in this in- 
dustry, "Can motion picture producers ever learn to sell a 
film in a sincere merchandising manner?" 

In this book you will find few superlatives and no figments 
of the imagination. 



"Flying Down to Rio" 
Staged in the clouds! 



CTIONS 



:tions! 



IN THIS BOOK WE TALK ABOUT PRODUCTIONS, NOT 
PREDICTIONS. 

It seeks to make one important point ... it is that RKO- 
RADIO will continue making first rate pictures! 

In the season just closing no program was more consistently 



. no other 




LIONEL 
BARRyMORE 



filled with substantial audience attractions . 
producer turned out so many definite box- 
office hits. The list is long, we will not 
repeat it here. 



But we will repeat that our 

studio, under the direction of Merian C. Cooper 

is committed to a plan to surpass that enviable record in 

1933-34. 

The frequency with which this company turned out successes 
is proof that they were not accident, but the product of an 
organization geared to the production of successful shows, 
with the genius to conceive and the resources to produce 
with intelligence. 



RICHARD DIX 

CONSTANCE 
BENNETT 




"Little Women" — 
dear to the heart of 
every woman 



"Ann Vickers" — This year's 
greatest dramatic property 










s* 




Beautiful — explores the 
secret heart of womankind 




One Man's Journey" 
a drama of devotion 



KATHARINE HEPBURN 



FRANCIS 
LEDERER 





52 FROM 
RKO-RADIO 



1933... 1934 



IRENE 
DUNNE 



It is upon a record of accomplishment that RKO 
RADIO presents in this book an outline of its forth 
coming program. 

This book intentionally does not attempt to list the 
title of every picture that RKO-RADIO will pro- 
duce during the 1933-34 season. You know, and 
we know, that is not practical. 

In a business as kaleidoscopic as this, 
almost journalistic in its reflection of 
shifting public tastes and interests, 

a producer's course must be laid to grasp 1 
every new opportunity, to acquire 
new books and plays, to sign 
the new stars that sweep across 
the theatrical skies. 






FRED ASTAIRF. 

ADOLPHE 
MENJOU 



*:. 



Francis Lederer, a soul 



Of Human Bondage" 
greatest novel of the 
20th century 



on fire with song! 




DOUGLAS 
FAIRBANKS, Jr. 




Morning Glory" — a small 
'own girl, human and real 




Our plans 
resources 

to grasp these ever rising opportunities 
& ... because we vvant these things t 
and so do you 

In this book you will find productio 
not predictions. 



LESLIE 
HOWARD 



Tou will be told about pictures actually made 
or in production. About books and plays that 
have been bought and will be produced. About 
stars and players signed and cast. 

The list is too long to talk about here but it 
includes such notable productions as "ANN 
VICKERS" by Sinclair Lewis, beyond doubt 
today's greatest dramatic property with IRENE 
DUNNE in the most coveted role of the year. 





Ace of Aces' — A woman's 
heroic battle for a burned- 
out soul 



Green Mansions ' — love 




ZASU 
PITTS 




DOROTHy 
JORDAN 



"GREEN MANSIONS", W. H. Hudson's majestic 
novel of idyllic love with the stars of "Bird of 
Paradise", DOLORES DEL RIO and JOEL 
McCREA. FRANK BUCKS "WILD CARGO", W. 
Somerset Maugham's "OF HUMAN BONDAGE" 
with LESLIE HOWARD, Louisa M. Alcott's 
"LITTLE WOMEN", beloved by every woman of 
every age with a brilliant cast headed by KATHA- 
RINE HEPBURN, who will also be seen with 
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. and Adolphe Menjou in 
"MORNING GLORY", John Barrymore in 
"FUGITIVE FROM GLORY", LIONEL BARRY- 
MORE in "ONE MAN'S JOURNEY", the new 
Cooper-Schoedsack romantic sensation "SON OF 
KONG" and the musical extravaganza staged in 
the clouds "FLYING DOWN TO RIO" with Fred 
Astaire, and music by Vincent Youmans. 
These are but a few. The starring vehicles 
of CONSTANCE BENNETT, RICHARD DIX, 





JOAN 
BENNETT 




"Fugitive from Glory — Filmed in 
Arabia, where Lawrence reigned 



Escape to Paradise — Love 
and danger in the whaling seas 




Wild Cargo nature saves her 
]reatest thrills for Frank Bvck! 




GINGER 
ROGERS 



ANN HARDING, IRENE DUNNE, KATHARINE 
HEPBURN, FRANCIS LEDERER, JOEL 
McCREA, DOLORES DEL RIO, DOROTHY 
JORDAN, WHEELER AND WOOLSEY, BRUCE 
CABOT and others of our galaxy are equally 
as impressive to the exhibitor who looks 
at the new season product with a keenly ana- 
lytical eye. 

You will find a cross-section representative of a 
program planned to produce only outstanding 
shows for the simple common-sense reason that 
they are the only ones that are profitable. 




JOEL 
McCREA 




"Son of Kong" — the Cooper- 
Schoedsack big show of 1933 



"A Chance at Heaven 
— written down to earth 
by Vina De/mar 






II* 



make em say 

THE WHOLE 
SHOW WAS 
GREAT!"... 









Mi 



ELV 
CULBECTSON 



}M®vISm 



EDGAR KENNEDY & FLORENCE LAKE 

CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

HEADLINERS 

BLONDES and REDHEADS 

MUSICOMEDIES with Ruth Etting 




MERIAN C. COOPE 

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER 



8 



PICTURE 



MINI 



THE 



Monday, July 10, 1933 



■^ 



DAILY 



A LITTLE from "LOTS 



►// 



By RALPH WILK 



HOLLYWOOD 

"HE title of Will Rogers' next 

starring- production for Fox has 

)een changed from "Life's Worth 

Nothing" to "Doctor Bull." This 

Itory is from the successful novel. 

'The Last Adam," by James Gould 

iTozzens, and was adapted to the 

;creen by Paul Green, Pulitzer prize 

winner, for his "In Abraham's 

, 3osom." 

* * * 
Samuel and Bella Spewack have 

leen signed to new long term con- 
racts by M-G-M, while Paul Green 
a new addition to the roster of 
vriters at this company's studios. 

* * * 

Davis Lewis, associate producer 
t RKO studios, has been appointed 
y Merian C. Cooper to succeed 

lexander McKraig as story editor. 
JcKraig will engage in New York 
tage-play production for a few 

onths and return to RKO as asso- 
iate producer later in the year. 

* * * 

Added to the cast of Buddy De- 
iylva's production, "My Weakness," 
or Fox are Charles Butterworth, 
larry Langdon, Suzan Fleming and 
Jarbara Weeks. Featured player* 
ire Lilian Harvey and Lew Ayres. 
)avid Butler will direct with Lee 
Jarmes as cameraman. Music and 
yrics for the production are by 
lichard Whiting and Leo Robbin. 

* * * 

John Ford has been signed to di- 
rect "Patrol," for RKO Radio Pic- 
lures. 

* * * 

Rouben Mamoulian has been en- 
raged to direct Greta Garbo's new 
ftarring vehicle. 

* * * 

Agnes Christine Johnston, screen 
writer, has been signed by RKO Ra~ 
jlio to write the screen play version 
|>f "Stingaree," an original story by 
W. Hornung, which will star 
Irene Dunne. 

* * * 

Jimmy Durante has been added to 
Jhe cast of M-G-M's "The March of 
rime." 

* * * 

Conrad Nagel, after a sojourn in 
few York and stage activity there, 
nil return to the screen in one of 
\he leading roles of "Ann Vickers." 
Jagel is slated to leave New York 
|>n July 9 and will assume his role 
the new picture immediately on 
^is arrival in Hollywood. 

* * * 
Richard Boleslavsky will direct 

I-G-M's "Beauty Parlor," featur- 
ig Otto Krueger and Madge Evans. 



Due to last minute revisions in 
cript requiring a change in char- 
cterization, Fay Wray will play the 
ole announced for Elizabeth Allan 
n "Shanghai Madness," opposite 



Spencer Tracy. Ralph Morgan and 
Howard Lally are other members 
of the cast to be directed by John 
Blystone. 

* * * 

"Bombshell," for which Jean Har- 
low had been previously announced, 
will have Victor Fleming as director 
and Lee Tracy in the principal male 
role, according to announcement by 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 

* * * 

Hugh Herbert, comedian, who was 
signed to a long-term Warner con- 
tract immediately following his work 
in First National's "Goodbye Again," 
is working simultaneously in "Foot- 
light Parade" and "Bureau of Miss- 
ing Persons" at the Warner Bros, 
studios here. 

* * * 

Ed Wynn, who will arrive in 
Hollywood Sunday, will begin work 
at once on a feature picture for 
M-GM, tentatively titled "The Fire 
Chief." Musical numbers have been 
contributed by the team of Rodgers 
and Hart. 

* * * 

The complete cast of "Beauty Par- 
lor," forthcoming M-G-M picture 
based on Faith Baldwin's novel, 
"Beauty," includes Madge Evans, 
Otto Kruger, Una Merkel, Eddie Nu- 
gent, Phillips Holmes, May Robson, 
F'lorine McKinney and Louise Clos- 
ser Hale. Zelda Sears and Eve 
Green prepared the film adaptation 
of Miss Baldwin's book, and Richard 

Boleslavsky is director. 

* * * 

Three writers joined the Para- 
mount story department yesterday. 
They are George B. Seitz, Lewis 
Gensler and George Marion, Jr. 

* * * 

Paramount yesterday made six 
acting assignments for current pro- 
ductions. Lilyan Tashman was 
added to the cast of "Too Much 
Harmony," Verna Hillie and Ed- 
ward Arnold were cast in the com- 
edy "Duck Soup," James C. Kenton 
and Charles Middleton joined the 
cast of "Big Executive" and Sidney 
Toler was cast in "The Way to 
Love." 

* * * 

Paramount's "One Sunday After- 
noon" is completed and will be one 
of the first of the new season's re- 
leases. 

* * * 

Henry O'Neill has been assigned 
to a role in "I Loved A Woman" in 
which Edward G. Robinson is star- 
ring for Warner Bros. 

* * * 

Fox has purchased "The House of 
Connelly," Theater Guild Stage 
success by Paul Green, Pulitzer 
Prize winner, to star Janet Gaynor. 

* * * 

John Warburton and Walter By- 
ron have been added to the cast of 
"Charlie Chan's Greatest Case," 
which Hamilton MacFadden is di- 
recting for Fox. 



Camden Anti-Trust Case 
Resumes in Court Today 

(Continued from Page 1) 

held on a motion to quash service 
of processes in connection with the 
case, on the grounds that the defen- 
dants are not doing business in New 
Jersey and therefore are beyond the 
jurisdiction of the court. The hear- 
ing is scheduled to occupy two days. 

Allied States Ass'n Board 
Is Planning Code Draft 

(Continued from Page 1) 

"the( influence of independent ex- 
hibitors will be marshalled in sup- 
port of the plan finally drawn by 
the board of directors." Allied will 
first determine exhibitor wishes be- 
fore proceeding, says the statement. 



PHILIP MERIVALE CAST 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Philip Merivale will 
play the leading role in Fox's "As 
Husbands Go," which Jesse L. Lasky 
will produce. 



THEATER DECORATION 
GETS TOO MUCH CARE 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Eberson, allowed themselves to be 
carried away by the ambition and 
enthusiasm of theater company ex- 
ecutives. 

The architect, who has designed 
various interesting small houses as 
well as de luxe theaters, declared 
that the tendency is generally to 
build houses of too large capacities. 
He has a plan for a new small-type 
house, presenting a new seating ar- 
rangement and which can be built 
and operated at low cost. 

"Audiences should feel, not see, 
theater decorations," declared Eber- 
son. 

The architect deplored failure of 
many exhibitors to renovate their 
houses, postponing this work owing 
to business conditions. In the long 
run, said Eberson, the costs will be 
higher because of this delay. 



NEW OHIO CORPORATION 

Cincinnati, 0. — The Clinton 
Amusement Co. has been incorpo- 
rated with a capital of 250 shares of 
no par stock to operate picture the- 
aters, by Morris Segel, Jacob Segel 
and Alvin H. Rowe. 



H. BURMAN AT NIGHT CLUB 

Baltimore — Howard Burman, for- 
mer publicity director for the Hip- 
podrome, is now managing the May- 
;air Gardens, local night club. 





ORITZ 





1VE above the 
tree-tops . . No extra 
charge for a restful 
view of entire Central 
Park and a refreshing breeze . /'Amer- 
ica's only truly Continental hotel"., de- 
htful . . different . . convenient to 
theatres, shops and business. 

• 
Dinner and supper dancing nightly in the 
SKY GARDEN, New York's intimate and 
popular Roof . . entertainment. Lunch- 
eon or tea at . . . RUMPELMAYER'S. 

Rates- Single $3 50-$5; double $5-$7; suites trom $3 
ATTRACTIVE WEEKLY AND MONTHLY CONCESSIONS 

Moderately priced apartments furnished or 
unfurnished avaiWe NOW or October 1st. 



DIRECTION 
CREGOr,y TAYLOR 








"THE SONG OF SONGS", a statue by S. C. Scarpitta inspired by certain 
incidents in Paramount's motion picture, "THE SONG OF SONGS". A Rouben 
Mamoulian Production, starring MARLENE DIETRICH, with Brian Aherne, Lionel 
Atwill and Alison Skipworth. "THE SONG OF SONGS" is Dietrich at her best! 







The 


Daily N 


ews 


paper 


Of Motion 


Pi 


ct 


u r es 


Now 


Fifteen 


Ye; 


irs 


Old 



ABB 



VOL. LXIII. NO. 8' 



yCEtt, TUESDAY, JULY 11, 1933 



<S CENTS 



Urge Tole 



un Admission Price Minimum 



T. 0. C. JL WANTS ARBITRATION SETUNN CODE 

Med Depinet Lists 11 More RK0 1933-34 Feature Titles 



Announcement Brings Up 
To 34 Titles of New 
Pictures Listed 

test Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
, Hollywood — Ned E. Depinet has 
nnounced 11 additional titles foi- 
ls 1933-34 RKO features. This 
rings the total of announced titles 
j> 34 as at the New York meeting, 
■5 titles of the scheduled 52 were 
sted. 

The new features on the line-up 
re "Rodney," "Aggie Appleby, 
laker of Men," "Monsters of the 
eep," "The Family Man," "Man 

(Continued on Page 4) 

IEW HUFFMAN FIRM 
GETS PUBLIX HOUSES 

; Denver — Publix is definitely out 
c Denver and its two houses here 

(,ve been taken over by the Gen- 
al Theaters, Inc., with Harry Huff- 
an as president. Theaters controlled 
'w the company are the Denver, 
mg the ace house here, the Para- 
lount, also a Publix operation; 
jladdin, Tabor and Rialto, the last 

(Continued on Page 4) 



'ompel Austrian Houses 
To Run Domestic Shorts 

ashington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Under new Austrian 
lm reelings, all picture theaters 
mst include shorts of an average 
■ngth of 250 meters, produced in 

ustria over Austrian apparatus, 
he subjects may be newsreels and 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Film Issues Generally Show Upward Trend 

Film stocks generally evidenced a decided upward trend on the big board yesterday, 
Loew's, Inc., led the list of stocks, closing at 27y 2 , a net gain of 2% points. Loew's 
preferred closed at 71%, a gain of 1% points. 

Warner common advanced 1 %, closing at 8, and the preferred 1 l/i, closing at 22. 
Pathe Exchange showed a net gain of % of a point, the "A" stock a rise of 1 Vs points. 
RKO was up % of a point, Fox Film "A" 1 point, Consolidated Film Industries Vi 
with the preferred closing at IB'/s, a gain of % of a point. Paramount certificates 
gained a quarter point. 



Ask Over Thirty Independent Distributors 
To Code Meet At Hays Office Tomorrow 



More than 30 independent distrib- 
utors have been invited to partici- 
pate in a conference tomorrow at 3 
p. m. at the Hays office to discuss 
proposed clauses for the industry 
code. In the absence of Attorney 
Gabriel Hess, who left New York 
last night by 'plane for the Coast 
to sit in on code conferences being 
held there by Will H. Hays, Attor- 



ney Louis Nizer will aid at the New 
York meeting. 

The following companies have 
been invited to attend: Amkino 
Corp., Arena Attractions, Aywon 
Films, Al Bondy, Capital Film Ex- 
change, Century Pictures, Chester- 
field Pictures, First Division Ex- 
changes, General Electric Pictures, 

(Continued on Page 6) 



23 Film Trade Ass'ns 

Wash. Bur. of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — According to a Dept. of 
Commerce survey, made in connection 
, with the Industry Recovery Act, there 
are 38 national and interstate associa- 
tions identified with the amusement 
Field, 23 of which are concerned with 
motion pictures. 



Mayor of Minneapolis 
Starts New Preview Plan 

Minneapolis — Mayor A. G. Bain- 
bridge, in his inaugural address, said 
that he would personally exercise 
proper supervision over theatrical 
attractions in the city and that he 
would appoint a committee to view 
motion pictures in advance of their 
public showing. This committee 
would recommend cuts and changes 
and inspect all advertising matter 
intended for use in connection with 
the showing of films. 



Warner Bros. Oppose Fees 
In St. Louis Company Row 

St. Louis, Mo. — Circuit Judge 
Henry Hamilton has taken under 
advisement the application of Roy 
F. Britton and Henri Chouteau, 
temporary receivers for the St. Louis 
Amusement Co., for additional fees 
of $10,000 each for their services 
under the receivership. They were 
placed in charge of the company's 
properties in November, 1931, and 
have already been paid fees of $24,- 

(Continucd on Page 6) 



First Run Minimum Admission 
Price Urged By Toledo Exhibs 



Equitable Plan Will Be 

Urged as Feature of 

Code Draft 

Members of the T. O. C. C. who 
are now being surveyed for their 
suggestions for incorporation in the 
industry code, are understood plan- 
ning to recommend a national sys- 
tem of arbitration, equitable in char- 
acter and with persons not identified 
with the industry acting as arbiters. 

The New York exhibitor associa- 
tion will not undertake to draft an 
exhibition code of its own but in- 
stead will co-operate with groups en- 
gaged in the work. 

UNITED ARTISTS MAY 
SELL AS MANY AS 40 

United Artists' employees totaling 
118 will attend the company's an- 
nual sales convention opening Mon- 
day at the Drake Hotel, Chicago, 
when announcement will be made 
that its new season program will be 

(Continued on Page 6) 

Contract Breach Penalties 
Provided in Writers' Code 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — The Screen Writers' 
Guild code provides that producers 
may file complaint against Guild 
members for violation of its rules 
of conduct in not living up to the 
terms of their contract with pro- 
ducers. Members found guilty of 
(Continued on Page 6) 



Fifteen years is a long time in pictures, com- 
etely covered in the forthcoming "New Deal" 
imber of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



Limit New Indep't Ass'n 
To Producers, Distributors 

Members of the Association of 
the Motion Picture Industry, Inc., 
at a meeting at the Park Central 
Hotel last night, decided to restrict 
their membership to independent 
producers and distributors. It had 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Toledo — In an effort to eliminate 
five-cent admissions, which, accord- 
ing to present indications, may fur- 
ther spread in this territory, the 
Toledo Amusement Managers' Ass'n 
has appealed to exchange managers 
here to enforce their contracts which 
provide for a 10-cent minimum ad- 
mission. They have urged them to 
(Continued on Page 6) 



Charting RKO 

Harold B. Franklin will today re- 
lease an RKO Theaters organization 
chart in which the duties of all RKO 
theater executives will be defined. Ac- 
cording to Franklin, the work formerly 
in the hands of Herschel Stuart will 
be divided between Phil Reisman, B. J. 
Hynes, Arthur Benline, and the local di- 
vision managers. 



Fifteen years of production, distribution and 
exhibition completely covered in the "New 
Deal" number of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



THE 



•<%£1 






DAILY 



Tuesda y) Julyir,1933 




Vol. LXIII, No. 8 Tues., July 11, 1933 Price 5 Cents 
JOHN W. M.IC0ATE : : : Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
it 1650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
and General Manager; Arthur W. Eddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at N«w York, 
N. Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 1-650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
Phose, Circle 7-4736, 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London — 
Ernest VV. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
— P. A. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 

High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 6 5% 5% — % 

Columbia Picts. vtc. 223,4 215/ 8 21 % — 1/4 

Con. Fm. Ind 5 4% 5 + Vt, 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. 131/4 12V4 13'/ 8 + 3 A 

East. Kodak 84 81% 82'/ 2 — 1 Vl 

Fox Fm. "A" .... 43/ 4 33/ 4 45/ 8 + 1 

Loew's, Inc 27% 243/ 8 27 Vi + 23/ 4 

do pfd 71% 713/ 4 713/ 4 + 13/ 4 

Paramount ctfs. . . . 2% 2 23/ 8 + l/ 4 

Pathe Exch 2/2 1 % 2'/ 2 + Va 

do 'A" 83/ 4 71/4 83/ 4 + l'/ 8 

RKO 51/4 4i/ 2 51/4 + % 

Warner Bros 8 65/ 8 8 + 1 1/4 

do pfd 22 21 22 +114 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. pfd... % % % 

Technicolor 8I/4 81/4 8V 4 — 1/4 

T nans-Lux 3 3 3 + Va 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40. 5 4y 2 4 1/2 — Va 

Keith A-0 6s 46... 50 50 50 +1 

83 83 83 

26 25 
371/2 37 



Loew 6s 41 ww. . . . 
Paramount 6s 47 
Par. By. 5&s 51 

Par. 51/2S 50 26i/ 4 25 

Pathe 7s 37 75 75 

Warner's 6s 39.... 39Vi 37/2 

NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE 
Para. Publix IVa 1% 2l/ 8 



26 + 1 

371/2 

251/2 + 1/2 

75 

39 + VA 



JOSEPH URBAN DIES 

Joseph Urban, internationally- 
famous stage designer and artist, 
died yesterday at the age of 61 at 
the Hotel Regis, New York. 



Latest type DOUBLE and SINGLE track 
SOUND MOVIOLAS with NEW SI- 
LENT MOTORS FOR SALE AND RENT 
by DAY, WEEK OR LONG TERM. 

Reasonable Rental Charges 

Ruby Camera Exchange 

727— 7th Ave., N. Y. Tel. BRyant 9-9430 



Incorporate New Lab. 

Association at Albany 

Albany — Motion Picture Labora- 
tories Association of America, Inc., 
New York City, has been chartered 
by the Secretary of State as a mem- 
bership corporation without capital 
stock to foster trade and commerce 
and promote the interests of its 
members engaged in the motion pic- 
ture laboratory business; to adopt 
and submit to the President of the 
United States for approval and to 
enforce a code or codes of fair com- 
petition for the industry represented 
by the members as provided by the 
National Industrial Recovery Act. 

Cateryn C. Magenheimer, 98 
Litchfield Avenue, Babylon; Milton 
Green, 674 East 163rd St., New York 
City; Louis Gray, 259 Rockaway 
Turnpike, Lawrence; Frank Budick, 
537 East 146th St., New York City; 
Sally Canton, 239 Ocean Ave., 
Brooklyn; Francis Soule, 2233 Hen- 
drickson St., Brooklyn; Emma Maio, 
221 William St., Port Chester; Eve- 
lyne Harker, 541 Isham St., New 
York City; Florence Macneil, 316 
West 56th St., New York City, are 
the incorporators. Meyer H. Laven- 
stein, New York City, is attorney 
for the new association. 



PICKFORDS TO DIVIDE TRUST 

West Coast Bureau, of THE FILM DAILY 
Los Angeles — Mary Pickford and 
Lottie Pickford Guillard, her sister, 
will benefit under a $227,038 trust 
fund, it was revealed when a peti- 
tion for authority to dispose of the 
funds left by their mother, Mrs. 
Charlotte Smith Pickford, was filed. 
The money was left in trust for the 
benefit of Jack Pickford, who died 
last January. 



LOEW BACK AT DESK SOON 

Arthur Loew, who was injured 
Saturday when his airplane crashed 
at Roosevelt Field, will return to his 
office late this week, it was an- 
nounced at the M-G-M offices yes- 
terday. Loew was at his home yes- 
terday nursing scratches on his chin 
and legs after being treated at 
Mineola Hospital. 



"DIGGERS" RELEASE SEPT. 2 

Warner Bros, musical hit, "Gold 
Diggers of 1933," which has been 
having numerous pre-release en- 
gagements, will be given its general 
release over the country starting 
Sept. 2, as the first of Warner 
Bros. 1933-34 product. 



M. P. T. O. A. MEET TODAY 

Chicago — Meeting of the M. P. 
T. O. A. executive committee will 
start .today. It had originally been 
planned to open yesterday at the 
Congress. 



FUNERAL OF SIGMUND MOOS 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Funeral of Sigmund 
Moos, manager of the leasing de- 
partment at the Universal studios, 
who died of a heart attack, was held 
yesterday. 



Progressive to Make 

Features and Shorts 

A new production company to be 
known as Progressive Pictures, Inc., 
with Meyer Davis as president, Mon- 
roe Shaff, vice-president, and Jerry 
Wald, secretary, has been formed. 
Plans are to produce a series of mu- 
sical and comedy shorts as well as 
features. Work on the first of the 
series, which will be a group of 
musicals, is scheduled to start in 
an eastern studio in about two 
weeks. 



JUDGMENT VS. BLUMENTHAL 

A receiver has been appointed for 
the property of A. C. Blumenthal 
as the result of a judgment obtained 
against him because of a note for 
$32,000 which he indorsed for John 
Zanft, former vice-president of Fox 
Theaters Corp. The receivership was 
sought by the Banking Dept. of 
Pennsylvania. 



'Phantom Broadcast' For RKO 

Contracts will be signed today by 
First Division and RKO whereby Mono- 
gram's "The Phantom Broadcast" will 
play the entire RKO circuit Aug. 9, 10 
and 11. The deal was handled by 
Johnny O'Connor tor RKO and H. H. 
Thomas and Bud Rogers for First Di- 
vision. 



SUE DUBINSKY BROTHERS 

Kansas City, Mo. — As the result 
of an explosion in the Orpheum at 
Leavenworth, Kan., Aug. 20, 1930, 
Albert R. Evans has filed suit 
against Edward and Irwin Dubinsky, 
owners, asking $10,000 damages. J. 
G. Eisch, violinist and orchestra 
leader, was killed when the com- 
pressor valve on the refrigeration 
plant exploded, which he went to 
the basement to shut off. Evans, 
machinist, was with Eisch at the 
time and was blown 20 feet. 



Limit New Indep't Ass'n 
To Producers, Distributors 

(Continued from Page 1) 

been originally intended to include 
other independent elements of the 
industry in the association^ All 
phases of the business, however, are 
invited to submit independent code 
proposals to the association. 

Twenty-two members of the di- 
rectorate, which is to comprise 30, 
were named last night. They are: 
Frank Wilson, Robert Savini, Les- 
ter Adler, Jack Bellman, William 
Pizor, P. A. Powers, Phil Meyers, 
Pop Korson, Arthur Greenblatt, 
Charles Glett, Ben Berk, Frank D. 
Ferrone, Cy Braunstein, J. S. Kess- 
ler, John Weber, Al Mannin, Sam 
Flax, Harry Thomas, Jack Berko- 
witz, Bernie Mills, Herbert Eben- 
stein and George Batcheller. 

Officers of the association, which 
will be incorporated under the above 
mentioned name, were instructed to 
invite every organized industry unit 
to send delegates to the Coast con- 
vention to be held at the Hotel As- 
tor July 24-25. Attorney Jacob 
Schechter was named counsel of 
the organization. Next meeting will 
be held Monday evening at the Park 
Central. 



New Deal 

15 YEARS 

* I 

Film Daily 



Just Words Now But Wait Until The 

Middle of August and You'll Find Out!!! 



; 



AND THEN COMES 
THE CAKE! 





The Announcements 
for 1933-34 all look 
great! 

You've seen them all — 
* 

MORE POWER 

TO THEM! 

• 

They'll need it 
to compete with— 



ji 



METRO - G OLD WYN- MAYER's 

10 th CHAMPIONSHIP 
YEAR-1933-1934 



Watch Tomorrow's Film Daily 
for the Announcement of 

THE MAJOR COMPANY! 



THE 



// 



I 

REMEMBER 
WHEN 



// 



By 

CHARLES L GLETT 

as told to 
DON HANCOCK 

of The Film Daily Editorial Staff 
II A BOUT 15 years ago, when the Ac- 

*» tors' Fund of America held its bene 
fit show at the Grand Central Palace, 
they had constructed at one end of the 
hall an improvised movie studio so that 
the laymen might see the 'secrets' of mo- 
tion picture production," said Mr. Glett, 
vice-president of Monarch Productions. 

"Naturally they needed actors and ac- 
tresses, and a wealth of 'talent' was al- 
ways to be found in the volunteer ranks 
around the make-shift studio. I was called 
upon to appear before the lens, doing a 
'clinch scene' with a beautiful blonde. 
Sometimes the camera was loaded with 
film, sometimes not, but as long as the 
public heard the click of the camera, that 
was sufficient. 

"After we had done our little scene, the 
director, whom I believe was Alexander 
Leftowitz, told me that I was 'fair' but 
that the blonde who appeared with me 
was 'just too bad and had no chance in 
the movies.' That blonde is known today 
as Marion Davies." 



FRAZER SALT LAKE MANAGER 

Salt Lake City— Dave Frazer has 
become manager of the Salt Lake 
Sheffield-Monogram exchange here, 
replacing H. G. Glanfield who has 
resigned to take a position as sales- 
man for Paramount in the Montana 
territory. Frazer comes from the 
northwest. 



H. D. ARNOLD DIES 

Harold DeForest Arnold, director 
of research for Bell Telephone 
Laboratories, died at his home, 
Summit, N. J., yesterday. 



Coming and Going 



CONRAD NAGEL is en route to the Coast 
from New York. 

CLAYTON P. SHEEHAN is due in New York 
Thursday on the Manhattan. 

DAVE PALFREYMAN of the Hays office re- 
turns to New York Thursday from Chicago. 

BERT ADLER has returned to New York after 
a Washington visit. 

NAT DORFMAN leaves New York Friday for* 
a vacation at Lake George. 

ATTORNEY GABRIEL HESS left New York 
last night for the Coast. 

JOHN M. SPEAKS of the RKO studios is 
in New York and will return to the coast late 
this week. 

GEORGE SCHAEFER arrives in New York to- 
morrow from the coast. 

JAKE WILK, Warner story chief, returned to 
New York from the coast yesterday. 



J^ 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 11, 1933 



IONGthe 

WITH 

PHIL M DALY 



• • • MAKE A notation right now on your desk calendar 

to give yourself a holiday on Aug. 2 to sport 

in the woods and meadows with the frogs and daisies up 

at Bear Mountain for the M. P. Club is staging its first 

annual boat ride, clam bake and nudist colony cult on that day 

an extensive schedule of athletic events and games 

will be on the card for the rheumatic gents who can't 

indulge in the strenuous sports there will be a Nature 

Study Club formed also a Boy Scout Division for the 

lads who like to tramp over hill and dale the Clam 

Bake will be the big attraction with real clam? 

served more details later but meanwhile keep 

the date open you can't go wrong on this booking .... 
a five-spot will cover everything 

* * # * 

• • • BREAKING OF ground for the Palazzo d'ltalia in 
Rockefeller Center will take place with suitable ceremonies on 
Wednesday morn at 11 o'clock Jack Noble is not defi- 
nitely set as yet on his reported production of features 

A. S. Kirkpatrick is back on Film Row, and looking quite 
chipper after his siege of illness "Hell's Holiday," open- 
ing on the 16th at the Mayfair, is copping a lot of advance 
talk 



• © e IT LOOKS as if crashing in his airplane is becom- 
ing a habit with Arthur Loew so Dave Blum suggests 
that Arthur should take up the study of tropical fish or some 

other equally hazardous pastime Harry Beaumont is 

taking his first vacation after working 14 years on the M-G-M 
lot Harry is on his way to China for a six-month layoff. 



• • • ONE GENT who has caught the Spirit of the Far 

East for the films Ward Wing who produced 

"Samarang" a pix with a different flavor Mister 

Wing is making preparations to leave for the Malay Penin- 
sula in a few weeks to produce "Jungle Love" to be 

followed immediately by another before he hits back to civili- 
zation here is a gent who works without much bally- 
hoo he just goes out and does it 



• • • A LINE from Mike Simmons now in Holly- 

wood Mike came pretty near breaking the record for 

an Eastern tenderfoot goin' to work in the Cinema City 

he arrived late in the evening, and at 9:30 the next morn he 
was in conference with Raoul Walsh, supervisor Ray Griffith 
and Wally Beery on "The Bowery" Mike has the honor 

of having his script the first on the production schedule of 
Darryl Zanuck 



• • • IN THE M. P. Tennis League United Artists 

heads the teams with six straight wins Columbia is the 

runner-up with Universal trailing in the cellar Sam 

Warshawsky's drama, "The Woman of Destiny," will be pre- 
sented at the Red Bank theater the week of July 31st, with 

Broadway production lining up for October Miss Eurega 

Eloy David of the RKO booking ossif, who wrote a stage play 
with Lilian Okun, calls our attention to the fact that she is a 
gal, and her name is not "Eugene" as we originally quoted 
far be it from us to change your sex, Eurega . . A 

nifty souvenir put out by RKO on their series of Ely Culbert- 

son shorts in the form of a deck of bridge cards strung 

together making a Grand Slam it goes through the mail 

in a compact container 



NED DEPINET LISTS 
11 MOREJKO TITLES 

(Continued from Page 1) 
of Two Worlds," "Dance of Desire," 
"Stingaree," "Three Came Un- 
armed," "Patrol," "Hide in the 
Dark" and "Just Off Fifth Avenue." 
The remaining 18 are now being 
selected by the story department 
and will likely be announced next 
month. 



New Harry Huffman Firm 
Gets Publix Denver Houses 

(Continued from Page 1) 

named three Huffman houses. The 
new company introduced several 
Denver social and financial names 
to the theater business, and include, 
besides Huffman, Claude K. Boett- 
cher, Wilbur Newton, W. W. Wat- 
son, Frazer Arnold, L. C. Brown, 
John Evans and Horace W. Bennett. 
Capitalization is set at $50,000. 

By this move Huffman controls 
nine Denver theaters, one-fourth of 
those operating. He is managing 
the Orpheum for the receiver, owns 
the Bluebird and Bideawee, neigh- 
borhoods, and is president of the 
company controlling the Broadway, 
used for legit. 

Fanchon & Marco stage shows, 
with a resident manager and line, 
will go into the Orpheum Aug. 4. 
The Denver will be used for class A 
films downtown, the Aladdin for the 
uptown, and the Rialto will continue 
second-run, with the Tabor second- 
run, with stage shows produced there. 



« « « 



» » » 




Name Division Managers 
For Chicago Contest 

Chicago — Division managers for 
the Hollywood-Universal "Miss Per- 
sonality" contest will be: Harry 
Rathner, Buffalo, New York, Al- 
bany, Boston and New Haven; 
Charles Moore, Philadelphia and 
Washington; William Callahan, St. 
Louis; Harry Neill, Indianapolis; 
Al Wolf for Dallas and Oklahoma 
City and Eddie Askin for the Chi- 
•ago and Wisconsin territories. 






Sally Blane 



Walter Wanger 



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A Short Subject 

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rea \ized thes ^construct 

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ticket ^or t e snort an ^iajeW g „„- g ^ - .^ re «-w 

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do»a rt {eC t »n A y ct sl nce 

h Jha bas ^eP f stimulation o every 

t^tZo^r* ot^or 

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-BOOK IT NOW WHILE IT'S HOT! 



THE 



■g&H 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 11, 1933 



THEATER CHANGES 

Reported by Film Boards of Trade 



NORTH CAROLINA 
Changes in Ownership 

HAMLET--Catolina. transferred to H. H. 
Anderson by R. P. Rosser. TARMV1LLE 
— Paramount, transferred to J. S. Brown by 
Norwitt Bros. FRANKLIN — Macon, trans- 
ferred to Vester Woods by Porter & Lias. 
LOUISBURG — Opera House, transferred 
to L. V. Parker by Murray, Pratt and 
Owens. ROANOKE RAPIDS— Imperial, 
transferred to General Amusement Co., Inc., 
by Nash, Traynham and Wheeden. SELMA 
— Carolina, transferred to J. E. Norket by 
C. L. Massey. 

Openings 

AYDEN — New (new theater), by T. S. 
Brown. CHARLOTTE— Pearl, by George 
L. Orr. 

Closings 

BLOWING ROCK— Carolina (damaged by 
fire). WILSON— Wilson. 

NORTH DAKOTA 
Openings 

COLUMBUS— New Columbus. 
Closing 

ST. THOMAS— Opera House. 

OKLAHOMA 
Changes in Ownership 

CHICKASHA— Ritz, transferred to Griffith 
Amusement Co. by Leon Milne. CLINTON 
— Rio, transferred to Griffith Amusement 
Co.. by John Terry. MARLOW— White- 
way, transferred to Burrell Jones by Miss 
Orene Stephenson. PERRY — Annex and 
Roxy, now being operated jointly by Tate 
& Willeson. WEST TULSA— Cameo, 
transferred to Midwest Theater Operating 
Co., Inc., by J. Jacobson. WEWOKA— 



Key, transferred to John Terry by L. 
Chattham. 

New Theaters 

COMMERCE— Nusho, by L. A. Zimmerman. 
VINITA— Grand, by L. L. Taylor and R. 
B. Sexton. WELLSTON— Merchants, by 
H. B. Morris. 

OHIO 
Changes in Ownership 

CINCINNATI — Beecher, transferred to 
James H. Ross by J. McCoul. HAMIL- 
TON — Regent, transferred to Midham Corp. 
by Grand Theater Co. ; Rialto, transferred 
to Midham Corp. by Jewell Photo Co. MID- 
DLETOWN— Gordon, transferred to W. 
Gibbs by Charles Kuehle. MILFORD— - 
Family, transferred to Finke & Hautz by 
Charles Weigel. 

Openings 

MILLERSPORT— Pythian. 

Closings 

CINCINNATI — Capitol. COLUMBUS — 
Pythian. GROVE CITY — Kingdom. 
HAMILTON— State. NEW STRAITS- 
VILLE— New. 

TENNESSEE 
Changes in Ownership 

HALLS — Halls, transferred to Escue & 
Woodley by George H. Likens. JACKSON 
— Paramount, transferred to Melco Thea- 
ters, Inc., by Publix-Saenger. WAVERLY 
— Palace, transferred to Jack Saunders by 
Victor Sensing. 

Openings 

MEMPHIS — Lyric (new theater), by Your 
Theater Corp. 

Closings 

MEMPHIS— Lyric. RIDGELY— Palace. 



United Artists May Sell 
As Many as 40 Features 

(Continued from Page 1) 

increased from 14 to 35 or 40 fea- 
tures. 

Among the United Artists execu- 
tives expected to go direct to the 
convention from the West Coast are 
Joseph M. Schenck, president of 
United Artists; Al Lichtman, vice- 
president in charge of distribution; 
Samuel Goldwyn, producer; Hal 
Home, director of publicity and ad- 
vertising; Edward Finney, assistant 
to Home; Lynn Farnol, personal 
representative for Samuel Goldwyn. 

Leaving from New York will be Harry 
Gold,, assistant to Al Lichtman ; Monroe 
Cireenthal, director of exploitation; Carroll 
S. Trowbridge, personal representative in the 
East for Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pick- 
ford; James Mulvey. Samuel Goldwyn's rep- 
resentative; W. P. Phillips, executive; Sadie 
Feuerstein. secretary to Al Lichtman Dennis 
O'Brien, counsel; Leon Lee, sales promotion 
department; Sam Cohen, foreign publicity 
department; Paul Burner, Martin Moskowitz, 
Ciummo Marx. Jack Von Tilzer, Moe Strei- 
mer, David Burkan, Meyer Lieberman, Nat 
Beier, Leon Herman, Edward T. Mullen, E. 
T. Smith, S. W. McGrath and Jack Dacy. 

Among the highlights of the con- 
vention will be accounts of each 
day's happenings forwarded to ex- 
hibitors throughout the country. On 
the last day an open forum for 
prominent exhibitors and trade pa- 
per representatives will be held 
with United Artists sales executives 
taking part. 

Following is a list of exchange 
managers and salesmen who will 
attend from all sections of the 
United States and Canada: 

C. Eiseman. Paul Harrison. M. C. Hill 
and A. M. Tolkins from Atlanta; Charles 
Stern. John J. Dervin, Sam Stern, A. I. 
Weiner, Lou C. Wechster and George Hager 



Compel Austrian Houses 
To Run Domestic Shorts 

(Continued from Page 1) 

educationals to propagate knowledge 
of culture and economic life in Aus- 
tria, or films showing Austrian 
landscapes, says the Dept. of Com- 
merce. 



from Boston; E. C. Markins, M. V. Sullivan, 
Tr.. T. A. Bvkowski and J. H. Kaplan from 
Buffalo; H. W. Helmbold and R. H. Master- 
man from Charlotte; E. H. Benson, S. B. 
Kramer, H. Dudelson and George C. Porter 
from Cincinnati; A. M. Goodman, L. Geiger 
and N. Levin from Cleveland; A. C. Bucha- 
nan, T. R. Barber, Jay Schrader. Doak Rob- 
erts and C. J. Cammer from Dallas; Harry 
Stern, James Hommel and Al Hoffman from 
Denver; J. D. Goldnar. Leonard Soskin. Wm. 
Feldstein and M. Dudelson from Detroit ; 
Joseph Cantor, E. V. Donnelly, Gaylord Black 
and Carl Goe from Indianapolis; W. E. 
Truog, F. A. Rohrs. W. C. Haynes and Guy 
F. Navarre from Kansas City; E. W. Mac- 
Lean, Guy S. Gunderson, Fred Gage from 
Los Angeles; Frank Young, A. I. Kent. Max 
Weisner and Edward C. Krofta from Mil- 
waukee; William Gould, F. E. Abelson, H. J. 
Devlin, Max Stahl and R. S. Cramblet 
from Minneapolis; Arthur Horn and Reville 
KnifFin from New Haven; G. R. Frank and 
Floyd Murphy from New Orleans; D. V. 
McLucas, H. R. Barker, E. Rostermundt. 
Leo J. Dotv and M. Frankle from Omaha: 
H. C. Bodkin. H. A. LaVine. T. L. Davis 
from Philadelphia; Bert M. Steam, Harry 
Rees, William Scott and Leonard Cantor 
from Pittsburgh; S. M. Horowitz. Edward 
Rosecan, L. J. Williams, A. R. Dietz and 

A. M. Weingerber from St. Louis ; Joe 
Solomon and E. M. Gibson from Salt Lake 
City: D. J. McNerney. O. H. Watson and 
W. M. B : gford from San Francisco: Irving 
Schlank, Jack O'Bryan, F. M. Higgins and 
Edward J. Kennedy from Seattle; Charles 
Franz. A. H. Retler. G. P. Jacobs. Samuel 
R if kin and Sidney Lehman from Washing- 
ton; A. Feinstein from Calgary, Alta. ; A. J. 
Jeffrey from Montreal. Que.; G. M. Hovt 
from St. John, N. B., H. M. Masters, S. 
Glazer, M. H. Wilkes, H. Kohen from To- 
ronto, Ont. ; D. Griesdorf from Vancouver. 

B. C, and Philip Sherman from Winnipeg. 



TOLEDO EXHIBS URGE 
ADMISSION MINIMUM 



(Continued from Page I) 

establish a minimum of 20 cents 
admission for first-runs. 

Representing the managerial as- 
sociation in the matter are Martin 
Smith, chairman of its board of con- 
trol; Nat Charnas and Bud Silver- 
man. They told the branch heads 
that the Atlas and World, operated 
by George Fleischmann, and the 
Ohio, operated by Jack O'Connell, 
are running two days a week on a 
nickle policy. The managers claimed 
ignorance of these policies. 



MONOGRAM 
MENTIONS 



Ask Over 30 Indie Distribs 
To Code Meet Tomorrow 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Guaranteed Exchanges, Helber Pic- 
tures, Interstate Film Foundation, 
Invincible Pictures, Irving Ex- 
change, Italian Star Productions, 
Kinematrade, Lincoln Pictures, Mad- 
ison Pictures, Majestic Pictures, 
Mayfair Pictures, Monarch Ex- 
change, Monogram Pictures, Mono- 
pole Films, Napoli Films, Principal 
Pictures, Protex Exchange, Public 
Welfare Pictures, Quality Exchange, 
Standard Exchange, Syndicate Ex- 
change and Transcontinental Pic- 
tures. 



New Orleans — Eddie Golder 
stumbled in after 48 hours on a hoi 
train from New York, having caughi 
a late one after the Monogram ban- 
quet Monday night. He wore a nevi 
green hat, which may have had 
something to do with the fact tha- 
his old green hat — known to every- 
one in the industry — had met a sac 
fate at the Monogram New York 
meeting. 



Arthur Bromberg of Atlanta %% 
beaming with smiles. Arthur i 
watching the reports on cotton pricn 
confident that things are going ft 
be all right down south. 



Carl Floyd from Tampa, th- 
youngest Monogrammer in atten- 
dance, is also the most enthusiastic 



Warner Bros. Oppose Fees 
In St. Louis Company Row 

(Continued from Page 1) 

000. In addition they have also re- 
quested the Circuit Court to fix their 
future fees at $1,666.67 a month 
each, or at the rate of $40,000 a 
year. 

The application of the receivers 
for the fees was vigorously opposed 
by Sam B. Jeffries and Arthur E. 
Simpson, attorneys for Warner 
Bros., owners of 92 per cent of the 
outstanding capital stocks of the 
St. Louis Amusement Co. They con- 
tended that the receivers have given 
but little personal attention to the 
business, confining their activities to 
merely a supervisory role while all 
of the actual management has been 
done by the general manager of the 
company, who is paid $150 a week 
for his services. 



Contract Breach Penalties 
Provided in Writers' Code 

(Continued from Page 1) 

such practices are subject to any 
one or a combination of the follow- 
ing penalties: private reprimand, 
public reprimand, suspension or ex- 
pulsion from the Guild, fine of from 
$50 to $1,000. 

Any member who might refuse to 
abide by a judgment against him 
would also be breaching his contract 
with the Guild and would be liable 
up to $10,000 to the Guild. 



Leo Seichsnaydre, the genial host 
from the New Orleans office, wasM 
full charge of arrangements and aio 
a swell job. 



Bill Underwood, the distributor- 
theater owner from Dallas, told the 
convention that he had been through 
the pioneer days of Warner Bros 
and Columbia, and felt that Mono- 
gram was now sitting in the sami 
spot and is headed for the big time 



Sol Davis from Oklahoma arrivk 
with a wide sombrero — hot off tha 
plains of Oklahoma. 



Claude Ezell, formerly Warnei 
sales manager, is one of the boy? 
welcomed at this regional sales 
meeting. He is a new Monogramme: | 
and full of Monogram Pep. He ar- 
rived from Dallas with Bill Under-| 
wood. 



Heck Everett of Charlotte knom\ 
this town like a book and is showing] 
the boys all the high spots of tm\ 
unusual city. 



When the Jung Hotel manage 
ment learned that their hotel had 
been picked for the meeting the; 
drew a deep sigh, remembering per 
haps the wreck that had been causei 
here a couple of years ago when al' 
the Monogrammers were here at < 
national convention. 



WAFILMS MOVING 

Wafilms has leased space on the 
11th floor of the RKO building, 1270 
Sixth Ave., for occupancy immed- 
iately. 



B. F. Busby of Little Rock sak 
he must have come in on "The Sim 
Train from Arkayisas" it was » 
darn hot. 



Booking Offices Starting 

Salt Lake City — Pantages Booking Of- 
fices, Ltd., formed in New York, will 
start functioning as soon as the new 
circuit planned by Alexander Pantages 
begins operations, Alexander Pantages 
told THE FILM DAILY yesterday. Pan- 
tages is here working out the wrinkles 
in his deal to take over the RKO- 
Orpheum. Herman Zohbel, receiver 

for the RKO Western Circuit announced 
yesterday that the Orpheum will close 
Thursday. 




the HEADLINES 



TODAY'S BIG NEWS 
in a 3 STAR SHOW ( 
CRAMMED WITH 



Says the 
National 
Exhibitor 



RKO 



pictuius 



he crook they 
couldn't arrest 
is in the hoose- 
gow now, 




He shook down 
the nation with 
crooked bonds 
. . . but he 
had no defense 
for crooked 
blondes! . . . , 



The Little Napoleon of wildcat finance , , . his life and love 

With 

GEORGE E. STONE 
PHILLIPS HOLMES 
FAY WRAY 

Minna Gombell, Reginald Owen, 
Lilian Bond, Reginald Mason, 
Sam Hardy, Lueien Littlefield 

Directed by George Archainbaud. Samuel 
Bischoff, associate producer* 



ytf$& 



BROS. 



. n&K^ ^ J ^ e 



15, 



19.S 



S«EARS 

























oetai» e u 



ȣS ****** 

fie a** ja°* 



^4 *. *^ 






. e8 Ken* * 

U lli e ^^ 



B °* n sett 



Bara 4 °r B Ta» c,a 







H™ 



, 



M-G-M Announcement In This Issue 







The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Now Fifteen Years Old 



FDAILY 



YCCI\, WEDNESDAY, JULT 12, 1933 



5 CENTS 



Name Frank Walker Secretary of Recovery Council 

ANTI-BLOCK BOOKING PROVISION FOR PATMAN BILL 

Geo. Weeks Resigns From Mayfair; Plans New Concern 



That Decision 

...Mr. Lasky and a squawk 

By JACK ALICOATE 



\FTER some ten days of reflection we 
find that no greater mental or physical 
rimulant could be given this up-and-re- 
jrning motion picture industry than the 
■cent sweeping decision of Federal Judge 
)hn P. Nields, Jr., in Wilmington. The 
pinion is revolutionary in character and 
eans that all tying agreements and re- 
rictive conditions heretofore imposed by 
le electrics are outlawed. It is that 
oad that it covers every branch of pic- 
ires including the theater, the studio and 
'en music. It is a brilliant victory for 
ie industry and gives this great business 
■ amusing our millions the god-given right 
: living in the sunshine and working out 
s own destiny entirely free and apart 
om the ever-threatened domination of the 
iectrics. 



yjEET Mr. Lasky. We might say "the 
*' man who came back" if it were not 
r the fact that he never left. When 
Isse Lasky and Paramount parted there 
ere those who opined that, cinematically 
eaking, that was the last of Mr. Lasky. 
nfortunately they did their opining with- 
jit a full appreciation of the resourceful- 
:ss and ability of Mr. Lasky. Witness his 
st four productions for Fox. Each one 
fine picture, a credit to the industry, 
id each one better than the last. "Zoo 

Budapest," "The Warriors' Husband," 
The Power and the Glory" and now 
ierkeley Square." And the finest of 
ese is "Berkeley Square." At least that 

the confidential and unprejudiced ad- 
ce we have from Southern California. 



.OR a long time we have wondered 
j whether the human noises that pop from 
ost news-reels and travelettes get into 
e hair of screen patrons as they do with 
A Col. Alicoate. Imagine our glee, then, 
\lien the first letter we opened this morn- 
( g contained the following: "Is there no 
,ipe that the imbecile 'wisecracking' of 
(.Continued on Page 2) 



Former Para. Distribution 

Head to Resume Early 

in September 

George W. Weeks yesterday re- 
signed as president of Mayfair Pic- 
tures Corp. and in the fall will an- 
nounce plans for a new independent 
company. As yet a successor has 
not been named. 

Ill health was given as the cause 

(Continued on Page 43) 



TEXAS EXHIBS URGE 
42-HOUR MAX. WEEK 



Dallas — A working week with a 
42-hour maximum and 30 cents an 
hour as a minimum wage will be 
recommended for inclusion in the 
industry code as a result of Mon- 
day's exhibitor mass meeting held 
under the auspices of the Texas 

(Continued on Page 42) 



Allied N. J. Convention 

At A. C. Sept. 6, 7, 8 

Annual convention of Allied The- 
aters of New Jersey will take place 
Sept. 6, 7 and 8 at Atlantic City, it 
was decided at a meeting of the unit 
yesterday in New York. The indus- 
try code and the Electrical Research 
Products decision handed down at 
Wilmington were discussed. 



Work on Code Draft 

Chicago — Drafting of an exhibition 
code was continued by the MP. TO. A. 
executive committee at a meeting at 
the Hotel Congress yesterday. Those 
attending were Fred Wehrenberg, chair- 
man of the board; Fred Meyer of Mil- 
waukee; Love Harrell of Atlanta; M. 
A. Lightman of Memphis; Dave Bar- 
rist and George Aarons of Philadel- 
phia; Jack Miller of Chicago; Ed Kuy- 
kendall, and Dave Palfreyman of the 
Hays Office. 



REISMAN VICE - PRES. 
FOR RKO THEATERS 



Phil Reisman becomes vice-presi- 
dent in charge of theater operations 
and J. J. O'Connor, formerly Reis- 
man's assistant, is named film buy- 
er in an RKO Theaters organization 
chart issued yesterday by Harold B. 
Franklin. The chart is divided into 

(Continued on Page 43) 



Indie Ass'n Committee 

To Draft Labor Code 

A proposed working arrangement, 
fixing a minimum wage scale and 
maximum number of working hours, 
will be drafted by the labor commit- 
tee of the Association of the Motion 
Picture Industry. Comprising the 
committee are: Harry Thomas 
chairman; William Pizor, Alex 
Moss, Ken Kulick, Ben Berk, Frank 
C. Wilson. 



Walker Appointed Secretary 
Of National Recovery Council 



Fox-Loew Product Deal 
Now Being Negotiated 

Negotiations have started towards 
purchase of Fox's 1933-34 product 
for the Loew circuit. John D. Clark, 
in charge of Fox distribution, and 
Col. E. A. Schiller are now arrang- 
ing a deal covering out-of-New York 
theaters. 



Frank C. Walker, general coun- 
sel of the Comerford circuit and 
formerly general counsel of the M. 
P. T. 0. A., yesterday was appointed 
executive secretary of the recovery 
council organized by President 
Roosevelt which includes Cabinet 
members. Walker, who is now in 
(Continued on Page 42') 



Amendment Is Planned for 

Measure Now in 

Committee 

Bv WILLIAM SILBERBERC 
Wash. Correspondent, THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — A provision to pro- 
hibit block booking is to be added 
to the recently-introduced bill of 
Congressman Patman of Texas ask- 
ing for creation of a Federal Mo- 
tion Picture Commission. 

Patman's bill which was intro- 

(Continucd on Page 42') 

SEES HEAVY~DEMAND 
FOR SHORTS IN SEPT. 

Envisioning short subject produc- 
tion given a "new impetus and fresh 
incentive" by the decline of the 
double feature, Eai-1 W. Hammons, 
president of Educational, yesterday 
declared "I sincerely believe that 
there will be the heaviest demand 
in years for short subjects starting 
in September, when most com- 
panies' current season's releases will 
have been exhausted." 



Director Answers Slaps 
At Hollywood-At-Fair 

Answering attacks on Hollywood- 
at-the-Fair, a feature of the Cen- 
tury of Progress at Chicago, Jack 
Sullivan, co-director of the exposi- 
tion with George Jeske, yesterday 

(Continued on Page 43) 



Beauty Contest Tieup 

In addition to the Seventh Ave. Roxy, 
six Wilmer & Vincent houses have 
tied up with the International Beauty 
Pageant, managed by Martin Starr. 
"Miss New York" finals will be staged 
at the Roxy. Under a deal closed by 
Pete Woodhull with Joe Eagan, Wil- 
mer & Vincent houses in the following 
towns will sponsor entries in the 14th 
annual "Miss Universe" event: Rich- 
mond and Norfolk, Va. and Allentown, 
Easton, Harrisburg, Reading and Al- 
toona, Pa. 



—3JIK, 



DAILV 



Wednesday, July 12J933 



I - THE 

lUt MWMVIlf. 
Of IIUMrOM 




ne 



Ul llll MHS 
Ml llll IIMl 



if— V=DAILY- 



Vol. LXIII, No. 9 Wed., July 12, 1933 Price 5 Cents 
JOHN W. ALICOATE : : : Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
■t 1650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk. Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
and General Manager; Arthur \V. Eddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at N«w York, 
N. Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 1-650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
Phone, Circle 7-4736, 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London — 
Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin — Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
—P. A. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 6 6 6 + V4 

Columbia Picts. vtc. . 24 227/ 8 2314 + 1 % 

Con. Fm. Ind 5V 4 5 5 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd 133/ 8 12% 127/ 8 — 1/4 

East. Kodak 833,4 8U/2 83% + 1 1/4 

Fox Fm. "A" .... 434 41/4 45/ 8 

Loew's, Inc 273/ 4 26 Vs 26 '/ 2 — 1 

do pfd 717/ 8 717/ 8 717/g -f- i/ g 

Paramount ctfs 23/ 8 2V 8 2V 4 — Vs 

Pathe Exch 2/2 2Vs 21/4 — Vs 

do "A" 9 8 8i/g — s/g 

RKO 5i/ 4 43/4 47/ 8 — 3/ 8 

Warner Bros 8'/ 2 1 s /s 8Vg + Vs 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. pfd... 7/ 8 7/ 8 7/ g 

Technicolor 93/ 8 8% 85/g — 7/ 8 

Trans-Lux 27/ 8 23/ 4 27/ 8 — l/ 8 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 . 7 6Vi 1 + 14 

Gen. Th. Eq.6s40ctfs. 6 5% 53/4 + l/ 2 

Loew 6s 41ww. ... 83 81 Vs 81 Vs — 1 % 

Paramount 6s 47 27 Vi 25% 27 Vs — Vs 

Par. By. 5'/ 2 s 51.. 37 363/ 8 363/ 8 — 1 Vs 

Par. 5'/ 2 s 50 27 253/ 4 26]/ 2 + Vl 

Pat. 5' 2 s50 ctfs. . 26 26 26 + % 

Pathe 7s 37 77 77 77 +2 

Warner's 6s39 413/g 39>/ 4 39'/ 4 — 1 1/4 

NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE 

Para. Publix 23/ 8 2 2l/ 4 — 1 1/4 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



Today: World Premiere of "Pilgrimage" at 

Gaiety, New York. 

Today: Meeting of independent distributors 

at Hays office at 3 p. m. on industry code. 

July 15: Monogram central sales meeting, 
Blackstone Hotel, Chicago. 

July 17: United Artists sales convention, Chi- 
cago. 

July 18: Meeting of M. P. T. O. of Arkansas, 
Mississippi and Tennessee, Jackson, Miss. 



Warner Minneapolis "Field Day" 

Minneapolis — Warner Bros, pictures are having a field day here this week, as 
no less than five of the seven first runs are playing pictures from the house of 
Warner. "Gold Diggers" is at the State; "Little Giant" Uptown; "Mayor of Hell" 
Lyric; "Private Detective 62" Grand and "The Silk Express" Astor. 



That Decision 

. . . Mr. Lasky and a squawk 

(Continued from Pckic 1) 

news reels and travelogues be stopped. 
Interesting and oftimes beautiful scenes 
are made completely nauseating by the 
verbal effusions tacked on to them. Since 
the producing powers seem to lack the 
taste necessary to distinguish the common- 
place from wit it would be advisable to 
discontinue that sort of comment alto- 
gether." And so, with running the risk of 
offending the entire membership of the 
Association of Motion Picture Travelogue 
Commentators we say, "us too." 



Morton Heads Manitoba 
Buying Co-operative Unit 

Toronto — The organization move- 
ment in Canada has spread to the 
independent exhibitors of Manitoba 
where the Western Associated The- 
aters Limited has been formed with 
headquarters in the Film Exchange 
Building at Winnipeg, R. S. Bell be- 
ing general manager. 

Officers of Western Associated 
have been elected as follows: Presi- 
dent, H. A. Morton; Vice-President, 
J. Miles; Treasurer, Nat Rothstein; 
Secretary, M. Triller; Director, S. 
Weiner, and General Manager, R. S. 
Bell. 



271 of 296 Ontario 

Houses Are Licensed 

Toronto — Of the 296 picture 
houses in Ontario that were operat- 
ing in 1932, a total of 271 have re- 
ceived their licenses from the On- 
tario Government for the current 
year, as from July 1. All the film 
theaters in Ontario are now sound 
houses. 



TREM CARR AT CHICAGO MEET 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Trem Carr is now in 
Chicago where he will attend the 
Monogram regional sales convention 
Saturday. Following the meeting 
Cax - r and W. Ray Johnston will 
leave for the Coast for the western 
sales meeting in Los Angeles July 
28 and 29. Lou Ostrow, executive 
producer, is in charge of Monogram 
studio activities during Carr's ab- 
sence. 



ADJOURN P. E. MEETING 

Adjourned meeting of creditors of 
Publix Enterprises scheduled for yes- 
terday was deferred until July 21 
at the office of Referee Henry K. 
Davis. It is expected that M. F. 
Gowthorpe will be examined. 



TEMPORARY HEADQUARTERS 

Hershel Stuart is temporarily 
making his headquarters at the Fan- 
chon & Marco office. 



12 of Statewide Theaters 
Are Placed in Bankruptcy 

Milwaukee — Statewide Theater 
Corp., former operators of 12 
houses, now closed under court or- 
der, has been adjudged bankrupt by 
Federal Judge F. A. Geiger. Sched- 
ules of assets and liabilities must 
be filed by July 18. 

Since an involuntary bankruptcy 
petition was filed against the com- 
pany by creditors six weeks ago, 
its assets have been under control 
of Clarence Benton, receiver ap- 
pointed by Judge Geiger. Houses 
operated by the circuit included the 
Modjeska, Mirth, Garfield, Princess, 
Plaza, Savoy, Tivoli and Uptown 
theaters, Milwaukee, Lake at Keno- 
sha, State at Racine, Oshkosh at 
Oshkosh and Jeffries at Janesville. 



REGENT CHANGES TITLE 

"Get That Venus!" is the final 
title of the feature picture recently 
completed by Starmark, Inc. for 
Regent Pictures release, its working 
title was "The Unwanted Venus." 
This film is now being edited under 
the supervision of Grover Lee, di- 
rector, with release set for an early 
date. 



HOW GOOD 



Is Your 




1. When and with whom did Cecil B. De 
Mille enter pictures? 

2. What was the first picture made at 
night under lights? 

3. Who directed Thomas Ince's "Civiliza- 
tion?" 

4. Who was the first president of the 
M. P. T. O. A.? 

5. What was the title of the first feature 
to be roadshown? 

(For Answers See Page 43) 



Herman Ross Organizes 
Yiddish Picture Company 

Herman Ross, president of Ros 
Enterprises, has formed a ne\ 
Jewish art motion picture compan 
to make Yiddish classics. Ross has 
already signed Jacob Ben-Ami, for 
merly with Eva LaGallienne ant 
the Theater Guild. First produc 
tion will be "The Wandering Jew. 
George Roland will direct. 



* * * 



BUILDING BIGGER BUSINESS EXTRA 



* * 



: 



GOES 
EVERYWHERE 




syne 



COVERS 
EVERYTHING 



LONDON 



HOLLYWOOD 



NEW YORK 



PARIS 



BERLIN' 



There is nothing mysterious about adver- 
tising. It will not work miracles or 
run pennies into millions over night butl| 
it is as necessary to modern business, 
particularly in this industry, as the 
telephone. Two advertising fundamentals! 
are; 1st, Truth in Advertising, and 2nd,| 
reaching directly the man you wish to 
interest. In the motion picture indus- 
try The Film Daily reaches its buying 
power every day of the year because it j 
has behind it fifteen years of prestigs^i 
reader interest and clean journalism. 



!' 







l>AkAD£ 



bunion 



«/-(ULV4R(lTY, (^LlfOl^ni^ 

The celebration is on! It's the Tenth Birthday of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer ! 
What a party 1933-34 is going to be... everybody will be back at the world's 
most renowned studio for M-G-M's Tenth Championship Year! 

Welcome, Greta Garbo...glad to hear you've had a grand vacation. You're look- 
ing perfectly beautiful, and are your fans hungry for a new picture! Nobody 
ever received so much publicity during an absence from the screen! 

And what a pleasure to see beloved Marie Dressier back on the lot! She's just 
completed 'Tugboat Annie" co-starring with Wallace Beery. . . and will soon 
start on another. 

By the time this message gets into print, the most celebrated screen Mr. and 
Mrs. will be packing their trunks en route to Culver City, U. S. A. Certainly 
we mean Norma Shearer and Irving Thalberg who will immediately resume 
their activities on the M-G-M lot. 

What a Reunion Party! They're all welcomed back by delighted associates. 
And what a Welcoming Committee — headed by Louis B. Mayer— David O. 
Selznick, Eddie Mannix, Harry Rapf, Hunt Stromberg, Bernie Hyman, 
Al Lewin, John Considine, Jr., Lawrence Weingarten, Walter Wanger, 
Lucien Hubbard, Sidney Franklin, Howard Hawks, Lou Edelman, Frank 
Davis, showman producers without equal! And the Star Committee of 
Welcome . . . Marion Davies, Wallace Beery, Joan Crawford, Clark Gable, 
John and Lionel Barrymore, Jean Harlow, Robert Montgomery, Helen Hayes, 
Jimmy Durante, Ramon Novarro, Laurel & Hardy, Lee Tracy, Ed Wynn, 
Jack Pearl and all the others. 

Happy days ahead, indeed! M-G-M's not only got its Million Dollar Family 
all together again . . . but powerful additions in every phase of producing, 
acting, writing, direction ! 

Cast your box-office orbs on my Parade of Stars. That's Music for your 
Marquee! Greater Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1933-34! Tenth Championship 
Year! You're invited to a party! 

(signed) LEO of M*G'M 



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On the occasion of its 
10 th Birthday, the happy 
family of M-G'M presents , 

46 Pictures In 1933 34 

6 Specials 

NIGHT FLIGHT 

CLARK GABLE, JOHN & LIONEL BARRYMORE, HELEN HAYES, ROBERT 
MONTGOMERY, MYRNA LOY in the cast. "Night Flight" is based on the 
French prize novel which has its locale in South America. A giant production 
under the direction of Clarence Brown. 

HOLLYWOOD PARTY 

MARIE DRESSLER, JOAN CRAWFORD. JEAN HARLOW, JIMMY DURANTE, 
LUPE VELEZ, JACK PEARL, CHARLES BUTTER WORTH, NILS ASTHER, 
LEE TRACY, JEAN HERSHOLT, ALBERTINA RASCH DANCERS, WALT 
DISNEY "SILLY SYMPHONY" and many more Big Names . . . that's just part of 
"Hollywood Party," a grand musical screen story developed by Edmund Goulding 
and Howard Dietz into what will be a revolutionary screen attraction. Dialogue 
by Herbert Fields. Music by Rodgers &. Hart. Additional music by Brown &. Freed. 
Director, Edmund Goulding. 

MARIE DRESSLER 

Her own special starring production! Beloved Marie Dressier, idol of the screen, 
in a story brimming with the laughter and tears she knows so well how to bring 
forth. Title to be announced. 

TWO THIEVES 

CLARK GABLE, ROBERT MONTGOMERY in the leading roles. Probably the 
most ambitious dramatic spectacle since "Ben Hur." An intensely exciting romance 
set in the period of Pontius Pilate. A few highlights : Pillage of Herod's Tomb; 
Chariot pursuit through city and country; Romance of ex-slave and Roman beauty; 
Plot to overthrow Pilate; Abducting girls from harem of Ben Rashid, etc. Picture 
is based on Manuel Komroff's best-seller novel. 

(Continued) 



(Specials, Continued) 

TARZAN and his MATE 

JOHNNY WEISSMULLER, MAUREEN O'SULLIVAN in a giant sequel to their 
earlier "Tarzan, the Ape Man." A new story, with amazing features built for thrill 
and romance, has been written by Edgar Rice Burroughs. 



SOVIET 



WALLACE BEERY, JEAN HARLOW, CLARK GABLE and a large cast enact in 
"Soviet" a picture which will be unique in the new season. It is the first important 
American picture to use as its background the dramatic implications of Russia in 
its current phases. Typical of M-G-M showmanship ingenuity in seeking new 
locales for romantic picturization. Frank Capra, director. 



30 Star Pictures 



3 JEAN HARLOW 

1 LIONEL BARRYMORE 
1 CLARK GABLE 
1 MARION DAVIES 

1 WALLACE BEERY 

4 COSMOPOLITAN 

2 GRETA GARBO 

2 JOAN CRAWFORD 
1 ROBT. MONTGOMERY 



2 HELEN HAYES 

2 JIMMY DURANTE 

with STUART ERWIN 

1 JOHN BARRYMOR 

3 LEE TRACY 
1 ED WYNN 
1 JACK PEARL 

1 RAMON NOVARRO 

1 NORMA SHEARER 

2 LAUREL-HARDY 




3 Co Star Pictures 

CRAWFORD-GABLE HARLOW-GABLE 






BEERY-GABLE 



7 TYlarquee Pictures 



The industry has come to know that the M-G-M MARQUEE symbol in the past 
several seasons has meant pictures of quality. Many outstanding hits carried this 
distinguishing mark, among them "Hell Below," "Tarzan the Ape Man," "Red 
Headed Woman," etc. 



WE LIST just a few of the many story properties, stage plays, originals and novels, from which picture material 
will be drawn during the new season: "BIOGRAPHY," Theatre Guild stage hit; "ROAD TO ROME," Robert E. 
Sherwood's stage success; and these other stage hits, "THE BARRETTS OF WIMPOLE STREET," "THE LATE 
CHRISTOPHER BEAN," "THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE." "THE GOOD EARTH" and "THE FOUNTAIN" are two inter- 
national best-sellers. "GRAND CANARY" the new book success by A. J. Cronin; Edith Wharton's "THE OLD MAID," 
Somerset Maugham's "THE PAINTED VEIL;" the Pulitzer Prize novel, "LAUGHING BOY;" Vina Delmar's new serial 
"PRETTY SADIE McKEE;" "THE EDUCATION OF A PRINCESS;" Stephen Zweig's "MARIE ANTOINETTE," and others. 




Champions offtl(p]7l's 
IO/^iHTlJ>IOn$HII> Y<M 






^K 



l t»t> 



%v% 



JOHN BARRYMORE 
LIONEL BARRYMORE 
WALLACE BEERY 
JACKIE COOPER 
JOAN CRAWFORD 
MARION DAVIES 
MARIE DRESSLER 
JIMMY DURANTE 
CLARK GABLE 
GRETA GARBO 
WILLIAM HAINES 
JEAN HARLOW 
HELEN HAYES 
ROBERT MONTGOMERY 
RAMON NOVARRO 
JACK PEARL 
NORMA SHEARER 
ED WYNN 



STARS AND PLAYERS 

Elizabeth Allan 
Tad Alexander 
Nils Asther 
Alice Brady 
Charles Butterworth 
Mary Carlisle 
Mae Clarke 
Nelson Eddy 
Stuart Erwin 
Madge Evans 
Muriel Evans 
C. Henry Gordon 
Lawrence Grant 
Louise Closser Hale 
Russell Hardie 
Jean Hersholt 
Phillips Holmes 
Jean Howard 
Benita Hume 
Walter Huston 
Otto Kruger 



Myrna Loy 
Ben Lyon 

Margaret McConnel 
Una Merkel 
John Miljan 
Colleen Moore 
Frank Morgan 
Karen Morley 
Maureen O'Sullivan 
Jean Parker 
May Robson 
Ruth Selwyn 
Martha Sleeper 
Lewis Stone 
Franchot Tone 
Lee Tracy 

Johnny Weissmuller 
Diana Wynyard 
Robert Young 
Lupe Velez 






DIRECTORS 

Richard Boleslavsky 
Charles Brabin 
Clarence Brown 
Tod Browning 
Jack Conway 
George Cukor 
George Fitzmaurice 
Victor Fleming 
Edmund Goulding 
Howard Hawks 
Robert Z. Leonard 
Russell Mack 
Charles Riesner 
Edward Sedgwick 
Edgar Selwyn 
W. S. Van Dyke 
William Wellman 
Sam Wood 



AUTHORS 

Frank R. Adams 
John L. Balderston 
Beatrice Banyard 
Philip Barber 
Cormack Bartlett 
Vicki Baum 
Richard Boleslavsky 
Malcolm Stuart Boylan 
W. R. Burnett 
Edgar Rice Burroughs 
Frank Butler 
Erskine Caldwell 
Ruth Cummings 
Jack Cunningham 
Delmar Daves 
John Emerson 
Gene Fowler 
Paul Hervey Fox 
Becky Gardiner 
Oliver H. P. Garrett 
Harvey Gates 
Benjamin Glazer 
Frances Goodrich 
Howard Green 
Rene Gueta 



Albert Hackett 
Elmer Harris 
Moss Hart 
H. M. Harwood 
Ben Hecht 
John Housemann 
F. Hugh Herbert 
Robert E. Hopkins 
Boris Ingster 
Laurence E. Johnson 
Gordon Kahn 
Harry Kahn 
George Landy 
Vincent Lawrence 
John Lawson 
Anita Loos 
Josephine Lovett 
John Howard Lynch 
Willard Mack 
John Lee Mahin 
John McDermott 
James K. McGuinness 
Wm. Slavens McNutt 
John Meehan 
Helen Meinardi 



Bess Meredyth 
Lucile Newmark 
Leonard Praskins 
Norman Reilly Raine 
W. L. River 
Wells Root 
Bradford Ropes 
Madeleine Ruthven 
Robert Sherwood 
Paul G. Smith 
Ralph Spence 
Samuel &l Bella Spewack 
Donald Ogden Stewart 
Edward Dean Sullivan 
Matt Taylor 
Courtney Terrett 
Sylvia Thalberg 
Wanda Tuchock 
Ernest Vajda 
John Van Druten 
Bayard Veiller 
Lieut. Comm. Wead 
Claudine West 
Basil Woon 




YOU ARE INVITED TO 
A PARTY at which will be 
present more Big Stars, more 
Great Directors and Authors, 
more Celebrated Producers th an 
have ever come together before 
at any studio, at any time. 

METRO - GOLDWYN - MAYER 

The Major Company 



JUNE 26 






d eiF 








: 



1 









' 



it 



GOSH! HOW JUNIOR 
HAS GROWN!" 



I 



GO AHEAD BOY 
TELL THE FOLKS YOUR 
PLANS FOR NEXT 
YEA Ps 







"Okay, Pop! Here's the story in a nut- shell . . . 

FEATURE STRENGTH in SHORT SUBJECTS 
. . . The line-up for 1933-34 talks for itself . . . 
STAR VALUES . . . I'm giving them names for 
the marquees... PRODUCTION VALUES 
. . . nobody in the industry can touch our de luxe 
qualities. We've purposely kept the quantity down, 
so that we're sure to keep the quality up! We've 
built a program of short subjects with one idea. . . 
to help sell the entire show." 



M-G-M FEATURE STRENGTH SHORTS 




"No introduction necessary here. 
Never-the-less for the benefit of those 
who came in late, I give you HAL 
ROACH, the master-mind of mimicry, 
king of comedy (pardon me while I 
toss him a crown). Star-finder, star- 
maker! He has under contract the 
greatesr < ^sor!ment of big-time stars in 
the snort feature comedy field. He has 
his own studios, his own writers, his 
wn directors — he visits more theatres 
to get first-hand audience reaction than 
any producer m captivity. He believes 
in action on the screen ! He knows 
what it's all about! 42 two-reel come- 
dies from Hal Roach — a pleasure!" 




M-G-M FEATURE STRENGTH SHORTS 



next page please- — 



6 STAN 

LAUREL 

OLIVER 

HARDY 

tivo reel comedy 
SPECIALS 



"They are FEATURE AT- 
TRACTIONS in any length! 
Did you ever nonce how the 
folks begin to laugh when their 
names are flashed on the screen, 
before the picture even begins! 
That's popularity. Six short 
comedies from these boys in 
'33-'34 is good news for the 
box-office. And you know how 
their full-length comedies help 
build them for shorts! Keep a 
poster cut-out of these boys 
handy... build them up in your 
ads ... no one wants to miss a 
Laurel-Hardy comedy!" 




M-G-M FEATURE STRENGTH SHORTS 




8 CHARLEY 

CHASE 

TWO REEL COMEDIES 

"Pardon my upside-down position 
— my enthusiasm gets the best of 
me. But no matter how you look at 
this fellow, Chase — he's there! Ex- 
hibitors asked us to put him in more 
comedies like 'High C's' and 'Ara- 
bian Tights'. Okay, folks, that's just 
the type of he-man, action comedy 
he's going to give you. Plus music, 
too! That's the stuff, Charley, give 
'em the works in '33-'34." 



8 THELMA 

TODD 

with PATSY KELLY 

TWO REEL COMEDIES 

"Hal Roach scoured the show world 
for a comedienne to team up with 
beautiful Thelma Todd— Patsy Kelly 
is the girl! Watch her carefully. She's 
a scream! The name Todd-Kelly is 
going to mean fast, furious fun to 
audiences. Patsy Kelly comes direct 
from New York's biggest musical 
comedy successes, Vanities, Flying 
Colors, etc. What a team these two 
leaping ladies are going to make!" 



M-G-M FEATURE STRENGTH SHORTS 




TWO REEL COMEDIES 

"This Hal Roach fellow is a genius. 
He has <a marvelous idea for the 
NEW SERIES of Our Gang— says it 
came as an inspiration while flying 
cross-country in an aeroplane. And 
what an idea it is ! Look for some- 
thing entirely new — sure-fire in its 
audience appeal. Spanky, the young- 
ster that made such a hit last year 
will be right up front — the rest of 
Our Gang, too. The public will get 
a brand new kick out of the NEW 
'OUR GANG'." 



■*■ 



8 HAL ROACH 

ALL STAR 

TWO REEL COMEDIES 

"Imagine touring the world for an 
idea! Hal Roach did it! Toured all 
Europe looking for big-time talent — 
found it in England in DouglasWake- 
field and Billy Nelson. Then Hal 
(everybody calls him Hal) raids 
Broadway and signs up Don Barclay, 
sensational comedy favorite of revue 
spectacles. Supported by a flock of 
other talent, action will stick out all 
over this series. It was Hal Roach 
All Star series such as this that de- 
veloped stars like Harold Lloyd, 
Bebe Daniels, Laurel and Hardy and 
others. History repeats!" 



M-G-M FEATURE STRENGTH SHORTS 




HAL ROACH 

6 MUSICAL 

COMEDIES 

TWO REELS EACH 

"Answering the current demand of your 
box-office for lavish musical entertainments 
— six magnificent, spectacular musical re- 
vues featuring musical comedy stars, chorus 
beauties from the Broadway stage. Songs, 
dances, music — rippling with rhythm and 
laughter. If you liked M-G-M musical revues 
of last year (and who didn't), you'll go for 
these in a big way. Billy Gilbert, Billy 
Bletcher, Lillian Moore, Lillyan Andrus 
and many, many, many more." 



"Here's the home of the comedies 
that have been the best for 20 years! 
Enough studio space to make the 
biggest feature pictures — and devot- 
ed entirely to the production of Hal 
Roach Comedies. Unlimited in its 
resources — complete as to its tech- 
nical equipment and man power — 
no wonder Hal Roach Comedies 
have built right into them that De 
Luxe production quality that makes 
them the best in the business." 



HAL ROACH STUDIOS ♦ CULVER CITY ♦ CALIFORNIA 



a———— 



M-G-M FEATURE STRENGTH SHORTS 




AMAZING IDEA 

that will he a positive 
sensation I \ 





VOlStjf 



2 REELS 
EACH 





Produced with the cooperation of the 

UNITED STATES BUREAU OF 

INVESTIGATION, 

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



"'Are you gasping? 1 warned you to be prepared for ideas that were NEW, 
SENSATIONAL! Right here is the biggest idea of the year in shorts. Imagine 
— each release of this series is based on material from the secret files of the 
Department of Justice in Washington, D. C. Actual, authentic stories of the 
most unusual, notorious crimes that the Department has had to contend 
with over a period of years. In the pictures the crimes are reenacted exactly 
as they happened but of most importance is the picturization of government 
officers tracking down the criminals and bringing them to inescapable justice. 
Produced at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's own great studios with casts of feature 
players to enact each exciting role. Thrilling! Actionful! An amazing insight 
into the ingenious detection methods of government agents. Startling dramas 
from real life. "Crime Doesn't Pay" will pay you BIG! I'm all a-tingle!" 
IVUG-M FEATURE STRENGTH SHORTS 



13 

WILLIE 
WHOPPER 



single reel 

CARTOON 
COMEDIES 

Here's Great News 
of Something New! 

A Whale of an Idea 
That Will Panic 
the Public! 



"Folks, I'm just about the 
proudest little lion in 
the world. On this page 
more great news » 








' Never mind that, Leo, my lad. I always tell the folks 
myself. Howdy, showmen, one and all! I'm WILLIE 
WHOPPER, the one and only 1933-34 style cartoon 
character. I've got more on the ball than you've ever 
seen in animation before. Between thrills and laughs 
you'll probably choke! My adventures alone would 
make enough cartoon comedies to keep you the rest of 
your days — and then you'll ask for more. On the way 
over here to make this speech I captured a whale twelve 
city blocks long — barehanded — what a battle but I've 
got him! What? You don't believe me? Wait until 
you see my first picture and I'll prove it to you. Then 
you'll realize how far cartoon comedies have progressed 
since away back last year. Let's go!" 



M-G-M FEATURE STRENGTH SHORTS 





HU^ 



12 M-G- 
ODDITIES 

One reel each 



"Here's how ten minutes on your pro- 
gram can lift the entire rhow with light- 
ning-quick change of pace. Oddities pack 
a real program wallop! The greatest vari 
ety of novelty material ever put into one 
series. Strange places, queer things, ad 
venture, sport, wild-cat hunting by aero- 
plane, wild animals and birds that you 
wouldn't meet outside of the D. T's. With 
the whole world to choose from, M-G-M 
exceeds even its own reputation for 
Oddities in '33-'34." 




12 FITZPATRICK 

TRAVELTALKS 



One reel De Luxe 

"The De Luxe series that is equally at 
home on the program of a two dollar 
Broadway premiere or in the tiniest ham- 
let. Trade paper surveys prove that travel 
pictures have increased in popularity by 
leaps and bounds. Fitzpatrick has just re- 
turned from an exploration expedition to 
many strange countries that have never 
been on the screen before. I'll be seeing 
you in Rarotonga, Apia, Suva, Papua, 
Kalabahai, Delagoa Bay and all points 
East, West, North and South. Exhibitors 
and public alike agree that Fitzpatrick 
Traveltalks are the finest of them all I" 



M-G-M FEATURE STRENGTH SHORTS 



THE GREATEST WORLD-WIDE 
COVERAGE OF ANY NEWS- 
REEL SERVICE! 




, 



TWICE EACH WEE 

"Here is an absolute fact! Hearst Metrotone 

News presents the greatest international news 
t coverage of any news film service. And right on 
I its toes when it comes to local subjects! Com- 
; bined with Hearst Metrotone News is 'The 

Globe Trotter' whose eye-witness descriptions 
; of important events add to the entertainment 
I and interest of every patron. He's on the air, 
| too, — and advertised in newspapers of the 

nation's most important cities. A triple tie-up 
i reaching millions that no other newsreel enjoys. 

The newsreel that seeks new worlds to conquer. " 






M-G-M FEATURE STRENGTH SHORTS 



M-G-M 

SHORTS 

1933-34 

T 

Two Reels 



HAL ROACH - M-G-M 
COMEDIES 

6 LAUREL-HARDY 

8 CHARLEY CHASE 

8 THELMA TODD 
PATSY KELLY 

8 HAL ROACH ALL STARS 

(Douglas Wakefield, Billy 
Nelson, Don Barclay) 

6 OUR GANG 

(Spanky, Stymie, Echo, 
Tommy, Pete-the-dog) 

6 HAL ROACH 

MUSICAL COMEDIES 

(Billy Gilbert, Billy 
Bletcher, Lillian Moore, 
Lillyan Andrus) 

8 M-G-M 

CRIME DOESN'T PAY 

▼ 
One Reel Subjects 



12 M-G-M ODDITIES 

(Dialogue by Pete Smith) 

12 FITZPATRICK 
TRAVELTALKS 

6 "MADCAP MOVIES" 

13 WILLIE WHOPPER 
CARTOON COMEDIES 

104 HEARST 

METROTONE NEWS 



EXTRA! 

Just added by exhibitor 
demand — 2 Reels Each 

6 M-G-M 
MUSICAL 
REVUES 



REMEMBER 





there is no substitute 

for the 

STAR 

POWER 

of 

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 

Short Features 

in any picture line -up 

of any motion picture 

company 

in this entire industry! 

^ t^A tale with a 





M-G-M FEATURE STRENGTH SHORTS 



Wednesday, July 12, 1933 



—&&* 



DAILY 



39 

m 



■IMELY TOPICS 

ompeting With 
ritish Pictures 

T OWER production costs, now 
the rule rather than the ex- 
ception in Hollywood studios, 
have dealt a serious blow to the 
British film industry. English- 
made pictures have advanced a 
long way in the last year, and 
were wedging themselves into a 
formidable position throughout 
Great Britain and the British 
colonies because of their low 
production costs, with resultant 
lower rental charges. But our 
American producers have come 
along and upset old John Bull's 
apple-cart. Our studios have 
seen the foolishness of the great 
waste that has been rampant 
since the inception of the busi- 
ness a quarter of a century ago, 
and the financing pruning 
shears that have been clipping 
costs for three months or more, 
now have our negative expense 
down to the bone. We can give 
our British cousins a far su- 
perior product for the same 
money they pay for the less- 
intriguing British films. It's 
fhe silver lining that we have 
found on the other side of our 
depression cloud. 

— Richard Wallace. 



UNDERGOES OPERATION 

W Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Conchita Montenegro, 
;een actress, was in a hospital to- 
y following an emergency ap- 
1 idicitis operation. Physicians said 
t is now apparently out of dan- 



A.RT FIRM ENTERS FIELD 

The Braumeister Co., handling ad- 
vising, art and all phases of pro- 
ition, has entered the picture 
Id. Its personnel includes: Jack 
fie, president; Jack Level, Guy 
wler, Frank Ayers and James 
le. 




HARLES HAYMAN of the Lafayette, Buf 
. is in New York on business. 

'LAIRE ADAMS is en route to the Coast 
ii New York. 

ICHARD BLUMENTHAL has arrived at the 

st from Paris to supervise the making of 

French version of "The Way to Love" for 

amount. 

ERBERT MARSHALL arrived in New York 
jerday on the Olympic. 

(IMI JORDAN, Fox player, is in New York 
p the Coast for a vacation. 

AY BINGER and BEN SILVEY are en route 
■ he Coast. 

|AT HOLT arrived in New York from Cin- 
jati yesterday. 

JOLLEEN MOORE and her husband AL SCOTT 
Ii in Chicago and are expected to arrive in 
York next week from the Coast. 




9 9 9 MULLING OVER the ole files of the paper which 

was named after us personally or were we named after 

it? it's so long ago, we can't quite remember 

but as we were saying going back through the records 

convinces us more than ever. ... that Fifteen Years Is A 

Long Time In Pictures and we noted a review of a 

pix 15 years ago which crucified it with this catch line 

"Got away to a fine start, but FLOPPED at the 

finish". ..... ain't it too true? ....... of so many pix today 

. of so many propositions today of so many film 

mugs today even as you and I. ...... .we start off with 

the sirens screeching and the bands blaring and wind 

up with a faint wheeze in the ashcan oh, well, the 

OTHER feller does sure, we understand you 

just haven't hit your stride YET you Optimist'. 

when they spread the Final Flowers over you, you'd maintain 

it was really your Opening Nite IF you could talk 

ya just can't face the Facts of Life and why in 'ell 

should you? "It's fun to be fooled" and what 

a lotta fun most of us are havin'! 

* * * * 

• • • BE THAT as it may 15 years ago the boys 

were having their Joys and Sorrows just the same all 

coked up with Hope and Hoosh sometimes they clicked 

then again oh, well "Roxy" was making 

his checkerboard moves along Broadway, from the Strand, to 

Rialto, to Rivoli remember his stage presentation, "The 

Victory of Democracy" that opened the Rivoli? Hodkin- 

son was all steamed up with an idea for taking a larger pic- 
ture on the film by running it sideways instead of endways 

15 years later our film is STILL endways 

along with a lotta mugs who handle it how do ya 

do ? 

9 9 9 STICK RIGHT along while we amaze and fas- 
cinate you with some more Romances of the Past in 

the winter of 1918 it was so cold along Times Square that 
the theayter managers were faced with the startling problem: 

"How to get rid of audiences?" the film houses were 

the only warm places in town and ya couldn't pry the 

customers from the seats it was in the same year that 

Doug Fairbanks first started quitting the films he an- 
nounced that he was going to be a war aviator. but it 

was only a plug for his next Artcraft pix so-o 

9 9 9 AND WE must not overlook that gallant and 

glorious scheme to revolutionize the biz back in 1918 

films "from manufacturer to consumer" was the slogan 

backed by three producing companies each state organ- 
ization of exhibs was to receive films direct from the factory, 

and distribute the canned goods to their theater members 

no exchange overhead grand ! and Charlie Pet- 

tijohn made a cross-country hike as sec of the A.E.A., trying 

to sell the plan tell us all about your experiences, 

Charlie more from time to time on these marvellously 

intriguing Adventures of the Pioneers and if you sus- 
pect that this is all a plug for our Fifteenth Anniversary Issue 

you're one smart guy at guessin' and we gotta 

hand it to you 

X * * * 

9 9 9 SOME OF our film execs are interested in raising 

dough for a very worthy cause to buy used sound 

equipment for a Boy Scout camp in Dutchess County 

the camp has several sons of execs on the roster Bar- 
bara Adams looks like a new screen comer, with stage and 
screen experience here and abroad and lots of what it takes 

Duell Hollow Inn, up in Dutchess County, summering 

locality of various film execs, is growing quite popular this 
year with pix people 



« « « 



» » » 



EXPLOITETTES 

Float Used 

to Plug "Gold Diggers" 

(^HARLES SMAKWITZ, War- 
ner Bros.' exploiteer in up- 
state New York, has all of Al- 
bany "Gold Diggers" conscious 
with his smash campaign on the 
Warner Bros, musical hit when 
it played the Strand theater 
there. Smakwitz's biggest 

stunt was the using of a large 
Federal truck as a street float, 
equipped with loud speaker, 
microphone, phonograph and 
amplifying set. The float pre- 
sented a gorgeous spectacle as 
it passed through the busiest 
sections of the city, with its 
cargo of scantily clad girls 
dressed as gold diggers, each 
one holding a gold-painted pick 
or shovel. The background was 
made to represent a stone pile, 
with the foreground represent- 
ing bags full of gold nuggets. 
— Strand, Albany. 



DEMONSTRATES NEW LAMP 

Ulysses A. Sanabria, Chicago in- 
ventor, yesterday gave a television 
demonstration at Macy's department 
store which, it is claimed, utilized a 
new lamp that will rival in intensity 
the electric arc used in motion pic- 
ture projection. The lamp is a 
"carbon-dioxide arc" and it is pre- 
dicted by the inventor that through 
its use television will be possible 
in homes within two years. 



BOWES GIVING "TEA" 

This afternoon, from four until 
seven, Major Edward Bowes, Man- 
aging Director of the Capitol, will 
be host at a "tea" for the press to 
be given at the Warwick Hotel in 
honor of Lee Sims and Uomay 
Bailey, ether stars. Miss Bailey 
and Sims will begin a week's en- 
gagement at the Capitol Theater 
Friday marking their first appear- 
ance in a New York theater. 



RIALTO PREMIERE JULY 14 

"Laughing at Life" will have its 
world premiere at the Rialto, July 
14, with a preview Thursday eve- 
ning. 




Features Reviewed in Film Daily Jan. 1 to July 8 



Tit li Reviewed 

A Kek Balvany-XX 4-19-33 

Adorable-F 5-19-33 

After the Ball-F 3-18-33 

Air Hostess-COL 1-21-33 

Alimony Madness-MAY ... 5-5-33 
Almas Encontradas-XX .7-7-33 

Ann Carver's Profession-COL 

6-9-33 

Baby Face-WA 6-24-33 

Barbarian, The-MGM ... 5-13-33 

Bed of Roses-RKO 7-1-33 

Bedtime Story, A-PAR. .4-22-33 
Behind Jury Doors-MAY .3-15-33 

Below the Sea-COL 6-3-33 

Be Mine Tonight-U 3-16-33 

Berlin Alexanderplatz-XX 

5-13-33 

Between Fighting Men-WW 

2.8-33 

Big Drive-FD 1-20-33 

Big Cage, The-U 5-10-33 

Billion Dollar Scandal-PAR 

1-7-33 

Blondie Johnson-FN 3-1-33 

Bondage-F 4-22-33 

Breed of the Border-MOP 

5-10-33 

Broadway Bad — F 3-7-33 

Cavalcade-F 1-7-33 

Central Ai,rport-FN 3-29-33 

Charles XII— XX 4-3-33 

Cheating Blondes-C AP . . . 5-20-33 
Child of Manhattan-COL. 2-11-33 
Christopher Strong-RKO 3-11-33 
Circus Queen Murder-COL 

5-6-33 

Clear All Wires-MGM 3-4-33 

Cocktail Hour-COL 6-3-33 

Cohens and Kellys in Trouble- 

U.. 4-15-33 

College Humor-PAR 6-14-33 

Come On Danger-RKO. .2-16-33 
Come on Tarzan-WW 1-4-33 

Constant Woman, The-WW 

5-23-33 

Cornered-COL 2-1-33 

Corruption-IMP 6-21-33 

Cougar, The King Killer- 

SNO 5-23-33 

Cowboy Counsellor-FD. ..2-1-33 

Crime of the Century-PAR 

2-18-33 

Dangerously Yours-F. .. .2-24-33 
Daring Daughters-CAP. .3-25-33 
Das Lickende Ziel-XX ... 6-20-33 
Das Nachtigall Maedel-CAP 

1-28-33 

Deadwook Pass-FR 6-6-33 

Death Kiss-WW 1-28-33 

Deception-COL 1-10-33 

Der Hauptman Von Koepe- 

nick-AMR 1-20-33 

Der Liebling von Wien-XX 

6-14-33 
Der Schuetzen Koenig-GER 

5-10-33 
Destination Unknown-U .. .4-8-33 

Devil's Brother-MGM 6-10-33 

Diamond Trail-MOP 4-19-33 

Die Frau von Der Man 

Spricht-XX 4-26-33 

Diplomaniacs-RKO 4-29-33 

Dos Noches-HOF 5-10-33 

Drei Tage Mittelarrest- 

XX.. 5-18-33 

Drum Taps-W W 4-26-33 

Dude Bandit-ALD 6-21-33 

Eagle and the Hawk-PAR. 5-6-33 
Ein Maedel Der Strasse-XX 

4-10-33 
Eine Liebesnacht-XX ...5-18-33 
Eine Nacht Im Paradise-AMR 

2-23-33 
Eine Tuer Geht Auf-PRX 2-8-33 
Eleventh Commandment-ALD 

3-25-33 

Elmer the Great-FN 5-26-33 

Emergency Call-RKO 6-24-33 

Employees' Entrance-FN 1-21-33 
End of the Trail-COL. . .2-23-33 

Ex-Lady-WA 5-13-33 

Face in the Skv-F 2-18-33 

Fargo Express-WW 3-1-33 

Fast Workers-MGM 3-18-33 

Fighting for Justice- 

COL.. 5-17-33 



KEY TO DISTRIBUTORS 



ABC — Arkay Film Exch. 

AE — Aeolian Pictures 

AG — Agfa 

ALD — Allied Pictures 

ALX — William Alexander 

AM — Amkino 

AMR — American Roumanian 

Film Corp. 

ARI Arthur Lee 

AU— Capt. Harold Auten 

BEE — Beekman Film Corp. 

CAP — Capitol Film Exchange 

CHE— Chesterfield 

COL — Columbia 

COM — Compagnie Universelle 

Cinematographique 
EC — Enrico Cutali 
K — Fox 

FAM — Foreign American Films 
FD — First Division 
FOR — Foremco Pictures 
FR — Freuler Film Associates 
FN — First National 



FX— The Film Exchange 
GB — Gaumont-British 
GEN — General Films 
GER — Germania Film Co. 
GOL — Ken Goldsmith 
GRF — Garrison Films 
HOF— J. H. Hoffberg Co. 
ICE — Int. Cinema Exch. 
IMP — Imperial Dist. 
INT — Interworld Prod. 
INV — Invincible Pictures 
JE — Jewell Productions 
JRW— J. R. Whitney 
KIN — Kinematrade 
MAD — Madison Pictures 
MAJ — Majestic Pictures 
MAY — Mayfair Pictures 
MO — Monopole Pictures 
MGM — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
MOP — Monogram Pictures 
PA R — Paramount 
PO — Powers Pictures 



POL— Bud Pollard Productions 
POR — Portola Pictures 
PKI — Principal Dist. Corp. 
PRX — Protex Dist. Corp. 
REG — Regent Pictures 
KKO — KKO-Radio pictures 
SCR— Screencraft 
SHO — Showmen's Pictures 
SNO — Sidney Snow. 
SYA — Synchro Art Pictures 
S Y N — Syndicate 
TF — Tobis Foreign Film 
TOW — Tower Prods. 
U — Universal 
UA — United Artists 
UFA— Ufa 
WA — Warner Bros. 
WK— Willis Kent 
WOK— Worldkino 
WW— World Wide 
XX — No distributor set 
ZBY — Zbyszko Polish-American 
Film Co. 



Title Reviewed 

Fighting President, The-U. 4-8-33 

Fires of Fate-PO 4-4-33 

Footsteps in the Night-INV 

5-10-33 

Forbidden Trail-COL 4-10-33 

Forgotten-INV 5-20-33 

Forgotten Men-JE 5-13-33 

42nd Street-WA 2-4-33 

Flaming Guns-U 6-17-33 

Flaming Signal-INV 5-25-33 

Four Aces-SYN 2-24-33 

Fourth Horseman-U 2-8-33 

Frisco Jenny-FN 1-7-33 

From Hell to Heaven- 

PAR.. 3-18-33 
Gabriel Over the White House 

MGM 4-1-33 

Gefahren Der Liebe-MAD .5-1-33 

Ghost Train-ARL 2-18-33 

Girl in 419-PAR 5-20-33 

Girl Missing-WA ...... .3-18-33 

Glos Pustyni-XX 4-26-33 

Gold Diggers of 1933- 

WA.. 5-25-33 
Goldie Gets Along-RKO . .6-3-33 

Grand Slam-WA 2-23-33 

Great Jasper, The-RKO . .2-17-33 
Hallelujah I'm a Bum-UA, 

1-27-33 

Haunted Gold-WA 1-11-33 

He Learned About Women 

PAR.. 3-2-33 

Hell Below-MGM 4-27-33 

Hell on Earth-AE 3-31-33 

Hello Everybody-PAR ..1-28-33 

Hello, Sister-F 4-14-33 

Her Resale Value-M AY . .6-21-33 
Hertha's Erwachen-UFA. 3-13-33 
Heute Nacht-Eventuell-XX 

7-7-33 

Hidden Gold-U 3-22-33 

High Gear-GOL 3-22-33 

His Private Secretary-SHO 

6-6-33 

Hold Me Tight-F 5-20-33 

Hold Your Man-MGM 7-1-33 

Holzapfel Weiss Alles-MO 

1-12-33 

Hotel Variety-SCR 1-4-33 

Hot Pepper-F 1-21-33 

Horizon-AM 5-13-33 

Humanity-F 4-22-33 

Hyppolit A Lakaj-ICE ..1-20-33 
Ich Will Nicht Wissen Wer 

Du Bist-INT 2-17-33 

Hire Majestaet Die Liebe- 

WA.. 2-8-33 
I Love That Man-PAR. . .7-8-33 
I Loved You Wednesday-F 

6-16-33 

India Speaks-RKO 5-6-33 

Infernal Machine-F 4-8-33 

I Cover the Waterfront- 

UA.. 5-19-33 
International House-PAR. 5-27-33 

Intruder, The-ALD 3-13-33 

Iron Master-ALD 2-4-33 

Island of Lost Souls-PAR 



Title Revieived 

1-12-33 
It's Great to Be Alive-F. . 7-8-33 

Ivan-GRF 2-23-33 

Jennie Gerhardt-PAR 6-9-33 

Jungle Bride-MOP 5-13-33 

Justice Takes a Holiday- 

MAY.. 4-19-33 

Kadetten-FX 3-31-33 

Kazdemu Wolng Kochac-XX 

5-24-33 

Keyhole, The-WA 3-31-33 

King Kong-RKO 2-25-33 

WA.. 2-18-33 
King of the Jungle-PAR 2-25-33 

King's Vacation-WA 1-20-33 

Kiss Before the Mirror-U 

5-13-33 
Korvettenkapitaen-AG ...3-25-33 

Kuhle Wampe-KIN 4-26-33 

La Donna D'Una Notte- 

POR.. 3-13-33 
Lady's Profession, A. 

PAR.. 3-25-33 
Ladies They Talk About-WA 

2-25-33 
La Ley del Haren-XX .. .6-20-33 

Laubenkolon:e-GEN 6-9-33 

La Voce del Sangue-SY A. 4-19-33 
Law and Lawless-MAJ. .4-12-33 
Les Trois Mousquetaires- 

COM.. 5-1-33 

Life Is Beautiful-AM 2-17-33 

Life of Jimmy Dolan-WA 

6-14-33 

Lilly Turner-FN 6-15-33 

L'italia Parla-EC 2-20-33 

Little Giant-FN 4-14-33 

Long Avenger-WW 6-30-33 

Looking Forward-MGM . .4-29-33 
Love in Morocco-GB ....3-20-33 
Love Is Like That-CHE. 4-29-33 

Lucky Devils-RKO 1-28-33 

Lucky Larrigan-MOP ..3-15-33 

Luxury Liner-PAR 2-4-33 

M— FOR 4-3-33 

Madame Wuenscht Keine 

Kinder-XX 6-3-33 

Malay Nights-MAY 2-1-33 

Man Hunt-RKO 5-5-33 

Man of Action-COL 6-6-33 

Man They Couldn't Arrest- 

GB.. 3-13-33 

Man Who Won-PO 2-25-33 

Mano in Mano-XX 2-23-33 

Marius— PAR 4-19-33 

Matto Grosso-PRI 1-14-33 

Mayor of Hell-WA 6-23-33 

Melody Cruise-RKO 6-16-33 

Men and Jobs-AM 1-6-33 

Men Are Such Fools- 

RKO.. 3-13-33 

Men of America-RKO 3-1-33 

Men Must Fight-MGM . .3-11-33 

Mindreader-FN 4-7-33 

Mistigri-PAR 1-20-33 



Title Reviewed 

Mon Coeur Balance-PAR 2-8-33 
Monkey's Paw, The- 
RKO.. 6-1-33 

Morgenrot-PRX 5-18-33 

Murders in the Zoo-PAR. .4-1-33 
Mussolini Speaks-COL ..3-11-33 
Mysterious Rider — PAR... 6-1-33 
Mystery of the Wax Museum- 

WA. .2-18-33 
My Mother-MOP (Reviewed as 

Self Defense) 2-17-33 

Nagana-U 2-11.. 33 

Namensheirat-FAM 1-12-33 

Narrow Corner. The-WA. 6-20-33 

Night and Day-GB 5-27-33 

Night of Terror-COL 6-7-33 

No Other Woman-RKO . .1-1 3-33 
Noc Listopadowa-PRX . . . 5-1-33 
Nuisance, The-MGM ...5-27-33 
Obey the Law — COL. . .3-11-33 

Officer 13-FD 1-27-33 

Oliver Twist-MOP 2-25-33 

On Demande un Compagnon- 

XX. .6-9-33 

Our Betters-RKO 2-24-33 

Out AD Night-U 4-8-33 

Outlaw Justice-MAJ 2-23-33 

Outsider, The-M-G-M 3-29-33 

Over the Seven Seas-XX. 5-24-33 
Parachute Jumper-WA ..1-27-33 

Paris — Beguin-PRX 1-6-33 

Parole Girl-COL 4-10-33 

Past of Mary Holmes-RKO 

4-29-33 
Peg O' My Heart-MGM.. 5-20-33 

Penal Code, The-FR 1-6-33 

Perfect Understanding-UA 

2-24-33 
Phantom Broadcast-MOP 

4-4-33 
Phantom Thunderbo".t-WW 

6-14-33 

Pick-Up-PAR 3-25-33 

Picture Snatcher-WA 5-19-33 

Piri Mindot Tud-ABC ..1-28-33 

Pleasure Cruise-F 4-1-33 

Potemkin-KIN 4-3-33 

Primavera en Otono-F.. .5-24-33 
Private Detective 62-WA. .7-8-33 

Private Jones-U 3-25-33 

Professional Sweetheart- 

RKO.. 5-27-33 

Racetrack— WW 3-7-33 

Reform Girl-TOW 3-4-33 

Renegades of the West 

RKO 3-29-33 

Return of Casey JonesMOP 

6-30*33 
Return of Nathan Becker- 

WOK.. 4-19-33 
Reunion in Vienna-MGM .. 5-2-33 
Revenge at Monte Carlo-MAY 

4-26-33 

Rivals-AM 4-10-33 

Robber's Roost-F 3-18-33 

Rome Express-U 2-25-33 

Sailor Be Good-RKO 3-1-33 

Sailor's Luck-F 3-17-33 

Samarang-UA 5-18-33 

Savage Girl, The-FR 1-6-33 



Title Revieui 

Savage Gold-AU 5-23-: 

Scarlet River-RKO 5-24-i 

Second Hand Wife-F 1-14-3 

Secrets-UA 3-16-3 

Secret of Madame Blanche 

MGM 2-4 3 

Secrets of Wu Sin-CHE. .2-3-; 

Self Defense-MOP 2-17-3 

Shadow Laughs-INV 3-27-3 

Shame-AM 3-15-3 

She Done Him Wrong- 

PAR. .2-10-3 

Silk Express-WA 6-23-3 

Silver Cord-RKO 5-5-3 

Sister to Judas-MAY ...1-18-3 

Smoke Lightning-F 5-12-3 

So This Is Africa-COL. .4-22-3 
Soldiers of the Storm- 

COL. .5-18 3 
Somewhere in Sonora-WA. 6-7-3 
Song of the Eagle-PAR. .4-27-3 

Song of Life-TF 3-17-3 

Sous La Lune Du Maroc- 

PRX 1-28 3 

Speed Demon-COL 1-7-3 

State Fair-F 1-27-3 

State Trooper-COL 3-27-3 

Story of Temple Drake- 

PAR 5-6-3 

Strange Adventure-MOP 2-8-3 

Strange People-CHE 6-17-3 

Strictly Personal-PAR ...3-18-3 

Study in Scarlet-WW 5-26-3 

Sucker Money-WK 3-1-3 

Sundown Rider-COL 6-9-3 

Supernatural-PAR 4-22-3 

Sweepings-RKO 3-22-3 

Taming the Jungle-INV. .6-6-3 

Taras Triasylo-XX 3-15-3. 

Tatra's Zauber-PRX 2-20-3; 

Telegraph Trail-WA 3-29-3 

Terror Abroad-PAR 7-3-3: 

Terror Trail-U 2-11-3 

Theodore Koerner-XX .. .5-10-3 

There Goes the Bride- 

GB. .3-1-3 
They Just Had to Get 

Married-U 2-10-3 

This Is America-BEE... 5-23-3- 
Today We Live-MGM ..4-15-S 

Tombstone Canyon-F 7-3-3: 

Tonight Is Ours-PAR . .1-21-3.] 

Topaze-RKO 2-10-3. 

Trailing North-MOP 5-17-3 

Traum von Schoenbruhnn 

XX..6 3-J 

Treason-COL 5-4-31 

Trick for Trick-F 6-10-3! 

Truth About Africa-ALX. 4-19-3 
20.000 Years in Sing Sing 

FN.. 1-114 
Una Vida Por Otra-XX. .2-17-? 

Vampire Bat-MAJ 1-10-3): 

Via Pony Express-MAJ. .5-4-3 
Victims of Persecution-POL 

6-17-3 

Warrior's Husband-F — 5-12< 
West of Singapore-MOP.- 4-1-3 

Western Code-COL 1-12-3 

What, No Beer-MGM...2-U 
What Price Decency?- 

MAJ..3 2-3 
What Price Innocence-COL 

6-24-3 
When a Man Rides Alone-FR 
2-1-c 
When Ladies Meet-MGM 

6-24-3 

When Strangers Marry- 

COL..5-25-: 
Whistling in the Dark-MGM 

1-28-3: 
White Sister-MGM ....3-20-3; 
Wild Horse Mesa-PAR. . .l-°-i 

Wives Beware-REG 5-24 

Woman Is Stole-COL. . .6-30-* 
Woman's World-AM ...1-284 
Women Won't Tell-CHE 1-3- 
Woman Accused-PAR. . .3-11- 
Working Man, The-WA. .4-12- 
World Gone Mad-MAJ. .4-15-1 
Yanko Muzykant-ZBY ..3-13-]; 
Young Blood-MOP . . .1-18-1- 
Zapfenstreich Am Rhein- 

JRW..2-84 

Zoo in Budapest-F 4-12-fi 






THE 



IB 



ednesdayjuly 12, 1933 




S5S3BHK 



A TITTLE" from HOLLYWOOD TOTS 



//- 



By RALPH U'ILK 
10BERT BENCHLEY, who ar- 
\ rived at RKO Radio studios some 
v.sks ago with a contract to write 
a^ act, has been assigned a role in 
" : nn Vickers," now in production 
v.-h Irene Dunne as star. 

* * * 

The company which flew to Rio 
d Janiero to film, for the first time, 
n ural scenic backgrounds of this 
b utiful city for the new RKO Ra- 

I picture, "Flying Down to Rio," 
h ; landed in Rio, says cabled re- 
p ts received by Louis Brock, as- 
s iate producer. 

* * * 

'he option on the services of 
\ >rthington Miner was exercised 
o ! Monday by Merian C. Cooper, ex- 
e tive producer at RKO Radio 
edios. The next assignment of 

'■ stage director will be as dia- 
l.ue director for Constance Ben- 
I t's next picture. 

* * * 

tarold Entwhistle has been sign- 
e for an important role in "Little 
Y=men," RKO Radio picturization 
o the Louisa M. Alcott classic now 
i ling under George Cukor's direc- 

i. 

* ♦ * 

)orothy Wilson and Eric Linden 
bjre been cast in "Family Man," 
JO Radio picture which will go 
■m ore the cameras late in July. 



What It Takes to Please Sid Grauman 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Listing four requirements he insists upon in a picture before booking 
it for his Chinese Theater in Hollywood, Sid Grauman, who stated in a letter to 
Jack Warner, that he found "Gold Diggers" to contain these exacting qualities. 

The four requirements Grauman looks for in a picture before he books it, are: 

1. It must have the quality to stand up for a long run. 

2. It must justify advanced prices. 

3. It must have a great cast, tell a fine story and also have spectacle. 

4. It must have what we call two-a-day class. 



Looks as though Henry Travers 
will never get back to New York. 
Travers, brought out from Broad- 
way to repeat the father role he cre- 
ated on the stage in "Reunion in 
Vienna," was literally snatched off 
the train on his return trip and as- 
signed a featured role in "Another 
Language." And now MG-M is 
holding him for another important 
part in "Beauty Parlor." 



Lloyd French, former RKO direc- 
tor, is now directing Laurel and 
Hardy at the Hal Roach studios. He 
directed the comedians in "Tickets 
for Two" and another comedy, as 
yet untitled. 



M. A. Anderson, Jr., veteran cam- 
eraman, is photographing "Notorious 
But Nice," a Chesterfield production, 
which is being directed by Richard 
Thorpe. 



Gilbert Roland, who wooed Mae 
West in "She Done Him Wrong," is 
now to turn his attention to Alice 
Brady in "Beauty Parlor." The fa- 
mous Latin actor has been signed 
by M-G-M for the role of "Abbott" 
in the picturization of the Faith 
Baldwin story. In this he is to be 
paired romantically with Miss Brady, 
who is seen as a newly-rich wife. 

* * * 

Glenda Farrell celebrated her 
birthday with a small dinner party. 
She didn't get any presents — because 
none of the guests knew it was her 
birthday. 

* * * 

William Powell's next Warner 
Bros, starring picture, "The Kennel 
Murder Case," by S. S. Van Dine, 
is in active preparation. Mary 
Astor has been signed for the lead- 
ing feminine role. 

* * * 

Fay Wray joins Wallace Beery, 
Jackie Cooper and George Raft in 
the cast of "The Bowery," which 



Joseph M. Schenck and Darryl . . Zan- 
uck are making as their first Twen- 
tieth Century Pictures' production 
for United Artists release. 

* * * 

Ned Sparks, Grace Bradley and 
Kitty Kelly have been added to the 
cast of "Too Much Harmony," which 
Edward Sutherland will put into pro- 
duction this week at the Paramount 
studios with Bing Crosby, Jack 
Oakie, Skeets Gallagher and Harry 
Green in the leading roles. 

* * * 

Sam Mintz and Leonard Praskins 
are the first of the small army of 
writers on the staff of Twentieth 
Century Pictures, the Joseph M. 
Schenck-Darryl F. Zanuck producins 
company, to have their contracts ex- 
tended. 

Ernest Pagano, comedy writer at 
the Educational Studios for the past 
few years, is at the Warner Studios 
writing an original for Joe E. 
Brown. He returns shortly to the 
Educational Studios to commence 
work on the first Andy Clyde and 
Moran and Mack comedies for the 
new season. 

* * * 

After viewing his work in "The 
Man Who Dared," Fox Film officials 
immediately selected Preston Foster 
for the leading role in "Woman and 
the Law," from the story by Judith 
Ravel and Lowell Brentano. 




'airlee, Vt. — H. E. Smalley has 
losed the recently reopened Fair- 



'ella, la. — W. F. Bailey has pur- 
ijsed the Pella from H. Whitney 
1 taken possession. 



Kansas City, Mo. — John C. Staple, 
e|ibitor at Rockport, Mo., and ed- 
i" r of the Atchison "County Mail" 
' Rockport, has been appointed 
pMicity director for the Missouri 
S&nocratic State Committee. 



Jaltimore — Fred C. Schanberger, 

: is now identified in the new Na- 
<ial Theatergoers' Ass'n, which 
. been formed in New York. He 
with Keith's and Schanberger 
;atrical Interests. 



Boston — Maurice Grassgreen has 
n appointed sales manager fol- 
ic here. 



More Eastern Production 

Educational may produce several of its 
mportant series in the East, providing 
equired talent is available, E. W. Ham- 
ons said yesterday. Tom Howard is 
> star in an Eastern-made series, it 
s definitely planned. 



Detroit — The Graystone, West 
Side house, is having the lobby and 
front remodeled. New box-office is 
being built by Anthony Dubiel, pro- 
prietor. 



Detroit — The former Universal, 
now closed for several months, is to 
be converted to a beer garden. 



Detroit — Electrotone Corp., manu- 
facturers of recording apparatus, is 
out of business. John Rinderman 
was general manager of the com- 
pany. 



Oklahoma City — Warners' Mid- 
west has gone dark for the rest of 
the summer. 



Chicago— "This Nude World," ap- 
proved by the censors, has opened 
at the Castle. 



Chicago — Town Talkies, Gold 
Coast and Julian have closed for the 



Baltimore — A refrigerating plant 
has been installed in the New How- 
ard, operated by Sam Soltz. 



Baltimore — N. C. Haefele, man- 
ager of the National Supply Co., has 
installed a new sound screen in the 
Capitol, which Eddie Kimple man- 
ages for Associated Theaters. 



Council Bluffs, la.— F. R. Felker, 
former manager of the Broadway, 
has leased the house from A. H. 
Blank and will operate it as an in- 
dependent. 



Bristol, Va. — C. A. Goebel has re- 
gained control of the Cameo. 



Richmond— The I. A. T. S. E. lo- 
cal here is holding an all-day outing 
down the James River July 16. 



Atlanta — M. C. Hill has joined the 
sales force of United Artists here. 
E. A. Rambonnet has been added to 
the sales force of Arthur C. Brom- 
berg Attractions, Inc., distributors 
of Monogram in this territory. 



Atlanta— W. S. Tuttle, well known 
in film circles over the southeast, 
doorkeeper at a hostess dance here, 
was recently attacked by thugs who 
tried to hold up the establishment. 



Atlanta, Ga. — The Fox, which has 
been using two and three acts of 



Fanchon & Marco vaudeville week- 
ly for the past eight weeks, returns 
to a straight picture policy the week 
of July 8. Mel Ruick and a 10-piece 
stage band will be added. The Fox 
is a 4,500-seat de luxe house, built 
and leased to the Fox Theaters, Inc., 
but now being operated by a Shrine 
committee. 



Buffalo — The Victoria theater, this 
city, which closed July 5 for altera- 
tions, will reopen July 23, as the 
seventh theater in Basil Bros. Cir- 
cuit. Nicholas H. Basil is the gen- 
eral manager of this circuit. Victor 
Lownes, formerly manager of this 
playhouse, is now on a vacation at 
Stephen's Point, Conn. He has not 
yet announced his plans for the fu- 
ture. 



Monogram's Year Book 

Monogram's 1933-34 year book, is 
the most colorful and elaborate ever 
issued by that company. The cover 
is of gold, white and black and car- 
ries only the company trade-mark. Pic- 
tures of Monogram executives, fran- 
chise holders, stars and directors are 
featured along with action drawings 
of all films in the line-up. Russell 
M. Bell designed the entire book with 
Mike Simmons contributing the copy. 



\2 




DAILY 



Wednesday, July 12, 19: 



ANTI-BLOCK BOOKING 
RULE IN PATMAN BILL 



duced late in the special session of 
Congress was referred to the Com- 
mittee on Interstate Commerce. Pat- 
man advised The Film Daily that 
he would add the block booking pro- 
vision while his bill was in the com- 
mittee. The original bill would re- 
quire a Federal license for every 
photoplay to be exhibited, which 
would virtually mean federal cen- 
sorship. 



Texas Exhibitors Urge 
42-Hour Maximum Week 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Allied unit. The meeting named a 
committee of five to work out spe- 
cific recommendations in connection 
with the code. 

Another recommendation is to the 
effect that the code provide for local 
committees to handle arbitration. 
Personnel of the committee, it was 
urged, would consist of distributors, 
exhibitors and a person not iden- 
tified with the industry. 



GENE DENNIS FOR ALBEE 

Gene Dennis plays an engagement 
of a week or more at the Albee, 
Brooklyn, next week. 



\mmammmmmm 

HOLLYWOOD 

PLAZA 



V rf D °n 



-a u' 



D"C 



C na.Q 0" 3 | 



SUMMER 
RATES, Now 

$2 per day single? 
$2.50 per day double! 

Special weekly and monthly rates 

All rooms with bath and 
shower. Every modern 
convenience. 

SFine foods at reasonable 
prices in the Plaza's Rus- 
sian Eagle Garden Cafe. 
Look for the'Doorway of Hospitality" B 
ChaA.DanyiqyiMm. Cum nsStfi nHu xdfl 
VINE AT HOLLYWOOD BLVD. 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



THEATER CHANGES 

Reported by Film Boards of Trade 



OREGON 

Changes in Ownership 

i < >:;\ ALUS - Whiteside, transferred to 
WIiiIim.1l- Hn.s. In- Fox West Coast. EN- 
TERPRISE— Okay, transferred to Stock- 
dale & Reed by R. E. Stiver. EUCJENE— 
Rex, transferred to Evergreen Amusement 
Co. by Fox West Coast. MEDFORD— 
Criterion, transferred to Tri State Amuse- 
ment Co. by Fox West Coast; Rialto, trans- 
ferred to Tri State Amusement Co. by Fox 
West Coast. PORTLAND — Alberta, trans- 
ferred to H. V. Evans by L. H. Evans; 
Hollywood and Liberty, transferred to 
Evergreen Amusement Co. by Fox West 
Coast. 

Closing 

PORTLAND— Union. 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Changes in Ownership 

AMBRIDGE— Penn, transferred to A. N. 
Notopouios by Publix. BUTLER— Capitol, 
transferred to A. N. Notopouios by Publix. 
3EECHVIEW— Olympic, transferred to J. 
Orlando by Klare & Lint. HALLSTEAD 
— Capito! (formerly New Plaza), transfer- 
red to Wyndham Davies. HARRISBURG 
— Royal, transferred to W. B. Schwalm. 
JOHNSTOWN — State, transferred to 
George Panagatocas by Publix. KNOX — 
Knox, transferred to Patrick M. Notariana 
by Odd Fellows Association. PARKES- 
BURG — Opera House, transferred to Rob- 
ert Morrow and Harry Rivers. PHILA- 
DELPHIA — Carman, transferred to George 
T. Gravenstine by American Theaters 
Corp. ; Castle, transferred to Kaye Krouse 
and E. Levick by Faye Krouse; Wayne, 
transferred to Charles A. Riley by Wilmer 
Realty Co., Inc. REYNOLDSVILLE— 
Adelphia and Majestic, transferred to John 
Damore by F. £. Johnson. TRE.VORTON 
— Forrest, transferred to Firo Theatrical 
Entertainments by Michael Kearns. WES- 
LEYVILLE — Penn, transferred to Edwin 
P. Brown by E. Williams. 

Openings 

ALIQUJPPA— Strand. CADOGAN— Cado- 
gan. CONNEAUT LAKE— Park. GIR- 
ARD— Denman. HALLSTEAD — Capitol 
(formerly New Plaza), by Wyndham Da- 
vies. HARRISBURG— Royal, by W. B. 
Schwalm. JOHNSTOWN— Dale. GROVE 
CITY— Majestic. MANOR— Elite. MON- 
ESSEN— Star. PHILADELPHIA — Ger- 
mantown, by Warner Bros. REYNOLDS- 
VILLE— Libel ty. ROCHESTER— Majes- 
tic. 

Closings 

I.EECHBURG— Cosmorama. McDONALD— 
Grand. PHILADELPHIA — Orpheum. 
PITTSBURGH— New Palace and Variety. 
ROBERTSDALE — Liberty. SEWARD— 
Regent. 

RHODE ISLAND 
Openings 

NARRANGANSETT PIER— Casino, by R. 

I. M. Stanzler. 

Closings 

PROVIDENCE— Fay's. WOONSOCKET— 
Park. 



SOUTH CAROLINA 
Changes in Ownership 

AIKEN — State, transferred to State Aniu-c- 
ment Co., Inc., by 11. B. Ram. BATES 
BURG — Carolina, transferred to S. Boyos- 
lousky by C. H. Albretch. 

SOUTH DAKOTA 
Changes in Ownership 

ABERDEEN— Aster (formerly State), trans- 
t erred to John Hartman by Dick Sutton. 
ALCESTER — Barrymore, transferred to 
Vernon Larson by H. W. Lund. DeSMET 
— Ritz, transferred to Ely & Holliday by 
G. E. Christianson. EAGLE BUTTE— 
Strand, transferred to Davis & Davis by 
Joe Paul. WOONSOCKET— Gem. trans- 
ferred to Harold May by E. C. Arehardt. 

Openings 

ABERDEEN — Astor. BURKE — Burke. 
EAGLE BUTTE— Strand. CENTER- 

VILLE— Broadway. PLATTE — Lyric. 
REVILLO— Auditorium. 

TEXAS 
Changes in Ownership 

GOLIAD — Goliad, transferred to Mrs. O. G. 
Frels. GREENVILLE— Star, transferred 
to C. E. Murrell. MARLIN— Martex (for- 
merly Lyric), transferred to P. H. Cox. 
HONEY GROVE — Strand, transferred to 
J. J. Brown. MENARD — Mission, trans- 
ferred to Henry Reeve. ATLANTA — 
Ritz (formerly Liberty), transferred to N. 
L. Smith. JASPER — Lone Star, transfer- 
red to A. B. Rhodes. LONGVIEW— Lib- 
erty (formerly Legion), transferred to E. 
E. Lutz. 

Openings 

CRYSTAL CITY— Juarez, by F. Dila Garza. 
NEWTON- -Pastime. LEONARD— Liber- 
ty. AMARILLO— Fair. TYLER— Palace, 
by S. G. Fry. HILLSBORO— Majestic. 
ROGERS— Strand. KNOX CITY— Texas. 
EL PASO— Airdome. McGREGOR— Opera 
House. 

Closings 

DEL RIO— Casino. MIDLOTHIAN— Crys- 
tal. PORT LAVACA— Amusu. SOMER- 
VILLE— Majestic. OLNEY— Ritz. THUR- 
BUR— Opera House. SAN MARCOS— 
Plaza. Rusk — Astor (damaged by fire). 
DALLAS — Melba. CANTON — Royal. 
PHARR— Valenzia. ROCKWELL — Em- 
press. WHITEWRIGHT— Palace. MER- 
CEDES— Mercedes. VAN ALSTYNE— 
Lyric. AMARILLO— Paramount. (JUITA 
QUE— Queen. CRYSTAL CITY— Guild. 
SPEARMAN— Lyric. FRIONA— Capitol. 
SABINAL— Majestic. BONHAM— Texas. 

UTAH 
Change in Ownership 

ST. GEORGE— Electric, transferred to 
Wadsworth Bros. 

Openings 

BEAVER— Lyric, by W. A. Firmage. KA- 
MAS — Opera House, by Simpson and Pitt. 
VERMONT 
Openings 

FAIR LEE— Fairlee, by H. E. Smalley. 
MENDON — Mysrnuck Park, by S. Brody. 

Closings 

BARRE— Magnet. WATERBURY— Lyric. 



ATTENDING "PILGRIMAGE" 

Among the stars who will attend 
the world premiere tonight of Fox's 
"Pilgrimage" at the Gaiety are: 
Sally Eilers, James Dunn, Mimi Jor- 
dan, Bert Wheeler, Robert Woolsey 
and Henrietta Crossman. 



FINISH N. Y. EXTERIORS 

Ray Binger and Ben Silvey, both 
of Twentieth Century Productions, 
are en route to the Coast from New 
York after making exteriors for 
"The Bowery." Ben Berk and Frank 
Zuker, cameramen, worked with 
them. 



LABS ELECT TODAY 

Laboratory executives will meet 
today at the Hotel Astor to hear 
the first report of their code com- 
mittee and to elect officers. It will 
be a closed meeting for members 
only. 



PEARL WHITE IN HOSPITAL 

Paris — Pearl White is under 
treatment at the American Hospital 
suffering from a recurrence of a 
spine injury. She claims she sus- 
tained the injury while playing in 
"The Perils of Pauline," serial, some 
years ago. 



NAME F. WALKER SE, 
OF RECOVERY GOUNC 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Washington, returns to New Yq 
tomorrow. 

Walker is treasurer of the Den 1 
cratic National Committee and p| 
viously occupied a similar post w| 
the New York state Democratic col 
mittee. He has long been an in 
mate friend of Roosevelt. A f 
months ago Walker was offered j 
important executive position in q 
Paramount Publix reorganization] 



"INFLATION" FOR CAPITOL 

"Inflation" an M-G-M short, \J 
be shown at the Capitol for u 
week beginning Friday, in conjuij 
tion with the feature "Midnig 1 
Mary." 



NED 
WAYBURF 



Announces Summer Classes in all Types 
Stage and Social Dancing at Greatly 
Reduced Rates 



• ADULT GIRLS' AND WOMEN'S CLASSES 

Ages 16 years and over. Enroll now. Start i 
Monday. Also special one-hour evening clas' 
1 , ?, or 5 times weekly. Mondays to Frida 

• WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY FOR CHILDR 

— Ned Wayburn is famous for his work w 
children. Classes for boys and girls, ages 3 
16. Thorough training in all types of darcii 
Classes meet Saturdays. Also special one-he 
weekly classes after school hours. 

• BODY PROPORTIONING— Is there any< 
around you overweight? Ned Wayburn can tic 
them. Weight reduced or increased. A 
that has been perfected after years of 

the most celebrated stars of stage and 
Utmost of privacy. Whatever your age or siz 
Ned Wayburn can help you. 

• BROADCASTING INSTRUCTION — Class 

private instruction in diction, song rend t 
microphone technique for radio and talkies. 

• THE NED WAYBURN 1933 ANNUAL DANC 
FROLIC AND RADIO REVELS will be held tt 
year in the Auditorium of the A. W. A. Cm! 
house, 361 West 57th Street, New York Cit 
Saturday, June 17th. This is one of the mo 
important social and theatrical functions c- ' 
year. Matinee and evening performance. R" 
ervation for seats should be made well ir S 
vance. 

NOTE TO MEN AND WOMEN ENGAGED I 
MOVIE INDUSTRY 

If members of your family or friends are ir 
terested in a career on stage, screen, radio, cj 
in having a beautiful figure, have them consuj 
Ned Wayburn. He has helped up the ladder c 
fame such outstanding stars of the stage, scree 
and radio as Al Jolson, Marilyn Miller, Fr 
Adele Astaire, Eddie Cantor, Jeanette McDonald 
Ed Wynn, Nancy Carroll, Clifton Webb, H 
Leroy, Ann Pennington, Jack Whiting, F 
Ellis (the latest — seen with George Arliss i ! 
"The King's Vacation"), and hundreds of other. 1 ! 

NED WAYBURN INSTITUTE OF DANCING 1 
AND RADIO BROADCASTING SCHOOli 
Depf. F, 625 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Yt 
Bet. 58th & 59th Sts. Tel. Wlckersham 2-4301 



II 



;dnesday, July 12, 1933 

\ 

REMEMBER 
WHEN 

By 
MARCO 

as told to 

DON HANCOCK 

of The Film Daily Editorial Staff 



?UITE some years ago when Al Jol- 
son consented to make personal ap- 
: ances in motion picture houses we had 
i experience which was unique in its own 
I ," said Marco of Fanchon and Marco. 
We had booked Jolson at Loew's War- 
), San Francisco, on percentage. He was 
instantaneous success and had to do six 
seven shows a day to accommodate 
crowds. Lines extended down the 
et and around the corner. Extra police 
.e sent to keep the people in order. 
Although Jolson had been used to re- 
ing large pay envelopes for screen and 
;e work, when he saw the crowds, he 
itally figured that on percentage he 

iild draw a sum far beyond his expecta- 
s and in fact a sum that was 'too good 
>e true.' 

During his last performance the last 
jit, Jolson jokingly told the audience 

he would hold the show until he re- 
ed his check for his percentage of the 
ik's gross. And he did. He clowned, 

stories and sang for over an hour and 
ilf more than his scheduled time. Mean- 
le the theater manager was frantically 
jching for the district manager whose 
ature was necessary on the check. Fin- 
■ they caught up with the district man- 

and the check was signed. Then the 
[iter manager went tearing down the 
j waving a check for $22,500, Jolson's 
[e of the receipts, which, I believe, is 

highest amount ever received by an 
srtainer for a week's work." 




DAILV 



OORE MAY STAR IN SHOW 

■t Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

lolly-wood — Colleen Moore has 
t for New York, via Chicago 
ere she will visit the World's 
ir with her husband, Al Scott. 
5S Moore has just completed the 
x feature "The Power and the 
■ry" opposite Spencer Tracy. She 
1 spend five months in the east 
'ing which time she may appear 
a Broadway stage production. 



ANSWERS 

to 
"HOW GOOD IS YOUR 
MEMORY" QUESTIONS 

In 1913 with Jesse L. Lasky. 

Biograph's film of the Jeffries-Sharkey 

match at Coney Island. 

Raymond B. West. 

Sydney S. Cohen. 

"Quo Vadis." 



WEEKS QUITS MAYFAIR; 
WILL START OWN GO. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

of Weeks' resignation. He is under- 
stood to be undergoing treatment in 
Canada at present. Weeks, who was 
formerly general manager of dis- 
tribution for Paramount, will re- 
sume activities early in September. 



Phil Reisman Vice-Pres. 

For R-K-0 Theaters 

(.Continued from Page 1) 

four divisions: Executive, Operation, 
Field and Corporate. 

In the executive division Merlin 
H. Aylesworth is chairman of the 
board with Walter L. Brown as as- 
sistant. Harold B. Franklin, presi- 
dent, Samuel L. "Roxy" Rothafel, in 
charge of Radio City theaters and 
Malcolm Kingsberg, vice-president. 
The operation division personnel 
and positions are Robert F. Sisk, ad- 
vertising and publicity; Terry Tur- 
ner, exploitation; Perc Trussell, 
publications. Vaudeville, A. Willi, 
eastern, and H. Howard, western. 
B. J. Hynes, personnel; A. J. Ben- 
line, coast control. Field division, 
H. R. Emdee, uptown; C. B. Mc- 
Donald, downtown and Brooklyn; J. 
J. Franklin, Albee, Brooklyn; 
Charles W. Koerner, up state and 
Boston; L. Goldberg, Brooklyn; J. 
M. Brennan, New Jersey and Wash- 
ington; Chicago, N. J. Blumberg; J. 
M. Franklin, Canadian; Cliff Work, 
west coast; A. Frudenfeld, Detroit; 
Nat Holt, middle west. Corporate 
division, Herman Zohbel, treasurer; 
secretary, William Mallard; 0. R. 
McMahon, comptroller; F. Alstock, 
statistics; J. M. Maloney, insurance; 
Louis Cohen, real estate. 



Director Answers Slaps 
At Hollywood-at-Fair 

(Continued from Page 1) 

described the exhibition as construc- 
tive from the standpoint of the in- 
dustry. Sullivan, who has arrived 
in New York, said that only the 
technical side of the business is 
being shown and everything possi- 
ble is being done to impress the 
public with the fact that Hollywood 
is not a "playground" but instead a 
colony of hard-working individuals. 
In no sense is Hollywood-at-the- 
Fair designed to compete with the 
industry, Sullivan declared. Instead, 
it invites the co-operation of picture 
companies in sending their players 
to appear personally before the hun- 
dreds of thousands of persons who 
are attending the exposition, he 
said. 

Frank Heath, formerly casting di- 
rector at the Paramount Long Island 
studio, has been appointed New 
York representative for Hollywood- 
at-the-Fair. 



SEVENTH FOR BASIL BROS. 

Buffalo — Basil Brothers' Circuit 
has acquired its seventh house 
through taking over the Victoria 
here. 




pROGRE 

• 

Summer 1918 

New Deal 

Film Daily 

15 Years 



Prestige 



* 



Meaning That During The Summer The 

Film Daily Will Celebrate Its 15th Anniversary 
As The Newspaper Of The Motion Picture 
Industry With A "NEW DEAL" Number 
Covering What Has Gone Before, What's Going 
On Now and What The Future Has To Offer 



II 




DAILY 



Wednesday, July 12, 1 

!■ IMH I— —» 



"TOMORROW AT SEVEN" 

RKO Radio 62 mins. 

MURDER MYSTERY WITH COMEDY 
RELIEF RATES AS FAIR PROGRAMME! 

Despite a confusing plot and a not very 
mysterious mystery this one will probably 
please the customers. All the old mystery 
picture gags such as hands knocking on 
doors, girls being dragged through windows 
by arms without bodies and lights that 
conveniently go out are used but the whole 
thing moves smoothly and should go over. 
Story relates the doings of an ego-maniac, 
the "black ace," who tells his victims 
when they are to be killed and then goes 
through with the jebs on schedule. Chester 
Morris as a detective story writer, gets 
mixed up in the plot and flies to Louisiana 
with a man who has been warned that he 
is next. On the plane the man's assistant 
is killed at the time appointed for the 
next murder. A couple of dumb cops, who 
furnish the comedy, are on board and they 
try to unravel the murder and uncover the 
"black ace." After they arrive in Louisi- 
ana the novelist straightens out the mess 
and uncovers the culprit. Frank McHugh 
and Allan Jenkins are good as the dumb 
dicks. 

Cast: Chester Morris, Vivienne Osborne, 
Fran McHugh, Allan Jenkins, Henry Ste- 
phenson, Grant Mitchell, Charles Middle- 
ton, Oscar Apfel, Virginia Howell, Cor- 
nelius Keefe, Edward Le Saint, Gus Robin- 
son. 

Director, Ray Enright; Adaptor, Ralph 
Spence; Dialoguer, same; Film Editor, Rose 
Loewinger; Cameraman, Charles Schoen- 
baum; Recording Engineer, Lodge Cun- 
ningham. 

Direction, Good. Photography, Good. 



Victor McLaglen in 

"LAUGHING AT LIFE" 

Nat Lcvine 72 mins. 

McLAGLEN REGISTERS STRONG IN 
FAIR ACTION STORY WITH EXCEL- 
LENT CAST. 

This stcry is built entirely around Vic- 
tor McLaglen, his escapades in many cities 
of the world and his absolute disregard 
of all law and order. He starts out as 
a civil engineer in Panama, then he be- 
comes a gun runner, later he enters the 
world war and finally lands in South Amer- 
ica where he starts a rebellion. During 
his travels, his wife dies and he subse- 
quently loses all trace of his young son. 
While organizing the rebels, he is joined 
by Regis Toomey who is later arrested by 
the party in power. McLaglen discovers 
that Toomey is his own son. He then de- 
mands that the president cf the republic 
release Toomey under threats of incensing 
the revolutionists into action. The presi- 
Gent consents, McLaglen breaks up the 
revolution and he and Toomey escape. 

Cast: Victor McLaglen, Conchita Monte- 
negro, William Boyd, Lois Wilson, Henry 
B. Walthall, Regis Toomey, Ruth Hall, 
Dewey Robinson, Guinn Williams, Ivan 
Lebedeff, Mathilde Comont, Noah Beery, 
Tully Marshall, J. Farrell MacDonald, 
Henry Armetta, Edmund Breese, Frankie 
Darro, Buster Phelps, Pat O'Malley, Wil- 
liam Desmond, Lloyd Whitlock, Philo Mc- 
Cullough, George Humbert. 

Director, Ford Beebe; Author, same; 
Adaptors, Prescott Chaplin, Thomas Du- 
gon; Editor, Ray Snyder; Cameramen, 
Ernie Miller, Tom Calligan; Recording En- 
gineer, Earl Crane. 

Direction, 01 ay. Photography, Fair. 



"BY APPOINTMENT ONLY" 

with Lew Cody, Sally O'Neil, 

Aileen Pringle 

Invincible 63 mins. 

OVERLOADED WITH DIALOGUE AND 
TOO LITTLE ACTION IN A RAMBLING 
ROMANCE. 

The idea they started with was fairly 
interesting, but they failed to get much 
meat into the plot, and very little action 
and change cf scenery. The result is that 
the greater part of the film is acted out 
on one set — the offices of Lew Cody, the 
great consulting specialist. Here the plot 
unravels slowly in a cloud of dialogue that 
grows tedious. Sally O'Neil plays the part 
of a 14-year old orphan, no less, whom 
Dr. Cody adopts. Meanwhile he has an 
ambitious fiancee in Aileen Pringle who 
won't marry him till he goes to Europe 
for a few years and grabs off a lot of 
degrees for himself. The plot shifts back 
to the doc's offices in America again, with 
the orphan a beautiful young girl of 18 
and the doctor falling in love with her, 
and trying to bust up her engagement to 
his fiancee's brother. And so to the forced 
ending, with the doc coming to his senses 
and letting the kid marry in her own age 
class, while he gets sentimental again with 
his aging fiancee, Aileen. 

Cast: Lew Cody, Sally O'Neil, Aileen 
Pringle, Marceline Day, Edward Morgan, 
Edward Martindel, Claire McDowell, Pau- 
line Garon, Wilson Benge, Gladys Blake. 

Director, Frank Strayer; Author, Robert 
Ellis; Adaptor, same; Dialoguer, same, 
Cameraman, M. A. Anderson. 

Direction, Handicapped by Material. 
Photography, Very Good. 



53 Contract Players 
Now at Warner Stu 

West Canst Bureau of TUP, FI1 

Hollywood — Warner Bn» 
have 53 players under contr 
Their names follow: 

Stars include Ruth Chatter L 
Leslie Howard, Richard Bartl 
mess, William Powell, Kay Fiarf 
Edward G. Robinson, Joe E. Lin, 
Al Jolson. James Cagney, J 
Blondell, Warren William, I 
Muni, Barbara Stanwyck, Ad< 
Menjou, Bette Davis, Ruby Kec 
Dick Powell and Ann Dvorak. 

Featured players include A.l 
MacMahon, Patricia Ellis, Gleij 
Farrell, Margaret Lindsay, I 
Talbot, Allen Jenkins, Guv Kibti 
Claire Dodd, Ruth Donnelly, Gd 
Brent, Philip Faversham, Fr; 
McHugh, Helen Vinson, Elefl 
Holm, Sheila Terry, Jean HI 
Theodore Newton. George Bla 
wood, Gordon Westcott, Artl 
Hohl, Robert Barratt, Marjorie L 
tell, Juliette Ware, Lorena Lays(I 
Barbara Rogers, Renee Whitn j 
Helen Mann, Loretta Andrews, llj 
Wing, Alice Jans, Lynn Browni ,J 
Ann Hovey, Maxine Cantway, Jaj| 
Shadduck and Geraine Gear. 



3 A YEAR FROM HARDINCi 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM 

Hollywood — Under Ann Hardin 
new RKO contract, ' which covi 
two years, she will make six p| 
tures on the basis of three a yei 



REVIEWS OF NEW SHORT SUBJECTS! 



"Bosko's Knight-Mare" 

(Looney Tunes) 

Vitaphone 7 mins. 

Peppy Cartoon 

An adventure of Bosko, who 
dreams that he is a knight at the 
ancient court of King Arthur, where 
he pulls his modern stuff on the 
Knights of the Round Table. There 
is plenty of excitement when the 
villain "knight abducts the fail- 
heroine. Bosko awakes in the mid- 
dle of a hot fight to find that it's all 
a dream. The modern treatment of 
the knights in armor is clever and 
has plenty of laughs. 



"Rambling Round Radio Row" 

(No. 5) 

Vitaphone 11 mins. 

Radio Names 

Introducing some well known ra- 
dio entertainers who are presented 
at a house party in their specialty 
numbers. Harry Rose is the host, 
and presents the Three Keys, Lou 
Conrad and his Orchestra, Harriet 
Lee and her boy friends, and Uncle 
Don. Jerry Wald is featured. Some 
good song numbers keep this one- 
reeler pepped up. It has plenty of 
class, and with the radio names can 
be played up. 



time beer garden in the early nine- 
ties. The leading lady on whom Tom 
is very sweet starts to play up to a 
new boy friend, and the complica- 
tions come fast and funny. It has 
a load of funny characters, and the 
material is burlesqued with a serious 
treatment that gets over strong. 
Harry Sweet directed. Tom and his 
pal do a duet, rendering some old 
ballads that will make anybody 
laugh. They are putting plenty into 
this series, and this one clicks. 



"The Bully's End" 

(Aesop Fable) 

Radio 7 mins. 

Action Cartoon 

One of the barnyard operas in 
cartoon, with a bout arranged be- 
tween the rooster, the barnyard 
bully, and the little duck, who was 
successfully coached by the dog hero. 
The ringside atmosphere is carried 
out in detail, and there is plenty of 
action and excitement before pug 
duck knocks his big antagonist 
through the ropes. 



"She Outdone Him" 

Radio 20 mins. 

Very Good 

Swell comedy "with Tom Kennedy 
featured as the proprietor of an old- 



"Inflation" 

M-G-M 10 mins. 

Popular Presentation 

A popular explanation of the sub- 
ject of Inflation in a way that should 
appeal to the average theatergoer. 
There is nothing technical about it. 
The effects of lowering and raising 
the purchase value of the dollar are 
shown in a simple way, and then the 



effect of the inflated dollar is illus- 
trated by showing how one particu- 
lar dollar is spent, and how its cir- 
culation through various industries 
and trades helps in increased em- 
ployment and the speeding up of the 
wheels of business in general. Pete 
Smith gives the explanatory narra- 
tion. Directed by Zion Myers. 



"Giants of the North" 

(Bray Naturgraph) 

Educational 11 mins. 

Outdoor Adventure 

Very interesting trip into the 
wilds of the North in search of the 
bear in his native haunts. Some fine 
shots of bears are caught at close 
range, showing them protecting their 
young and their method of catching 
salmon. The camera work is ex- 
ceptionally good, and as an outdoor 
number this will go good through 
the hot days. 



"Parades of Yesterday" 

Vitaphone 10 mins. 

Dull Stuff 

A lot of old parade shots dug up 
from the archives make up this one 
but it has no particular interest due 
to a lack of old screen personalities. 
Even the parades are unimportant. 
A shot of John Bunny, reviewing a 
parade, is flashed on the screen at 
various times during the picture and 
the narrator reintroduces him each 
time in an attempt to get laughs. 



Bobby Jones in 

"How to Break 90" 
Number Six, Fine Points 
Vitaphone 10 mil 

The last of the newest Bob 
Jones series should be helpful to I 
golfers who are willing to follow t 
plain instructions given. This o 
tells how to correct a slice or hoo 
how to slice or hook purposely ai 
how to stop a ball on the green. 



"Wake Up the Gypsy in Me" 
Vitaphone 7 mir 

Peppy Cartoon 

A lively Merrie Melody burle 
quing the Russian revolution wi 
the sinister "Rice Put Em" kidm, 
ping the little gypsy girl and beii 
blown up by the revolutionist 
Tuneful and well done. 

"Straight Shooters" 
(Sports-Eye-View Series) 
Paramount 9 mil 

Only Fair 

One of the Grantland Rice serii 
with the sports writer introduci] 
two leaders of the golf game — Bob 
Jones and Joe Kirkwood. In t 
first half Bobby demonstrates soi 
difficult drives and putts, and e 
plains as he goes along. The s< 
ond half gives Kirkwood a chan 
to show the humorous side of t 
game, with some goofy trick she 
and phony golf sticks. Just the re 
ulations sports number. 






= FOX Announces Fifteen Dated Pictures in this Issue 




rhe Da i ly N per 

Of Motion Pic i u s 
Now Fifteen Years C 




NE># yCPK, TlitCSDAy, JULY 13, 1933 



5 CENTS 



llan Freedman Heads Laboratory Association 

IUST INCREASE ADMISSION PRICES, SAYS RECEIVER 

roposed N. Y. Tax on Operators Would Raise $60,000 



y's New Revenue Plan 
Would Impose Fee for 
Examination 

'ew York projectionists will pay 
city $60,000 annually in new 
s provilding the Board of Al- 
ien passes a proposal made by 
?rman Curley which would im- 
a fee of $5 for a city examina- 
of operators. This is Curley's 
. nate. If adopted the $5 would 
^applied to the annual license 
of $10. 



OF 60 WARNER 
STORIES ACQUIRED 



rirty of Warners' new program 
features have been purchased 

all are either completed, in 
<., or ready for production with 
5 assigned to the leading roles, 
■ Wilk, Warner story head, told 

Film Daily yesterday, 
io-called 'program' pictures will 

{Continued on Page 24) 



tiopoly Suit Is Filed 
T Legg, Texas Exhibitor 

illas — B. Legg, operator of the 
trba, Denison, has filed suit ask- 
;he 101st District Court for re- 
from alleged monopoly of the 
on picture business by "pro- 
rs and distributors." Legg al- 
; in his petition that the de- 
ants have refused to permit him 
)tain pictures for exhibition and 
he fears they will not make 
:acts with him for 1933-34 ex- 
ion. 



Kane with Fox Aug. 1 

Association of Robert T. Kane with 
x in an important production post will 
formally announced by that company 
out August 1. Kane, who resigned 
me months ago as the Paramount pro- 
cing head at Joinville, France, recently 
ived in New York. 



Burkan Chairman of Industry Jewish-German Relief Committee 

Nathan Burkan has accepted the chairmanship of the motion picture industry di- 
vision of the German Relief Campaign of the American Jewish Joint Distribution 
Committee which is raising funds for the victims of the Nazi regime. 

The relief organization, whicn is non-political, is seeking $2,000,000. Burkan is 
now appointing an industry committee to co-operate with him. He returns to New 
York tomorrow from Massachusetts. 



Salacious Pictures are Condemned by 200 

Iowa Exhibitors at Allied Des Moines Meet 



Des Moines — Two hundred inde- 
pendent exhibitors attending a meet- 
ing of Allied Theater Owners of 
Iowa yesterday went on record as 
condemning salacious pictures. Les- 
ter Martin, president of the asso- 
ciation, described the action as a 
move to clean Iowa theaters and to 

(.Continued on Page 26) 



Says Japan to Make 800 
Features and China 100 

Six regular Japanese producers 
will make approximately 800 fea- 
tures during the new season while 
four Chinese firms will turn out 
about 100 features, according to Roy 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Robb and Rowley-Para. 

Dallas Dispute Ends 

Dallas — Paramount and Robb & 
Rowley have adjusted their differ- 
ences over local exhibition of "Col- 
lege Humor," with the latter with- 
drawing its injunction action against 
the distributing company. The trou- 
ble occurred when the picture moved 
from the Palace to the Old Mill. 
The theater company claimed that 
it had a contract for all Paramount 
second runs and subsequently filed 
its injunction action. 



Supreme Court Denies 
Permit Men's Petition 

Judge Riegelman of the Supreme 
Court, Brooklyn, yesterday handed 
down a decision denying a petition 
of 337 permit men for a court order 
granting them full membership 
privileges in Local 306, operators' 
union. The justice recommended, 
however, that perimt men be given 
preference in examinations and 
that their $500 fee be put aside and 
made available to them if and when 
they withdraw. 



Alan Freedman Elected Head 
Of Laboratory Association 



Invite Myers to Talk 

At Indie Code Confab 

Abram F. Myers, Allied States 
Ass'n general counsel, has been in- 
vited to address the mass meeting 
called by the Association of the Mo- 
tion Picture Industry for July 24-25 
at the Hotel Astor. Invitations to 
organized industry groups include 
the Academy of M. P. Arts and Sci- 
ences and the S. M. P. E. 



Officers and board of directors 
were elected yesterday by the unani- 
mous vote of all members attending 
a meeting of the Motion Picture 
Laboratories Association of America 
at the Hotel Astor. Every local 
laboratory was represented in the 
vote. Officers chosen are: president, 
Alan Freedman of De Luxe; vice- 
president, Tom Evans of Major; 
secretary. Stephen H. Eller of 
(Continued on Page 24) 



H. A. McCausland, RKO 

Receiver, Sees Need 

Of Scale Boost 

Theater prices must be consider- 
ably advanced before the start of 
the new season if the majority of 
circuit houses expect to survive the 
coming winter, H. A. McCausland, 
receiver for RKO Theaters, told The 
Film Daily yesterday in an exclu- 
sive interview. "The summer sea- 

(Continued on Page 24) 

INDIES AND MAJORS 
IN JOINT CODE WORK 

Prospects of a further unification 
of industry code drafts loomed yes- 
terday when independent distribu- 
tors, at a meeting at the Hays of- 
fice, agreed to work with the na- 

(Continued on Page 26) 



Edward Dillon, Director, 
Is Dead in Los Angeles 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Edward Dillon, 60 
years old, first leading man for Mary 
Pickford and later a director for 

(Continued on Page 26) 



"Pilgrimage" 



If "Pilgrimage," the Fox presentation 
that had its Broadway premiere last 
evening at the Gaiety Theater can be 
taken as a criterion of what is to come 
then Fox has again hit its stride and 
the picture-loving public can look for 
pleasing things from the industry for 
the coming season. "Pilgrimage" is es- 
sentially a love story, told against an 
impressive background and of splendid 
rhythm and exquisite vitality. It is one 
of those occasional wholesome and fine 
efforts that should prove entertaining 
to every type of audience in every type 
of community. Henrietta Crosman is 
as splendid on the screen as she was 
on the stage. John Ford never di- 
rected with better understanding. Old 
favorites s"ch as Bob Warwick, Lucille 
La Verne, Francis Ford and Bettv Blvthe, 
in minor roles, took us hapoilv back info 
th° silent days We liked "Pilgi-Imagq" 
a lot. You will too. — Jack Alicoate 



THE 



-%£! 



DAILY 



Thursday, July 13, 1 



I 




Vol.LXIII.No. 10 Thurs.. July 13. 1933 Price 5 Cents 



JOHN W ALICOATE 



Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and HoliJsys 
at ltoO Broadway. New York, N. V., 
bv Wids'a Films and Film Folk. Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau. Secretary-Treasurer 
and Gcnrnil Manager; Arthur \V. Eddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
Mav 21, 1918, at the post-office at New York, 
N. ' Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY. 1-650 Broadway, New York, N. Y.. 
Phone, Circle 7-4736. 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk. 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London- 
Ernest \V. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wanlour St., \V. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
— P. A. Harle, La Cinematographie Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

High Low Close 

Am. Scat 6Vi 6 'A 6 Vl 4 

Columbia Picfs. vrc. 24 23 23 '/g - 

Con. Fm. Ind 5 4Vs 5 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. 12% 12' 8 123/ 8 - 

East.- Kodak 83% 82 83%- 

Fox Fm. "A" 4% 4% 4Vi - 

Loew's, Inc 27'/ 2 25% 26% -4. 

Paramount ctfs 2% 2% 2l/g - 

Pathe Exch 2% 2 2 - 

do "A" 834 8 8% -j 

RKO 4% 45 /8 47/g 

Warner Bros 8% 73/ 4 7% - 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. pfd. . % % % — 

Technicolor 9 8'g &V& 

Trans-Lux 2% 234 2% 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 6% 63 8 6V 2 - 

Gen. Th. Eq.6s40ctfs. 5% 5% 5% - 

Keith A-0 6s 46 ... 51 51 51 J 

Loew 6s 41ww . ... 8234 82 82 -\ 

Paramount 6s 47 27 25% 255/g - 

Par. By. 5' 2 s51 3534 32 32 - 

Par. 5' 2 s50 26' 2 25'g 25% - 

Par. 5' 2 s 50 ctfs. 25 25 25 - 

Pathe 7s37 77 77 77 

Warner's 6s39 . ... 40 39 40 -\ 
NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE 

Para. Publix 21/g 2 2'/ 8 



Net 
Chg. 

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CHESTERFIELD 

and 

INVINCIBLE 

Again Deliver 
ON TIME 

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N. Y. C. 



William Boehnel's Ten Best 

William Boehnel. motion picture critic for the "New York World-Telegram" yes- 
terday announced his selections of the "ten best films" released from January to 
June of this year. Here are Boehnel's selections: "Cavalcade," "M," "The Red Head," 
"State Fair," "Morgenrot." "Topaze." "Rome Express." "The Great Jasper," "She Done 
Him Wrong" and "I Cover the Waterfront." 



Says Japan to Make 800 
Features and China 100 

1 1 ntinued from Page 1 ) 
Scott, formerly with the Paramount 
production department, who has re- 
turned to New York from the Orient. 
There is virtually no theater con- 
struction going on in China, Scott 
said yesterday. He plans to work 
out a producing company project to 
work in Japan in co-operation with 
the Government there. 



NO CHANGES, SAYS REISMAN 

No changes in the methods of op- 
eration of RKO houses are contem- 
plated nor will changes be made in 
executive personnel, Phil Reisman 
told The Film Daily yesterday. 
"No circuit is better equipped with 
man power," said Reisman. "Divi- 
sion Managers McDonald, Emde, 
Goldberg, Blumberg, Holt and Koer- 
ner are the most capable men in 
their line in the country." Reisman 
will continue to supervise film book- 
ings in addition to managing all 
RKO theater operations. 



OSCAR LYNCH DEAD 

Fremont, O. — Oscar J. Lynch of 
New York died recently at the home 
of a sister in Cleveland. At one 
time he was connected with the Mor- 
gan Lithograph Co. Later he went 
to New York, where he work exten- 
sively in theater and picture adver- 
tising. Lynch brought the film, 
"Dante's Inferno," one of the first 
motion pictures shown in this coun- 
try to America from Italy. 



RKO MANAGER RESIGNS 

Cleveland — Harris Silverberg has 
resigned as manager of the local 
RKO exchange. Harry Michaelson, 
district manager, is in charge of the 
office until Silverberg's successor is 
named. 



PEARL WHITE RECOVERING 

Paris — Pearl White left the Amer- 
ican Hospital yesterday. She had 
received treatment for rheumatism. 



Court Orders Receiver 
To Assign Sound Patent 

Wilmington — On the petition of 
U. S. Senator Daniel O. Hastings, 
receiver for General Theaters Equip- 
ment, Inc., Chancellor J. O. Wolcott 
in Chancery Court yesterday signed 
an order directing Hastings to as- 
sign to Orchestraphone Co., the 
U. S. patent 1,831,589 now held by 
General Theaters. Hastings stated 
in his petition that in March, 1932, 
after he was appointed receiver for 
General, the Orchestraphone Co., 
pursuant to a previous agreement, 
assigned to General all its patents 
and inventions in the field of sound 
film, including the recording of 
sound on film. The petition stated 
that among the patents assigned was 
one for "magnetic pickup" relating 
to phonograph pickup systems. Hast- 
ings claimed that this patent was 
inadvertently included among the 
patents assigned and should be re- 
turned to Orchestraphone. 



"DISGRACED" AT PARAMOUNT 

Paramcunt's "Disgraced" opens 
at the New York Paramount tomor- 
row. 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



July 15: Monogram central sales m 
Blackstone Hotel, Chicago. 

July 17: United Artists sales convention 4. 
cago. 

July 17: Meeting of Association of the M'i 
Picture Industry at Park Central Hotc 

July 18: Meeting of M. P. T. O. of Ark « 
Mississippi and Tennessee, Jackson, 

July 19: Premiere of "Song of Songs" at t> 
terion, New York. 

July 21-22: Fox Film Corp. special stock i- 
ers' meeting, home office, New Yo 

July 21 : Adjourned meeting of Publi> I 
terprises creditors at office of Re t 
Henry K. Davis. 

July 24-25: Code convention at Hotel i 
under auspices of National Associate 4 
the Motion Picture Industry. 

July 25: Meeting of Allied Theaters of * 
Jersey at 2 P. M. 

July 28-29: Monogram western sales me< | 
San Francisco. 

July 28-31: Meeting of Independent Th * 
Supply Dealers' Association at St * 
Hotel, Chicago. 

Aug. 2: Outing at Bear Mountain under 
pices of Motion Picture Club. 

Aug. 2-3: Monogram Canadian sales met | 
Toronto. 

Aug. 23-24: First annual convention of I 
pendent Motion Picture Owners Associ I 
of Delaware and Eastern Shore of Mar 1 
at Hotel Henelopen, Rehoboth, Del. 

Sept. 5-6-7: Allied Mew Jersey conver ■ 
at Atlantic City. 

Sept. 13: A. M. P. A. holds annual elccti. I 
officers 



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THEATRE OWNERS 
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activities in 

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FINISHED: 

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IN PRODUCTION: 

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• MOUSEY 

• THE FISHERMAN 



- NEAR 
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— Marshall Neilan 
— George Melford 



— Margaret Mayo 

Ford Sterling 
— George Melford 



— James Kirkwood 
— Marshall Neilan 
— George Melford 
— Margaret Mayo 

Ford Sterling 
— Buster Keaton 



PRODUCED BY FLAMINGO FILM CO. 
DIRECTOR— MARSHALL NEILAN — WRITER — LEW LIPTON 



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RIGHT ON 
THE HEELS 
, OF ITS 
YEARBOOK 



...comes this 
amazing news 
from FOX! 







%> 




TODAY... 

this minute... you can actually 
set dates on the new FOX 
pictures ... for the entire first 
quarter! Another precedent- 
smashing miracle by FOX 
man-power... proud of giving 
you the greatest break you 
ever had. 



New Leader of the Industry 




Release 

Date 

Aug. 18 

Aug. 25 

Sep. 1 
Sep. 8 

Sep. 15 



Picture title 

My Lips Betray 
The Last Trail 



Pilgrimage 

Paddy the Next 
Best Thing 

Charlie Chan's 
Greatest Case 



Sep. 22 The Good Companions 
Sep. 22 Life's Worth Living 

Sep. 29 The Power and 

the Glory 

Oct. 6 Walls of Gold 

Oct. 13 While the City Sleeps 

(tentative title) 

Oct. 20 The Worst Woman 
in Paris? 

Oct. 27 Berkeley Square 



Nov. 3 



The Mad Game 



Nov. io Jimmy and Sally 



Nov. 17 



My Weakness 



No need to wait 
and wonder WHEN 
you're going to get your 
new season's product. 
FOX Man power is on the 
job...READY with DATES. 



Stars, etc. 

Lilian Harvey, John Boles, El Brendel. 
Directed by John Blystone. 

Zane Grey story. George O'Brien, 
El Brendel, Claire Trevor. 

Henrietta Crosman, Heather Angel, Norman 
Foster, Marian Nixon. Directed by John Ford. 

Janet Gaynor, Warner Baxter. 
Directed by Harry Lachman. 

Earl Derr Biggcrs' Charlie Chan adventure. 

Warner Oland, Heather Angel. 

Directed by Hamilton MacFadden. 

From J. B. Priestley's novel. Jessie Matthews. 

Will Rogers, Louise Dresser, Vera Allen, Marian 
Nixon, Ralph Morgan. Directed by John Ford. 

Spencer Tracy, Colleen Moore, Ralph Morgan, 
Helen Vinson. Directed by William K. Howard. 

Sally Eilers, Norman Foster. 
From Kathleen Norris' best seller. 

Warner Baxter in a "Cisco Kid" role. 



Carole Lombard, Adolphe Menjou, John Boles. 
Direction and story by Monta Bell. 

Leslie Howard, Heather Angel, Valerie Taylor, 

Irene Browne, Beryl Mercer. 

Directed by Frank Lloyd. 

Spencer Tracy, Ralph Morgan, Claire Trevor. 
Directed by Irving Cummings. 

James Dunn and Sally Eilers. 
Story by Maun Grashin and James Seymour. 

Lilian Harvey, Lew Ayres, Sid Silvers. 
B. G. De Sylva production. 
Directed by David Butler. 



Read the following pages for more details . . . happiness in every word 







• 






"Get Lilian Harvey!" shouted half-a-dozen 
big producing companies. But Lilian knew 
which company to pick for prestige and an 
assured future. So she signed with FOX. 
Md what a show FOX puts her in. Custom- 



LILIAN 

HARVEY 



in 



MY UPS 
BETRAY 

with 

► john BOLES 
EL &RENDEL 

"Der Komet by ^ 
by John Blystone 



\ 







made for this SINGING, DANCING, dainty 
miss. Teamed with John Boles. Isn't that romantic? 
Dizzy El Brendel added for laughs. It's there, 
friends. You'll be seeing Miss Harvey . . . and beg- 
ging to see more. Let's continue . . . 




^" T aday on Broadway.-- mummer 
W ' W! TW ° I" t0 p.. knocking the summer 
uncooled theatre...^ P ' look at the way 

, nf ice-houses. J^ L 
P** f ° C a r ° W ID at the Gaiety, New York. 

"Pilgrimage" is mopping up at 



GRIMAGE 

HENRIETTA CROSMAN 





HEATHER 
ANGEL 

NORMAN 
FOSTER 

MARIAN 
NIXON 

Story by |. A . „ wyi|E 
"'""•"' °/ JOHN FORD 



Yessir! John Ford has directed another "Four Sons." Honest, 
human, understandable stuff that hits folks where they live... 
no matter where they live. Shot through with genius... and 
lade... TREMENDOUS! But Fox has just started... 



he MA 

GAM 

SPENCER TRAC 

MORGAN 
EVOR 




Directed by 

~ ing 



% 




i~ 



I 




JIMMY 






and 




n 



SALLY 

with 

JAMES DUNN 

and 

SALLY EILERS 

From the story by Mauri 
Grashin and James Seymour 

'THE MAD GAME." Did ~~ 

««™g meWrama? J .««H ** fast-paced, 

fr °«page scare-heads. TT,riI^ of ^ "^ rf **»"»'x 
. ™«d on blood.monev as u ° ?" g<Ws ^en . „„__ 

'"^mous father Hou, I Wue - Uoods - ignorant of rf, ' " "-> IM MY AND SALLY » u 

^"'rgood! iVfew . , m " be °«e of their be*. That's 

J 



Jesse L. Lasky 
Production 



THE 




WORST WOMAN 
IN PARIS? 



CAROLE LOMBARD 



Wh y & fo/ks co 
theatre? To ^ f ° ^ OUf 

l T h<m (ho « f L • "^ *>omes? 
' ' ' S a y> foreign 



ADOLPHE MENJOU 
JOHN BOLES 

Direction and original story by 
Monta Bell 




P'-^sute pl aces 
wallop. fo vrn * * • s P lCe > music 3 , , 

/<H>oe MeU^^mng V^^ ^ a siedgeh 

that we// k„ he ^or/d'c l , y ' • ■ hiduio h^ l 

weiL - known [e«„ r , best -dtes^rl g " er heart 

«*. «„<,^ . . . *~ ^ mud, Give 2 ^H^ ** ' 



THE POWER 




1- • tViis will be trie u»*»- asking 

u , muld never torget . . . 
A star they coulq 



AND THE GLORY 



SPENCER 
TRACY 



with 



COLLEEN 
MOORE 



RALPH MORGAN HELEN VINSON 




Jesse L. Lasky Production 



Directed by William K. Howard 




me 



1 „tker master touch . • • l e 
W. a* V»- tt ° ev „ m H- he cJB '<_ * h „ fatta m *' FOX 

to „.— >« «■» P^V. A A ■*■ T «* 



cap 



,f hits'. Canyou 



WARNER BAXTER 

as his famous character 

"THE CISCO KID" 



in 



WHILE THE CITY 
SLEEPS 



(tentative title 



Suggested by O. Henry's 
famous character 







— K«V M And 
»! "The Cisco Kid ■ 
i -Tn Old Arizona ! 
One'. Two'. Three! I ^ ^ m that 

«Whik the City Sleeps . A 

n ° W '" KM" role for which audiences pay- ••* P 

porous "Cisco Ktd role ^ ^ Nm£ties . . . 

& c t V, e wide-open bowery 

full-blooded story of the w ^^^^^^^ 




^ .loose' Today's young folks 

roay ** ^e V**?^ ^ have to * ^ what a 
Rising "H ° ld dayS ; . the ftrst W ol Read on, my lads. 

, v n.cks Not if you played the 
,ck this pacKS. 



i i 




-^^^^^^ . for what he's doing to *e 

, U 1 ,sUe Howard be suppressed,. . ^ in revo lt . 

Should Leslie ri Qr woU ld the a. m 

f America's women . ^ y0 u get 

heart s of A«ne fat and thin . MgeVs 

They would .- oW J what a stag e hit. n 

th e play that was written for hi ^ _ 



B r** r^ ix c i c \/ 
b K K b L b Y 

SQUARE 

LESLIE HOWARD 
HEATHER ANGEL 

Valerie Taylor • Irene Browne • Beryl Mercer 




i t will they We her? They 
Is she sweet ... can she act . . • ^ Blg 

is going to do. 






WALLS 
of GOLD 

from 

KATHLEEN 
NORRIS' 

Famous Best-Seller 
with 

SALLY 
EILERS 

NORMAN 
FOSTER 





"Walls of Gorn»^^^^ 

; we " ''ttle ro mance ■ " ~ fo member that 
team ^e m „ paga]n fm ^f°«er?CWer t o 

''°— t sabou ,4;;*;^ orm ,, 

5 nc - A sure-fire fiit/ 



CHARLIE 

CHAN'S 

GREATEST 

CASE 

An Earl Derr Biggers' 
Charlie Chan Adventure 

WARNER OLAND 
HEATHER ANGEL 




"charue chan> ^^^^^ ^^ 

Chan I,l e w/ 8 St re ac/ers. Anr/ l , g Ask Your U I 

"Ke Earner q, And nobody can n/ r • ° Cai 

- B -% Square" ^ Be ^ ■ • • Heather An v" ^ CWie 



THE GOOD 
COMPANIONS 



JESSIE MATTHEWS 

From the famous novel by 

J.B.PRIESTLEY 



A Fox-Gaumont-British Picture 




ZANE GREY'S 

THE LAST 
TRAIL 

GEORGE O'BRIEN 

. BRENDEL CLAIRE TREVOR 

Directed by James TINLING 



HE GOOD COMPANIONS" Th j 
boofc...a best seller foryearland todTy Mot A ^ "" 

rev (only author whose h™U «..^n .l. „■, , 7 „ . P ^ ane 



' ^ ha "> **"«■ BOX OFFICE, here it come" 




r /■ i , . ".niiiHg comDinations... you can't top this Zar 

Grey (only author whose books outsell the Bibie-says V m J. G of* 
OBrten, b.ggest out-door box-office star (says M.P. Herald poll). El Brendel 

good for a guffaw at every appearance (says every aud.ence). briber ™da ' 

•r rUA showmen, n easr ' K^^ „„• _ ./ 



or FOX showmen, please! Keep 



going, there's no let-up 




bant ^^^^ i « Daddy 

1 W^^^^ , i f nr another ^ 

^^^ e rf the exhibit who -ked 6* ^ fot 

We ? 5«> * S HERB IT IS'- £" 

L ° ng r ^ot-Baxter story. A^D £t Baxte r as 

the perfect Gaynorb ^^ . her 

Gaynor as a rompmg, carefoe spl „t. Th 

a man of wealth a^^^^^^gf^ 



JANET 

GAYNOR 

WARNER 

BAXTER 



in 



PADDY 

THE NEXT BEST THING 



From the novel by Gertrude Page. Directed 
by Harry Lachman. Dialogue direction by 
Edwin Burke. Screen play by Edwin Burke. 



i- „ but 

- misunderstanding ■ • • 
, forced apart by misun ^ 

by near-tragedy • • ■ d with W nerul meloo. 

C Ions Romance higb-spotte d commg ut 

not for long tQ ur th eatre . • 

^ SeC '"it ThatlW . • • 
Lth beaming races. 







LILIAN 
HARVEY 

LEW 
AYRES 



in 



MY 



weakness/" 

with 



SID SILVERS 

And a host of Hollywood's hand-picked 
beauties. Story and dialogue by B. G. 
De Sylva. Additional dialogue by Bert 
Hanlon and Ben Ryan. Music and Lyrics 
by B. G. De Sylva, Leo Robin, Richard 
Whiting. Directed by David Butler. 

B. G. DE SYLVA 
Production 




Gangway f or a 





Ch °cfc full of A 

&fc u P » and -rj*?*' «» -g h^ ne mto 

ea-ral \y/l , aKe a chance" / t W. , F nto Sunr >y 

kino f ' S '" " ? Lo * Lilian H "" "° cW Broa <W 

flemimx. FOX ck ° tS Maii ory Bark, w, , ' ^ 



^r. . 



^ 




WILL 

ROGERS 



in 



LI FES 

WORTH 
LIVING 



(tentative title) 



From James Gould Cozzen's 
sensational seller 

"THE LAST ADAM" 

with Louise Dresser, Vera Allen, 
Marian Nixon, Ralph Morgan 

Directed by JOHN FORD 




. . . full of pep and 

• i _ 



— o _ ^ llttk letters that always spell 

WILL ROGERS -tenX^ fans . And 

! p.-o-to. Get readyforanother^ to J ^ Last 

^prepared for a lot of extra trade- H ^ _. Men . ^ gQ tfs a 

AdJ^»M>^^^"^1?y n you know it's a showma n's day ■ 

on the book in your ads). Did 70 ^ ^ ^ starnng ^^ ^ f e . 

J folks" story. . ■ lik e State • | ^ M||M ^ M ^^^^ j^fcat a program •' 




MOHE 




SI AfSATIOMI, 



M Itl'ICIM > AIIK 



OX THE WAY! 



eared to high-speed hit produetioi 
the smooth-functioning FOX organiza- 
tion roars along. Alert manpower at the 
helm assures you that other great 
stories will he seized 
for surprise hits 




Fair" last year. r 
Great stars will be added to the al- m 
ready brilliant roster ... as were Lew p^ 
Ayres, Clara Bow, Lilian Harvey, 
m Henry Garat. Not a single opportunity 

V"' 

will be missed to make the tremendous 
V FOX line-up even more powerful! 




with FOX 



hursday, July 13, 1933 



flMELY TOPICS 



T i 



he Place of Music 
n the Motion Picture 

HE return of music in mo- 
tion pictures will not bring 
back the so-called theme song. 
In its place will come a scoring 

lesigned to interpret the mood 
and action of the story, rather 
than make the plot a medium 
for "plugging" songs. Music 
will become more and more an 
integral part of the motion pic- 
ture in the future. But it will 
not be successful as incidental 
interpolations that pop right out 
of the story for no particular or 
justifiable reason, as many of 
the "theme songs" did. The 
work of the composer and sce- 
nario writer must be blended 
carefully. Unless the musical 
scoring and vocal numbers tell 
the same story as the dialogue 
and action of the plot, they 
serve no useful purpose. The re- 
vival of music in pictures will 
not follow the formula that 
marked its introduction several 
years ago. There was too much 
music for too trifling an excuse. 
It is impossible to successfully 
take a song that happens to be 
catchy and put it into a motion 
picture just because the num- 
ber sounds good. Dialogue that 
can possibly be eliminated al- 
ways comes out of a picture in 
{the final cutting. The successful 
song number must be able to 
Stand the same test as dialogue. 
It must be indispensable. Music 
[will always be popular in pic- 
tures. Nothing is so delightful 
as an appropriate musical set- 
ting that flows along with the 

empo and trend of the story 
without exerting its influence 
too strongly. It is when the 
story stops and music is inject- 
ed that an unpleasant situation 
jievelops. The motion picture 
.screen is an ideal medium for 
musical entertainment. The sing- 
er is not a block away on a 

;tage but right before the eyes 
jmd ears of every person in the 
Jiudience. An orchestra plays to 
pest acoustical advantage when 

•xpertly recorded. 

— Herbert Stothart. 




.MANY HAPPY RETURNS 



ishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
Industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 




July 13 



rl E. Milliken Cornelius Keefe 

Sidney Blackmer 




DAILY 



23 




lOMCTHt 



PHIL M DALY 



• • • ONE OF those very intimate and ritzy parties was 
thrown by Major Bowes as genial host at the Warwick 

hotel in honor of Lee Sims and Miss Ilomay Bailey 

who are about to knock the customers cold at the Cap- 
itol they gave the guests a sample of what they can do 

on a theater stage this gent Sims has got a technique 

at the piano that is positively sensational as he accom- 
panies Miss Bailey in her splendid vocalization the Ma- 
jor figured that he had something worth launching a party as 
a preliminary send-off and he's right he has. 



O • • NEWS FROM the Radio Lot Eric Linden 

is spending his vacashe revising several plays he has written 
William Gargan ate up most of the props on the "Head- 
line Shooters" set, the same being pretzels, potato chips and 

sandwiches used in one of the sequences Bob Armstrong 

acted as referee of a boxing match at his fight club, but his 
footwork wasn't so good, and he lost the decision to both 

fighters Dorothy Wilson carries an odd luck piece while 

emoting before the camera — one of her baby shoes, which she 

tucks in a pocket of her dress before beginning a scene 

(do gals have pockets in their dresses ? oh, well) 

Betty Furness is grieving over the loss of her pet duck, "Iggy" 
■ — it suffered a sun-stroke and gave up the ghost 1 



• • • LOTS OF important changes over at the Columbia 

home office Hal Hode made assistant to Jack Cohn 

Maurice Grad is now director of sales promotion, Hal's former 

job Louis Astor is home office sales exec I. H. 

Rogovin of the Boston sales staff has moved up to New Haven 

branch manager to take Astor's former job Joe Mc- 

Conville has been promoted to a key position to assist Abe 

Montague, sales manager Ed Olmstead has joined 

George Brown's department as a member of the exploitation 
staff under the supervision of Lou Goldberg . Olmstead 
has a fine record with Paramount for 13 years handling the- 
aters and exploitation 

% £ * * 

• 9 • OUT AT the Century of Progress exposition in 
Chi A. E, Dumont is clicking in the Hollywood conces- 
sion with his talkie movie test studio Harry Hornick 

is his exploitation manager handling the New York end 

In answer to a letter from Monroe Greenthal advising him that 
he had been nominated for the board of directors of the AMPA 

and that John Flinn would be the next prexy Hal Home 

replies in characteristic style "The first choice is very, 

very bad and the second good, extremely good." 



• • m THE GUESTS of honor at the Gala Party tonite 
at the Sky Gardens of the St. Moritz will be Harold Arlen and 
Ted Kohler composers of "Stormy Weather" im- 
promptu entertainment will be furnished by some of the boys 

who sing the pop songs of this combination Leon Be- 

lasco and his two orchestras will dispense the harmony 

these Thursday nite affairs are becoming the popular rendez- 
vous for the after-theater parties they have that "cer- 
tain something" Olive Borden left yesterday to take part 
in the Hollywood concession at the Century of Progress in 
Chicago. 



« « « 



» » » 



EXPLOS ~TES 

Trailer Given 
Presentation Setting 

pOR one week prior to open- 
ing of "Today We Live," 
the National screen trailer was 
given a presentation setting. 
Title and cast credits were pro- 
jected on a scrim curtain behind 
which a girl in evening gown 
was posed on an elevated plat- 
form. As a red overhead "spot" 
gave her prominence, she drew 
her arms aloft in the manner 
of the Joan Crawford figure in 
3-col. ad mat of press sheet. 
Trailer scenes followed after 
"spot" was killed. 
— Fox Oakland, OaMand, Cal. 



Uses Smart Front 

On "42nd Street" 
J^ FLASHY and attractive 
theater front, was used on 
"42nd Street." Directly over 
the entrance was the title of the 
picture in raised colored letter- 
ing with two beautiful chorus 
girls reposing between the 
words. Underneath the title 
were cut-out stars with the 
heads of the cast, in each one. 
In addition to this, panels were 
used showing the title, cast, 
song hits and date. The front 
used on "42nd Street" was con- 
sidered one of the best, ever seen 
in Trenton. Incidentally, the 
picture was held over for three 
weeks. 

— Stacey, Trenton, N. ./• 



C 



oming a 



nd G 



oing 



MARSHALL NEILAN. BUSTER KEATON and 
AUBREY M. KENNEDY has arrived in New 
York from St. Petersburg. 

WILLIS KENT is en route to New York from 
the Coast to market his new version of "Road 
to Ruin." 

HENRY C. DUSMAN returned to Baltimore 
yesterday after a New York visit. 

CHARLES C. PETTIJOHN returns to New 
York today from Europe. 

JACK SULLIVAN leaves New York today on 
his return to Chicago. 

NATHAN BURKAN returns to New York to- 
morrow from Massachusetts. 

PIERRE COLLING has arrived in New York 
from the Coast in connection with his next 
story. He leaves for Washington immediately 
in quest of story material. 

ROBERT WOOLSEY checked out of the St. 
Moritz and left New York yesterday for Hollyj 
wood. 

GEORGE SCHAEFER and NEIL AGNEW re- 
turned to New York yesterday from the Coast. 

IRVING THALBERG and NORMA SHEARER 
sailed from Southampton yesterday on the Ma- 
jestic, arriving in New York J..!y 18. 

ERICH POMMER sailed on the Majestic last 
night en route to Germany to produce for Fox. 

WILLIAM SAAL will arrive in New York 
Monday via airplane from the coast. 

GEORGE HICKEY, M-G-M western sales man- 
ager, is in New York. 

NED DEPINET, JULES LEVY, ROBERT SISK, 
AL MERTZ, AMBROSE DOWLING and SOL 
NEWMAN are expected to return to New York 
from the coast Tuesday. 



THE 



24 



■z&>* 



DAILY 



Thursday, July 13, IS) 



SAYS MUST INCREASE 
ADMISSION PRICES 



tinued from Page I ) 
son, so Ear, is much behind antici- 
pated receipts. So much so that 
it is now evident that either atten- 
dance increase to a marked degree 
within the next two or three months 
or prices must be advanced before it 
is too late," said McCausland. "Un- 
less one of these changes comes 
about, there will not be such a thing 
as net profits. As it is, few houses 
can now pay interest on principal 
nor many of the other charges that 
should be added to the operation 
cost if a true profit is to be chalked 
up." 



Short Shots from Eastern Studios 



lB\ CHARLES ALICOATE 



30 of 60 Warner Bros. 
Stories Now Acquired 

(Continued from Page 1) 

have no place on our program," said 
Wilk. Six features are ready for re- 
lease, six are in work, six are about 
to go into production and 18 have 
left the writing department com- 
pletely prepared for shooting with 
stars already assigned to the films. 



DEFER OPENING ONE DAY 

Tickets go on sale today at the 
Criterion for "The Song of Songs," 
starring Marlene Dietrich, which 
will have its world premiere at that 
theater Wednesday instead of Tues- 
day as originally scheduled. 



PROGRESSIVE PICTURES, newly 
formed company headed by Mey- 
er Davis, orchestra leader, plans to 
make a series of 13 shorts, musical 
and comedy. Monte Shaff will han- 
dle the production with Jerry Wald 
in charge of the stories. 



The success of a recent Vitaphorx 
short subject in which Gus Shy had 
been featured, resulted in assign- 
ment of the musical comedy favorite 
to a new two-reel comedy. Called 
"Turkey in the Raw," the short is 
now in production at the Brooklyn 
Vita/phone studio. In its supporting 
cast, the film, one of the series of 
"Big V" comedies, features Fritz 
Hubert, Helen Goodhue and Al Ochs. 
Joseph Henabery is directing fro-m 
an original scenario by Eddie Moran 
and Jack Henley of the studio writ- 
ing staff. 

Seymour Gross, winner of the one- 
act play writing contest held at Cor- 
nell University, is spending two 
weeks at the Brooklyn Vitaphone 
studio observing things. 

May Vokes, stage comedienne who 
makes her screen debut in "Get 
That Venus!" recently completed 
Starmark Picture for Regent, is 
best known through her work in the 
stage production of "The Bat," in 



* + * 



BUILDING BIGGER BUSINESS EXTRA 



* * -* 



THE 



GOES 
EVERYWHERE 




8HHE 



COVERS 
EVERYTHING 



LONDON 



HOLLYWOOD 



NEW YORK 



PARIS 



BERLIN 



The Film Daily is the most quoted publi- 
cation in the motion picture industry... 

This primarily because it is read 

every day by editors and critics of some 
three hundred prominent publications 
scattered all over the United States.... 
Its advertising value, too, is estab- 
lished through the fact that it goes 
straight as an arrow, every morning of 
the year, to those executives represent- 
ing the buying power of the industry. 



which she scored a tremendous suc- 
cess as a goofy maid. 

• 

Glen Lambert and Jack Henley, 
staff writers at the Vitaphone stu- 
dio, are now working on a story 
which will feature George Givot and 
Charles Judels in a short comedy to 
be made at the Brooklyn plant. 
. 

Work on the script for "Take a 
Chance," the musical to be produced 
by Laurence Schwab, William Row- 
land and Monte Brice, has been 
started, with production scheduled 
for July 25 at the Eastern Service 
studio in Astoria. 

Lillian Roth, stage and screen 
star, has been signed by Laurence 
Schwab, William Rowland and Mon- 
te Brice to play the screen version 
of the role created by Ethel Mer- 
man in the musical, "Take a 
Chance," which goes into production 
at the Eastern Service studios, As- 
toria, within the next two weeks. 

Ray McCarey, director at the 
Brooklyn Vitaphone studio, is re- 
cuperating after an operation far 
sinus trouble. 

A two-reel short subject called 
"The No Man" was completed by 
the Vitaphone studio in Brooklyn 
recently. It is a miniature musical 
revue satirizing that widely pub- 
licized theatrical institution, the 
"yes man." Appearing in the cast 
of the short are Hugh O'Connell, 
Anne Greenway, Wilbur Hall and 
Johnny Downs. Roy Mack di- 
rected. 

"Operator's Opera,' the Vitaphone 
two-reel "Broadivay Brevities" just 
completed at Warner Bros. Brook- 
lyn studio, can lay claim to being a 
super-short. The filming required 
seven sets, a number not usually em- 
ployed in shooting short subjects. 
• 

Editing and cutting on the first 
of the series of six comedy shorts 
featuring Pick and Pat, known as 
Molasses 'n January and featured on 
the Show Boat radio hour, has been 
completed by Perfex Pictures Corp. 
• 

Glen Lambert, staff ivriter at the 
Vitaphone studio, is collaborating 
with Goodman Ace, author and di- 
rector of the "Easy Aces" radio fea- 
tures, on the script for a short, to 
be produced at the Brooklyn plant. 
• 

Tom Howard and George Shelton 
have been booked for the Capitol 
stage in a comedy act starting July 
15. The deal was completed through 
I. N. Weber. After their run at the 
Capitol, work on the series of shorts 
featuring Howard, supported by 
George Shelton, and to be made by 
the W.K.D. Productions, is expected 
to get underway. 



FREEDMAN HEADS 
LABORATORY ASJ. 

(Continued from Page 1) 

H.E.R.; treasurer, Al Fiedler of 
pire. The board of directors 
eludes, in addition to the offic 
Frank Meyer of Paramount; H 
Yates, Consolidated; Arthur G 
lieb, DuArt; A. B. Poole, Pathe 
Alexander Marks, Malcom. It 
voted to turn the compilation of 
reconstruction code over to the bt 
of directors which will hold it^ I 
meeting next week. 



Six of Fox First Quartei 
Releases Are Complei 

West Coast Bureau of THE FIU 

Hollywood — Fox's release si 
ule for the first quarter of the 1! 
34 announced program of 54 
tures includes 13 productions 
which six already are completed, 
are now in the course of produc 
and two in preparation. 

"Paddy, the Next Best Thing 
to be the first of the new seas< 
product for release in August. 1 
Gaynor-Baxter photoplay is 
being directed by Harry Lachn 
Later in the month George O'Brii 
"The Last Trail," by Zane G: 
will be shown. 

During September "Pilgrimaj 
the I. A. R. Wylie story now at 
Gaiety for a special showing, 
be released, followed by the F 
Gaumont musical, "The Good C< 
panions," by J. B. Priestley. A 
"Charlie Chan's Greatest Case," 
Earl Derr Biggers yarn with W 
ner Oland and Heather Angel, wh 
is now being filmed. 

In September Will Rogers' "D 
tor Bull," from "The Last Adai 
will be released as well as 
Weakness," the lavish musical w 
Lilian Harvey, Lew Ayres and 
all-star combination. Both are v 
before the cameras. 

October will see "The Power i 
the Glory," already completed, 
for exhibition. This is a story ij 
Preston Sturges starring Spen-j 
Tracy and Colleen Moore. Follow*! 
this will be "Walls of Gold," w 
Norman Foster and Sally Eile 
now in preparation. "The Wo 
Woman in Paris," Monta Bell- 4 
with Adolphe Menjou, John Bo 
and Benita Hume, is now beinj, 1/ 
ed for October release. This will (I 
followed by two already complete 
photoplays, "Berkeley Square," t 
Lasky production with Leslie Ho 
ard and Heather Angel," and "?' 
Lips Betray," the Lilian Harvj 
special. The last of the quarter 
to be "He Knew His Women,", 
Warner Baxter special, now 
preparation. 



Singing School at Hipp. 

A free school of choral singing tfill l> 
soon be opened at the Hippodrome by 
Signor Alfredo Salmaggi, director of the i 
Chicago Opera Co., which has been sue- l 
cessfully playing the big Sixth >ve. | 
house for some weeks. 






ursday, July 13, 1933 



THE 



-%2>H 



DAILY 



25 



IUIPMENT FIRMS 
PLANNING DISPLAYS 



'arious new equipment develop- 
nts will be demonstrated at the 
mal meeting of the Independent 
iply Dealers' Ass'n scheduled for 
Ly 28-31 at the Stevens Hotel, 
cago. More than 25 dealers and 
manufacturers will attend the 
ating, said Secretary Henry C. 
;man in New York yesterday. A 
iture of the meeting will be the 
•tion of officers. J. E. Robin is 
i-ently president. 

. f embers of the association are: 
.musement Supply Co., New 
»kj Breck Photoplay Supply Co., 
! Angeles; Capitol Motion Picture 
jiply Corp., New York; Capitol 
ater Supply Co., Boston; Crown 
;ion Picture Supply Co., New 
k; Des Moines Theater Supply 
Des Moines; J. F. Dusman Mo- 
|i Picture Supplies, Baltimore; 
ribitors Supply Co., St. Louis; 
i.-ham Bros. Theater Equipment, 
.ver; Guercio & Barthel Theater 
lipment, Chicago; Mc Arthur The- 
' Equipment Co., Detroit; Oliver 
ing Picture Supply Co., Cleve- 
1; Walter G. Preddey Theater 
plies, San Francisco; Quality 
later Supply Co., Omaha; Clem 
lio Theater Supplies, Philadel- 
i; B. F. Shearer Co., Seattle; 
Ray Smith Co., Milwaukee; Su- 
<!or Motion Picture Supply Co., 
sburgh; United Film & Projec- 
Corp., Buffalo; Western The- 
cal Equipment Co., San Fran- 



ist Laboratory Ass'n 
Starting Draft of Code 

j Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

ollywood — Work of drafting a 
iratory code will be tackled im- 
iately by the newly formed 
.ma Laboratories Ass'n, of which 
ft. Bachelder, secretary of the 
'on Picture Credit Ass'n, has 
! elected chairman. It has 17 
ter members. 



lANZIGER WITH ROGERS 

Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
illywood — Bill Danziger has re- 
id from the Paramount public- 
taff to become director of pub- 
r and advertising for Charles 
ogers Productions. He succeeds 

Gersdorf, who now is devoting 
lis time to free-lance publicity. 



AST AGENCY DISSOLVED 

R(: Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
,'llywood — The Hoffman-Robin- 
I Agency has dissolved. 



Wharta a Break! 

' 'Why isn't there a cooling system in 
ur theater?" a FILM DAILY reporter 
I uired of the manager of an uptown 
jise that caters to Spaniards and Ne- 
|es. "Well," replied the perspiring 
jitleman, "Y'see, our patrons all come 
Im a hot climate and so don't mind 
I theater temperature." 




Cleveland— Keith's East 105th St., 
first-run, 2,200-seat neighborhood 
house, closed Saturday. Closing is 
presumably for the summer, al- 
though it is rumored that the house 
will reopen in August with a com- 
bination policy of vaudeville and pic- 
tures, depending upon the wage 
scale settlement with the musicians. 
All vaudeville in Cleveland was dis- 
continued last April when the mu- 
sicians refused to accept a proffered 
cut. 



Cleveland — A galaxy of National 
Broadcasting Co.'s biggest stars 
opened a one-week engagement Sat- 
urday at the Public Auditorium in 
celebration of the Ford Industrial 
Exposition which extends from July 
8-15 and is free to the public. 



Salt Lake City — A new show sea- 
son is now under way at the Para- 
mount, Capitol and Victory theaters 
in Salt Lake City recently returned 
to management under L. Marcus. 
The new season is advertised here 
as "Louis Marcus Theater's New 
Deal in Entertainment." 



Kansas City, Mo.— The Fox Up- 
town, suburban first-run, has added 
stage shows for its July Jubilee. 



Kansas City, Mo. — "College Hu- 
mor" has been held over for the sec- 
ond week. 



St. Louis, Mo. — The Gayety at 
14th and Locust Sts., has closed for 
the summer. 



St. Louis, Mo.— The new $5,000,- 
000 municipal auditorium and com- 
munity center building now under 
construction on Market St. between 
14th and 15th Sts., will be opened 
next fall. 



Council Bluffs, la.— F. R. Felker, 
who formerly managed the Broad- 
way, an A. H. Blank house, has 
leased and will reopen it. 



Des Moines — ■ Park Robuck is 
building an $800 addition to the 
Ideal at 2447 East Walnut St. and 
will install new seats. The theater 
is continuing in operation but will 
be closed for a few weeks in August 
to complete the improvement. 



Jefferson, la. — Merchants' trade 
shows started at the Iowa theater 
as a means of providing free trips 
to the Century of Progress fair, are 
being continued because of their 
popularity. An admission charge of 
15 cents is made. 



Fayette, la. — Paul Swanson has 
reopened the Cozy here in spite of 
difficulties. An electrical storm 
caused the electric service to be 
turned off on his opening night and 



the following day a motor burned 
out. He continued his plans to re- 
open, however, after a half week's 
delay. 



Springfield, 111. — The local police 
have not yet apprehended the two 
armed bandits who held up the of- 
fice of the Orpheum theater here on 
the morning of July 3, escaping with 
$4,850.85 in receipts over the previ- 
ous week-end. 



Boston — Lawrence Berg, formerly 
manager of the Metropolitan, has 
been transferred from duties of dis- 
trict manager in Montreal to handle 
affairs for Publix in Vancouver. 



Boston — Gene Fox, publicity man 
for Paramount on the west coast, 
has been brought east to handle ex- 
ploitation for the Publix Metropoli- 
tan, New England's largest picture 
house. 



Boston — Larry Gardener, who was 
taken ill during the recent RKO 
convention, was taken to the Baker 
Memorial Hospital here Saturday 
for observation. 



Dallas— Bill Wolf son, RKO adver- 
tising manager in New Orleans, has 
married Miss Sammie Jones of Ft. 
Worth. 



Cleveland — M. B. Horwitz is the 
acknowledged youngest grandfather 
in the Film Bldg. He won the title 
last Sunday when a daughter was 
born to his daughter, Mrs. Richard 
Miller of Detroit. 



Cleveland — Funeral services for 
Oscar Lynch, veteran film man, who 
died here July 5, were held Friday 
at St. Ann's Church, Fremont. 
Lynch, who started his career with 
the Morgan Lithograph Co., later 
owned the American distribution 
rights to "Dante's Inferno." 



Steubenville, O. — When the steel 
mills near here took on more men 
and raised the wage scale last week, 
business at local theaters jumped 
more than 50 per cent, according to 
C. E. Prinsen, general manager of 
the newly formed Chatfeld circuit 
houses here. 



Cleveland — "I Cover the Water 
Front" is being held a fourth week 
at the Allen. 



Cleveland — Bill Robinson's Revue, 
"Goin' to Town," was the big at- 
traction this week at the Hippo- 
drome, together with the feature 
picture, "The Mind Reader." Ad- 
mission prices were raised to 50 
cents top, including the tax. 



Boston — John Jennings has been 
named city salesman for Fox. 



RKO HAS 7 1! ^RK, 
SIX IN CUTTING 



West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — RKO now has seven 
new season features in work with 
five 1932-33 features and one 1933- 
34 picture in the cutting rooms be- 
ing prepared for early release. Nine 
new features are ready to go into 
production with all directors assign- 
ed and stars cast. The films in 
work are: "Son of Kong," "Ace of 
Aces," "Little Women," "Ann Vick- 
ers," "Rafter Romance," "Midship- 
man Jack" and "One Man's Jour- 
ney." The last season's remaining 
feature now being edited is "Morn- 
ing Glory." 

New product in the cutting rooms 
includes: "Headline Shooter," "Flam- 
ing Gold," "Fool's Gold," "Blind Ad- 
venture" and "Double Harness." In 
preparation are "Aggie Appleby, 
Maker of Men," "Flying Down to 
Reno," "Sweet Cheat," "Family 
Man," "Beautiful," "Escape to Par- 
adise," "My Gal Sal," "Dance of 
Desire" and an untitled Francis 
Lederer feature. 



SET 3 PRE-RELEASE DATES 

Warner Bros, announce three spe- 
cial pre-release playdates for "Mary 
Stevens, M.D." at the Earle Theater, 
Washington; the Boyd Theater, 
Philadelphia; and the Strand The- 
ater in Hartford, in which spots the 
picture will play simultaneously dur- 
ing the week of July 21st. "Mary 
Stevens, M.D.", which is set for na- 
tional release July 29th, features 
Kay Francis, Lyle Talbot, Glenda 
Farrell and Thelma Todd. 



GILLHAM, WILKIE AT COAST 

Robert Gillham, director of ad- 
vertising and publicity, and Al Wil- 
kie, Eastern publicity manager, who 
attended the Paramount Coast con- 
vention, are remaining in Hollywood 
for a week for studio conferences. 



MRS. LOEW TO MARRY 

Mrs. Caroline R. Loew, widow of 
Marcus Loew, and Max Minzeshei- 
mer, retired dress merchant of New 
York, will be married today at the 
groom's home, 210 West 70th St. 



JACK DEMPSEY TO WED 

Fort Worth — Jack Dempsey, for- 
mer heavyweight champion, yester- 
day confirmed reports that he will 
soon marry Hannah Williams, New 
York musical comedy actress. 



IntensifiedCampaigns 

for 
TEST ENGAGEMENTS 
and 
BROADWAY PREMIERES 

Personally Handled by 

F. RALPH GERVERS 

Exploitation Headquarters 
125 W. 45th St. 
Tel. BRyant 9-0648 



THE 



mt 

26 




DAILV 



Thursday, July 13, 1< 



"GAMBLING SHIP" 

with Cary Grant. Benita Hume 

Paramount 67 mins. 

MIXED YARN OF GAMBLING, RACK 

L1EERS AND LOVE LACKS PROPER 

MOTIVATION 

All about the doines en a palatial 
pamblinc ship in which Cary Grant secures 
a half interest, and finds himself in for a 
lot of trouble and excitement because a 
racketeer 3nd his gang are his rivals with 
another Heating gambling palace run by 
Jack LoRuc. On his way west from Chi 
cago Grant meets Benita Hume, and falls 
in leve with her and determines to forget 
his "ambling life and settle down with her, 
little realizing that she is part of the 
racketeering crowd, and a lady known to 
the district attorney's office. A let of 
fancy scenes with the gambling atmos- 
phere are staged on board the gambling 
ship, and the plot ambles along without 
any particular motivation to the climax, 
where the rival and his gangsters start out 
to mess up the hero and his gambling 
yacht. They throw a bomb on the boat, 
and later attack the proprietor who is alone 
with the girl after the customers have 
'led. Then into a meller finish with Grant 
wrecking his ship to drown the rival, and 
getting the girl to shore safely for the 
happy honeymoon. 

Cast: Cary Grant, Benita Hume, Roscce 
Karns, Glenda Farrell, Jack LaRue, Arthur 
Vinton, Charles Williams, Edwin Maxwell, 
Harry Shutan, Frank Moran, Spencer Char- 
ters, Otho Wright, Evelyn Selbie. 

Directors, Louis Gasnier, Max Marcin; 
Author, Peter Ruric; Adaptors, Max Marcin, 
Setcn I. Miller, Claude Binyon; Camera- 
man, Charles Lang. 

Dirtcticn, Weak. Photography, Good. 



Tom Kcene in 

"THE CHEYENNE KID" 



Radio 



61 mins 



Jack Hoxie in 

"GUN LAW" 



Mcjestic 



60 mins. 



PLENTY OF FAST ACTION AND 
FIGHTING IN WESTERN THAT GIVES 
TOM KEENE THE SPOTLIGHT. 

A better than average western, with 
Tom Kccne in a whirlwind of action and 
fighting stuff that should please the fans. 
He starts out by conquering a tough horse 
at a rodec, and becomes acquainted with 
Mary Mason who has bet against him and 
so lost all her father's money. Tom tries 
to make good her less by following her to 
give her some of his winnings, but he 
is rebbed and soon finds himself mixed 
up in a lot of exciting events with a killer 
and his gang, as well as a crooked assaye.- 
who is after a gold mine owned by the 
girl's father. There follows a series of 
mixups with the gang, with the hero hot 
on the trial of the killer. There are sev- 
eral good hand-to-hand encounters, with 
Keene getting plenty of opportunity to dis- 
play his horsemanship and general fighting 
ability. Rcscoe Ates takes the part of the 
hero's stuttering pal and adds some good 
ccmedy to the thrills and action. 

Cast: Tom Keene, Mary Mason, Roscce 
Ates, Alan Roscoe, Otto Hoffman, Al 
Bridge, Anderson Lawler. 

Director, Robert Hill; Author, W. C. 
Tuttle; Adaptor, Keene Thompson; Camera- 
man, Nick Musuraca. 

Direction, Good. Photography, Okay. 



OKAY WESTERN WITH JACK HOXIE 
IN THRILL SITUATIONS COMBINING 
GOOD HUMAN TOUCH. 

The routine western stuff is relieved 
by some good old hoke wherein Jack 
Hcxie takes the place of his dead bandit 
pal and presents himself as the long lost 
sen to the blind mother who does not 
know her son was an outlaw. But the 
trouble is that Jack was a member of the 
outlaw gang also, and the rest of the 
gang trail him to the ranch where he is 
starting a new life under the inspiration 
of a girl he finds there. They start to 
spill the beans about his past, and the 
hero cannot clear himself without destroy- 
ing the mother's happiness, as she believes 
him tc be her boy. So he is forced to 
trail along for a while, but in the final 
showdown when the marshal arrives look- 
ing for one of the outlaws, he realizes the 
situation and gives Jack a clean bill of 
health so that the supposed mother re- I 
mains happy in her belief that she has her 
boy with her. There is plenty of fast 
fight stuff, gun play and all the fireworks 
that go to make a thrill western. Mary 
Carr plays the mother and lends the sen- 
timental and human touch. 

Cast: Jack Hoxie, Betty Boyd, Mary Carr. 
Paul Fix, Harry Todd, J. Frank Glendon. 

Director, Lew Collins; Author, Oliver 
Drake; Adaptor; same; Dialoguer, same; 
Cameraman, not listed. 

Direction, Fast. Photography, Good. 



"DOUBLE HARNESS" 

with Ann Harding, William Powell 
Radio 7 m 

LIGHT ROMANCE MISSES WITH T 
MUCH DIALOGUE AND POINTL 
STORY THAT RAMBLES. 

Adapted from the play by Edward 
Montgomery, this is one of those polite 
semi-sophisticated theatrical plots 
lends itself poorly to screen adapta. 
All the clever direction and the finis 1 
acting of Ann Harding and William Pov 
could not make it more than passable 
tertainment. It is overloaded with cialoi 
and shy on real dramatic situatio s. 
wanders along to a more or less for. 
ending that is unconvincing. Will, 
Powell plays the part of a con'irrr 
bachelor of means, with Ann Harding det 
mined to land him at all costs. She 
ranges to have her father call when 
is visiting Powell alone in his apar mc 
and the result is that Powell is hook, d 
marriage, and quite resentful 'j?vc 
months pass with hubby unreconciled 'o 
fate, and starting to flirt around w.'h 
eld flame. Then he suddenly realizes t 
he likes married life and is in love * 
his wife, and so to the happy ending t 
is very artificial and anything but e 
vincing. 

Cast: Ann Harding, William I 
Henry Stephenson, Lilian Bond, Geo 
Meeker, Reginald Owen, Lucile 
Kay Hammond, Leigh Allen, Hugh huntl 
Wallis Clark. 

Director, John Cromwell; Author, Edv. 
P. Montgomery; Adaptor, Jani 
Editor, George Nichollis, Jr ; Cameram 
J. Roy Hunt. 

Direction, Very Good Photography, F 



Salacious Films Condemned 
By 200 Iowa Exhibitors 

(.Continued from Page 1) 

indicate the exhibitors' position in 
the matter. The unit outlined 34 
points for an exhibition code and 
will work with Allied States Ass'n 
on the matter. 



SYDNEY-MURRAY SHORTS 

Columbia has closed a contract 
with George Sydney and Charlie 
Murray, for a series of two-reel 
comedies. 



Edward Dillon, Director, 
Is Dead in Los Angeles 

(Continued from Page 1) 
D. W. Griffith, died here recently of 
heart disease. He is survived by 
his brother, John Dillon, an actor, a 
sister, Marcella, of New York, and 
h ; s former wife, Mrs. Franc Dillon 
of Los Angeles. 

SOVIET FILMS FROM N. Y. 

All Soviet films formerly released 
in the mid-west territory through 
Foreign Language Photoplays, Chi- 
cago, will now be handled directly 
from New York by Amkino Corp. 



Something New in Vacations 

Before you decide where you will spend your vacation this summer ask your friends 
2bout Hotel Uncas, situated directly on the most beautiful part of Lake George Queen 
of American Lakes. 

This unique hotel offers features of tremendous appeal to those who seek a vacation 
that really re-creates mind, body, and soul . . . every facility for rest and recreation. 

SPORTS 

Finest swimming from our private dock (longest on Lake George) or bathing from 
private sandy beach. The water is so clean, clear and pure that you can drink it— or 
read this advertisement through three feet of it. 

Boating— canoes, sailboats, speed boats, out-board motor boats, aquaplaning. 

Tennis— Splendid courts maintained in best of condition. Golf, fishing mountain 
climbing, horseback liding, dancing, billiards, bowling. 

1933 RATES 

Rates at Hotel Uncas have always been so moderate no drastic reductions have been 
made this season. Inasmuch as rates depend on location and type of accommodations 
desired it is suggested that prospective guests send for details. The clientele is restricted 
Booklets upon request. 

Address 

HOWARD V. DAYTON 

HOTEL UNCAS 

UNCAS-ON-LAKE GEORGE 

NEW YORK 



14 Vitaphone Shorts Now 
In Brooklyn Cutting Room 

Sam Sax, production chief of the 
Brooklyn Vitaphone studios an- 
nounces 14 Vitaphone shorts in the 
hands of the studio cutters, being- 
readied for release. These include 
eight double reels and six singles. 

The two-reelers in the cutting 
room are "Operator's Opera," a 
"Broadway Brevities" musical with 
Donald Novis, Dawn O'Day, The 
Four Eton Boys and Bobby Watson; 
"Turkey in the Raw," a "Big V" 
comedy with Gus Shy and Fritz 
Hubert; "Fatty" Arbuckle in his 
fifth and sixth "Big V" comedies, 
entitled "Close Relations" and "In 
The Dough," Charles Judels and 
George Givot in "Gobs of Fun," a 
"Big V" comedy"; Lita Grey Chap- 
lin in "Seasoned Greetings," a 
Broadway Brevities"; Jack Haley in 
"Salt Water Daffy," a "Big V" Com- 
edy, and "Paul Revere, Jr." a 
"Broadway Brevities" starring Gus 
Shy. 

The one reel films include a "Pep- 
per Pot" novelty featuring The 
Notre Dame Glee Club; Rubinoff 
and his Orchestra in "Black and 
White," a "Melody Masters" num- 
ber; Eddie Duchin and His Orches- 
tra in a "Melody Masters" number 
with Sylvia Froos also featured; 
Borah Minnevitch and His Harmon- 
ica Rascals in a "Melody Masters" 
short; "Laughs in Law," a "Pepper 
Pot" comedy novelty; and Dr. Rock- 
well in a "Pepper Pot" comedy. 



Indep'ts and Majors 
Are in Joint Code Woj 

(Continued from Page 1) 

tional distributors affiliated with t 
Hays association. The independer 
will appoint a committee of six mei 
bers to meet with the major ci 
panies' committee to work out 
proposed code. 

Attorney Louis Nizer, who ;i 
zided at the meeting, said that ii 
opinion, the Administration is pri 
cipally, at the moment, conce raj 1 
with maximum working hours » 
minimum wage scale. Trade I 
tice agreements, he declared, mi 
follow this phase in importance. I{ 

Another joint meeting is pLnni ; 
for Wednesday at 2:15 o'clock. 1 
the meanwhile questionnaire I 
to national and independent di- trie 
tors alike by the Hays office on tl 
code suggestions are expecte*. 
received back and thus prov le t 
committees with material to ensid 
for the code draft. About -\0 i 
dependents attended the me ting. 



ONE HURT IN FIR 3 

A fire at the Morningside t 
Eighth Ave. and 116th St., earlji 
Tuesday night sent 300 pf trons 1 
the street with but one casualty 
Mrs. Jane Siefeldt suffered I 
bruised knee and was attended t| 
an ambulance surgeon. The fiflj 
occurred during the chan -ever < 
film from one projector t anotheji 



THE BIGGEST PARTY 
SINCE THE FLOOD! 





It is a long time since Old Man 
Noah pulled that great stunt aboard 
the Arc . . . 

♦ 
But we Noah party that Filumland 
will never forget . . . 

THE MOTION PICTURE CLUB'S 

1st Annual 

OUTING and UP-THE-HUDSON 
CRUISE 

Wednesday, August 2d 

THE PALATIAL STEAMER 'FAVORITE,'' UNDER EXCLUSIVE CHAR- 
TER, LEAVES PIER 84 (foot of West 46th Street), North River, 
PROMPTLY AT 10:00 A. M. 

TICKETS: $5.00 per person 
On Sale at the Motion Picture Club 

Special Arrangements Have Been Made for A.M.P.A. Members to 

attend in a body. 

FOR A.M.P.A. TICKETS Call: 

Marvin Kirsch, Film Daily; Al Sherman, Morning Telegraph; 

Ray Gallagher, Motion Picture Herald; Rutgers Neilson, RKO; 

or Paul Benjamin, National Screen Service. 

BOAT RIDE : DECK GAMES : LUNCHEON : FIELD SPORTS 

MUSIC : BEER : BRIDGE : SWIMMING : PRIZES . . . 

and GOLF FOR THOSE WHO WANT GOLF. 

GALA SHORE DINNER AT BEAR MT. INN 



BASEBALL AND GIANT ATHLETIC MEET 
. . . THE MOTION PICTURE CLUB —vs.— A. M. P. A. 



THE 



28 



J^ 



DAILY 



Thursday, July 13, 1 



i 



A "LITTLE" from HOLLYWOOD "LOTS"=; 



.!/./•// 117/ K 

DICHARD WHITING, author of 
many famous song hits including 
the currently popular "Adorable," 
which he wrote for the Fox produc- 
tion starring Janet Gaynor and Hen- 
ry Garat, has been signed by Fox 
Films to write music for produc- 
tions during the coming year. In 
that time he will compose the tunes 
for "My Weakness," the Lilian Har- 
vey picture, and for "Paddy, the 
Next Best Thing," starring Janet 
Caynor and Warner Baxter. Whit- 
ing wrote most of the hit songs 
sung by Chevalier, including "Lou- 
ise." "My Ideal" and others. He is 
best known for his popular piece, 
"Till We Meet Again." 

j|e s|e s|e 

C. Henry Gordon has been added 
to the cast of "Turn Back the 
Clock," it is announced by the M-G- 

M. studios. 

* * * 

Warner Baxter has been borrow- 
ed from Fox to play the male lead 
in M-G-M's "Penthouse," which will 
be directed by W. S. Van Dyke. 
Charles Butterworth and Madge 
Evans are the only other members 
of the cast so far selected. "Pent- 
house" is based on the serial by 

Arthur Somers Roche. 

* * * 

Alice Brady, Maureen O'Sullivan 
and Franchot Tone will have lead- 
ing roles in M-G-M's picture version 
of "Stage Mother," the novel by 
Bradford Ropes. Charles Brabin has 
been assigned to direct the new pic- 
ture. 

Jean Hersholt has been added to 
the cast of "The Late Christopher 
Bean," in which Marie Dressier and 
Lionel Barrymore will be co-starred 
by M-G-M. Sam Wood will direct 
the film version of the Sidney How- 
ard-Rene Fauchois play. 

% 3= * 

Luana Walters has signed for a 
brief but important role in "Midship- 
man Jack," RKO Radio picture with 
Annapolis as a background. Bruce 
Cabot, Betty Furness, Arthur Lake, 
Frank Albertson, John Darrow and 
Robert Benchley head the cast. 

* * * 

Benita Hume, who recently com- 
pleted her first American motion 
pictures, "Clear All Wires" and 
"Looking Forward," is currently fea- 
tured in "Only Yesterday," and has 
been signed to a long term contract 

by Radio. 

* * * 

Olin Howland, brother of Jobyna 
Howland and prominent artist, was 



German Attendance Off 

Wash. Bur. of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — German cinema atten- 
dance during May sustained its largest 
drop than ever before at this time of 
the year, according to Trade Commis- 
sioner Canty, reporting to the Dept. of 
Commerce. The reason is claimed to 
ba the considerable number of political 
meetings and conferences in addition 
to the hot weather. 



Zeidman Increases Schedule to Four 

West ( oast Bureau oj I HE III- \l DAILY 
Hollywood — Benny Zeidman has increased his production plans for the new season 
to four features. Two have been announced for Universal release. The remainder will 
be handled by some other national distributing company. A Mussolini feature and a 
Stacy Williard Central America adventure film will complete his present year schedule. 
"Undine" and a musical picture are being prepared by Zeidman. 



signed to play the school teacher in 
"Little Women," which has just gone 
into production at RKO Radio Pic- 
tures' studios under George Cukor's 
direction. Florence Enright and 
Marilyn Knowlden were also signed 
for important parts in the picturiza- 
tion of Louisa May Alcott's literary 

classic. 

* * * 

George Stevens, who directed 
"The Cohens and Kellys in Trouble," 
is directing the first of a new work- 
ing girl comedy series called 
"Blondes and Redheads" at the RKO 
Radio studios. "Saturday Afternoon" 
is the title of the comedy now in 
production and features June Brew- 
ster, Carol Tevis, Eddie Nugent and 

Grady Sutton. 

* * * 

Jack LaRue, who "went West" 
on the legitimate stage as Mae 
West's leading man in "Diamond 
Lil," has gone "Western" for Para- 
mount. He has been assigned to the 
bad man role in Zane Grey's "To the 
Last Man" soon to go into produc- 
tion at the Paramount studios. 

* + * 

"The Paradise Case" is announced 
as a forthcoming production at 
M-G-M,' with Diana Wynyard, John 
and Lionel Barrymore in leading 
roles. This is an adaptation of the 
novel by Robert Hichens. 

Cedric Gibbons has been selected 
as director for "Tarzan and His 
Mate," according to announcement 
by M-G-M. This sequel to last year's 
production, "Tarzan, the Ape Man," 
is a special story written for John- 
ny Weissmuller by Edgar Rice Bur- 
roughs and is due to get under way 
in the near future, with Maureen 
O'Sullivan in the leading feminine 
role. Gibbons was formerly art di- 
rector at the Culver City studios. 
and this will be his first directorial 

assignment. 

* * * 

Two unpublished stories have been 
acquired for pictures by M-G-M. 
Thev are "Hall of Justice," by Mor- 
rie Lavine, and "Always Tomorrow." 
by Mildred Cram and Marcella 

Burke. 

* * * 

Jack Hays, producer of Educa- 
tional's Baby Burlesk series, is pre- 
paring "Kid'n Africa" as the first 
of the new series. Shooting is 
scheduled to start about July 15. 

* * * 

Clive Brook will play the lead in 
RKO's "Long Lost Father." John 
Barrymore was announced as the star 
of the film at the RKO regional 
convention. It is understood that 
Brook has been signed by RKO for 
three features this year. 



Ann Dvorak, who has been absent 
from the screen for over a year, 
most of which was spent in traveling 
abroad with her husband, Leslie 
Fenton, will play opposite Richard 
Barthelmess in his next starring pic- 
ture for First National, "Shanghai 
Orchid." 

* * * 

Kay Francis, who has never be- 
fore sung on the screen, will render 
several selections of classical calibre 
in First National's "I Loved A Wo- 
man." 

* * * 

The juvenile lead opposite Ruth 
Chatterton in First National's "Fe- 
male," will be played by Philip 
Faversham, son of William Faver- 
sham. 

* * * 

Robert Bruce has finished shoot- 
ing on the first release in the new 
Educational — -As Dog Thinks series, 
tentatively titled "You And I And 
The Gatepost." 

Adrian Rosaly, Broadway char- 
acter actor, has been signed for the 
role of Baptiste in "My Weakness," 
the Buddy De Sylva production 
starring Lilian Harvey and Lew 
Ayres. Rosaly was featured recent- 
ly in the Broadway production of 
"Of Thee I Sing." 

From a job as a cafe entertainer 
to a featured role in Buddy De 
Sylva's production for Fox, "My 
Weakness," is the jump just made 
by Dixie Francis, beautiful brunette 
dancer and blues singer. Miss Fran- 
cis recently came to Los Angeles 
with a banjo to sing, play and dance 
at the "Plantation" in Hollywood. 
'<■• * * 

The third — and final — change in 
the directorial assignment on 
"Shanghai Orchid," Richard Bar- 
thelmess's next First National pic- 
ture, has been made and Howard 
Hawks emerges as the man behind 
the megaphone. Previously William 
Dieterle and William Wellman had 
the assignment to direct "Shanghai 
Orchid" but the production schedule 
intervened. 

* * * 

Irving Kahl and Sammy Fain and 
not Walter Donaldson and Gus Kahn 
are writing the music and lyrics for 
"Footlight Parade," the Warner 
Bros, musical which is now in pro- 
duction with James Cagney, Joan 
Blondell, Ruby Keeler and a cast 
of beauties and featured players. 
One of the catchiest songs Kahl and 
Fain have written for this new War- 
ner Musical, is entitled "The Foot- 
light Parade." This, of course will 
be the theme song of the picture. 



QEORGE R. BATCHELLERJ 
completed the cast of "No i j; 
But Nice," the third Chesterfielif 
lease of the 1933-1934 seil 
Marian Marsh and Betty ; 
have the leads, supported bj i 
chelle Hudson, Donald Dillol 
John St. Polis, Edmund Brees ' 
Carroll Naish, Robert Ellis j 
Dewey Robinson. 

* * * 

Additions to the cast of 
Weakness" the Buddy De Sj 
production with Lilian Harvey, I 
Ayres, Charles Butterworth, H 
Langdon and Sid Silvers, arc I 
Ware, Irene Bentley, young; 
York society girl, signed rect 
by Fox, and Henry Travers, ch; t 
ter actor with the Theater Guilcj 
many years. 

* * * 

John Van Druten's London s 
play hit, "Behold We Live," 
purchased yesterday by Radio, 
play is being considered as a vel 
to co-star John Barrymore 
Katharine Hepburn, or to star 
Harding or Irene Dunne. 



Vincent Youmans, composer, 
completed the original musical n 
bers which he was contractei 
Radio to write for "Flying 
To Rio," the aerial-Brazilian 
sical soon to go into production 
der Louis Brock's supervision, 
tunes are the theme number, " 
ing Down To Rio," and the fol 
ing numbers which will inv 
elaborate girl dancing enseml 
"Dancing the Carioca," "Orchid 
the Moonlight," "The Guest Is 
ways Right," and "The Streeb 
Rio." 



Ginger Rogers' contract 
Radio, has been converted froi 
picture to picture arrangement 
yearly basis, starting July 12. 
next picture in which she will 
the principal feminine role ,| 
"Sweet Cheat," slated to go 
production the latter part of 
month under the direction of 
liam Seiter. 

Rafaelo Ottiano and May Bes 
have been signed for roles in ". 
Vickers," the Irene Dunne stan 
vehicle which Radio Pictures is 
filming. 

* * * 

Paramount has assigned L 
Calhern to the role of gay dece 
in the Four Marx Brothers pro 
tion, "Duck Soup," and Edward 
nold originally slated for the 5i 
Brothers role, to Mae West's 
No Angel." 



Walker "Ass't President" 

Wash. Bur. of THE FILM D.-UL) 
Washington — Appointment of Franl 
C. Walker, M. E. Comerford circui 
executive, as executive secretary o 
the recovery council just organized b 
the Administration virtually make' hir 
assistant President. He will co-or inat 
various government activities. 




timate in Cha ra cter 
ernational in Scope 
dependent in Thought 

i 



The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Now Fifteen Years Old 



-1FDAILY' 



tw rccr, rciDAy, jult 14, 1933 



5 CENTS 



bx Will 



At Least 12 Features Abroad 



DDE EXPECTED TO APPLYONLYTO LABOR MATTERS 

1PTOA To Consider ERPI Service Charges Refund Suit 



Television 

. . . and other things 



^ 



By JACK ALICOATE— = 

REST in television, through the in- 
ive genius of Dr. Vladimir K. Zwory- 
nd his revolutionary electric eye or 
cope, is once again on the up-curve. 
stic exponents are predicting that 
art of television, as practical enter- 
jrit for the home, is now at hand, and 
ihe next few years will see it moving 

id with the relative speed of radio, 
opped down to Macy's the other day 
e their television demonstration and 
{we saw was well worth the trip. 

I Ision is here, make no doubt about 
On the other hand those close to the 

ion tell us the motion picture indus- 
s nothing to fear from its immediate 
Iss. in fact, plans are already under 
n some industry quarters, for a hand- 
d working arrangement between tele- 
and the screen. 
• 
is announcement week and all of 
e big outfits are heralding their prod- 
lr the coming season. Better, possibly, 
it be called commencement week for 
ks not only the commencing of a new 
I season on the part of the majors, 
I reality, the commencement of a new 
k the motion picture industry. To 
the campaign books of the different 
nies is to bask in the realization that 
feat business will not lack for suit- 
Jroduct during the coming twelve 
;. Still more heartening is the thought 
business, either in production, ac- 
shment, or morale, has more quickly 
le anticipation of the Administration 
come-back, than the industry of the 



> speaking of morale it might not be 
ird for one of observation to sepa- 
iose companies of the picture busi- 
tat are on the way back from those 
e on the way out. A single sight- 
trip through the offices would do 
ck. Morale is somewhat intangible 
means plenty, especially in the show 
is. Keep your gang happy, fighting 
ive and you are going places. Keep 
nervous and worried and you're 
1. 



President Kuykendall To 

Study Claims Upon 

Arrival Tomorrow 

Feasibility of filing a joint ex- 
hibitor suit against Electrical Re- 
search Products, seeking to obtain 
refunds of service charges because 
of the recent Wilmington court de- 
cision finding illegal certain restrict 
clauses of the Erpi equipment agree- 
ment, will be considered by the M. 
P. T. O. A. upon the arrival from 
the Middle West of President Ed 

{Continued on Page 14) 



WARNERS WILL LIST 
PROGRAM ON AUG. 1 



Complete details on the Warner 
Bros. -First National new season pro- 
gram, which will comprise at least 
60 features, will be announced about 
Aug. 1, Major Albert Warner said 

(Continued on Page 8) 

Dowling and Hopkins 

To Make 6 in East 

Tentative production plans of Ed- 
die Dowling and Arthur Hopkins 
call for six features which will be 
produced in the East. All will be 
based on plays Hopkins' owns. Dowl- 
ing will appear in the second story 
entitled "Hell's Kitchen." 



Sees German Production Drop 

Production in Germany will show a 
considerable decline during the coming 
year, Charles C. Pettijohn of the Hays 
office reported yesterday upon his ar- 
rival on the Manhattan from Europe." 
I talked with several important people 
in Berlin but did not hear of any an- 
nounced plans for the production of 
films," said Pettijohn. General condi- 
tions are excellent in England, particu- 
larly in the theaters, he said, and Eng- 
lish theaters will show heavy grosses 
for the coming year. 



KENT SEEKS SUPPORT 
FOR REORGANIZATION 



In a letter sent to Fox Film stock- 
holders yesterday seeking their 
proxies for the stockholders' meet- 
ings adjourned to July 21 and 22, 
Sidney R. Kent, president, reiterates 
in behalf of the management an ap- 

(Continucd on Page 14) 

New Edwin Carewe Firm 
To Produce 12 Features 

Edwin Carewe arrived in New 
York yesterday with plans for a 
new producing company called Ed- 
win Carewe Pictures, Inc., and a 
start-off program of 12 features. 
While spending two weeks in the 
east he will make releasing arrange- 
ments. 

Six of the titles are: "The Devil 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Fox Plans to Make at Least 

Twelve Features in Europe 



Reported Forming New 
Indie Finance Company 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Fitelson and Mayers, 
New York film attorneys, are re- 
ported representing banking inter- 
ests which are organizing a com- 
pany to finance independent produc- 
tion and distribution. William 
Fitelson has returned to New York 
from the Coast. 



Coincident with the arrival yes- 
terday from Europe of Clayton P. 
Sheehan, head of the Fox foreign 
department, it was disclosed that 
Fox will produce at least 12 and 
possibly 16 features on the continent 
during next year. The company also 
plans to make a minimum of 49 
dubbed versions of American-made 
features. 

Four originals will be made in 

(Continued on Page 14) 



Doubt That It Concerns 

Block Booking, Dual 

Feature Bills 

By WILLIAM SILBERBERG 
Wash. Correspondent, THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — That block booking, 
double feature and other mooted film 
practices are not likely to be incor- 
porated in the industry code became 
evident yesterday when it was 
learned that several different indus- 
tries have unsuccessfully tried to 
insert provisions in their codes not 
directly affecting employment of 

(Continued on Page 14) 



SGHAEFER SEES 2,000 
THEATERS REOPENING 



That more than 2,000 small the- 
aters will reopen within 18 months 
was predicted by George J. Schaefer, 
Paramount general manager, yes- 
terday following his return to New 
York from the Coast. 

"Double feature bills, are falling 

(Continued on Page 8) 



RCA Victor Workers 

Get 10 P. C. Pay Rise 

Camden — W. R. G. Baker, vice- 
president of RCA Victor, announces 
a ten per cent increase in the wages 
of all hourly-rated and piece work 
employees. The raise will go into 
effect July 24 and will affect ap- 
proximately 80 per cent of the em- 
ployees of the company. According 
to Baker, the increase is being put 
through at this time so that it may 
be included in the establishment of' 
a code now in preparation. 



Recovery Act Short 

Cashing in on a timely topic, Vita- 
phone is making a two-reeler dealing 
with the operation of the Industry Re- 
covery Act. It will be ready for re- 
lease next month. Burnet Hershey is 
doing the script. 



Fifteen years is a long time in pictures, com- 
pletely covered in the forthcoming "New Deal" 
number of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



THE 



<2^ 



PAILV 



Friday. July 14 




VoL LXIII. No. 11 Fa.Jilj 14. 1933 Prico 5 Coots 



JOHN W ALICOATE 



Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
•I lf)5d Broadway, New Yorlc. N. , > .. 
by Wis's Films an! Film Folk. Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate. President. Editor and Publisher: 
Donald M. Mersereau. Secretary-Treasurer 
and Genera! Manager; Arthur W. Eddy. Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette. Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at N'«w York, 
N. Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, S3. 00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, M50 Broadway, New York, N. Y.. 
Phone, Circle 7-473o. 7-4737, 7-4733. 7-4739. 
Cable address: Film lay. New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk. 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London — 
Ernest \V. Fredman. The Film Renter. 89-91 
Wardour St., VV. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn. 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
— P. A. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



Attorney General Cuts Censors' Pass List at Richmond 

Richmond — Motion picture interests have gained another victory in Virginia, hav- 
ing just caused Col. John Richard Saunders, attorney-general of the state, to rule 
that only one instead of a score or more of "volunteer" inspectors may get into a 
theater free of charge to see that the seal of the commonwealth is affixed to the 
films being shown. 

Despite the fact that Richard Cassius Lee Moncure a former member of the legis- 
lature, is director of the censorship division, Attorney-General Saunders controls that 
branch of work, and his decision to do away with the excess "deadhead" list as to 
inspectors was announced after protests had been made by local theater managers. 



Claim Toledo Exhibitors 
Did Not Represent Ass'n 

Toledo — Denying the right of sev- 
eral exhibitors, who asked exchange 
managers to enforce a first-run min- 
imum admission price scale, to rep- 
resent the Toledo Managers' Ass'n. 
organizarion executives yesterday 
said that any official action must be 
concurred in by the Fleischman and 
Kroetz circuits, Allied Theaters and 
the Benson Circuit, representing the 
majority of neighborhood house 
seats. Affairs of the association are 
in charge of its board of directors 
t comprising seven members, it is 
stated. 



"Fattv" Arbuckle Estate 
Does Not Exceed 82,000 

Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle, who 
died June 29, left an estate which 
does not exceed 82,000, it was dis- 
closed yesterday when Surrogate 
James A. Delehanty granted letters 
of administration in his estate to 
his widow. Mrs. Addie Arbuckle. 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

High Low Close 

Am Seat 7' 3 6S3 7 

Columbia Picts. vtc 24 23' 2 23 Vi - 

Con. Fm. Ind 5 43 4 5 

Con Fm. Ind. pfd 13 12' 3 12'i - 

East. Kodak 8S3 4 84 85'/4 - 

Fox Fm. "A" 41/2 4' 3 4% - 

Loew's. Inc 273 3 26' 2 26%- 

do pfd 73 7234 73 - 

Paramount ctfs 2'A 2 2' 3 

Pathe Exch 2'A 1% 2 

do "A" 81/2 63 4 8 - 

RKO 5 45 3 4% - 

Warner Bros 8 73.. 7% 

do pfd 20' 2 ZOV'2 20'/ 2 - 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Columbia Pets, vtc 23 > 2 23 ' 2 23 1 2 - 

Gen. Th. Eq. pfd .13-16 3.. 3 4 

Technicolor 9'/4 8 3 3 8% - 

Trans-Lux 3' 3 23 4 3' 3 - 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 S% 6 6I/4 - 

Gen. Th. Eq.6s40ctfs. 5% 5' 2 5> 2 - 

Loew 6s 41 ww 82 81 81 

Paramount 6s 47 .. 26' 2 26 26' 2 - 

Para. 6s47 ctfs 25 26 25 

Par. By 5' 2 s51 35 34 35 

Par. 5' 2 s50 26' 2 253 3 25' 2 - 

Par. 5 ; 2 s50 ctfs . 26 25 26 

Warners 6s39 ... 40 38 39 - 
NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE 

Para. Publi- 2' 3 1% 17s - 



Net 
Chg. 

V2 



2 

1/4 

I'/s 



Va, 

l'/2 



EXCHANGE OWNERS BUYING 
Ed Blumenthal and L. C. Baxley 
of Standard Attractions, Dallas, who 
recently opened as a state right ex- 
change, arrived in New York yes- 
terday to buy product for the new 
selling season. Blumenthal was for- i 
merly salesman for RKO and Bax- 
ley was recently manager of the 
Dallas Universal exchange. 



Release Schedule Set 
On Four M-G-M Features 

M-G-M's revised release schedule, 
set yesterday by the sales depart- 
ment, is as follows: Aug. 4, "Tug- 
boat Annie''; Aug. 11, "The March 
of Time"; Aug. 18, "Turn Back the 
Clock"; Aug. 25, "Night Flight." 



NOLAN GETS 2 COLO. HOUSES 

Denver — Harry Nolan, manufac- 
turers' agent and formerly owner 
of a number of theaters in the 
state, has recovered the Mesa. 
Grand Junction, and the Rex, Gree- 
ley, from Publix, through foreclosure 
proceedings. 



l 



ADJOURN CREDITORS MEETING 

Creditors of Fox Metropolitan 
Playhouses agreed yesterday in U. 
S. District Court to an adjournment 
until Aug. 3. The hearing was to 
consider a report of Irving Trust 
Co., receiver for the company. The 
court extended the receivership for 
one month from vesterdav. 



EUROPA CLOSES 

The Europa theater closed yester- 
day for the rest of the summer. A 
number of European films have al- 
ready been secured to be shown at 
the house when the theater reopens 
in the early part of September. 



V* 

Va 

V* 

1 

7 3 

1 

3 

V/s 
1 
1 

14 



•ISLAND OF DOOM" AT CAMEO 

"Island of Doom," latest Soviet 
film directed by Timoshenko, will 
have its American premiere at the 
Cameo starting today. The musical 
score is played by the Leningi-ad 
Symphony Orchestra. 



SIGNS CONSTANCE CUMMINGS 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Darryl Zanuck has 
signed Constance Cummings for 
Twentieth Century. She will start 
work in October. 



MPTOA MEETS. ADJOURNS 

Chicago — After holding its sec- 
ond session here yesterday, the meet- 
ing of the M. P. T. O. A. executive 
committee is expected to conclude to 
day. 



CHESTERFIELD 

and 

INVINCIBLE 

FORGE AHEAD 

With 2 Pictures Completed 
and 2 in Production 

1933-34 SEASON 



RELEASING CINECOLOR FILM 

William Steiner will release the 
Cinecolor feature, "The Hawk," on 
the independent market. 



SCHUESSLER RESIGNS 

ILM DAILY 
Hollywood — -Fred Schuessler has 
handed in his resignation as casting- 
director at Radio to take effect 
July 22. 



SCHNEIDER WITH PARAMOUNT 

Bill Schneider returns to Para- 
mount as head of the secretarial 
of George Schaefer. having re- 
signed from Educational. Schenider 
was formerlv with Publix. 




^President 



ATLANTIC CITY'S 

NEWEST BOARDWALK 

HOTEL 

Five Hundred Rooms with Sea Water 
Baths — American and European Plans. 
Also Beautiful Furnished Housekeeping 
Apartments with Complete Hotel Service 
by the Week, Month or Year. 

SEA WATER SWIMMING POOL 

MARINE SUN DECK 
TURKISH BATHS 



Ready Reference Directo 

With Addresses and Prions Nuaben 
Recognized Industry Concern 



Where To Buy It 



• Distributors • 



A Picture YOU Ca 
BANK ON! 

'EASY MILLION 

"Skeets" Gallagher — Merna Kenaet 
Dorothy Burgess — Johnny Arrnr 

A \IO\ARCH PRODI"- 



* Engravers • 



CALL— 

"CITY- 
PHOTO ENGRAVING 

(Day and Night Service) 
250 W. 54th St., N. Y. 

Tel. COIumbus 5-6741 



* Equipment • \ 



VORTKAMP AND COMPAN 

Lamps and Carbons 
ALL OTHER THEATER SUPPLIES 
1600 B'way, CH. 4-5550 N. Y 



Hand Coloring 




HAND COLORING 

of POSITIVE PRINTS 

528 Riverside Drive New York Ot> 

UNiversity 4-2073 



• Foreign 



AMERANGLO 
CORPORATION 

EXPORTERS— IMPORTERS 
Cable: Chronophon 

226 WEST 42ND STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 

LONDON PARIS tERLI* 



• Scrap Film 



WE BUY JUNK FILM 

Guarantee No Piracy 
BEST MARKET PRICES 




WOODRIDGE 



NEW JERM, 



^H 



iM. 



WARNER BROS. 




for 1932-33 



// 



CAPTU RED! with LESLIE HOWARD, 

Doug. Fairbanks, Jr., Paul Lukas, 
Margaret Lindsay* 



GOODBYE AGAIN" Broadways 
longest-run laugh hit of the year— 
6 big starst 

GEORGE ARLISS in VOLTAIRE - 

Paris — and Madame Pompadour 
in France's wildest days* 



JAMES CAGNEY in "FINGER MAN" 

—tailored to this popular star's 
talents* 

RUTH CHATTERTON in "FEMALE" 

— colorful novel by the author 
of "Millie"! 



EDW. G. ROBINSON - KAY 
FRANCIS in "I LOVED A WOMAN' 

—A brand new star teamt 

JOE. E. BROWN in "SON OF THE 

GOBS— his first comedy of the year 

KAY FRANCIS in'MARY STEVENS, 

M.D."— Lyle Talbot— first story of 
a woman doctor* 

THE NARROW CORNER" with 
DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS, Jr. 

-PATRICIA ELLIS -based on 
Somerset Maugham's best seller* 

• 
SHE HAD TO SAY YES" with 
LORETTA YOUNG- LYLE TALBOT 

— truth about "customers' girls"t 



WARNER BROS 




for 1933-34 



to maintain the same consistent; 
quality standard set by their 
great attractions of the past year. 

*A Warner Bros. Picture f A First National Picture Vitagraph, Inc., Distributors 



ay, July 14, 1933 



DAILY 



MELY TOPICS 

ting Rooms Provide Best 
ining for Directors 

'HE best training for those 
I who desire to be film direc- 
ts is obtained in the cutting 
mi. I don't say that because 
happened to travel the film 
iting route. All you have to 
is glance down the list of 
ccessful directors to find that 
tost of them served their ap- 
3nticeship with the shears, 
ch directors as Lewis Mile- 
me, Josef von Sternberg, Rich- 
1 Wallace, Dorothy Arzner, 
i|y Enright and many more, 
irted in the cutting room. 
:ectors must know cutting be- 
■e they can do their work ef- 
iently. A good picture de- 
lds largely on the ability of 
director to visualize the film 
it will be in the final stage 
editing. I don't say that 
">ry cutter can be a director, 
ey must first understand the 
"'hnique of the drama. How- 
ifcr, the director who has had 
i ting experience will thorough- 
I, understand the art of 'tim- 
i ,' one of the most essential 
liases of production. This 
Wans the correct tempo of mo- 
il to speech, and is all-im- 
h'tant. 

— Alexander Hall 



.ommg an 



d G 



oing 



MAS A. BRANDON, head of the Eltabran 
a. with headquarters in Atlanta, has left 
fork after conferring with Charles L. 
Vice-President of Monarch productions. 

.ULAH BANKHEAD has arrived at the 
'from New York. 

: PEGLER has arrived at the Coast 
ew York via San Francisco. 

! ENCE OLIVIER, who will play the lead 
Is Greta Garbo in her next for M-G-M, 
om Southampton tomorrow on the Eu- 
i route to the Coast. 

LGE KILNER, British producer, is en 
I o New York from London. 

N CAREWE arrived in New York yes- 
from the Coast. 

1AM FITELSON returned to New York 
le coast yesterday. 

JJK WILSTACH will return to Naw 
|Om the coast Monday. 

TON DOWNEY and BARBARA BENNETT 
d to New York from Europe on the 
jtan yesterday. 

\md MRS. FRED ASTAIRE leave for the 
y airplane this morning. 

JS PETROFSKY leaves New York today 
coast. 

ILUMENTHAL and L. C. BAXLEY ar- 
i New York yesterday from Dallas. 



jLONGTHt 

WITH 

PHIL M DALY 



• • • OUT IN Japan the picture industry is booming 

with the sons of Nippon emulating Hollywood 

for anything "made in America" commands the greatest respect 

and admiration of the Japanese according to Roy Scott 

formerly with the Paramount production dep't for 13 

years who has just returned after months of produc- 
tion work for the Japanese government and he likes it 

so much that he is going back to make a feature production 

on his own something that will be designed as a real 

novelty for American audiences presenting the charm 

and allure of Japan which for some mysterious reason has 
never been utilized on the screen before 



• • • THE JAPANESE government welcomes the oppor- 
tunity to present their country to the world through the eyes 
of an American producer telling the story in modernis- 
tic Western style so they will put every official agency 

and department at his disposal it should prove a charm- 
ing novelty the real story of the geisha girls 

which is entirely different from our erroneous conception 

respectable, dignified Japanese gentlemen dancing joyfully out 
of the temples on religious holidays all coked up on native 

hoosh for this is their way of showing their honorable 

ancestors that they are happy and not a bad religion, 

say we add to this every variety of scenic beauty 

snow-capped volcanoes, cherry trees in bloom, miniature gardens 

no beggars, no poverty anywhere a veritable 

paradise inhabited by a very happy people so Mister 

Scott is sure there is A Picture there when he combines 

it with the Entertainment Values that American audiences want 
and that's exactly what he proposes to do 



• • • LOOKS AS if the Ultra-Violet effects 

known as the Stroblite System ...... may revolutionize stage 

lighting and decoration a recent spectacular presenta- 
tion at the Radio City Music Hall had the audience ooh-ing and 
ah-ing with amazement and this coming week the Cap- 
itol will stage one that will prove a genuine Novelty 

the System lends itself to innumerable showmanship purposes 

the technique of this lighting unit is so simple that 

stage directors, designers and producers can easily master it 
and create beautiful and spectacular effects never be- 
fore possible on the stage can you imagine an elephant 

disappearing before your eyes on the stage? just one 

of the tricks that can be performed with this system of Alex- 
ander Strobl's Ultra-Violet lights and colors ballet girls 

transformed into dancing skeletons as at the old Roxy some 

time ago scenics and drops changing magically in a 

series of iridescent patterns and pictures as you watch 

a new Novelty Note the theater can use to revive jaded audi- 
ences 

• • • THE MODERN touch at the Little Picture House 

over on 55th Street Director Sophie Smith regales her 

guests in the Tavern Room with skittles of beer and sand- 
wiches and is that Tavern Room popular! Up 

toward Yonkers on Central Avenoo is the Central Cabaret, 
where bashful Broadway stage and screen folks find a neat 

hideaway Doris Warner, who recently returned to New 

York from the Coast, is back at the Warner home office 

"hard at work," as she so expresses it It looks like 

Old Home Week for the Radio City Music Hall the new 

bill will have "Roxy" making his first personal appearance in 
three years along with his radio "Gang" of yes- 
terday and today one of the most imposing list of radio 

artists ever assembled on a stage 



EXPLOITETTES 

Private Screening 
For "Reunion" 

"CIVE days in advance special 
day letter invitations were 
sent out to the editorial staffs 
of the "Bee-News" and the 
"World-Herald" for a special 
press screening of "Reunion." 
Invitations were also sent to all 
managers of the radio stations, 
announcers, local celebrities and 
special guests of Mr. Rosenfield, 
manager of the Paramount. All 
guests met at the theater at 
8:30 and were transported in 
Yellow Cabs to the Fox Film 
screening room. After the 
screening they were taken to 
the Rose Room of the Paxton 
Hotel and served a buffet sup- 
per. At each table where the 
press was seated was a group of 
stills on "Reunion" for them to 
pick their art from. At 11:00 
o'clock Paul Ash and his enter- 
tainers arrived and furnished 
the entertainment. 

■ — Paramount, Omaha. 



Personal Address 
Made by Manager 

"pOUR days prior to opening a 
preview was held for promi- 
nent local people. In addition 
to a news story in the "Gazette," 
which mentioned the more im- 
portant persons who attended, 
"ad" copy contained a box head- 
ed: "If you want to know about 
'Hell Below,' ask any of the 
following Renoites. They saw 
it at a private preview." Instead 
of the regular advance showing 
of the trailer, Manager Tomp- 
kins resorted to personal an- 
nouncements over the house 
public address system, explain- 
ing that no trailer, regardless 
how elaborate it might be, could 
possibly do justice to a picture 
as worthy as "Hell Below." A 
glowing endorsement of the pic- 
ture was included. The 14-chap- 
ter serialization ran in the Reno 
"State-Journal." 

— Majestic, Reno, Nev. 



« « « 



» » » 




II 



MANY UAPPV RETU&NS 



■est wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 



July 14 



Dave Fleischer 
Louis F. Blumenthal 
Stuart Stewart 
Zita Johann 



M. J. Slegel 

Charles Weinstein 

Lucien Prival 

Olive Borden 



THE 



sSSft* 



DAILY 



Friday, July 14, 19 



© N-E-W-S O-F T-H-E D-A-Y © 



Albany — Associated Motion Pic- 
ture Operators' Union, Inc., Middle- 
town, N. Y., has been chartered at 
Albany as a membership corporation 
without capital stock. Carl Leder, 
367 Miller Ave., Brooklyn; Samuel 
M. Falk, 1700 Longfellow Ave., 
Bronx; Samuel Sole, 553 Hinsdale 
St., Brooklyn; Jack Linder, 1114 
Gerard Ave., Bronx; Nathan Leder, 
10 Bedford Ave., Monticello, are the 
incorporators. David Fishman, Mid- 
diet own, N. Y., is attorney for the 
association. 



Salt Lake City — Police were en- 
gaged in a city-wide search for the 
thief who robbed the box-office at 
the Paramount theater of $150 a few 
nights ago. 



Salt Lake City — The premiere 
western showing of "The Big Brain" 
is being offered at the RKO Orph- 
eum here this week. 



Greeley, Colo. — Westland Theaters 
has opened the 508-seat Kiva, a new 
house. 



Fremont, O. — Schine has taken 
back the Opera House, until recent- 
ly operated by Paramount, and will 
reopen shortly. 



Cleveland — "Sunny Side Up," re- 
issued by Fox, is booked into the 
Hippodrome the last week in July. 



Cleveland — Loew's Stillman, play- 
ing two first-run features at popular 
prices, will continue this policy in- 
definitely, according to H. M. Addi- 
son, Loew district manager. 



Akron, O. — Stephen Walters, who 
came to Akron from New York City 
as assistant to Frank King, Colo- 
nial manager, is just summering at 
the theater management. He's a law 
student. 



Canton, 0. — Bob Rhodes, who has 
been assistant manager of Loew's 
theater here since its opening more 
than five years ago, has tendered 
his resignation to Manager Adolphe 
Buehrig, Jr. 



Youngstown, O. — Joe Trunk has 
resumed charge of the State. Sol Sil- 
verman, former manager, is manag- 
ing Santry's Band. 



Indianapolis — "Gold Diggers of 
1933" is being held over for the 
second week at the Circle. 



Laconia, N. H. — T. J. Mclntyre 
has transferred ownership of the 
Colonial to George A. Giles, inde- 
pendent circuit owner with head- 
quarters in Boston. 



Boston — Phil Smith is holding 
"Gold Diggers of 1933" at the 
Majestic for the third week. Man- 
ager P. F. Lydon of the Tremont, 
where "Be Mine Tonight" is on its 
fifth week, says that the crowds 
have been picking up since the third 
week. 



Boston — William Snyder has been 
assigned by the local Fox branch to 
act as salesman in Western Massa- 
chusetts. 



Buffalo — Word has been receh 
in Buffalo that Charles A. Raymoi 
formerly manager at the Gn 
Lakes theater and well-kno' 
among motion picture exhibitors 
Western New York, is now mana 
ing the Loew theater in Johann< 
burg, South Africa. 



Boston — Morey Goldstein, forrm 
ly head booker for the M-G- 
branch, has been made salesman. 



Indianapolis — Henry K. Burtc 
head of the Burton Theatrical E 
tertainment Service, Indianapol 
has taken over the Lyric for the H 
mainder of the season. It had be< 
announced that the Fourth Avetr 
Amusement Co. of Louisville, K; 
was surrendering the lease on tl 
Lyric and that after Friday it wou 
remain dark. Vaudeville temporari 
will be discontinued. 



Joseph Schenck Party 

Flies to Chicago Meet 

Via the airways, six members of 
the United Artists personnel today 
leave Los Angeles for Chicago to 
attend the company's annual sales 
convention which opens Monday at 
the Drake Hotel. Comprising the 
party are: Joseph M. Schenck, Al 
Lichtman, Hal Home, Walt Disney, 
Edward Finney and G. B. Sully. 

From New York yesterday de- 
parted Monroe W. Greenthal, Leon 
Lee and Sam Cohen, all from the 
home office. Other home office con- 
tingents leave today and tomorrow 
for Chicago. 



ESCORTING CONTEST WINNERS 

Carroll Trowbridge, personal rep- 
resentative of Mary Pickford, will 
escort winners of the "Secrets Cen- 
tury of Progress" contest on a tour 
of the exposition July 22 and 23. He 
will be aided by Jimmy Ashcraft. 
Trowbridge leaves New York Satur- 
day with the United Artists contin- 
gent going to the company's annual 
sales convention. 



STURGESS JOINS FIRST DIV. 

Detroit — W. G. Sturgess, formerly 
with Educational here, has succeed- 
ed Ray Elliott as branch manager 
of First Division Exchange of Mich- 
igan. 



A Sweeping Ban 

Berlin (By Cable) — Unless both your- 
parents and even grandparents were 
"Aryans." you can't work in the Ger- 
man film industry, according to the 
rules just issued by the central state 
employment office. This applies to pro- 
ducers, managers, composers, authors, 
cutters, art directors and cameramen, 
among others. 



Warner Bros. Will List 
Program on August 1 

(Continued from Page 1) 

yesterday in New York. These will 
be supplemented by a schedule of 
Vitaphone shorts. 

Major Warner said, in part: 
"Warner Bros, and First National 
are laying out the most elaborate 
production program in the history 
of these companies. The program 
will be announced in detail, stars, 
subjects, authors and other particu- 
lars, on or about August 1. 

"We have not rushed into print 
with half-baked plans because the 
program we are building is intended 
to be carried out according to 
schedule, and because it takes time 
to plan seriously for a year of pro- 
duction. 

"I may state now that we shall 
produce a minimum of sixty feature 
pictures with stars new and old. In 
addition we shall produce one and 
two-reel short subjects and a num- 
ber of special productions of which 
full particulars will be announced 
later. 

"We shall continue to blaze new 
trails as we have done in the past. 
We shall not make so-called 'pro- 
gram pictures.' The day of the 
routine, machine-made film is past." 



HOUSE FOR SWAMPSCOTT 

Swampscott, Mass. — What would 
be the first motion picture house 
here loomed late last week when a 
group of citizens affixed signatures 
to a petition calling for the rezon- 
ing of Humphrey Street for the 
specific purpose of erecting a the- 
ater. 



George J. Schaefer Sees 
2,000 Theaters Reopening 

(Continued from Page 1) 

off due to their own weight," said 
Schaefer. He declared that admis- 
sion prices must increase with other 
commodities. "In order to protect 
quality entertainment, exhibitors 
must give each picture the greatest 
possible amount of playing time," 
he said. "The public is interested, 
not in cycles or themes, but in the 
unusual in stories." 



New Edwin Carewe Firm 
To Produce 12 Features 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Behaves," "Shanghai Interlude," 
"Skyrocket," "Virtuous Sinners," 
"Fool's Paradise" and "Tarnished 
Youth." All of his stories have 
been acquired, Carewe said. 

The producer is taking over a 
coast studio and plans to begin pro- 
duction immediately upon his return. 
First will be "The Devil Behaves." 
Carewe product will be aimed at 
Class A houses, said the producer, 
who has opened offices in the Para- 
mount building. 



MORROW JOINS UNIVERSAL 

Kansas City — Mr. Ralph Morrow, 
formerly branch manager here for 
Educational, has replaced Truly 
Wildman as salesman for Universal 
in Kansas City and part of Missouri. 
Wildman has gone with M-G-M. Dan 
Meyers, who used to be with Pathe 
here some years ago, has become 
associated with Universal and will 
cover Northwestern Kansas. 



5 WEEKS AT HAMERICK'S 

Portland— "Gold Diggers of 1933" 
at Hamerick's Music Box is expect- 
ed to hold for at least five weeks. 



Pitts. Local Protests 

Free Shows in Park 

Pittsburgh— A committee rep» 
senting the Motion Picture Machir 
Operators' Local Union No. 17 
I. A. T. S. E., consisting of J. V 
Shawkey, James A. Sipe, C. N. Ha 
iland and Alfred L. Criswell a; 
peared before the Pittsburgh Cit 
Council yesterday to protest th 
granting of a permit to the Socialis 
Party to show free pictures in th 
city parks. The operators stresse 
the harm that would be done thei 
employers by this unfair competitio 
with legitimate business enterprise 
Mr. Stempf, representing Loew'si, 
Inc., attended the hearing. The in 
dependent theater owners were no: 
represented. 



SET 3 FIRST-RUN DATES 

Mascot Pictures Corp. report 
that "Laughing at Life," its lates 
feature production starring Victo 
McLaglen, has been set for thr 
important first-runs in key spots 
The picture is now playing the work 
premiere engagement at the Fox 
Philadelphia. Tony Lucchese ha. 
also set the picture for a first-rui 
at the Steel Pier in Atlantic Citj 
today. The New York premiere i' 
scheduled for today at the Rialto 



Now It's Col. Vogel 

Joseph R. Vogel, Loew Theaters ex- 
ecutive, sans moustache and goatee, is 
now a full-fledged Kentucky Colonel on 
the staff of Governor Laffoon. Louis 
K. Sidney and Charlie Moskowitz, act- 
ing emissaries of the Governor, formally 
presented the documents making Joe an 
immortal. 




F 
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OF 




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tveJLciAf o*uA 



. . . and 
give every 

EXHIBITOR 
a big hand 




THE PARAMOUNT 



'xUtM cru. the tcJrii.. 



♦MAURICE CHEVALIER *CLAUDETTE COLBERT 
•GARY COOPER * BING CROSBY *MARLENE DIETRICH 
•CARY GRANT * MIRIAM HOPKINS * CHARLES LAUGHTON 
•FREDRIC MARCH * FOUR MARX BROTHERS *JACK OAKIE 
* GEORGE RAFT * CHARLIE RUGGLES * SYLVIA SIDNEY 
•ALISON SKIPWORTH * MAE WEST * DOROTHEA WIECK 
•WALTER ABEL *BRIAN AHERNE *ADRIENNE AMES 
*LONA ANDRE * RICHARD ARLEN * GEORGE BARBIER 
•MARY BOLAND * GRACE BRADLEY * GEORGE BURNS 
*and GRACE ALLEN * KATHLEEN BURKE *RICARDO CORTEZ 
•MARI COLMAN *BUSTER CRABBE *W. C. FIELDS 
•FRANCES FULLER ^SHIRLEY GREY *ROSCOE KARNS 
•JACK LaRUE *CAROLE LOMBARD *BARTON MacLANE 
•HERBERT MARSHALL *GAIL PATRICK HYDA ROBERTI 
•RANDOLPH SCOn * SIR GUY STANDING *KENT TAYLOR 
•HELEN TWELVETREES * ELIZABETH YOUNG 




ITARS IN JLM^ 



_^S\ 



TRUM P 
THEM 
IF YOU 
CAN 




PARAMOUNT 

the 'BUY 5 word for 1933-34 





b 



iday, July 14, 1933 




DAILY 



m 



13 



A "LITTLE" from HOLLYWOOD "LOTS"; 



By RALPH WILK 

ONSTANCE CUMMINGS, now 
working in England, has per- 

ted her tennis game to such an 
i ;ent that she won a racquet and 
; lozen balls from three of her Eng- 

i friends in a match just a week 

1 ore she married Benn W. Levy. 

1 ear me, winning a tennis racquet 

ii a husband in one week is just 

Si thrilling," she wrote local 

: ands. 

* * * 

D hil Goldstone, chairman; Fred 
i ttson, Phil Berg, Samuel Bischoff , 

ward O. Blackburne, Samuel Bris- 

i, Merian C. Cooper, Dr. A. H. 
i mnini, Henry Ginsberg, Samuel 
i Idwyn, Sid Grauman, Sam Jaffe, 
• rl Laemmle, Jr., Louis B. Mayer, 
J rry Rapf, Joseph Schenck, Leon 
I llesinger, B. P. Schulberg, Ar- 
i ir TJngar, Jack Warner, W. R. 

lkerson, Marco Wolff, Sol Wurt- 
: and Darryl Zanuck comprise the 
< rcmittee of "24," which is raising 
J |ds for the Los Angeles Free 

berculosis Sanatorium, which is 
t fronted with a grave crisis in its 
1 mcial affairs. 



ien Holmes is directing Clark and 
' Cullough in "Snug in the Jug," 
1 Louis Brock, at RKO. 
* * * 

jack L. Warner, Sid Grauman, 
I rvyn LeRoy, Al Dubin, Harry 
1 rren, Busby Berkeley, Frank N. 
I rphy, Jack L. Warner, Jr., Sunday 
i ;red an effective radio program 
i behalf of "Gold Diggers of 1933," 
|«r showing at Grauman's Chinese. 
I keley, noted dance director, was 
i pleasant surprise to his hearers 
| ?n he sang one of the songs from 
"Gold Diggers." 



aquel Torres may go to Lon- 
to make a picture following the 
I ipletion of her role in the Marx 
I »thers' opus, "Duck Soup," in 
||ch she has started work at Para- 
i jint. 

* * * 

jharon Lynne's dancing partner, 

?n she first started taking lessons 

Los Angeles, was a dark-haired 

lantic boy, who confessed he 

ered at the old Majestic theater. 

awas Ramon Samineigos, later to 

Bjome better known as Ramon No- 

iro. 



i 

BIG 


pR& 








NEWS 




ftv^ 8 






|AS SEEN BY 










THE PRESS 


vf 








AGENT 








»» 


Ginger Rogers 


, Radio 


player, 


has 


been 


jfficially voted 


"the sweethea 


rt of 


the 


Japanese fleet." 











Paramount Studios Start Six Features 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — At the Paramount studios starting yesterday six of Paramount's line-up 
of 65 features were put into production. The pictures started are: "The Way to 
Love" with Maurice Chevalier and Sylvia Sidney; May West in "I'm No Angel"; 
"Duck Soup" with the Four Marx Brothers; "Too Much Harmony" with Bing Crosby; 
"Design for Living" with Miriam Hopkins and Fredric March, and Claudette Colbert 
in "Torch Singer." 



Art Jarrett, Jr., has been signed 
to play a leading part in the M-G-M 
production, "Dancing Lady," star- 
ring Joan Crawford. Leo Morrison 
office handled the deal. 

* * * 

Darryl Zanuck's first Twentieth 
Century production, "The Bowery," 
has had Pert Kelton, former Broad- 
way stage comedienne, added to the 
cast, which includes Wallace Beery, 
George Raft, Jackie Cooper and Fay 
Wray. Raoul Walsh will direct. 

As her first assignment before the 
motion picture camera, Jean How- 
ard, Broadway stage beauty, recent- 
ly signed on a long term contract 
by M-G-M, is to play a part in 
"Dancing Lady," Joan, Crawford's 
new starring vehicle. Miss Howard, 
former "Follies" girl and featured 
revue dancer, recently arrived in 
Hollywood from New York where 
her stage appearances won atten- 
tion of talent scouts. 

* * * 

Ferdinand Gottschalk has been 
added to the cast of "Dancing Lady," 
Joan Crawford's new M-G-M star- 
ring picture. 

* * * 

Albert Conti and William von 
Brincken have been added to the 
cast of "Shanghai Madness," Fox 
production. 

Gay Seabrook and Emerson 
Treecy, western radio entertainers, 
are featured in "Blue Blackbirds", 
the final comedy in Educational's 
current series of Moran and Mack 

Comedies. 

* * * 

David Abel, ace cameraman, is 
doing the camera work on "Anne 
Vickers," which John Cromwell is 
directing for RKO. Abel was also 
in charge of the photographs on 
"Rafter Romance," which was di- 
rected by William A. Seiter. Abel 
was formerly with Paramount. 

* * * 

Charles R. Rogers has signed 
Genevieve Tobin for the leading 
feminine role in "Golden Harvest," 
the first of a series of 10 productions 
which he will make for Paramount 

release. 

* * * 

Unknown to all studio exe- 
cutives at the Fox Movietone 
Studios, Mary Howard, who has 
been working in a Fox picture for 
the last two week is in reality Mary 
Rogers, daughter of the comedian, 
Will Rogers. Until yesterday her 
true identity was not known to even 
David Butler, director and B. G. De 
Sylva, producer of the film in which 
she is appearing. 



Second in the series of six pic- 
tures to be produced by Helen Mit- 
chel will be "Dance Clown." War- 
ren Millais, who is now directing 
"Waffles," the first in the series, 

will also direct "Dance Clown." 

* * * 

Addition of Beulah Bondi and 
George Coulouris of the original 
stage cast of "The Late Christopher 
Bean" to M-G-M's fUmization of this 
comedy completes the cast. Previ- 
ously selected to support Marie 
Dressier and Lionel Barrymore were 
Jean Hersholt, Helen Mack, Helen 
Shipman and Russell Hardie. 

Una Merkel, May Robson and 
Frank Morgan have been added to 
the cast of "Stage Mother," picturi- 
zation of Bradford Ropes' new novel 
now under way at the M-G-M stu- 
dios. Charles Brabin is director of 
"Stage Mother" and the cast in- 
cludes Alice Brady, Maureen O'Sul- 
livan and Franchot Tone. 

Lucille La Verne, who has an im- 
portant role in Fox's "Pilgrimage," 
has been added to the cast of "The 
Last Trail," the Zane Grey story 
starring George O'Brien, Claire 
Trevor and El Brendel. 

Rochelle Hudson will play the part 
originally scheduled for Boots Mal- 
lory in "Doctor Bull," film adapta- 
tion of "The Last Adam" by James 
Gould Cozzens. Other plans force 
Miss Mallory to forego the role in 
the production starring Will Rogers, 
Ralph Morgan, Andy Devine, Vera 
Allen, Louise Dresser and Marian 
Nixon. 

* * * 

Mae Clarke and Lee Tracy have 
started to "turn back the clock" in 
more ways than one. Four years 
ago when Mae first came to Holly- 
wood from the New York stage she 
appeared opposite Tracy in "Big 
Time," which was also Lee's initial 
picture. Since then, both have forged 
to the front ranks of screen lumi- 
naries, but they have not seen each 
other. Now they spend their spare 
time reminiscing. 

Our Passing Show: Eddie Cantor, 
Ben Bard, Bradford Ropes, Georgie 
Jessel, Norma Talmadge, William A. 
Seiter, Ivan Kahn, Elissa Landi, 
Sidney Blackmer, Gouverneur Mor- 
ris, Marc Lachman, Eddie Welch, 
Abe Meyer, Graham Baker, Harry 
Hervey, Larry Hart, Richard Rod- 
gers, Albert W. Hale at opening of 
"Low and Behold"; Lola Woursol 
being mistaken for a movie star and 
beseiged by autograph hounds while 
entering the Paramount studio. 



Ned Mann has completed his work 
in charge of special effects on "The 
Deluge," being produced by Admiral 
Productions. Cecil B. De Mille view- 
ed the trick camera scenes in the 
picture and was loud in his praise 
of Mann's work. Mann was in 
charge of the miniature department 
at United Artists for three years 
and also did the special effects in 
"Dirigible," "Flight," "Secrets," 
"The Bat Whispers" and numerous 
other pictures. 

Jerome Sackheim is writing the 
adaptation for "The Stockholder," 
his original story which will be 

made by M-G-M. 

* * # 

Elliott Nugent, who is directing 
B. P. Schulberg's production of 
"Three Cornered Moon" for Para- 
mount release, has cast himself in 
an important role. He will play in 
support of Claudette Colbert, Rich- 
ard Arlen and Mary Boland. 

Maude Eburne, famous character 
actress, has been signed for an im- 
portant role in "Shanghai Madness," 
starring Spencer Tracy and Fay 
Wray. 

* * # 

Adolphe Menjou, who recently 
signed a contract with Warner Bros.- 
First National, will report at the 
Burbank studios of First National 
within the next week or so, pending 
completion of a picture he is now 
making for another company. His 
first for First National will be "Con- 
vention City," which is based on a 
story by Will Turner. Robert Lord 
has adapted it for the screen. 



JOSEPH ADAMS DEAD 

Richmond, Va. — Joseph R. Adams, 
resident of Hilton Village, near 
Newport News, Va., for more than 
15 years, and widely known in the 
theatrical business, died at his home 
at Hilton Village recently. For many 
years Adams was connected with the 
Wells-McKee amusement interests 
and served as treasurer of the old 
Bijou here under the late Jake Wells, 
later going to Atlanta to take charge 
of one of Wells' theaters in the 
Georgia metropolis. He returned to 
Richmond and went to Hilton Vil- 
lage about 15 years ago. He is sur- 
vived by his widow. 



ADLER RETURNS TO DESK 

Lester Adler, an executive of 
Monarch Exchanges, Inc., has re- 
turned to his desk after an absence 
of ten days, due to an attack of 
grippe. 



$75,000 for Claims 

■IV est Coast Buy., THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — During the three-year pe- 
riod of player claims adjustments made 
by the producers' relations department 
of the Academy of M. P. Arts and Sci- 
ences, more than $75,000 has been 
turned over to actors as the result of 
decisions in their favor, according to 
the Academy. 



1 



THE 



u 



J^S 



DAILV 



Friday, July 14, 19 



KENT SEEKS SUPPORT 
FOR REORGANIZATION 



{Continued from Page 1 ) 
peal for support of its reorganiza- 
tion plan. 

Following is the letter: 

The meetings of * : called foi 

July 1st and July 3rd, 1933 respectively, of 
which notice was sent to you ».n June 21st. 
1933, have been adjourned to July _' 1-t and 
July J-'ihI. IV.k! respectively, at the same 
hour anil place. Adjournments of these meet- 
ings were taken pursuant to the direction of 
the Supreme Court of the State of New York, 
in a suit brought by James N. Cleary, the 
registered owner of ten (10) shares of Class 
A stock of Fox Film Corporation, and one 
Fannie Lurie (not a stockholder of record), 
wherein they sued on their own behalf and 
on behalf of all other stockholders similarly 
situated certain former directors of Fox Film 
Corporation, some of the creditors who are 
parties to the underwriting agreement, re- 
ferred to in my letter to you of June 21st, 
1933, and others, in connection with pro- 
ceedings in said suit, attacking that part of 
the plan of reorganization involving the re- 
lease of alleged claims arising out of the 
acquisition by Fox Film Corporation of 660,- 
900 shares of Loew's, Inc., stock, and ask- 
ing for an injunction and for the appoint- 
ment of a receiver of Fox Film Corporation. 
A separate action was brought by the plain- 
tiff Cleary against Fox Film Corporation, its 
present directors and others, asking only for 
an injunction and for the appointment of a 
receiver. 

As previously stated in my letter to you 
dated June 21st, 1933, the Corporation is 
faced with debts of approximately $42,000,000, 
of which approximately $12,000,000 is cur- 
rently payable. With the co-operation, how- 
ever, of the holders of more than $26,500,000 
(now nearly $28,000,000) of its outstanding 
debentures and other creditors, the Corpora- 
tion has presented to you a plan, whereby 
such debenture holders and creditors, after 
the proposed reduction of the capita! stock, 
have agreed to underwrite at $18.90 a share, 
additional shares of Class A common stock 
of the Corporation in the amount of more 
than $36,000,000 (now more than $37,500.- 
000) of such debentures and other indebted- 
ness, including interest. In connection with 
such underwriting, the underwriters (credi- 
tors) made what was believed by the manage- 
ment to be a reasonable demand, namely, that 
they should be released of any liability to the 
Fox Film Corporation and particularly with 
respect to the transaction involving the ac- 
quisition of the Loew's stock above referred 
to, since action had been brought against one 
or more of them on account of that trans- 
action and provision for such release was, 
therefore, incorporated in the plan. Upon the 
hearing of the above proceedings and later by 
formal instrument, the underwriters agreed 
to waive those provisions of the underwriting 
agreement requiring a release by the cor- 
poration, and all of the provisions mentioned 
in proposition 3 of the notice of stockholders' 
meeting of July 3rd, 1933, previously sent 
you. In view of such waiver, the underwriting 
agreement will be effective without any ac- 
tion being taken on proposition 3 in the notice 
of meeting called for July 3rd, 1933 and now 
adjourned to July 22nd, 1933, and as a con- 
sequence, no action will be taken thereon 
at said adjourned meeting, excepting only 
the authorization of the issuance to the un- 
derwriters, at $1S.90 per share, of the new 
Class A common stock not subscribed for by 



No Indie Code Deal 

Clarifying the position of indepen- 
dent distributors who attended the 
Hays office code meeting Wednesday, 
P. S. Harrison yesterday, as spokes- 
man, pointed out that no agreement has 
been reached for his associates to co- 
operate with the major distributors. 
Their purpose so far is merely to ob- 
serve and obtain information concern- 
ing major distributor code ideas. The 
Association of the M. P. Industry's 
committee met yesterday afternoon and 
drew up a set of by-laws. 



Code Expected to Apply Only 
To Industry Labor Matters 



(.Continued f 

labor and increase of purchasing 
power. 

Out of a haze of conjecture now 
stands the fact that the Administra- 
tion's principal objective under the 
code setup is to fix a minimum wage 
scale and maximum working hours, 
with the hope of putting more peo- 
ple to work and thus revive business 
conditions. 



Providing the Washington inter- 
pretation is accurate, and all current 
indications emphasize its accuracy, 
efforts of various film industry 
groups at drafting code proposals 
are virtually wasted, at least for 



om Page 1) 

code purposes, except as they apply 
to the labor situation. 

In event, as anticipated, major 
industry problems are not adjusted 
through incorporation in the code 
it is expected that their solution, in 
part, at least, will be left to the 
new standard exhibition contract 
which a majority of major com- 
panies are making available in con- 
nection with new season sales. 

Sidney E. Samuelson, Allied vice- 
president, yesterday said that the 
new twist in interpretation of the 
scope of the National Recovery Act 
vindicates his association's policy in 
"going slow" on the matter pending 
its final crystalization. 



MPTOA TO CONSIDER 
ERPI SERVICE CHARGES 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Kuykendall tomorrow, M. J. O'Toole, 
secretary of the association, said 
yesterday in New York. A number 
of exhibitors have communicated 
with national headquarters on the 
subject, he stated. 

It is planned to first request Erpi 
to refund service charges paid since 
their inception, said O'Toole. Ac- 
cording to an estimate furnished 
him exhibitors have paid approxi- 
mately $1-7,500,000 in these charges 
un to the present time. The M. P. 
T. O. A. is compiling data on the 
matter. 



PIZOR SETS RELEASE 

William Pizor has closed with Ex- 
cellent Pictures of Detroit for the 
distribution of the Imperial release, 
"Corruption." Hollywood Pictures 
will distribute the feature in Great- 
er New York, New York state, Phil- 
adelphia and Washington. 



FOX WILL PRODUCE 
12 FEATURES ABROAD 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Germany and Eric Pommer, who 
left New York yesterday for France, 
will make either eight or 12 orig- 
inals for Fox in Paris, starting 
Aug. 1. 

At the Phonoroma Studios in 
Italy, 25 features will be dubbed as 
against 20 for the past year. Twen- 
ty will be dubbed at the Phono His- 
ioano studios, Madrid, in comparison 
with but five for 1932-33. The num- 
ber to be dubbed in France is as 
yet undetermined. All synchroniz- 
ing will be on newly installed West- 
ern Electric equipment. In England 
the production situation will remain 
the same as the past year with the 
making of 15 films, said Sheehan. 



GARBO FILM AT RANDOLPH 

Chicago — Greta Garbo in "Streets 
of Sorrow," controlled by the Public 
Welfare Pictures, has opened for a 
run at the Randolph. 



the stockholders, to the extent of the indebt- 
edness of Fox Film Corporation to such un- 
derwriters. 

Upon the' understanding that the above 
mentioned release and the stockholders' ap- 
proval thereof would be waived by the under- 
writers as a condition of their obligations 
under the underwriting agreement, the court 
denied the motions for an injunction and 
for a receiver. In giving the court's de- 
cision, Mr. Justice Shientag of the Supreme 
Court of the State of New York, said in 
part with respect to the plan of reorganiza- 
tion: 

"To have had a receiver appointed for 
this corporation in a suit that was friendly 
or otherwise would have reacted disas- 
trously, in the opinion of the Court, to all 
concerned — the stockholders, the debenture 
holders and the hanks and corporations. It 
appeared to the Court from an examination 
of the plaintiffs that the present manage- 
ment of the corporation was an efficient 
management, and that the desirable thing 
to do, under conditions as they now ex- 
isted, was to have a reorganization on an 
equitable basis. 

"I stated in my memorandum that the 
fundamental principle involved in the re- 
organization plan was a sound one; namely 
that there was involved a conversion of 
outstanding obligations into the stock of 
the corporation: and that was a great ad- 
vantage, not alone to the stockholders of 



the company, who would of course under 
the plan be left with a percentage of their 
former holdings, but also, if the Court 
might venture an opinion on a question of 
finance, of advantage to the creditors them- 
selves." 
and in referring to the waiver by the un- 
derwriters of a release, and upon the assump- 
tion that this condition was, therefore, elimi- 
nated, the court further said: 

"* * * there hardly seems to be room 
for any difference of opinion as to the 
advisability of consummating this plan of 
reorganization. It seems to be eminently 
desirable from a financial standpoint, and 
it is just as equitable from the standpoint 
of all of the interests that are involved." 
I stated to you in my letter of June 21st, 
1933 that I strongly recommended to you 
the proposed plan and both the management 
and the board of directors of the Corpora- 
tion wish again to recommend to the stock- 
holders of the Corporation the plan of re- 
organization described to you in my said 
letter. If you have not already, therefore, 
signed and forwarded your proxy for the 
stockholders' meetings noticed to be held on 
July 1st and July 3rd. 1933 respectively, and 
now adjourned to July 21st and July 22nd, 
1933 respectively, please sign the proxy en- 
closed with this letter and mail the same to 
Fox Film Corporation, 444 West 56th Street, 
New York City, in the stamped addressed 
envelope enclosed herewith for the purpose. 



PLAN NO REPRISALS 
ON 306 JWMIT ME! 

No reprisals and a continuation 
the policy of extending every cc 
sideration to the "permit" man « 
assured yesterday by Harry She 
man, president of Local 306, folio 
ing the decision by Supreme Coi 
Justice Riegelmann in Brookl 
Wednesday in the case of 237 "pt 
mit" men against Local 306 of t| 
Moving Picture Operators' Unit' 
The decision was hailed by the 1 
bor leader as a sweeping vindicate 
of the rights of organized labor 
govern the conditions of membersh 
and to control the working rights 
those working under the protectii 
and jurisdiction of a union. 

Ruling that the "permit" m 
were not members of Local 306. Ju 
tice Riegelmann held that Local 3 
need not return the assessments pa 
to it by the "permit" men durii 
the period of employment and t: 
admission to the union of any a 
all of the "permit" men must 
based on th.-3 usual membership r 
quirements of the parent intern 
tional organization and of Local 3f 
The justice held, however, that I 
new members could be added 
either the regular members or "pe 
mit" men's roster of the local un 
the membership application of tl 
latter group has been either rejecti 
or accepted. 

Defendants in the action of tl 
"permit" men, a case which is e 
pected to exert a profound influen 
on "permit" members of labor unioi 
throughout the United States, we 
Harry Sherman as president of L 
cal 306; William C. Elliot, head i 
the parent international body, ar 
Wm. Green, A. F. of L. president. 

"Justice Riegelmann's decision u 
holds our every contention througl 
out the trial of this case," sa 
President Sherman of Local 30 
"The claim of the 'permit' men ' 
full membership in Local 306 d< 
manded preferential treatment f( 
a group of men who, having con 
under the protection of the local i 
recent years and thus contribute 
nothing to its upbuilding utterly if 
nored the rights and privileges c 
those regular members many 
whom have given their best effort 
to the local for more than 20 year 
This was the salient feature of t/ 
entire case, as I see it, and I as. 
glad that Justice Riegelmann's d< 
cision gives recognition to this fac 

"Those portions of the decision ri 
lating to the handling of the 'permi 
men's deposit funds and to the Jtt 
cedure to be followed in possib! 
future admissions of either reguk 
members or 'permit' men merel 
confirm the usual practice of Loc; 
306 to date." 



No Erpi Settlement 

A report that ERPI yesterday settled 
its royalty suit against Warners was 
denied last night by George Quigley 
of Warners. "Not a bit of truth in the 
rumor," said Quigley. 



t^^mm 



farteil tfeviwtxcn^lHl SPHINX 



NEW YORK EVENING JOURNAL • « 



THE SPHINX' 



.% 



J 4 



808K PELSWICK. 



Deaf Mute Who Talks' Glibly 
Proves Fascinating Slayer; 

By KOBE PELSWICK. 
Onoe again, this week at the Mayfair Theatre, Lionel Atwill 
impersonates a suave murderer That's not giving away the 
plot, because AtwUl has played so many maniacs, human vam- 
tires and diabolic scientists on the screen that 
his mere presence in a mystery film argues 
he's responsible for whatever deviltry's going 
888? AV*1S8 ° n " This time he a PP e ars in the title role of 
SSSSS? ^ «» B I 1,ece callf,<1 " Thfl Sphinx" And "Th? Sphinx" 
8mS»" : W us a gentlemanly killer who amuses himself by 
W** ■' *# strangling, of all people, stockbrokers. 

v You'll find "The Sphinx" a better than 

average melodrama. Suspense is sustained so 
adroitly that even though you know who did 
the murdering, you're kept on edge wondering 
how it was done. The solution isn't as ingenious 
as it might have been, hut any detective story 
writer or director who can accomplish the feat 
of holding the attention of his audience until 
the end, is accomplishing something. 

The picture opens with a shot of Atwill 
leaving the office of a stockbroker late at night. At the ele- 
vators of the deserted building he stops the janitor and asks 
him for a match. Then he asks him for the time. The ianitor I 
disturbed by this late visitor." 
peeps Into the stockbroker's office 
and finds the i tenant strangled. 
The police arrest Atwill. known 
here as Jerome Breen. and Breen 
goes to trial. But he's acquitted 
because, even though the Janitor 
swears he was the man who talked 
to him, several reputable physi- 
cians swear that Breen has been 
deaf and dumb since. birth. 
Cute? 

Deaf Mute 'Talks' 

A bright young newspaper re- 
porter thereupon sets out to un- 
ravel the mystery. Twice more 
Breen strangles people; and the 
police are helpless because each 
time the deaf mute Is Identified 
as the murderer by the witnesses 
who assert he asked them for a 
match and the time of the day. 
And the problem Isn't solved un- 
til a police Inspector stumbles on 
a clue while playing the piano. 

A good cast was assigned to the 
picture, for which Director Phil 
Rosen can take several bows. 
Theodore Newton Is excellent as 
the bright young reporter and 
Sheila Terry, who has a very 
pleasant voice. Is the romantic In- 
terest. Good performances are 
contributed also by Atwill: by 
Paul Hurst, as the piano-playing 
policeman; Lucien Prival, as At- 
will's nefarious assistant; the ges- 
ticulating Luis Albeml, and Rob- 
ert Ellis. An outstanding bit In 
the film occurs when Atwill, after 
murdering a young stockbroker's 
clerk, suddenly tums to his vic- 
tim's mother and coolly asks her 
the time. That scene ought to 
make you clutch the arm of the 
person sitting next to you. 

Mae West's Danr<= 



gg 



DAILY NEWS 



1! 



T\'EW YORK WORLD-TELEGRAM, 



MURDER RAMPAGE 

AT THE MAYFAIR 

By KATB CAMERON. 

"The Sphinx," a Monogram production, directed by Phil Rosen 
and presented at the Mayfair Theatre. 



Iiutn Llooel Atwill 

ine .' . 9beUe Terry 

rton. . .... .Tbeodore Newloo 

Hocao Paul Hurst 

li . Lata Albeml 

11;;. j Bobert EM* 



THE CAST 

Jenkj Lucien PriTal 



Dare Werner Paul Fix 

afro. Werner Lillian Leishton 

Curran Hooper Atehkj 

Proaecutor Wilfred Lucaa 

Caaer Oeorre Hajee 



Inspe, 

Lionel Atwill in the title role of "The Sphinx" Is committing mur- 
der by the wholesale at the Mayfair Theatre this week. He is going 
about his job smoothly and suavely, and as though 1m heartily enjoyed 
his work. Atwill is good at this sort of role because even in as arti- 
ficial a story as this he is able to be •uggestivaly menaciag; so menac- 
ing, indeed, that one sits on the edge of the seat while waiting for the 
police to catch him. 

There is no mystery, as far as the audience is concerned, about the 
murderer, but there is a mystery in the clue that leads the police to 
Sum. The suspense of the picture is in the frantic efforts of the police 





Sheila Terry and Lion*! Atwill have important role* in "The Sphinx," 
the May fair's new screen attraction. Others in the cart are Theo- 
dore Newton and Robert Etna. 

and a nice young reporter. Jack Barton, to oneovej th* clue that will 
convict the man they are sure committed the erimea before he has a 
chance to knock off any more victim*:. , 



DAILY MIRROR 



MOVIE NEWS 



MURDERER STALKS AT THE MAYFAIR 

Lionel Atwill'* Killings 

Show Usual Skill in 

"The Sphinx," 

By BLAND JOHANESON. 




"Thi Sphinx" at th* Mayfair. 

Killer Atwill at large in a 
fairly entertaining thrillar. 

A Monogram picture, directed 
by Phil Roien. 

THE CAST: 

Jerome Breen .Lionel Atwill 

Jerry Crane Sheila Terry 

Jack Burton Theodore Newton 

Terrence Hofan Paul Hurst 

Baclgalupl Luis Albeml 

Inspector Riley Robert Ellis 

Jenks Lucien Prival 

Dave Werner Paul Fix 

Mrs. Weroer Lillian Lelghtoo 

Curran .....Hooper Atchley 

Prosecutor Wlllred Lucas 



Old "Doctor X" Lionel Atwill 
is back in another murder mystery. 
This time he is seen as old Jerome 
Breen, an engaging philanthrop- 
ist and heart-broken, who prowls 
about strangling ■ people who 
stumble on "his secret." Jt is his 
aecret which provides the suspense 
in "The Sphinx." Mr. Breen, a 
<ieaf-mute without a doubt, speaks 
clearly and distinctly to any ac- 
cidental witness to his crime. Thus 
he confounds judges and jurors, 
embarrasses policemen and escapes 
punishment for his crimes. 

ENTER THE WOMAN 

Old Breen's "secret" remains 
one until he becomes interested in 
a woman. She is a sob sister and 
society editor who champions him 
his murder 



>^1DF A SERIES 
OF MONOGRAM HITS 



OLIVER TWIST 1 

WANTON BROMAiT 
BIAEK BEAUTY 

THE SPEiINX 
THE AVENGEH 



it 



II 



II 



II 



II 



"Sphinx" Is 
Satisfying 
Thrill_Film 

Lionel Atwill Makes 

Splendid Villain in the 

Mayf air's Show. 

By WILLIAM BOEHNEL. 

JF you haven't caught up on 
your weekly quota of mys- 
tery films drop in at the May- 
fair and see "The Sphinx," a 
sufficiently light and shivery 
little picture, and you will be 

ahead of the game. In It Lionel 
Atwill, without whom a mystery pic- 
ture Is no mystery picture at all— 
or maybe it Is— is deaf and dumb 
for the most part, and the young lady 
who gets gagged and bound to the 
chair is the striking and talented 
Sheila Terry instead of Fay Wray. 
This picture of queer goings on 
concerns a series of mysterious 
murders, all of which have been 
committed in the same fashion. The 
victim is strangled, and as the sus- 
pected culprit leaves the scene of 
the crime he makes it a point to 
ask someone in the immediate 
vicinity what the exact time Is. 
Defense In Dumbness. 
When this suspected culprit— he 
Is none other than the wealthy 
philanthropist, Jerome Breen— Is 
brought to trial It Is proven that he 
Is deaf and dumb and that the wit- 
nesses brought to testify against 
him must be suffering from hallu- 
cination. For. as the defense lawyer 
asks, if Breen Is suffering from a 
congenital malady, how could he 
possibly ask the time even if he 
were at the scene of the crime. 

At any rate, Jack Burton, a young 
feporter on the Chronicle, who Is In 
love with Jerry Crane, the society 
editor, suspects Breen even though 
Jerry praises him (Breen) In her 
dally column and tells the world 
that Breen Is so gentle and good he 
is incapable of harming anyone. 

However, when a young clerk in 
Breen's brokerage house la mur- 
dered. Inspector Riley visits Breen 
with young Burton and thinks that 
he has discovered a clew. That 
night Riley Is murdered, the moral I 
of which la probably not to get too 
Inquisitive when fanatical killers are 1 
running around loose. 

Too Much Murder. 
Breen might have got away with 
his orgy of murders— It Is bteaklng 
no confidence to tell you that 
Breen Is the guilty culprit— if he 
hadn't decided to make pretty Jerry 
Crane one of his victims after she 
discovered his secret/ That Is too 
much for young Burton, who, with 
the aid of a none too Intelligent 
detective, tricks Breen Into a con- 
fession. 

Mr. AtwUl plays the title role 
with adroitness and finish and 
Theodore Newton does right well as 
the young reporter. As the society 
editor Miss Terry has a chance to 
show that In addition to Jiossesslng 
good looks she Is also a capable act- 
ress. Indeed, here la a young lady 
who has everything— beauty, charm 
personality, ability— for a successful 
movie career, and she should go far 
in the audible cinema. 

And, in conclusion, "The Sphlnit" 
is an entertaining, although by no 
means exceptional, little thriller 




now 



17 EXCHANGES TO SERVE YOU 



/ 




Intimate in Cha ractei 
nternational in Scope 
ndependent in Thought 



The Daily N 
Of Motion 
Now Fifteen 


ewspc 

Pict 

Years 


i per 
u r es 

Old 



DL. LXIII. NO. 1 



.,w. ^ NE |^yCRr, SATH3DAy,JLLy 15, 1^33 



<S CENTS 



?rank 



Industry Recovery Act Post 



IRST DIVISION TO SELL BETWEEN 50-55 FEATURES 

2 Theaters Reported In Ochs - Consolidated Merger 



e Ochs Expected to Have 
Operating Control 
of Theaters 

Negotiations are under way and 
I be consummated this week which, 
is understood, will result in a 
rger of the Lee Ochs-Consolidat- 
Amusement circuits. The deal, 
nade, will likely give Ochs oper- 
ig control of the Consolidated 
ses with a combined total of 22 
^ters in Manhattan and Bronx. 
;cutives of both the Ochs and 

(Continued on Page 4) 



100,000 CAPITAL 
FROM FINANCE CO. 



'reduction capital amounting to 

5 0,000 will be available to inde- 

[ dent producers through a new 

'nee company now being formed 

'Fitelson and Mayers, attorneys, 

a group of bankers, motion pic 

e executives and foreign picture 

;rests, William H. Fitelson told 

(Continued on Page 4) 

(^ims Miss. Exhibitors 
Will Okay 2 P. C. Tax 

ackson, Miss. — Exhibitors and 
i&s interested in the show busi- 
es in Mississippi will gather here 
iday to seek a reduction in the 
e admission tax of 10 per cent. 
Kuykendall, president of the 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Old Australian Custom 

\Vest Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
i Los Angeles — If Australian audiences 
lon't like a picture they simply count 
it out, explains Cress Smith, just back 
jrom that country. "Someone in the 
\iudience yells out 'One' and all who 
|hare his sentiments chorus 'two,' and 
he count proceeds up to ten," he 
ays. Then the house manager catches 



teen years is a long time in pictures, com- 
ly covered in the forthcoming "New Deal" 
<>er of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



No Efforts Being Made to Settle Para. -Banks Suit 

Suit brought by Root, Clark & Buckner, attorneys for the Paramount Publix trus- 
tees, seeking to compel 13 banks involved in the company's financing to return 23 
feature negatives transferred to Film Production Corp. will go directly to trial in the 
U. S. District Court and no efforts are being made to settle outside of court, THE 
FILM DAILY was informed yesterday. Indications are that the case will not reach 
trial until more than one month. 



Johnston to Discuss Plans Aiming to End 

Exchange Restrictions on Double Features 



Chicago — Plans for attempting to 
break up the practice of exchanges 
in refusing to serve theaters play- 
ing douhle features until the pic- 
tures are a year old, will be dis- 
cussed by W. Ray Johnston, presi- 
dent of Monogram, at the company's 
regional convention at the Black- 
stone Hotel tomorrow. Johnston will 



tell the delegates that the practice 
is doing "untold damage" to all in- 
dependent exhibitors in the Chicago 
territory. 

Plans will also be worked out for 
closer cooperation among branches 
where theater circuits overlap from 
one zone to another. It is possible 
that several division lines will be 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Jenkins Television Corp. 
Assets Go for $200,000 

Wilmington, Del. — All assets and 
property of the Jenkins Television 
Corp. were sold at public auction 
here this afternoon for $200,000 to 
the receivers for the De Forest 
Radio Co. There was but one bid. 
It is reported that in the near future 
Radio Corp. of America may ac- 
quire all assets of the De Forest 
Radio Co., including the Jenkins as- 
sets purchased today. 

The assets sold today included 

(Continued on Page 3) 



MPTOA Units to Pass 
On New Draft of Code 

The industry code drafted hy the 
M. P. T. O. A. executive committee 
at its Chicago meeting the past week 
will now be submitted to regional 
associations for their approval. 
Labor clauses were discussed at 
great length at the meetings, which 
terminated yesterday. The national 
organization, in its code draft, is 
understood to be urging provisions 
for a 15 per cent cancellation in in- 
stances where 40 or more features 
are bought. 



Frank Wilson Gets Exec Post 
In Industry Recovery Setup 



Kilner's New Company 
Will Make 12 in East 

George Kilner, who recently form- 
ed Superlite Productions in London, 
is now on his way to this country 
to complete a deal for the produc- 
tion of 12 features to be made in 
the east for release on the English 
and American market. Louis Weiss 
will handle production. 



Frank R. Wilson, vice-president of 
Principal Distributing Co., has been 
drafted by General Hugh S. Johnson, 
Administrator of the Industrial Re- 
covery Act, to assume an executive 
post in his public relations com- 
mittee to organize contacts be- 
tween the recovery group, indus- 
tries and the public. 

Wilson leaves tomorrow for Wash- 

(Contimied on Page 4) 



Harry Thomas Company to 

Make 4 or 8 on 

Its Own 

First Division, through its fast- 
developing system of exchanges, will 
distribute between 50 and 55 fea- 
tures during the new season, Harry 
Thomas said yesterday. 

Its list will include: 28 from Mon- 
ogram, including eight westerns, and 
18 from Chesterfield and Invincible. 
Between four and eight features will 
be produced by First Division on its 
own at the coast. 

"We are not hurrying on our pro- 
duction plans," said Thomas. 

HAYES, BEAlTOPEN 
NEW STUDIO IN L. I. 

Max T. Hayes and Charles W. 
Beall are opening a three-stage- 
studio at Oceanside, L. I., on a 10- 
acre plot. The plant, which in part 
comprises a reconstructed building, 
will be known as the Hayes & Beall 
Studio, Inc. 

RCA Photophone high fidelity 

(Contiyiued on Page 4) 



Funeral Services Held 

For Ascher at Chicago 

Chicago — Funeral services were 
held here Thursday for Nathan 
Ascher, founder of the Ascher Bros. 
circuit. Burial was in Rose Hill 
Cemetery. Death was due to heart 
trouble, occurring at his home. 
Ascher is survived by his widow, 



(Continued on Page 4) 



Fear Hertz Kidnap Plot 

Chicago — Government agents are 
guarding John D. Hertz, former Para- 
mount executive and taxicab magnate, 
following reports that the "mob" that 
kidnapped John (Jake the Barber) Fac- 
tor is out to "snatch" him, said Chi- 
cago newspapers today. 



Fifteen years of production, distribution and 
exhibition completely covered in the "New 
Deal" number of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



THE 



jg^S 



DAILY 



Saturday, July 15, 




Vol.LXIII.No. 12 Sat. July 15. 1933 Price 5 Cents 



JOHN W. ALICOATE 



Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
at 1650 Broadway, New York, N. V ., 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk. Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher; 
Douajd M. Mersereau. Secretary-Treasurer 
a^nd General Manager; ^Arthur W. Eddy. Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don CaVlfc- Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at Nuw York, 
N. Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
JTefms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 1-650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
PhoHe. Circle 7-4736. 7-4737, 7-4738. 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmdav, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk. 6425 Holly- 
Wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London — 
Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
— P. A. Harle, La Cinematographie Francaise, 
; Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

High Low Close 

Am. Seat 7 6'/i 6Vi — 

Columbia Piers, vtc. . 23% 23 23 '/ 4 — 

Con. Fm. Ind 5 4% 4% — 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. 12Vi 12 12V 4 — 

East. Kodak 89% 86 V 2 86% + 

Fox Fm. "A" 4% 4' 8 4'/ 8 — 

Loew's, Inc 27 26 26% + 

do pfd 74 73 74 + 

Paramount ctfs 2'/8 1% 2Vs . 

Pathe Exch 2Vs 1% 2 

do "A" 8 75/ 8 8 

RKO 43A 43/ 8 4Vi — 

Warner Bros 7% 7V, 7'/ 2 — 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. pfd.. % 11-16 % .. 

Technicolor 9 8% 8% • 

Trans-Lux 3 1/4 3V 8 3V 8 . 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40. . . 7 6 7 + 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 ctfs. 5% 5' 8 5Vs - 

Keith A-0 6s46 52 Vi 52 52 

Loew 6s 41ww 81 81 81 

Paramount 6s 47... 26% 25 26 — 

Par. By. 5V 2 s51 34V 2 34 34'/ 2 — 

Par. 5'/ 2 s50 263,4 247/ 8 26 — 

Warner's 6s39 39'/ 2 37'/ 2 371/ 2 — 

N. Y. PRODUCE EXCHANGE 

Para. Publix 2 1 % 2 + 



Net 
Chg. 

Vi 
Va 

% 

'/4 

v/ 2 

Vs 

% 
1 



+ 1 



•zeidman signs swimmer 

Elinor Holm has been signed by 
the Leo Morrison New York office. 
Miss Holm, who is now in the East 
to participate in a swimming meet, 
will leave for the coast immediately 
after the meet to play the lead in 
"Neptune's Daughter," to be pro- 
duced by Bennie Zeidman. 



No Thalberg Deal 

West Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Jack L. Warner last night 
issued a statement denying the report 
that Irving Thalberg would join Warner 
Bros. 



"Gold Diggers" in Seventh Week on Broadway 

Warner Bros, musical hit, "Gold Diggers of 1933," which ran a fortnight at the 
New York Strand before it was moved into the Hollywood, began its seventh week 
on Broadway and its fifth at the latter house yesterday. The picture is set for 
a through-the-summer run at the Hollywood, where it will be succeeded in the Fall 
with a two-a-day opening of "Captured." 



Home Office Contingent 

Off to U. A. Confab 

The largest contingent of United 
Artists' home office delegates de- 
part from New York today en route 
to Chicago for the opening of the 
company's annual sales convention 
Monday at the Drake. In the group 
are: Harry Gold, Paul Burger, Car- 
roll Trowbridge, Hal Krisel, Ed Mul- 
len, John von Tilzer, Moe Streimer, 
S. W. McGrath, Gummo Marx, Mar- 
tin Moscowitz, David Burkan, Meyer 
Leiberman, Nat Beier, Leon Herman 
and Jack Dacy. James Mulvey start- 
ed convention-wards yesterday. To- 
morrow W. P. Phillips and Dennis 
O'Brien will depart for the meet- 
ing. 

Monday's opening program is as 
follows: 10 a. m., roll call; 10:30, 
opening address, Al Lichtman; 1:45, 
exchange organization and check-up 
of sales and play-off 1932-33 prod- 
uct. 



RKO CAST TO BROADCAST 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — A dramatization of 
scenes from the RKO Radio Pic- 
tures' "Midshipman Jack," based 
around the United States Naval 
Academy of Annapolis, will be fea- 
tured during the weekly "Hollywood 
on the Air" broadcast Monday eve- 
ning, to - be heard over Station 
WEAF and the red network be- 
tween 12 and 12:30 P. M. Bruce 
Cabot, Betty Furness, Frank Albert- 
son, Florence Lake and Arthur Lake, 
principals of the film, are to be 
heard during the program, portray- 
ing bits from their roles. 



HANDLES FOREIGN PICTURES 

Detroit — Foreign language pic- 
tures, both features and shorts, will 
be exclusively distributed by the re- 
cently-organized Foreign Film Dis- 
tributors, headquartering here. First 
release is a Polish talker, "Ulani 
Ulani." The company is also open- 
ing a downtown first run house. C. 
G. Garner is general manager. 



FOLK DRAMA FOR PARA. 

"Run, Little Chillun," all-colored 
folk drama, which had such a long 
run at the Lyric theater during the 
past season, will be the stage at- 
traction at the New York Para- 
mount starting Friday. For this 
popular price engagement, the cast 
will remain intact with such features 
as the Hall Johnson Choir and Fredi 
Washington. 



"BITTER SWEET" PREMIERE 

"Bitter Sweet," which British and 
Dominions will release in this coun- 
try through United Artists, will 
have its world's premiere at th Carl- 
ton, London, Aug. 21. 



Says Australians Favor 
Musicals and Comedies 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Australian audiences' 
favorite screen entertainment are 
musicals and comedies, says Cresson 
Smith, RKO Western sales manager, 
who is here after returning from 
Australia where he closed a deal for 
his company's product to play some 
200 houses. American pictures are 
the real favorites in that country, 
he declares, although the Australians 
have a patriotic taste for British 
product. All houses are playing 
double features, Smith says. 



Sees Closer Cooperation 
Between Majors, Indies 

Predicting closer cooperation be- 
tween major and independent com- 
panies, John R. Freuler, president 
of Monarch, yesterday said: "The 
major and independent companies 
will come closer together than ever 
before during the ensuing months 
to reach agreements on interlocking 
arrangements of casting, studio fa- 
cilities and other controversial is- 
sues. 

"This will remove any existing 
discrepancies and the matter of 
booking pictures will rest, as it 
should, with entertainment values 
and not with trade-marks," contin- 
ued Freuler. 



LUSTBERG BUYS INTERN'L 

Jack Lustberg, representing the 
J. H. Hoffberg Co. and Spanish Pro- 
ductions, has established an office for 
his firms in Buenos Aires, where he 
will remain permanently. He has 
acquired the entire assets of Inter- 
nacional Films. 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



' 



Today: Monogram central sales mel 
Blackstone Hotel, Chicago. 

July 17: United Artists sales convention, ' 
xago. 

July 17: Meeting of Association of the M 
Picture Industry at Park Central Hotc 

July 18: Meeting of M. P. T. O. of Ark;' 
Mississippi and Tennessee, Jackson. 

July 19: Premiere of "Song of Songs" at 

terion, New York. 
July 19: Joint meeting of major and inde 

dent distributors on code at Hays c 

at 2:15 P. M. 
July 21-22: Fox Film Corp. special stockl 

ers' meeting, home office, New Yoi 

July 21 : Adjourned meeting of Publix j 
terprises creditors at office of Re I 
Henry K. Davis. 

July 24-25: Code convention at Hotel A 
under auspices of National Associatio I 
the Motion Picture Industry. 

July 25: Meeting of Allied Theaters of ' 
Jersey at 2 P. M. 

July 28-29: Monogram western sales mee 
San Francisco. 

July 28-31: Meeting of Independent The rl 
Supply Dealers' Association at Ste ,j 
Hotel, Chicago. 

Aug. 2: Outing at Bear Mountain under 
pices of Motion Picture Club. 

Aug. 2-3: Monogram Canadian sales mee 
Toronto. 

Aug. 3: Adjourned meeting of 
Playhouses' creditors. 

Aug. 23-24: First annual con 
pendent Motion Picture O' . 
of Delaware and Eastern Si 
at Hotel Henelopen, Rehobo.,., -c!. 

Sept. 5-6-7: Allied New Jersey conven 1 
at Atlantic City. 

Sept. 13: A. M. P. A. holds annual election 1 
officers 



PROTESTS AGAINST PICTUR 

Port of Spain — Trinidad — T 
French consul here is understood I 
have protested to the Governnu 
against the showing of "Beau Idea 
and against posters advertising t 
picture. The protest is said to ha' 
been based on local censor regu| 
tions prohibiting pictures casti 
discredit on military uniforms. 



Something New in Vacations 

Before you decide where you will spend your vacation this summer ask your friends 
about Hotel Uncas, situated directly on the most beautiful part of Lake George, Queen 
of American Lakes. 

This unique hotel offers features of tremendous appeal to those who seek a vacation 
that really re-creates mind, body, and soul . . . every facility for rest and recreation, i 

SPORTS 

Finest swimming from our private dock (longest on Lake George) or bathing from | 
private sandy beach. The water is so clean, clear and pure that you can drink it — or 
read this advertisement through three feet of it. 

Boating — canoes, sailboats, speed boats, out-board motor boats, aquaplaning. 

Tennis — Splendid courts maintained in best of condition. Golf, fishing, mountain 
climbing, horseback riding, dancing, billiards, bowling. 

1933 RATES 

Rates at Hotel Uncas have always been so moderate no drastic reductions have been 
made this season. Inasmuch as rates depend on location and type of accommodations 
desired it is suggested that prospective guests send for details. The clientele is restricted. | 
Booklets upon request. 

Address 

HOWARD V. DAYTON 

HOTEL UNCAS 

UNCAS-ON-LAKE GEORGE 

NEW YORK 



DAILY 



1MELY TOPICS 

tendance Figures 
$ Radio City 

"ALE on June 22 of the 4,000,- 

000th admission to the Radio 

ity theaters, which had been 

irown open to the public less 

iian six months prior to that 
ate, causes one to wonder if, as 

Inne would have us believe, the 
i-t of entertainment has lost 
round in recent years. Of 

irarse, 4,000,000 tickets in 
ss than six months is the 
reatest attendance figure in 
leatrical history. And, at that, 
large part of the six months 
as at the very pit of the de- 
■ession. It will be recalled, as 
matter of fact, that the open- 
g of the theaters in Decem- 
jr caused theatrical wiseacres 
shake their heads dubiously, 
>t the least reason being that 

!:ie theaters added more than 

i),000 seats to the theatrical 
ipacity of the Times Square 
strict. Time was when the 
ippodrome was the last word 
magnitude in the theater, 
at at no time in its history did 
e Hippodrome surpass 2,000,- 
cendance within a six- 
nth iieriod. On the other 
nd, the Radio City Music Hall 
1 the si., months just closed 
use:; 2,994,331 paid atten- 
dee, and the New Roxy was 
>st to 1,005,669 within that pe- 
)d. These figures, totaling 
)00,000, are of the above- 
entioned date of June 22. 

— George Gerhard. 



ikins Television Corp. 

Assets Go for $200,000 

(Continued from Page 1) 

es of stock of the Jenkins Tele- 
n Corporation of New Jersey, 
ins Laboratories, Inc., The Can- 
Television Company, Ltd., and 
atents of the Jenkins Television 
'loration. The sale was held by 
1 Biggs, Jr., and Clifton V. Ed- 
'ls, receivers for Jenkins and 
I be subject to confirmation in 
,. District Court here July 18. 



Coming and Going 



IERT MONTGOMERY and SAM MARX, 
Df M-G-M, are en route to New York 
the Coast. 

R.Y FOWLER, who has resigned as secre- 
to George Schaefer at Paramount, sails 
':sday on the Manhattan. 

! A. H. GIANNINI arrives in New York 
he Coast in time to sail on the Majestic 

to. 

IhUR FEIDELBAUM, M-G-M foreign ex- 
3, is en route to Europe from New York. 

JUDY" LAWRENCE plans to sail for 
D on the Manhattan July 19 from New 




rH 

PHIL M DALY 



• • • THE STORY in back of Robert Fogg's Arctic flight 
carrying photos for Paramount News of the Italian armada's 
arrival at Cartwright, Labrador, would make a highly graphic 

and absorbing film in itself Fogg covered the 1500 air 

miles between Cartwright and New York in 18 hours 

twice he was forced down in isolated harbors flew through 

fog for hours and for a stretch of 100 miles was forced 

by the fog to fly at a perilous low altitude of ten feet above 
the St. Lawrence 



• • O WITH THE Arctic aviator was Lou Hutt, Para- 
mount News cameraman who brought to New York 

along with the negative the first eye-witness account of the 

arrival of the Italian airfleet at the far northern port 

the film these two adventurers brought to the New York land- 
ing field was tossed to waiting dispatch riders rushed 

to the lab and within four hours prints were airmailed 

to thousands of theaters throughout the country thus 

another newsreel epic passed into film history it seems 

a pity the public cannot see the graphic tale of this hazardous 
flight for to our way of thinking it would be more in- 
teresting than the newsreel itself on the screen 



• • • WITH THE recent rise in the Seventh Avenue Roxy 
prices in the evening from 35 to 55 cents proving eminently 

successful Receiver Howard S. Cullman notes this as 

"the second step in the Roxy recovery" the first having 

been the show policy that went into effect last January 

the way the public has responded to increased prices convinces 

Mister Cullman that happy days are really here again 

we must cast a spray of lillies of the valley at publicity director 

Morris Kinzler and his sec, Mildred Kerr the way these 

two keep the peppy publicity items flowing to editorial desks 
daily is really amazing 



• • • OVER IN dear ole Lunnon Duke Ellington 

and his jazz harmonizers have rocked the conservative com- 
mentators out of their British stolidity playing at the 

Palladium here are some comments in the public prints 

"the most vital, emotional experience that vaudeville 

in England has ever known" "a ruthless exercise in sen- 
suality" and get this! "Here is a music far re- 
moved from the abracadabra of symphony" "The house 

roared its genuine appreciation of what was the greatest spec- 
tacle in jazz that this country has ever seen." and they 

say the British are Cold and Unresponsive! 



• • • SUIT HAS been filed for $50,000 by Joan Castle 
against a burlesque house, alleging they used her photo without 

permission The femme associates of Jerry Fowler at 

Paramount gave her a luncheon farewell Jerry has re- 

signed as sec to George Schaefer, and sails for Europe next 

week Columbia's baseball team accepts the challenge of 

the Paramount News baseball team noted here recently 

manager Danny Heiss of the Columbia gang says he will play 
the News lads at the close of the M. P. League season 



• • • FIFTEEN YEARS Is A Long Time In Pictures 

on Dec. 24, 1917, Walton McNeel, owner of the Crystal 

Theater in Burlington, Wisconsin wrote us a letter squawk- 
ing about Tuff Times but stating that they would be 

tuff er without the li'l ole paper so he sent his 10 berries 

to renew his subscription and 15 years later times are 

still slightly tuff but we're HERE! 



« « « 



» » » 



EXPLOITETTES 

Varied Campaign 
Helps "Waterfront" 

]y[ARTIN C. BURNETT, man- 
ager of Loew's theater in 
Dayton, O., went the limit in 
publicizing "I Cover the Water- 
front." An amateur reporter 
contest with one of the Dayton 
dailies rated the Loew house a 
two-column cut and a story each 
day for one week previous to 
the opening of the picture, and 
the Lux tie-ups, carrying the 
Claudette Colbert indorsement, 
was used with 20 A. & P. 
stores. Copies of the original 
novel by Max Miller went on 
display in three big Dayton book 
stores, Rike Kumler Co., Elder 
and Johnson's and Pettibone 
and McClean, while 18 Galaher 
drug stores featured a special 
waterfront window display. 

— Loew's, Dayton, O. 



New Sam Lind Company 
Gets 4 at Zanesville 

Zanesville, O. — Zanesville The- 
aters, Inc., recently chartered, has 
taken over three of the four houses 
formerly operated by the Brown 
Theatrical Co. which went into the 
hands of a receiver several months 
ago. The houses are the Columbia, 
Liberty and Imperial. Sam Lind 
heads the new company with Cald- 
well Brown, formerly at the head 
of the Brown Syndicate, secretary 
and manager. 

The Weller, an opera house owned 
by the Weller estate and also in- 
cluded in the Brown syndicate, has 
been taken over by the Shea inter- 
ests and will be opened in Septem- 
ber. 



WARNER RELEASE TODAY 

Warner Bros, announce the na- 
tional release of "She Had to Say 
Yes" today, which features Loretta 
Young, Lyle Talbot, Regis Toomey, 
Winnie Lightner and Hugh Herbert. 




MANY HAPPY PITUGNS 




Best wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 

July 15-16 



Sam Schneider Felix F. Feist 

Raymond Hackett 




Barbara Stanwyck 
George Marion 



Ginger Rogers 
Mary Philbin 



-. £3fr* 



DAILY 



Monday, July 17 



" 




Vol. LXIII. No. 13 Mon., July 17. 1933 Price 5 Cents 



JOHN W. ALICOATE 



Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
it 1650 Broadway, New York, N. V ., 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President. Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
and General Manager; Arthur \V. F.ddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at N»w York, 
N. Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 1-650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
Phone, Circle 7-4736, 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London- 
Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89 91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
— P. A. Harle, La Cinematographie Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK 

(QUOTATIONS 



STOCK MARKET 
AS OF SATURDAY) 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 



Con. Fm. Ind.. . 5 5 5 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. 12 1/2 12 12 — 

East. Kodak 87'/ 2 863/4 86% — 

Fox Fm. "A" 4l/ 8 4 4 — 

Loew's, lnc 267/ 8 26V 2 26i/ 2 — 

do pfd 75 75 75 4- 1 

Paramount ctfs 2V& 2 2 — 

Pathe Exch 2J4 2 2'/ 8 + 

do "A" 8V 8 7% 8V 8 + 

RKO 4Vi 41/4 4% — 

Warner Bros 7% 7l/ 2 75/ 8 + 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Technicolor 8% 8% 83/ 8 — 

Trans-Lux 3V4 3 3 — 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 6 5V 4 6 4- 

Keith A-0 6s 46 525/ 8 52y 2 52/2 + 

Paramount 6s 47 25% 25V 4 25% — 

Par. By. 5'/ 2 s51 . . . . 35 35 35 + 

Par. 5' 2 s50 25'/ 2 25V 4 25 Vi — 

Warner's 6s39 38 37y 2 38 4- 



'HEROES FOR SALE' AT STRAND 

First National's "Heroes For 
Sale" is scheduled to follow "The 
Narrow Corner" into the New York 
Strand Thursday evening. 



Desirable double unit with film vault, 
seventh floor Film Center Building, 
completely equipped, available. At- 
tractive terms for early occupancy. 



CASTLE FILMS 
630 Ninth Ave. New York City 



• The Broadway Parade • 



♦ FIRST RUNS ♦ 



Picture Distributor Theater 

Disgraced! Paramount Paramount 

Gold Diggers of 1933 (7th week) Warner Bros Hollywood 

The Narrow Corner Warner Bros Strand 

Gambling Ship Paramount Rivoli 

Laughing at Life Nat Levine Rialto 

Professional Sweetheart RKO Music Hall 

Cocktail Hour* Columbia RKO Roxy 

Melody Cruise" RKO Palace 

Hell's Holiday Superb Pictures Mayfair 

Midnight Mary M-G-M .Capitol 

Best of Enemies Fox 7th Ave. Roxy 



Subsequent runs. 



Pilgrimage. 



♦ TWO-A-DAY RUN * 



.Fox Gaiety 



* FOREIGN PICTURES ♦ 

A Nous, la Liberte (2nd week) Harold Auten Little Carnegie 

Island of Doom Amkino Cameo 

Das Lockende Ziel (2nd week) Charles Herrlitz Vanderbilt 

Horizon Amkino Acme 

* FUTURE OPENINGS ♦ 



Song of Songs (July 19) Paramount Criterion 

This Is America (July 19) No Dist Cameo 

Heroes For Sale (July 20) First National Strand 

The Strange Case of Tom Mooney (July 21 ) First Division Rivoli 



P. A. POWERS TO MARRY 

Stamford — P. A. Powers, producer 
and president of the Longshore 
Beach and Country Club, Westport, 
and Mrs. Pearl S. Lapey of New 
York and Westport have filed inten- 
tions to marry with the county mar- 
riage clerk here. The wedding will 
take place this week at the home 
of Mrs. Harold Burns in Stamford, 
former musical comedy star and sis- 
ter of Mrs. Lapey. The couple will 
reside at Powers' home, Spuyten 
Duyvil, New York. 



ARTHUR COHEN HAS NO PLANS 

London — Arthur Cohen, until re- 
cently head of Famous Players Can- 
adian as managing director, has no 
plans for the future, he said here 
Saturday. He is in London on a 
holiday. 



LASKY PICTURE FOR GAIETY 

Fox's forthcoming "The Power 
and the Glory," produced by Jesse 
L. Lasky, will be the next attraction 
to follow "Pilgrimage" into the 
Gaiety. 



THEATRE OWNERS 
ATTENTION! 



We 



have in stock 
over 50,000 yards 
CRESTWOOD & 
PREMIER CARPETS 

Largest variety of 

THEATRE PATTERNS 

ever assembled 



Greater N. Y. 
Export House, Inc. 

250 West 49th Street New York 

LAckawanna 4-0240 

Theatre Carpets Our Specialty 



SYLVIA SIDNEY IN HOSPITAL 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Los Angeles — Sylvia Sidney will 
remain in a local hospital about 10 
days following an operation for an 
impacted wisdom tooth. 



Sunday Shows Bill for Va. 

Richmond — Another attempt to arret 
the Virginia laws prohibiting Sure 
shows will be made, this time by Jol 
G. Stovall in the House of Delegate 
His bill would allow Sunday shows aft 
1 P. M. 



N. E. GOLF TOURNEY AUG 

Boston — The third annual film 
tournament of the New Englant 
dustry will be held this year at 
Pine Brook Valley Country Clu 
Weston on Aug. 8, the scene of ) 
original tourney. The Lieut. A. 
non Macauley (Motion Picture) 
of American Legion is the spor 
Eddie Ansen is chairman, CarlCr 
ford, treasurer, and G. Lester So I 
well, public relations director. 



RAYNOR JOINS SHEA 

Boston — William Raynor, who. 
cently resigned as RKO dist 
manager for New England, has s ' 
ped into an important position I 
the Shea interests. 



DIRECTOR HAS BROKEN LI 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DA" 
Hollywood — Frank Lloyd, direi 
of "Cavalcade" and "Berkt 
Square," is in the Mercy Memo 
Hospital, Whittier, Cal., with 
broken leg. The injury was i 
tained early last week when he s 
ped on the grass at the Lake.' 
Country Club during a golf ga - 



THIS 
CAST 




G R E A 



• • • • 



following 
numbers count- 
less legions . . . 



charm 
dazzles the 
world over . . . 



screen 
power is a draw 
to millions . . . 



.Will Capture The Heart of the World 



in Warner Bros. 



CAPTURED! 



Who Are They? 

Save The Sections Daily-Fit i 
Them Together Wednesday 

VJTAGRAPH. INC. DISTRIBUTORS 



day, July 17, 1933 




DAILY 



ORDS 
ISDOM 



from within and without 
the film industry 

ideas exist that we do not try 
to put on the screen." — E. H. 

Pith. 



on have to learn to talk all orer 
a to wear foreign uniforms." — 
3 ASTHER. 



■here has been too much time 
ed confusing beauty and brains 
ability."— ROY DHL RUTH. 



Ifforts at self-regulation have 
r been completely successful be- 
e of lack of authority, legal in- 
etations of the anti-trust laws, 
il and selfish obstruction of ir- 
-nsible minority interests." — ED 
KENDALL. 



•uring the past year we have 
to face discipline and respon- 
ity and have had to pass the 
I of loyalty, the very element 
i which success is based." — 
tOLD B. FRANKLIN. 



t is a known fact, however, that 
j charges are not being paid in 
>us sections and probably never 
code or no code." — JAY 
1NUEL. 



'he only way to assure our- 
;s of a steady supply of stories 
to write them ourselves." — 
tRYL ZANUCK. 



'he great need of the coming 
|on is for 'clean films.' " — JOHN 
REULER. 



'he Movies, the radio and the 
g stage have been at one an- 
r's throats for several years, but 
h is the lion, which the lamb 
which the tiger depends upon 
point of view." — S. L. (Roxy) 
HAFEL. 



.oming an 



d G 



oing 



ING THALBERG and NORMA SHEARER 
in New York tomorrow on the Majestic. 

11 BEHRMAN and ROWLAND V. LEE are 
In York from the Coast. 

llRIETTA CROSMAN will depart from New 
lluly 26 for the Coast. 

!)MAS MEIGHAN lands in New York to- 
ly when the Majestic arrives. 

1 1 EST HALLER is returning to Hollywood 
two months at the Astoria, Long Island 
s, where he filmed "The Emperor Jones" 
imsky and Cochran. 

1BERT MARSHALL and EDNA BEST left 
York Saturday for the coast. 








PHIL M.DALY 



• • • FULL STEAM ahead for the United Artists sales 
convention opening at Chi today prospects look exceed- 
ingly bright for Uncle Joe Schenck's boy yes, indeedy 

so they don't have to be cooked up with any of the 

ole line of ballyhoo the Inspiration Juice is right in the 

product and the lineup for the coming season Al Licht- 

man will do three speaking acts before the convention winds up 

Wednesday eve in fact, four for he will no doubt 

be the principal orator at the social banquet marking the close 

Mister Lichtman will outline the product for the new 

season later he will speak on the Disney specials, both 

Mickey Mouse and Silly Symphonies and on Wednesday 

he will discuss at length the new Sales Policy and as to 

that every exhib who plays United Artists pix will be anxious 
to hear 

* * * * 

• • • HOPE ALL you fellers have set aside Wednesday, 

August 2 if the film biz can possibly stagger along 

without your valued services on that day when the Em- 

pey Club holds its first annual Boat Ride, Clambake, Frolic and 

general Hoi-De-Hoo the AMPA is ably co-operating by 

lining up a series of games and athletic contests with their 

Bosses tickets can be had from George Morris at the 

Club or from Al Sherman of the Morning "Telegraph" 

and Rutgers Neilson of RKO-Radio a steamer has been 

chartered to sail up the Hudson to Bear Mountain, where the 
gang will disport themselves till the evening for a moonlight 

sail home no dames aboard So the Moonlight 

should be perfect look around among your pals and pick 

your partners a coupla guys we know will be in great 

demand 

* * * * 

• • • THE FIELD of the Serial is about to get a great 
boost with the arrival of the "Tarzan" special being put out 

by Principal with Buster Crabbe in the title role 

the way this boy has skyrocketed on a nationwide ballyhoo, to- 
gether with the universal appeal of the Tarzan character 

makes it a natural for live exhibs up in Boston Harry 

Asher has grasped the significance of the opportunity 

he has placed an order for one hundred 24-sheets and 

made an arrangement with the bill posters to smear these show- 
men sheets alongside every artery of traffic entering Boston, 
and covering surrounding territory as far as Brockton and Lynn 

for a period of One Year! that's what Mister 

Asher thinks of a good serial 

* * * * 

• • • A SANE thought expressed to us by Douglas Mac- 
Lean "Once a leading man, always a leading man is a 

fallacy." Doug claims that players should realize that 

if they switch to other type parts at frequent intervals they 
can prolong their screen life indefinitely for the charac- 
ter field is wide open hundreds of talented players now 

slipping slightly should make the change to other parts before 

it is too late, sez Mister MacLean he cited Marie Dressier 

and Wallace Beery as examples of stars of the "old school" 
who by changing their type parts have carried on successfully 

for years 

* * * * 

• • • A SPECTACULAR shot was filmed by Roy Hunt 
at Rio de Janeiro where he was sent by producer Louis 
Brock to secure authentic backgrounds for the RKO-Radio spe- 
cial, "Flying Down to Rio" through the Brazilian gov- 
ernment over 1,000 sailors were drafted they were ar- 
ranged on the flying field in a formation that from several 

thousand feet in the air spelled out the title of the pix 

then Hunt did a power dive with his camera in a plane toward 

the human sign as the men scattered and ran in all 

directions 



« « « 



» » » 



// 



// 



I 

REMEMBER 
WHEN 

By "BUDD" ROGERS 

as told to 

DON HANCOCK 

of The Film Daily Editorial Staff 



•lj WAS literally smoked into the pic- 

' ture business," said Budd Rogers, 
general sales manager for First Division. 

"The first production with which I was 
connected was 'Heroes of the Night' star- 
ring Cultin Landis, Marian Nixon and Rex 
Lease. It was a Renaud Hoffman pro- 
duction and was being made on the Uni- 
versal lot on the coast. Frank McCarthy 
was directing and Ray June handling the 
cameras. 

"The big scene of the picture was a 
fire sequence during which smoke was 
supposed to pour from the windows and 
roof of a building while firemen 'rescued' 
several extras, and some stunt men jumped 
into nets. I was acting as a sort of an 
assistant advisor to McCarthy. 

"Word was given and the smoke-pots 
lighted. Smoke poured from the house in 
tremendous volumes. Suddenly a west 
wind sprung up and blew all the smoke 
back into the structure and of course 
spoiled the effect needed for the situa- 
tion. Then my 'genius' exerted itself. 
Unknown to McCarthy, June or any of 
the cast, I rushed around to the back of 
the set and before long I had four huge 
airplane propellers in place and hooked 
up. I was going to save the picture and 
the day. At my signal the electricians 
turned on the juice and the propellers 
roared. The effect was perfect. Too 
perfect. Smoke roared and rolled from 
the windows, doors and roof of the house 
but instead of going up toward the sky, 
it kept on rushing and rolling toward 
McCarthy, the cameras and everyone on 
the set. The casualties numbered eight. 
Three extras were taken to the Receiving 
Hospital suffering from suffocation, Mc- 
Carthy almost went blind, June was re- 
vived in a dressing room and the three 
stars were each treated for suffocation by 
their personal physicians. 

"The next day I was assigned to the 
sales staff." 




MANY HAPPY REJUBNS 




Best wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 



July 11 




Frank Whitbeck 
Al Bondy 



Jack Conway 
Herschel Stuart 



James Cagney 



tfjrwouncina 



I 



I 






'M 







©LOT 

pneTum 







WE COME before the industry hoping that through INDEPENDENT organ- 
ization we may reach and entertain wide audiences in motion picture 
theatres the country over. Our first step toward the development 

of what we plan to be a world-wide organization, is the presentation of an initial 
program of twelve pictures — detailed on the opposite page. These pictures will 
be distributed nationally through independently operated affiliated exchanges, as 
a step preliminary to the later coordination of these exchanges into a close-knit 
national organization. The policy of INDEPENDENCE is not an ex- 

pedient with us — but a fundamental principle. We believe that the industry will 
be all the better if it affords a freer outlet for self-expression in production, dis- 
tribution and exhibition. However, we realize that unless independent activity 
justifies itself and serves a need — unless it aids independent theatres, distributors 
and producers by making possible a consistent flow of entertaining pictures — 
then independent activity has no reason for existence. We do not 

claim that our initial releases will startle the industry. As conditions exist today, 
this is economically impractical in independent activity. We do hope, however, 
to bring to the screen worthwhile stories and plays — in which talented artists and 
stars will give excellent performances under inspired directors. We 

know that with proper encouragement, INDEPENDENCE in production will ulti- 
mately result in a quality of product that will bring joy to audiences and proper 
reward to the box-offices. The problem belongs in the lap of the 

entire industry. We shall conscientiously devote ourselves toward doing our share. 







-Resolute pictur€S "-WoMy vft SueA^ScAg^L 




RESOLUTE PICTURES CORPORATION 

presents 





SEASON 1933-1934 



MEET SUYDAM SMITH 





By LOUIS JOSEPH VANCE, Author of "The Lone Wolf" 
Stories. . . . Adaptation of story in Red Book Magazine. 
Brings to the screen for the first time "Suydam Smith" — 
a greater character than the Lone Wolf. Real box-office. 



By WHITNEY BOLTON, Author of "If I Had a Million". 

. . . A winner! Human, throbbing, vital. A cross-section 
of life that will leave its impress on all types of audiences. 
We'll watch ourselves on this one, and get an ace production. 



SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL 




By R. B. SHERIDAN. . . . Famous stage play known the 
world over. Will be brought up to the minute for pres- 
ent-day audiences. A picture that will attract to the 
theatre those who do not respond to the average release 



STEPSISTERS 




By GILBERT SEWARD. . . . Poignant and moving domestic 
drama that strikes home with all classes of people. Con- 
flict, action, rhythm. Movement against backgrounds that 
are as familiar to the mass public as their own bedrooms. 



THE SUBSTITUTE PRISONER 




By MAX MARCIN, Author of "Silence," "Strange Case 
of Clara Deane," "Woman in Room 13". ... As strong 
and dramatic as "Madame X." We're fortunate in being 
able to get this big-time story. Splendid production values. 



SORCERY 




By LOUIS JOSEPH VANCE. . . . Another Suydam exploit. 
Witchery and magic against civilized backgrounds. An 
intriguing story that proves the old adage that truth is 
ofttimes more strange than fiction. Strikes a new note. 



THAT HOLLYWOOD REDHEAD 




By TOM GIBSON. . . . Fast-moving highlights in the hectic 
career of a Hollywood film star. We feel that this type 
of story — as we're going to handle it — will find a welcome 
on the screens of theatres the country over. Immense! 



THE EUGENIC BABY 




By GERALD BACON. . . . From the stage play, "Betty 
Be Careful." Also ran as a serial in the "Evening Graphic." 
Marvelous exploitation angles. Expect this to be one of 
the big money-makers of the year. Remember this promise! 



BEAUTY CONTEST 



lfe*pl); 



By EDWARD I. GREEN. ... An inside story written by a 
newspaperman who knows all about the racket. An actual 
beauty pageant will serve as one of the backgrounds. 
A perfect blend of drama, humor, heartache and tragedy. 



ANGELS WITHOUT WINGS 




By PAUL PEREZ, "Kiss Me Again," "Hotel Continental," 
"Goldie". . . . Theatrical angels and the moths who get 
their wings singed playing with fire. The making of a 
stage play and the unmaking of a star. Unusual treatment. 



THE ADVENTUROUS SEX 




By HOWARD ESTABROOK, "Cimarron," "A Bill of 
Divorcement," "Woman Hungry". . . . Another big-time 
author — and another production that should give a good 
account of itself. We'll turn out a real attraction in this one. 



AUCTIONED OFF 




By VIVIEN GREY, "The Party Girl". ... The public is 
ready for this type of picture. A revelation of the ex- 
tremes to which sophisticates go in their amours, philan- 
derings and nocturnal adventurings. A woman's picture. 



il ^ 




729 SEVENTH AVENUE 



" J HI i -•" " ^.^.^^.^^^a^^^^.,^^: 



NEW yCRK CITY 



DAILY 



Monday, July 17, 1 



49 FEATURES SET FOR 
EASTERN PRODUCTION 



{Continued from Page 1) 

try picture-making. Other pending 
announcements will substantially in- 
crease eastern production plans. 

With a schedule providing four 
features, Rowland and Brice begin 
work July 28 on "Take a Chance," 
musical. Supplementing this activ- 
ity is this company's short subject 
production includes a series of 20 
pictures. 

Starmark Pictures has completed 
the first of a series of six features 
for Regent and within two weeks 
begins its second picture, working 
at Metropolitan studio. 

W. K. D. Productions is planning 
to make four features as well as 12 
Tom Howard shorts, the first of 
which is titled "One Good Urn De- 
serves Another." The company also 
has 10 one-reelers scheduled. 

Exploitation Pictures has listed a 
series of four features. First on the 
program is "Enlighten Thy Daugh- 
ter." 

Max Hayes Productions has a 
schedule calling for two features 
and a series of 12 shorts. 

Production of 12 features is plan- 
ned by George Kilner of Superlite 
Pictures, newly-formed London com- 
pany, which will work in association 
with Louis Weiss in the east. 

Eddie Dowling and Arthur Hop- 
kins have projected plans for a se- 
ries of six features, with the first 
scheduled to start within a few 
weeks. 

First of a series of six features 
planned by J. D. Trop, Inc., will be 
started within two weeks. 

Chester Erskin, who recently com- 
pleted "Midnight," plans to get into 
production on his second of the se- 
ries of four features upon comple- 
tion of the editing and cutting of 
"Midnight." 

John Krimsky and Gifford Coch- 
rane, who have just completed "Em- 
peror Jones," plan to make two 
more features. 

Walter Futter is planning to make 
a series of four four-reelers and 13 
Travelaughs, featuring John Med- 
bury, in addition. 

From Progressive Pictures will 
come a series of 13 musical shorts. 
First picture is slated to go into pro- 
duction within the next three weeks. 

Gem Productions, Inc., will turn 
out a series of 13 Goofytone news- 
reels for Universal release. 

Perfex Pictures, new company, 
has plans for a series of shorts. 



It's Up To Parents 

Detroit — Agitation ot Detroit club- 
women to censor moving pictures more 
rigorously has come to no practical end, 
and no changes will be made, according 
to Lieut. Royal S. Baker, police censor, 
in a statement to FILM DAILY. "We 
cannot gauge what the adult audience 
obviously wants, trom box office re- 
ports, by what a child should or should 
not see. The responsibility for censor- 
ship for children is clearly on their par- 
ents under present conditions." 



Short Shots from Eastern Studios 

i By CHARLES A LI CO ATE' 



JOAN MARSH and Lillian Bond 
J have been signed for feature 
parts in the screen version of "Take 
a Chance," which Laurence Schwab, 
William Rowland and Monte Brice 
will produce for Universal. James 
Dunn, Lillian Roth and Cliff Ed- 
wards head the cast of players for 

the musical. 

• 

Roy Mack, director, has been 
placed in complete charge of musical 
shorts at Vitaphone's Brooklyn stu- 
dio. The appointment was a reward 
for the splendid job Roy has done 
in the last two years on Vitaphone's 
series of "Broadway Brevities." Her- 
man Ruby will have the supervision 
over stories for all other shorts. 



Ben Blue, now headlining at the 
Albee, Brooklyn, has been booked 
over the entire Loew circuit. On 
completion of his stage engagement 
he will leave for the coast where 
he will appear in a series of shorts. 
Joe Rivkin of the Leo Morrison of- 
fice negotiated the deal. 
• 

Sam Sax, production manager at 
Warner Bros.' eastern studio, con- 
tinues to follow a practice, recently 
established of signing Broadway's 
finest bands for the "Melody Mas- 
ters" series. He has now contracted 
for the Blue Ribbon Boys, from New 
York's Cotton Club, to appear in a 
short. 



Herman Rosse, art director for 
John Krimsky and Gifford Cochran 
on their production, "Emperor 
Jones," now nearing completion at 
the Astoria studio with Paul Robe- 
son in the title role, has just been 
honored by Queen Wilhelmina of 
Holland. Her Majesty has appoint- 
ed Rosse to a professorship in deco- 
rative design at the University of 
Delft. Rosse, who decorated the 
Peace Palace at the Hague, is a 
graduate of the University of Delft. 



Mary Rosenfeld, secretary to Sam 
Sax, production manager of War- 
ner Bros. Eastern studio, and Mil- 
ton Cohen, of the purchasing depart- 
ment, left on their vacations this 
week. 

• 

Burnet Hershey has completed 
dialogue and direction for "Savage 
Gold," feature which goes into the 
Mayfair July 17. 

• 

Shooting will start this week at 
the Vitaphone studio on "Yeast Is 
Yeast,'' a "Broadway Brevities" 
short which will star Tom Patricola. 
Cy Woods and Eddie Moron did the 
script. 

David Mendoza, music director at 
the Brooklyn Vitaphone studio, is 
an enthusiastic admirer of Rubinoff 's 
costly Stradivarius. Dave uses it in 
his current Vitaphone short, "Black 
and White." 



A LITTLE from "LOTS" 



By RALPH WILK 



HOLLYWOOD 
£HARLES LAUGHTON will play 
the role of Humpty-Dumpty in 
Paramount's production of "Alice in 
Wonderland". The part is Laugh- 
ton's favorite. Norman McLeod will 
direct. The search for Alice still 
continues. * * * 

Esther Ralston, whose recent 
screen activities have been in Brit- 
ish productions made in England, re- 
turns to the Paramount lot this week 
to appear with Buster Crabbe and 
Jack LaRue in Zane Grey's story, 
"To the Last Man," one of the four 
out-door romances on Paramount's 
1933-34 schedule. 

* * * 

"Cleopatra," which Cecil B. De- 
Mille will direct for Paramount with. 
Claudette Colbert in the title role, 
is now being prepared in Hollywood 
by Jeanie MacPherson and Bartlett 
Cormack. "Cleopatra" will go into 
production following the completion 
of "Four Freightened People," which 
DeMille starts directing early next 
month, and which will also find Miss 
Colbert in the top feminine spot. 

George Stevens, director, is busy 



with Scenarist Fred Guiol writing 
the screen story of Steven's next di- 
rectorial assignment, "Me and Wash- 
ington," another "Mr. Average Man" 
comedy for RKO Radio Pictures. 
Edgar Kennedy and Florence Lake 
enact the featured roles. 

* * * 

Maury M. Cohen's second Invin- 
cible picture is tentatively titled 
"Birds of a Feather." It is now 
being written by Keene Thompson. 
The second Chesterfield production, 
"Notorious But Nice," featuring 
Marian Marsh and Betty Compson, 
is now being cut. 

* * * 

Sam Behrman, author of the cur- 
rent success, "Biography," will write 
the script of the puppet show story 
which Jesse Lasky produced to star 
Lilian Harvey. 

* * * 

The cast of RKO Radio Pictures' 
next Clark and McCullough comedy 
was completed yesterday. Support- 
ing the comedy stars will be Anders 
Von Haden, Harry Gribbon, Brooks 
Benedict, Bud Jamieson, James Mor- 
ton and Lila Leslie. Ben Holmes 
wrote the yarn and will also direct. 



THALBERG PREDICTS 
SPECIALIZED Bit! 



(Continued from Page 1) 

of house to satisfy their tastes, 'fl 
clared the M-G-M production e)j 
tive. He declared that this dev i 
ment has already started in < 
United States. Through show| 
of pictures at special previews, 1 1 
ence reaction will determine f 
classification the pictures merit, j 
Thalberg. 

Approval of pictures with all-| 
casts was voiced by Thalberg, | 
pointed out, however, that it is i 
less to collate stars into a pk| 
without giving them worthv 
parts. 

"Merely to cram stars into a t 
er with a view to using their co 
tive names on marquee adverti 
is a very short-sighted policy," 
serted Thalberg. "Audiences den 
value for their money and I 
they might be inveigled into a 
ater once or twice by this trick, 
will soon resent it, and with 
their future patronage." 



Majestic Will Announce 
13 Features for Seasl 

(.Continued from Page 1) 

will take place July 29, 30 a 
at the Drake Hotel, Chicago. 
50 franchise holders, branch 
agers and salesmen will atteri 
well as Herman Gluckman, pi 
dent, and Phil Goldstone, execu) 
producer. They are now on 
coast lining up product for the ' 
season. 

First three pictures on the 
program will be shown at the m 
ings. They are "Sing, Sinner, Sir 
"Curtain at Eight" and 'The Sii 
Nora Moran." The musical will 
titled "Husband Hunters of 19* 
"My Life," a biography of Isac 
Duncan, will be the fourth feat 1 
Titles for the entire line-up will 
announced at the convention. 



HOW GOO 



Is Your 
Memory 




1. Who played the title role in the 1] 
Fox silent version of "A Connect 
Yankee at King Arthur's Court?" 

2. Where was William S. Hart born? 

3. What company produced "Variety" 

4. When was Metro - Goldwyn - Mai 
formed? 

5. What was the first feature produced 
Famous Players? 

(For Answers See Page 8) 



lay, July 17, 1933 




DAILY 



'PILGRIMAGE" 



Henrietta Crosman, Norman Foster, 
irian Nixon and Heather Angel. 

90 mins. 
ERTAINMENT FOR ANY TYPE OF 
NCE. WHOLESOME AND BEAU- 
LY-TOLD LOVE DRAMA, 
can hold its head high when it sells 
e. If it constitutes any indication of 
nay be expected from this company 
the coming year, then exhibitors can 
ir worthwhile product from Fox. The 
f "Pilgrimage" is an able one. Its 
as been painstakingly recorded against 
itiful background. It deals with a 
-Western mother whose love for her 
ounts to an obsession. When he falls 
i with a neighbor's daughter she tries 
ak up the affair and finally, in 
ition, sends him off to war. He is 
and his sweetheart, hated by the 
, has a baby boy. From this point 
ry concerns itself with the mother's 
for the girl and her son. She finally 
s when she comes across a situation 
to her own, while in Paris with the 
tar mothers." The dialogue rings 
I 

: Henrietta Crosman, Heather Angel, 
n Foster, Marian Nixon, Maurice 

Lucille La Verne, Charley Grape- 
edda Hopper, Robert Warwick, Betty 

Louise Carter, Francis Ford, Jay 

and Frances Rich. 

:tor, John Ford; Author, I. A. R 

: Dialogue Direction, William Collier, 

alogue, Dudley Nicholas; Adaptors, 

i Clein and Barry Conners; Art Direc- 

IJilliam Darling; Cameraman, George 

erman; Recording Engineer, W. W 

1 Jr. 

tion, Sympathetic. Photography, 



"BEST OF ENEMIES" 

with Buddy Rogers, Marian Nixon 
Fox 66 mins. 

PLEASING LIGHT COMEDY NUMBER 
GEARED TO MEET THE POPULAR TASTE. 
GOOD CAST HELPS. 

This offering carries a good quota of 
laughs and after a rather slow start, picks 
up and sails along quite merrily with the 
fine work of Joseph Cawthorn and Frank 
Morgan. They play the parts of the dad- 
dies of Marian Nixon and Buddy Rogers, 
respectively. There is nothing original about 
the situation of two old codgers eternally 
at loggerheads, but the old stuff is atoned 
for in the original and sprightly way in 
which it is handled by the two troupers. 
Morgan is a builder who tries to buy a 
lease of a beer garden owned by Cawthorn 
so he can build a skyscraper on the site. 
Cawthorn refuses, and thus the enmity 
starts that lasts through the years. The 
former friends drift apart, and their chil- 
dren grow up with their sentimental at- 
tachment for each other. Rogers turns to 
music, puts over Marian's song to a big 
hit with his jazz band in pop's beer gar- 
den in Europe where they have gone, and 
so to the happy finale when the two old 
codgers are tricked into friendship again 
by the youngsters. 

Cast: Buddy Rogers, Marian Nixon, Frank 
Morgan, Joseph Cawthorn, Greta Nissen, 
Arno Frey, William Lawrence, Anders Van 
Haden. 

Director, Rian James; Author, Sam Mintz; 
Adaptor, same; Dialoguer, Rian James; Cam- 
eraman, L. W. O'Connell. 

Direction, Fair. Photography, Good. 



"DISGRACED" 

with Helen Twelvetrees, Bruce Cabot 
Paramount 65 mins. 

GETS GOING SLOWLY AND FINISHES 
FAIR WITH THE HELP OF GOOD DRA- 
MATIC SITUATION. 

The story construction on this film is its 
principal weakness, with the hero playing 
a poor second fiddle in a light comedy 
characterization, and the villain appearing 
for several reels to be the hero, which 
isn't so hot for the cash customers. Espe- 
cially the women. Helen Twelvetrees as a 
mannequin falls for the line of Bruce Cabot, 
a rich youth who is engaged to a society 
girl. She believes him when he tells her 
he is passing the other woman up, and 
furnishes a bungalow in anticipation of their 
marriage. Finally when she realizes he is 
about to marry the society girl, Helen visits 
him at the cottage with a gun. Her father, 
a police captain, is sent to the scene to 
help the youth when he phones the district 
attorney. He kills the man who has fooled 
his daughter, and then into the really 
worthwhile part of the film with some good 
dramatic situations as the daughter takes 
the blame and her dad fights to assume 
responsibility. William Harrigan as the 
father easily steals the picture. 

Cast: Helen Twelvetrees, Bruce Cabot 
Adrienne Ames, William Harrigan, Ker 
Murray, Charles Middleton, Adrienne D'Am- 
bricourt, Ara Haswell, Dorothy Bay. 

Director, Erie C. Kenton; Author, Alice 
D. G. Miller; Adaptors, Alice D. G. Miller, 
Francis Martin; Cameraman, Karl Struss. 

Direction, Okay. Photography, Good. 



"MIDNIGHT MARY" 

with Loretta Young, Ricardo Cortez, 

Franchot Tone 

M-G-M 71 mins. 

WELL PRODUCED AND DIRECTED 
DRAMA-ROMANCE WITH FINE CAST 
AND FAIR APPEAL. 

This one will have its greatest appeal 
to the women even though the story is old- 
fashioned and the situations somewhat ob- 
vious. Loretta Young gains considerable 
sympathy as a young misguided girl who 
gets a bad start in life, grasps at a chance 
to go straight, but through unfortunate 
breaks is forced to return to loose living 
and the association of gangsters. Rather 
than see Ricardo Cortez, as her lover- 
racketeer, kill Franchot Tone, wealthy 
Samaritan with whom she is in love, Loret- 
ta murders Cortez. The picture opens at 
the trial and while the jury is deliberating 
her fate, Loretta's past flashes before her 
closed eyes. She is found guilty but saved 
by an appeal voiced by Tone who makes a 
last minute dramatic entrance into court. 
All characters are well handled and Direc- 
tor Wellman has pepped up what might 
have been draggy episodes with clever tech- 
nique. 

Cast: Loretta Young, Ricardo Cortez, 
Franchot Tone, Andy Devine, Una Merkel, 
Frank Conroy, Warren Hymer, Ivan Simp- 
son, Harold Huber, Sandy Roth, Martha 
Sleeper, Charles Grapewin, Halliwell Hobbes, 
Robert Emmett O'Connor. 

Director, William Wellman; Author, 
Anita Loos; Adaptors, Gene Markey, Kath- 
ryn Scola; Editor, William S. Gray; Cam- 
eraman, James Van Trees. 

Direction, Very Good. Photography, Ex- 
cellent. 



e of Detroit Buying 
Cooperative Increased 

: (Continued from Page 1) 

| Offices are continued in the 
''heater Bldg. 

rechristened organization will 
!m hereafter as a circuit, with 
ithority to do all booking for 
'uses involved. About 65 houses 
volved in the deal. 
[| new Mid-States Theaters is 
gited in some action on dual 
low played by practically ev- 
iluse in the city. 



Predari Elected Head 

Of Perfex Pictures Co. 

With intentions of making both 
features and shorts, Perfex Pic- 
tures has been incorporated at Al- 
bany, with New York headquarters. 
Officers of the firm are: president, 
C. John Predari; vice-president, 
Stuart K. Brandon; secretary and 
treasurer, Anthony Marella. 



"THIS IS AMERICA" OPENING 

"This Is America" opens at the 
Rivoli on Wednesday. 



Something New in Vacations 

3efore you decide where you will spend your vacation this summer ask your friends 
II Hotel Uncas, situated directly on the most beautiful part of Lake George, Queen 

merican Lakes. 

| 'his unique hotel offers features of tremendous appeal to those who seek a vacation 
| ! really re-creates mind, body, and soul . . . every facility for rest and recreation. 

SPORTS 

inest swimming from our private dock (longest on Lake George) or bathing from 
e sandy beach. The water is so clean, clear and pure that you can drink it — or 
this advertisement through three feet of it. 

.loafing — canoes, sailboats, speed boats, out-board motor boats, aquaplaning, 
"ennis — Splendid courts maintained in best of condition. Golf, fishing, mountain 
ing, horseback riding, dancing, billiards, bowling. 



1933 RATES 



r .ates 
this 
Jd it 
ets u 



at Hotel Uncas have always been so moderate no drastic reductions have been 
season. Inasmuch as rates depend on location and type of accommodations 
is suggested that prospective guests send for details. The clientele is restricted, 
pon request. 

Address 

HOWARD V. DAYTON 

HOTEL UNCAS 

UNCAS-ON-LAKE GEORGE 

NEW YORK 



* * * 



^ BUILDING BIGGER BUSINESS EXTRA 



* * * 




line 



COVERS 
EVERYTHING 



LONDON 



HOLLYWOOD 



NEW YORK 



PARIS 



BERLIN 



PERSONAL 

Will the person who steals Film Daily 
from my desk kindly give himself up 
--for --he who steals my life steals 
trash but he who steals my Film Daily 
keeps me from knowing what is going 
on in my industry. 

xyz 



THE 



<2^i 



DAILV 



Monday, July 17, 1! 



TWENTIETH CENTURY 
LISTS 12 FEATURES 

i Continued from Page 1) 



nual sales convention beginning to- 
day in Chicago. 

The lineup follows: "The Bowery," 
with Wallace Beery, Jackie Cooper 
and George Raft, an adaptation 
made by Howard Estabrook and 
Jimmie Gleason of a novel by Mich- 
ael L. Simmons and B. R. Solomon; 
two George Arliss starring vehicles, 
"Red Tape," by Sam Mintz and 
Maude T. Howell, and "The Great 
Rothschild," an original; two Con- 
stance Bennett vehicles, the first be- 
ing "Moulin Rouge," a musical ex- 
travaganza based on a French play 
by Lajon de Bri; "Broadway Thru 
a' Keyhole," based on a Walter Win- 
chell original, with Peggy Hopkins 
Joyce, directed by Lowell Sherman 
and adapted by Gene Towne and 
Graham Baker; "Blood Money," an 
original by Rowland Brown; "Miss 
Lonelyhearts," based on a novel by 
Nathaniel West and adapted by 
Leonard Praskins; "Trouble Shoot- 
er," an original by J. R. Bren and 
Elmer Harris; "Born to Be Bad," 
Ralph Graves' original; "P. T. Bar- 
man, " adapted by John Huston; 
"The Unnamed Woman," by Willard 
Robertson, adapted by Courtney 
Terrett and directed by Gregory La 
Cava. 

Under exclusive contract to Twen- 
tieth Century are: George Arliss, 
Constance Bennett, Loretta Young 
and Constance Cummings. 

The production executive person- 
nel includes Raymond Griffith, asso- 
ciate producer; Howard Smith, sce- 
nario editor, and William Dover, 
personnel manager. William Goetz 
is second vice-president and associ- 
ate producer. Joseph H. Moskowitz, 
for years the personal representa- 
tive of Joseph M. Schenck's inter- 
ests in New York, was brought to 
Hollywood by Zanuck as general 
manager of Twentieth Century. 

In addition to Raoul Walsh, bor- 
rowed from Fox, Twentieth Century 
also has its own staff of contract 
directors. They are: Gregory La 
Cava, Lowell Sherman, Walter Lang 
and Sidney Lanfield. 

Twentieth Century's scenario staff 
comprises: Howard Estabrook, El- 
mer Harris, James Gleason, Arthur 
Richman, Leonard Praskins, Sam 
Mintz, John Huston, Graham Baker, 
Gene Towne, Maude T. Howell, Nun- 
nally Johnson, Henry Lehrman, 



ANSWERS 

to 
"HOW GOOD IS YOUR 
MEMORY" QUESTIONS 

1. Harry Myers. 

2. Newburgh, N. Y. 

3. Ufa. 

4. 1924. 

5. "The Prisoner of Zenda." 



L. A. Takes Precautions Against Kidnappings 

Hollywood — The counfry-wide kidnapping epidemic has caused local authorities 
to take extra precautions to guard picture stars. Sheriff Riscailuz has created a special 
group of secret investigators to handle kidnapping cases. There is talk of forming a 
local "Scotland Yard" as a precautionary step. A number of stars are employing 
bodyguards for themselves and their families. 



Lichtman to Discuss 

U. A. Sales Policies 

Chicago — Al Lichtman will con- 
duct a discussion on sales policy as 
the main topic on the closing day 
of the United Artists convention 
here Wednesday. Branch managers 
and salesmen will be invited to join 
in the discussion which will cover 
sales terms, checking percentages, 
exploitation and accessories. Joseph 
M. Schenck will also address the del- 
egates on that day. Other speeches 
programmed for the closing session 
will be delivered by Harry Gold, 
Haskell Masters, Ben Fish, S. M. 
Horowitz, Charles Stern, J. Van Til- 
zer, Carroll Trowbridge and E. J. 
Smith. 

Tomorrow, the second day of the 
session, Harry Gold will open the 
meeting with an address on United 
Artists salesmen and will be fol- 
lowed by S. M. Horowitz, who will 
speak on the duties of a branch 
manager. Al Lichtman will outline 
the product for 1933-34 as the clos- 
ing item on the morning program. 
In the afternoon, trailers will be dis- 
cussed. James Mulvey, representing 1 
Samuel Goldwyn. will talk. Hal 
Home will speak on advertising, 
publicity and exploitation. Monroe 
Greenthal will discuss exhibitor co- 
operation. Ed Finney will speak on 
"The Press." There will be an ad- 
dress by Walt Disney and as the 
closing speech on the day's sched- 
ule, Al Lichtman will speak on the 
Disney products. 



Maberry, Carroll Set 

10 Bookings for Opera 

(Continued from Page 1) 

nolicy somewhat similar to the one 
at the New York Hippodrome, which 
they onerate. Bookings are as fol- 
lows: Newark, Julv 16; Boston. July 
20: Providence, July 22: Buffalo, 
July 28: Pittsburgh, July 31; Cleve- 
land, Aug:. 4; Akron (tentative 1 * 
Aue. 7. A Havana engagement will 
begin Dec. 26. 

Monogram to Support 
F. M. P. I. Recovery Code 

Monogram and all its franchise 
holders will sunport the so-called 
"Harrison code" of the Federation 
of the M. P. Industry. W. Ray John- 
ston announced Saturday before 
leaving: for the Monogram regional 
convention in Chicago. 

INSTALLING NEW VAULT 

A new film vault of 7,000,000 feet 
capacity will be added to the premi- 
ses of General Film Library this 
week. The vault will be installed 
on the 17th floor of 729 Seventh Ave. 



Laird Doyle, Courtenay Terrett, 
Michael Simmons, Ralph Graves. 
Harold Long, Rowland Brown and 
Willard Robertson. 



John Hicks to Set Para. 
French Production Plan 

Plans for the resumption of 
foreign language picture production 
at Joinville, France, will be made 
upon arrival of John W. Hicks, 
Paramount foreign department ex- 
ecutive, who sails from New York 
July 20 with Eugene Zukor. At 
present the studio is dubbing pic- 
tures but no actual production is 
going on. 

Paramount is making two foreign 
versions at its Coast studios cur- 
rently. One is "Cradle Song," based 
on a popular play, which is being 
made in Spanish, and the other is 
"The Right to Love," being pro- 
duced in French. 



ANOTHER FOR TAUBER 

"The Big Attraction," starring 
Richard Tauber, will open at the 
Vanderbilt Saturday. The feature 
is a musical and the second in a se- 
ries featuring Tauber. 



WARNERS TO FINISH 
30 BY END OF SEP 

(Continued from Pane 1) 



season program, Major War 
stated. 

"This is in keeping with our p 
icy of selling our product by act 
showing on the screen and i| 
merely on paper," he said. Contl 
uing: "We are keeping our sa| 
and production plans elastic 
cause it is good sound busintl 
sense to do so. We want to ktf 
our position of being able to ta 
advantage of new trends in pub) 
film tastes, and front page stori 
We want to be in a position to h<! 
exhibitors take advantage of 
creased admission prices that n 
seem inevitable in view of the r 
tion's trend toward higher pric 
dictated by President Roosevelt's | 
covery program." 



MAKING COLOR SHORTS 

Jacksonville, Fla. — Raymo 
Friedgen is directing Technico' 
short subjects at Ocala, Fla., a 
Bainbridge, Ga., for Photocolor St 
dios of Irvington, N. Y. 





DRITZ 

on-ihe-„ 





L. 




IVE above the 
1 tree-tops . . No extra 
III I charge for a restful 

view of entire Central 
Pork and a refreshing breeze . /'Amer- 
ica's only truly Continental hotel"., de- 
ightful . . different . . convenient to 
theatres, shops and business. 

• 
Dinner and supper dancing nightly in the 
SKY GARDEN, New York's intimate and 
popular Roof . . entertainment. Lunch- 
eon or tea at . . . RUMPELMAYER'S. 

Rates: Single $3.50-$5; double $5-$7; suites from $8 
ATTRACTIVE WEEKLY AND MONTHLY CONCESSIONS 

Moderately priced apartments furnished or 
unfurnished available NOW or October 1st. 



DIRECTION 
S. GREGORY TAYLOR 



Htt 




ntimate in Character 
international in Scope 
ndependent in Thought 



7. A. To Std 



ove For Higher Admissions 



SRAINGERJOINS UNIVERSAL AS DISTRIBUTION HEAD 

ndependent Group Incorporates Under A New Name 



I Concentrate on Four 
Points in Code 
Proposals 

incorporation under the new name 
Federation of the Motion Picture 
lustry of America, Inc., was an- 
i meed last night by the inde- 
! ident producer and distributor 
jump which met at the Park Cen- 
1 1. Officers are: Pete Harrison, 
I isident; W. Ray Johnston, Harry 
' 3mas, Jack Bellman and M. M. 
f ff man, vice presidents; Charles 

i:tt, treasurer; John N. Weber, 
{Continued on Page 2) 
iiXAS exhibYagree 

N NEW CODE POINTS 

alias — Further recommendations 
li" the national theater code were 
: ipted by the joint code committee 
^Allied Theater Owners of Texas 
iii Texas Theater Owners' Ass'n at 
i: concluding sessions here. The 
le recommended: 

peration of theaters by producer-distribu- 
is unfair and should be ended; protec- 
(Continued on Page 12) 



incipal Will Release 
44 Shorts in 1933-1934 

Principal Distributing will release 
one-reelers, 6 two-reelers and 12 

ter films of three to four reels 
I length next season, Frank R. Wil- 
ls told The Film Daily last night 
J core he left for Washington to 
• iume an executive post with Gen- 
i il Hugh S. Johnson, head of the 
jiustrial Recovery Act activities. 
j ties for the lineup will be released 

pet week. 



M-G-M Adding Multi-Star Vehicles 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — In addition to a dozen multi-star vehicles already outlined for the 
new season, M-G-M announces it will add others later, thereby turning out the biggest 
number of multi-star productions in the history of the company. There are now 16 
features in various stages of work at the M-G-M studios. Summer production 
activity will be the greatest in five years. 



Garyn Joins Master Art Products; 
Company Plans General Expansion 



First of Resolute's 12 
Starts Work This Month 

Production on "Meet Suydam 
Smith," by Louis Joseph Vance, the 
first of the Mastercraft Twelve fea- 
tures planned by Resolute Pictures 
Corp., gets under way the latter 
part of July at the Universal studios 
in Hollywood. Herbert R. Ebenstein 
{Continued on Page 11) 



Acquisition of an interest in Mas- 
ter Art Products by W. P. ("Pat") 
Garyn and his appointment as vice- 
president and general manager of 
the company effective immediately, 
was announced yesterday by E. 
Schwartz, president. Garyn's asso- 
ciation with the company will signal 
the entrance of Master Art into the 
feature picture field, specializing in 
(.Continued on Page 4) 



Oscar Hanson to Handle Educational in Canada 



Educational Pictures has closed a 
deal with Empire Films, Ltd., of 
which Oscar Hanson is president, 
for distribution of its product in 
Canada, according to announcement 
bv E. W. Hammons, president of 
Educational. Hanson originally 
opened the Educational exchanges 

{Continued on Page 13) 



Clyde Elliott Brings 

459,000 Feet of Film 

San Francisco — ■ Approximately 
459,000 feet of filmed negative was 
brought back from the Malay jungles 
by the Clyde Elliott expedition which 
returned last week on the N.Y.K. 
(Continued on Page 13) 



Can't Agree in Cleveland 

Cleveland — Eecause some of the sub- 
sequent run downtown houses are un- 
derstood to have refused to cut out 
double features, local exhibitors are no 
nearer reaching an agreement than they 
were a month ago when the first of a 
series of meetings was held to discuss 
duals and price boosts. 



Lichtman Says No U. A. Films 
Will be Shown at Cut Prices 



Seven Houses Reopened 
In Northwest Territory 

Minneapolis — Local exchanges re- 
port the reopening of the following 
seven houses: State, Sauk Rapids; 
Ivanhoe, Ivanhoe; Lyric, Lakefield; 
Lawler, Rochester, and a new house 
in Spring Grove, all Minn.; Grand, 

(Continued on Page 13) 



Chicago — United Artists will not 
allow exhibitors to play its pictures 
at reduced admission prices, and the 
company plans to start a movement 
whereby all companies will help 
bring about restoration of old box 
office schedules and thus restore 
prosperity and higher wages in line 
with the new deal program, said 
(Continued on Page 13) 



Former Fox Executive 

Succeeds L. J. 

Schlaifer 

James R. Grainger, who recently 
settled his contract with Fox, where 
he was in charge of distribution for 
eight years, yesterday assumed the 
same post at Universal, succeeding 
L. J. Schlaifer. In announcing the 
appointment, Carl Laemmle stated 
for years he has wanted Grainger in 
the organization, but only recently 
did events shape themselves to make 

(Continued on Page 13) 



BOOSTING ADMISSIONS 
CONSIDERED IN OHIO 



Columbus — P. J. Wood, business 
manager of the M. P. T. O. of Ohio, 
announces that he expects to call a 
state gathering of exhibitors in Au- 
gust with the primary purpose of 
discussing the question of raising 
admission prices. He declared with 
the minimum wage scale likely to be 
imposed together with other in- 
(Continued on Page 12) 



Epstein Buys Interest 
In Hollywood Exchange 

Morris Epstein has purchased an 
interest in the Hollywood Film Ex- 
changes, of which Jack Bellman is 
president. Epstein becomes vice- 
president and sales executive. A 
new exchange in Washington, D. C, 
will be opened by Hollywood with- 
in the next two weeks. The com- 
pany now operates branches in Buf- 
falo, Philadelphia and New York. 



Goldstone After Dietrich 

West Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Phil Goldstone, produc- 
tion head of Majestic Pictures, will at- 
tempt to borrow Marlene Dietrich to 
star in "An Entirely Different Woman," 
which Majestic yesterday purchased 
from Paramount. The reported pur- 
chase price is $20,000. 



THE 




■%£1 



DAILV 



Tuesday, July 1 8, 1*1 



Vol. LXI1I. No. 14 Tubs. JuW 18.1933 Price 5 Cents 



JOHN W ALICOATE 



Editor and Publisher 



Code Extended to White Collar Workers 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — Amendment to the cotton textile code to include office workers in the 
40-hour week, with no reduction in pay, is considered significant in the administra- 
tion's attitude toward white collar workers in all codes. 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
a t 1650 Broadway, New York, N *•. 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher 
Donald M. Mersereiu, Secretary-Treasurer 
and General Manager; Arthur W. Eddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at N.w York, 
N Y under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. , Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE r 11 ^ 1 
DAILY, >650 Broadway, New York, H. J-i 
Phone, Circle 7-4736, 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York Ho y 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London- 
Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter 89-91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin-Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 

p. a. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise, 

Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 6y 4 6Va 6>/ 4 — Vi 

Columbia Picts. vtc 23% 22y 8 23% + 1 
Con. Fm. Ind.. . 4% 45/ 8 45/8 + Vs 
Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. 12 1/4 11 Vl 1214 + Va 

E^st. Kodak 87 Vi 86 86 1/4 — Vl 

Fox Fm. "A" 43/g 4 4i/ 4 + Va 

Loew's, Inc 303/ 8 265/ 8 293/ 8 + IVi 

Paramount ctfs 2'/ 8 2 2'/ 8 + Vi 

Pathe Exch 23/ 8 2 23/ 8 + 1/4 

do "A" 9l/ 2 8V4 9l/ 2 + 13/ 8 

RKO 43/ 4 41/4 43/ 8 

Warner Bros 83/ 8 71/2 8I/4 -f % 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 
Columbia Pets. vtc. 22i/ 4 22 1/4 22 1/4 — 1 Va 

Gen. Th. Eq. pfd... % "-16 Va 

Technicolor 8% 8y 2 8% + Vs 

Trans-Lux 3l/ 8 3 3Vs + Vs 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 
Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40.. 83/ 4 71/2 8Vi + 1 
Gen. Th. Eq.6s40ctfs. V/ 2 6'/ 4 7'/ 4 + 114 
Keith A-0 6s 46.. 52% 523/ 4 52% + Vs 

Loew 6s 41 ww 82 81 Vl 81 1/2+ Vl 

Paramount 6s 47 .. 28 '/ 2 25 Vi 27 + 15/ 8 
Par. 6s47 ctfs. ... 27 26 27 +1 

Par. By 5Vis51 35% 35 35% + Vl 

Par. 5 Vis 50 28 25 Vi 28 + 2% 

Par. 5%s 50 ctfs.. 27 26% 27 + 1 

Pathe 7s 37 80 80 80 +3 

Warner's 6s39 39% 38 39% + 1 Vl 

NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE 
Para. Publix 2'/ 8 1 % 2 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



Today: Meeting of M. P. T. O. of Arkansas, 
Mississippi and Tennessee, Jackson, Miss. 

July 19: Premiere of "Song of Songs" at Cri- 
terion, New York. 

July 19: Joint meeting of major and indepen- 
dent distributors on code at Hays office 
at 2:15 P. M. 

July 21-22: Fox Film Corp. special stockhold- 
ers' meeting, home office, New York. 



Independent Group 

Takes a New Name 

(Continued from Page 1) 

temporary secretary. Phil Meyers, 
Glett and Johnston also were named 
as a finance committee. Jacob 
Schechter is attorney. An execu- 
tive committee of eight will be 
named next Monday. Constitution 
and by-laws were ratified. 

Discussing code proposals, oppo- 
sition was voiced to the scale of 
minimum wages and maximum 
hours which have been proposed. 
The association indicated it would 
confine itself to only about four 
points, including open market sell- 
ing, opposition to block-booking and 
divorcing producing - distributing 
from exhibition. 

Board of directors includes: Les- 
ter W. Adler, George Batcheller, 
Jack Bellman, Jack Berkowitz, Al 
Bondy, Sol Braunstein, Frank B. 
Ferrone, Al Friedlander, Herman 
Gluckman, Arthur Greenblatt, P. S. 
Harrison, W. Ray Johnston, Louis 
Korson, Phil Meyers, William M. 
Pizor, P. A. Powers, Herman Rifkin, 
Bob Savini, Jacob Schechter, Harry 
Thomas, John N. Weber, Ben Berk, 
Trem Carr, Maury Cohen, Charles 
Glett, Phil Goldstone, M. H. Hoff- 
man, Nat Levine, Alfred T. Mannon 
and William Steiner. 



Allen Glenn Joins Warners 
As So. Exploitation Chief 

Dallas — Allen Glenn has been ap- 
pointed southern advertising and ex- 
ploitation manager for Warner Bros, 
by S. Charles Einfeld, executive in 
charge of advertising and publicity. 
Glenn, who will operate out of War- 
ner's Dallas exchange under Fred 
M. Jack, district manager, will co- 
operate with exhibitors booking 
Warner product throughout the ter- 
ritory. 

Frank Strayer to Direct 
Remaining 8 Invincibles 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Frank Strayer has 
been signed by Maury M. Cohen to 
direct the remaining eight Invincible 
productions for this season. Strayer 
has just completed "By Appoint- 
ment Only" for Invincible. 

"VOLTAIRE" WORLD PREMIERE 

Pittsburgh — Warner's "Voltaire," 
starring George Arliss, will have its 
world premiere Aug. 24 at the Stan- 
ley. 



OLIVE BORDEN AT FAIR 

Chicago — Olive Borden, who re- 
cently finished making "Chloe" in 
Florida, follows Rosco Ates on the 
Hollywood set at A Century of 
Progress. Ates has left for the 
coast. Under co-direction of Jack 
Sullivan, formerly of Monogram, and 
George Jeske of the Torchy com- 
edies, Miss Borden will appear in the 
shorts now being filmed on the 
Hollywood lot. 



REGENT CLOSES DEALS 

Regent Pictures has closed con- 
tracts with H. A. Lande of Supreme 
Screen Classics, Chicago, covering 
distribution of "Wives Beware," 
starring Adolphe Menjou, in north- 
ern Illinois and Indiana, and with 
Andrew Wall of Great Southern 
Pictures Co., New Orleans, cover- 
ing Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, 
Georgia, Florida, Texas, Oklahoma, 
Arkansas, Tennessee, and North 
and South Carolina. 



RKO BUYS 2 STORIES 

West Coast Bureau, of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — -RKO has purchased 
"Dummy's Vote" by Arthur E. Hor- 
man. ZaSu Pitts will be starred. 
"Apple Tree" by John Galsworthy 
has also been bought by RKO from 
Frank Tuttle, director, who owned 
the screen rights to the play. Sev- 
eral sequences have already been 
made by Tuttle in England. 



.oming an 



d G 



oing 



DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS, JR., after being 
up in New York as a result of a pneu 
attack, has sailed for London to joii 
father. Doug, Jr., will spend about thi 
four months recuperating before he n 
film work. 

BERTHOLD VIERTEL, German film dii 
arrived on the Berengaria and is spendir \ 
week here at the St. Moritz Hotel I 
going on to Hollywood. 

HERBERT SILVERBERG, Buffalo film .-• 
ney, returned home last night after se\ 
days in New York. 

INA CLAIRE sailed Saturday on the Be | 
garia for a vacation abroad. 

ARTHUR L. PRATCHETT, general manage 
Compania Distribuidora De Pel iculas de C 
distributors of Paramount pictures in Cuba 'j 
in New York for conference with Emil 1 
Shauer and John W. Hicks, Jr. He will 
main for several weeks. 

BOB GILLHAM and AL WILKE of P| 
mount will return to New York tomorrow t 
the coast. 

NED DEPINET, JULES LEVY and ROBERT 
SISK of RKO will return from the coast toni 

AL MERTZ, MIKE POLLAR, and A. I 
SCHUBART of RKO returned from Hie c" 
yesterday. 

FRED McCONNELL of the Van Beuren t\ 
returned from the coast yesterday. 



TITLE CHANGED 

"Love is Dangerous" is the n 
title for Chesterfield's "Love is L 
That." 



WARNER BROS. 
CAPTU 



RED. 




STARS 



. .For a Drama Too Big for the Pages of History 



// 



CAPTURED! 



Who Are They? 

Save The Sections Daily Fit 
Them Together Tomorrow 

V1TAGRAPH, INC.. DISTRIBUTORS 






l£ADandfl£AP~ 

UTH THIS SENSATIONAL SUMMER SMASH, 



40WMEN RAVE 

about 

iCORD BUSINESS 



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Am convinced that not only has Columbia 
a box office smash but a masterful piece 
of entertainment. This picture has whole- 
hearted endorsement of local civic bodies 
and have been congratulated all day long 
for bringing such unparalleled entertain- 
ment to Springfield. Anticipate record- 
breaking business. Al Anders, BIJOU, 

Springfield, Mass. 



three 



Wl LLAR D MAC K 

JEAN PARKER 

MINNA GOMBELL 

Directed by Willard Mack 



k Price lO» 0CeftCe ^u real 

This picture low Sounds 

r rov ? icture /of buying *>ut 



ENDORSED AND ACCLAIMED BY 

NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 

AND CIVIC LEADERS- 



H. S. Cumming, Surgeon Gene- 
ral, Public Health Service, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Alan H. Nicol, Director of 
Visual Education, Board of Ed- 
ucation, Buffalo, N. Y. 
George T. Wood, Pres. Metro- 
politan Baptist Ministers. 
George H. Zehrung, National 
Council, Y. M. C. A. 
Judge Ben B. Lindsay, famous 
children's court magistrate. 
Judge Samuel D. Levy, Chil- 
dren's Court, N. Y. 
Judge Georgia Bullock, South 
Pasedena, Cal. 

Helen F. Huson, Dept. Public 
Welfare, Erie County, N. Y. 
Nat. Society of New England 
Council of Churches of Buffalo 
&. Erie County. 

General Federation of Women's 
Clubs, Los Angeles. 
International Federation of Ca- 
tholic Alumnae, N. Y. 



Maud Bogarth, Supt., Ingleside 
Home, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Local Civic Bodies in Spring- 
field, Mass. 

Rabbi Samuel Price, Temple 
Beth El, Springfield, Mass. 

Mrs. Edward Southworth, Com- 
missioner, Springfield Girl 
Scouts, Springfield, Mass. 

Rubie S.Crane, Chairman, M. P. 
Council, Springfield. 

Ethel F. Dexter, Chairman, Par- 
ent Teacher Council, Spring- 
field, Mass. 

Better Film Council, Buffalo, 

N. Y. 

Rev. J. H. MacConnel, Forest 
Ave. Congregational Church, 
New York City. 

Wilma A. Vanderwall, Execu- 
tive Secretary Church Mission 
of Help, Buffalo, N. Y. 
California Congress of Parents 
and Teachers, Los Angeles. 



and they're still pouring in 



Packed them in for 4 weeks at the Cameo, N. Y. 



kvick *%twWid CI with Gylumbia! 



the: 



■g&i 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 18,1931 



W, P. ('PAT') GARYN 
JOINS MASTER ART 



(Continued from Page 1) 
pictures with novel exploitation an- 
gles. No set program has been de- 
termined for 1933-34, the schedule 
being made flexible to permit acquir- 
ing of films with unique angles as 
they appear from time to time. "In 
line with the new and widened mar- 
keting possibilities in the motion 
picture industry, Master Art Prod- 
ucts will launch its 1933-34 season 
with an expanded distribution sys- 
tem and an increased releasing 
schedule including both features and 
novelties," said Schwartz. "Mr. 
Garyn's association at this time, is 
therefore, of particular interest to 
our corporation. He will take charge 
of distribution and assume certain 
other executive duties." 

At the same time, Mr. Schwartz 
announced the conclusion of negotia- 
tions whereby Edwin C. Hill, noted 
radio news commentator, will appear 
in a series of 13 featurettes to be 
known as "The Human Side of the 
News." This is the first addition to 
the increased lineup, which, of 
course, will embrace the regular re- 
leases of "Organlogues," "Melody 
Makers" and "Puzzlegrafs." Nego- 
tiations are nearing consummation 
for other groups. 

Master Art already operates its 
own offices in New York, Chicago, 
Los Angeles, Atlanta, Dallas snd New 
Orleans. Schwartz and Garyn will 
immediately set about to effect an 
expansion of its distribution system, 
until eventually offices are in opera- 
tion throughout the nation. 

Garyn jroes to Master Art from 
National Screen Service, where for 
six years he acted as general mana- 
ger in charge of distribution. Start- 
ing in the business some 15 years 
ago, in the sales division of Fox 
Garyn later held important sales 
positions with Goldwyn and M-G-M. 

BOOKED FOR RIALTO 

"Sleepless Nights" a Hollywood 
Exchange release is booked into the 
Rialto to play the last week in July. 
"The Savage Girl," another Holly- 
wood release, starts an engagement 
at the Mayfair on Friday. These 
are the first two of 40 features to 
be handled in the east by Hollywood 
Exchanges during the 1933-34 sea- 
son. 



Books About Movies 

A compilation of books about mo- 
tion pictures, entitled "What Shall W> 
Read About the Movies?" has been 
completed and issued in pamphlet form 
by William Lewin, chairman, of the 
Photoplay Appreciation Committee, Na- 
tional Council of Teachers of English. 
Lewin's aim was to provide a guide to 
the many books about the movies, their 
history, science, industry, art and fu- 
ture, compiled as an aid to photoplay 
appreciation. From about a thousand 
volumes, both old and new, good and 
bad, Lewin excluded the obsolete works 
and made a descriptive list of the 
books worth reading in 1933. 




A^ONC the 



PHIL M. DALY 



• • •..WHAT'S IN a Name? plenty when 

the name happens to be "Roxy" and he makes his first 

personal appearance on a stage in several years as he 

is doing this week at Radio City Music Hall the Maestro 

and his "Gang" are producing a spontaneous reaction at every 
performance which is a sight for any showman to marvel at 

four shows a day and "Roxy" conducts every 

number played through the show introduces every in- 
dividual in his "Gang" and puts over plenty of enter- 
tainment on his own in that way which makes him so 

peculiarly individualistic at the rate they are going over 

at the Music Hall, it will chalk up an $80,000 week 

and that, mind you, with just a so-so pix which makes 

it a Real Roxy Show to him goes the honor and the 

credit Mister Rothafel has conclusively demonstrated 

that he has a tremendous personal following that is Priceless 

his hold on the public cannot be better expressed than 

this comment we heard on the way out made by a 

young lug to his lady friend "It ain't exactly what he 

does — it's just Roxy" in a word PERSONAL- 
ITY 



• • • OF ALL things 1 who'dathot that a mere Boat 

Ride could be so popular? over at the Motion Picture 

Club the tickets for the first annual water carnival and Sunday 

School picnic to be held at Bear Mountain on Aug. 2 

are going in blocks of TEN the following gents 

having subscribed for wholesale quantities Artie Steb- 

bins, Lou Blumenthal, Harry Brandt, Leo Klebanow, Joe Brandt, 
Lee Ochs, Louis Nizer, Jack Shapiro, Harry Thomas, Jack 
Guttfreund, Arthur Seidman, Arnold Van Lear, Dave Loew, 

Charlie Goetz, Herbert Ebenstein, James L. Ryan 

MONEY must be comin' back to the ole film biz or are 

the boys coppin' in the stock market? 



• • • THE SCENE is the Atlas Studio ossif and 

manager Benny Berk talkin' to his sec (Benny havin' 

introduced his wife to the sec the day before, and the two got 

so chummy they talked for HOURS) Benny 

"How did you make such a hit with my wife?" The Sec 

"Mebbe I SYMPATHIZE with her!" well, you 

ASKED for it, Benny and ya got it. 



• • • THOSE TALKS that theater manager Joseph Bern- 
hard shoots out occasionally to the theater dep't of Warners 

are what you call Inspirational no blah just 

cold facts in the current one he mentions Charlie Ein- 

f eld's recent trade ad headed "Warner Brothers' Year 

Book is printed on Celluloid" a rather neat phrase that 

is more than a figure of speech instead of the Promises 

contained in an annual announcement they simply refer 

you to the Finished Pictures and in the final analysis 

that's all you theater boys are interested in 

what you can throw up there on the screen and TALK 

about to Jawn Public and his Family 

* * * * 

• • • FOR THE four weeks beginning next Friday, the 

7th Ave. Roxy has this feature lineup "Arizona to 

Broadway," "The Big Brain," "The Phantom Broadcast," "Fly- 
ing Devils" At the Strand next Thursday eve, Richard 

Barthelmess' "Heroes For Sale" opens ., Warners are 

starting to shout about their new musical pix, "Footlight Pa- 
rade," in which will appear a "find" known as Miss DeNiece 

Bellon a co-ed at the University of California discovered 

by Dance Director Busby Berkeley the gent who did 

so much to make "Gold Diggers" A Pix 



PLANNED MPTOA CO! 
GOING TO STATE 



« « « 



» » » 



Chicago — Draft of the propo.'l 
exhibition code completed here 1:1 
week by the M. P. T. O. A. executl 
committee after more than fol 
days in continuous session will I 
submitted to the organization's boa I 
of directors this week for ratifiil 
tion on the part of their state unil 
Many of the paragraphs in the col 
have been agreed to by the distribl 
tors, and the M. P. T. O. A. execl 
tive committee hopes that all col 
troversial points will be amiably a I 
justed before the final submissiil 
of the document to Washington. I 

The present code was drafted I 
the entire M. P. T. O. A. executi' 
committee, consisting of Pres^de.l 
Ed Kuykendall, Fred S. Meyer, 
B. Harold, Fred Wehrenberg, Jat 
Miller, M. A. Lightman, George 
Aarons and David Barrist. Dav 
Palfreyman represented the affiliat* 
theaters. A number of indpenden 
exhibitors interested in the code » 
in at most of the meetings. Amor 
them were Ed Silverman, Lou 
Rheinheimer, Arthur Schoenstad 
Max Krofta, F. C. "Peck" Bake 
and others. At its meeting in Ne 
York last month, the M. P. T. 0. l\ 
elected Kuykendall and Meyer, vm 
Jay Emanuel as alternate, to repn 
sent the executive committee in an 
future meetings with distributor 

On two of the code items in whic 
v he Administration is chiefly intei 
ested, wages and hours of work, tb 
M. P. T. O. A. set a 36-hour max 
mum week and a minimum pay of 3 
cents an hour except in the case o 
ushers and cleaners. 



NEW VANDERBILT FILM 

George Vanderbilt, now on a , 
fari in Africa hunting big ganr 
will return to New York about th 
middle of next month with scene 
of Tanganyika, Serengetti Plain, 
and Timbuktu. Upon Vanderbilt' 
return, Al Young will start compil 
ing a feature of the explorer's ad 
ventures. 



MANY UAPPY REIUHS 



Best wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 



July 18 



Walter Hiers 
Paul Perez 
Charles A. Stimson 



Arthur A. Lee 
Lupe VeleZ 
Richard Dix 




V 



as the best 
shorts, too! 



The most completeand 
varied line-up available 
from any distributor. 
Made possible only 
through arrangement 
with Educational Pictures 
and Movietone News, Inc. 
—packed with feature values 
because they're made by 
specialists in short feature 
production. Nineteen differ- 
ent classifications . . . each 
the cream of its kind. Hold 
on to this insert . . . the most 
valuable short subject cata- 
logue that has ever appeared. 








AM 



Turn over and you* 
see what we mean 



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- and th« 
sensational 

subjects on 

market 




gMtm^^JSS 



1 and more 

11 talking newsrceL . • • 

c ££*■"**■■** •*" 

} an c quicker news . . • 

L... better news.- qu^ 

ecause Fox Movietone New 



, see the world from a 
„* music! «*««•« • ' ' 



genuine news. 

e e WeekH 

* vn ; re Blends 
t hv a narrators voice. 




""" -T r including 

^f I XoldEdison Company 
her classics of the o 

3il ed down to one notous reel e 



, VttinB wisecracks by an off- 

?* SldC ' SP l Z l \ ^belly-Wb natural. 
stag e voice, j h your 

They will even make y ^ 

head oft. 







One reel eath 



* **; : tt « C^£ 

. ,men ..who grind as 

newsreel cameramen . _ 



i Plus a blood- 

danger rushes at ^ 

^ g ° ff -XC^nn:"The 
won't miss a tnk.by nt „ 

stuff is gasp-mducmg m 



reel each 




All Produced by Movietone News, Inc 



52 comedies that will be the basis of all the season's short sub 




TAR C0M6DY 
SPCCIALS 



The season's big news about 
comedies. Educational's Star 
Specials will bring you the 
biggest names 
youwillgettoex- 
ploitin any com- 
edy featurettes 
in 1933-1934 
— nothing less. 



"* 



3 







"inward" 

COMEDIES 

Star of stage, screen and 
radio, Tom Howard's fol- 
lowers are legion. Now 
riding the crest of popu- 
larity in one of the most 
successful programs on 
the air. A star name with 
a million dollars' worth 
of good will behind it. 



^©TfHcAL 

comEDiES 



The most famous of 
the world's great 
popular musical 
plays, in screen tab- 
loid versions, with 
new music added to 
their big hit melodies. 




© 



^ 2§? i 

MERMAID 

C O ME DIES 



It's an old Mermaid custom 
to get them laughing at 
the jump and keep them 
roaring to the fadeout. 
When it's real action and 
real laughs you want, 
book a Mermaid. 



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comedy field, ■»• ( him while 
"^^hC. A money name 



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foryo^M^^ 



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^J/l Mad -cap you* 



a^8BA€l^ 



The "TWO BLACK 

CROWS"-" W£ 

« uo any snow. 
en "P u ' ,, t u e 
Known to all ^e 

f-andom, their 
^ 'comedies otter a 

■^'''drawing P°* e '. ° 
bi feature calibre. 



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Mad-cap you* 
-,n whirlwind ro- 
mance / energe«c 

sports and frolic- 
some fun.The ir- 
resistible charm 
of boys and girls 
making hot-cha 
W hile youth 
blooms. Your 
"younger set 
Jill eat 'em up. 



^^*^ 






LIS 



iClasscomedy 
to bring the 
crowning bit 
of humorous 
entertainment 

to six big hit 
programs. 



PACKED WITH BELT- 



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X- 




Play Terry-Toons for that 100% appeal only a good cartoon 
can give. Smart, uproariously funny, musically perfect. 



Dramatic picturizations of current popular numbers sung by the 
millions. Drama, humor, and the best of the day's song hits. 




The tragic drama of Nature's bitter warfare, in a series 
icked with thrills in every foot of film. 




The 

TREASURE 

CHEST 



mm 



Every release a treasure chest packed with surprisii 
jewels of entertainment from all over the world . 



Fun - Thrills - Music - 
Romance - Variety in 

&duxxdlona€^ 
66 ONE-REEL 

ENTERTAINMENT GEMS 



BABY 



Produced by 
JACK HAYS 





The littlest stars with the great big pull. One season 
put the BABY STARS in the first rank of popular 




An entirely new and unique idea. Natural stories 
with their animal friends. Pictures with fresh, human 




Spots of rare enchantment, in all their >o' 
beauty, with romantic narrative by Claude Fie ni* 



DISTRIBUTED IN U. S. A. BY 
FOX FILM CORPORATION 






<±)c/<i<.<z/ic>uM Utcju 



sday, July 18, 1933 



THE 



-3&>* 



DAILY 



11 



UNITED ARTISTS 

CONVENTION 

CHATTER 



—CHICAGO 

TER a 12-hour flight from Burbank, 
I 'al., out of the skies came the advance 
of executives, and down to the Muni- 
Airport landing. As Al Lichtman, Walt 
Jy, Hal Home and Ed Finney crawled 
, the plane, the entire chorus of "Take 
ince" with Olsen and Johnson as the 
conspirators staged a welcome party, 
let's take a chance," said Hal. 



tager Eddie Groosman of the Chicago 

ige handled all arrangements at the 

for the delegates. No squawks yet. 

lur Horn of New Haven drove here in 
v 1933 model. Art was immediately 
ted with a book on traffic rules by the 
policeman. 



Levin of the Balaban and Katz outfit 
well pinch-hitter for the local press rep- 
i itivcs while they wile away the time. 



, my Green who wrote the song "I Cover 
aterfront'' and Bob Goldstein, Abe Ly- 
; manager, teamed up immediately. May- 
l a new vaudeville act. 

"Ipell Masters, the big contract man from 
to, issued challenges to everyone for 
i ions during the coming year. 



P. Sully was host at all screenings and 
his end of the job like a guy wot 
I how. 



Lee had a big basket of fruit sent 

Schenck's room, as a welcoming ges- 

When Leon heard that Mr. Schenck 

een delayed, he ran from his own 

clad in you-no-what and made a wreck 

fruit. "Never waste anything, not 

|jj peach," is Leon's slogan. 



il were the strange people roaming 
the Drake lobby looking for Sammy 
bR 1 Rumor has it that they were from 
iHStreets of Paris" at the Fair. 



ties Mulvey, Ed Finney and Monroe 
tvjhal pulled a tough assignment. They 
l|l greet the six beautiful Goldwyn girls 

(opped off at Chicago en route to the 
So, the girls nearly missed their train 



fy Gold and Paul Burger, as busy as 
rranging information for the salesmen, 
W to join the greeters' squad for a 
and dole out the glad-hands. 



IICA HOUSE ON THE AIR 

Wca, N. Y. — The Colonial, man- 
Mlby Eddie Selette, has gone on 
Niir three times daily under a 
" whereby radio audition con- 
i are held, with the station get- 
( ja break on new talent while 
Speater gets the publicity at no 



((PHONE BILLINGS UP 55% 

Vbphone short subject and 
\jjf billings for the entire sum- 
eriod are running 55 per cent 
jr than they did during the 
r period last year, Norman 
>ray, Vitaphone sales manager, 
yesterday. 



Northwest Outing 



linneapolis — About 200 members of 

exchanges and their families are 

cted to attend the annual outing 

22 at Waconia. Bill Shartin and 

■1 Workman have charge of arrange- 

i Its. 



A LITTLE from "LOTS" 



By RALPH WILK 



HOLLYWOOD 
£)ARRYL F. ZANUCK has signed 
those ace music writers, Al Du- 
bin and Harry Warren, to do the 
song and dance numbers for the 
musical extravaganza which will be 
Constance Bennett's first Twentieth 
Century picture for United Artists 
release. It is titled "Moulin Rouge." 
Raymond Griffith will direct. 

* * * 

Dick Powell, recovered from his 
illness, has started work in War- 
ner's "Footlight Parade," taking 
over his original role which was to 
have been done by Stanley Smith. 

Minor Watson signed by Columbia 
for "A Man's Castle." 

* * * 

Sarah Y. Mason and Victor Heer- 
man, signed by RKO as a writing 
team, will do the scripts of "Boy 
Meets Girl" and "Wild Birds" after 

finishing "Little Women." 

* * * 

Richard Wallace, back on the Par- 
mount lot to direct the Charles R. 
Rogers production, "Eight Girls in a 
Boat," regards this German story as 
a better screen possibility than 
"Maedchen in Uniform." 

Wally Albright, Margaret Arm- 
strong, Irving Bacon, Geneva Mit- 
chell and Arthur Hoyt added to 
RKO's "Ann Vickers." 

* * * 

Phillips Holmes for "Nana," Sam- 
uel Goldwyn-United Artist release. 

* * * 

Robert Presnell has put two more 
companies into production at First 
National: "The Kennell Murder 
Case," S. S. Van Dine mystery, and 
"Massacre," Robert Gessner novel, 
directed by Michael Curtiz and Mer- 
vyn LeRoy, respectively, with Pres- 
nell supervising. 

* * * 

Gloria Stuart will be Eddie Can- 
tor's love interest in "Roman Scan- 
dals," Samuel Goldwyn picture for 
United Artists. 



Edward H. Griffith has been in 
several huddles with Carl Laemmle. 
Jr., and reports have it the director 
may sign a long term deal with Uni- 
versal. 

Pert Kelton in RKO's "Flying 
Down to Rio." 

Lewis Milestone to marry Mrs. 
Jules Glaenzer after she gets her 
divorce in Paris. 

* * * 

Jacqueline Roth and Michael Cud- 
ahy honeymooning. 

* # * 

F. X. Bushman, Jr., and Gertrude 
Wood have taken our marriage pa- 
pers. 

* * * 

Joan Blondell will have the lead 
in Warners' "Havana Widows," with 
Aline MacMahon, Allan Jenkins, 
Frank McHugh and Guy Kibbee. 
Earl Baldwin has finished the script. 
Ray Enright will direct. 

* * * 

Dwight Taylor signed by RKO to 
write screen play of "Behold We 
Live." 

* # * 

Margaret Sullavan, upon finishing 
work in Universal's "Only Yester- 
day," will start in "Good Red 
Bricks" for the same company. 

* * * 

Cyril Hume is writing the screen 

play of RKO's "Flying Down to 
Rio." 

* * * 

Dorothy Mackaill, Regis Toomey 
and Dorothy LiBaire have been sign- 
ed by M. H. Hoffman to head the 
cast of Allied Pictures' special, "Red 
Kisses," from the stage play. Alan 
Hale, Will and Gladys Ahearn, Har- 
vey Clark, Mary Kornman, Viva 
Tattersall, Fred Malatesta, Mae 
Busch, Al Hill, Michael Visaroff, 
Brooks Benedict, Franklin Parker, 
Larry McGrath and Jimmy Aubrey 
also are in the cast. Phil Rosen is 
directing from the adaptation by 
Adele Buffington. 



OMAHA OPERATOR ORDINANCE 

Omaha — Local operators and ex- 
hibitors have at last agreed on a 
new city ordinance to govern licens- 
ing of projectionists. Plan passed 
by the city council provides for a 
board of examiners composed of a 
representative of the fire depart- 
ment, the city electrician and city 
building inspector. Former board 
also included one exhibitor and one 
projectionist. The new law will re- 
duce the 60-day residence require- 
ment to 30 days. 



VALLIE ENDS CHICAGO VISIT 

Chicago — Youth Vallie, the Little 
Rascal of the Our Gang comedies, 
has just concluded a week at A Cen- 
tury of Progress. He made a pic- 
ture at Hollywood-at-the-Fair dur- 
ing his stay. 



RKO THEATER ASSIGNMENTS 

George French, formerly assistant 
manager at the Keith Memorial, 
Boston, has been transferred to the 
management of the RKO Albee, 
Providence. J. Sayer Seely, former- 
ly assistant manager and treasurer 
of the Dyker, Brooklyn, has been 
transferred to the Regent in the 
same capacity. Arthur A. Gilgar, 
formerly at the Regent as assistant 
manager, is now at the Dyker. 



RE-ISSUING CARNERA FILM 

Vitaphone is re-issuing "The Big- 
ger They Are," a two-reel comedy 
starring Primo Camera, new heavy- 
weight boxing champion of the 
World, who made this film at the 
Brooklyn Vitaphone studio two 
years ago. 



MONOGRAM 

CONVENTION 

CLOSEUPS 



CHICAGO 

W. RAY JOHNSTON and Mrs. Johnston 
arrived on the Twentieth Century. Ray 
will continue to the coast with Trem Carr 
via auto. "Let us pray for dry weather," 
said Ray as he and Trem bent their elbows. 



Business must be good for Trem Carr. He 
arrived with Mrs. Carr in a new Lincoln 
coupe. 



Mr. and Mrs. Nat Lefton and T. S. 
Jossey head of the Cleveland-Cincinnati dele- 
gation also were driver-in-ers. 



Eddie Golden, having rehearsed his speech 
at the New York and New Orleans claims 
he is letter-perfect and can rattle it off with 
one eye closed. 



Irving Mandel, local exchangeman, is ace 
host to the gang. 



Jim Alexander of Pittsburgh blew into the 
Windy City. He missed the other meets and 
was rarin' to go. 

Nat Steinberg and Barney Rosenthal from 
St. Louis, pioneer Monogram men. are just 
puain dyed-in-the-wool optimists. They asked 
for extra blankets. 



First of Resolute's 12 
Starts Work This Month 

(Continued from Page 1) 

is president of Resolute, with Alfred 
T. Mannon as vice-president in 
charge of production and Alec Moss 
as vice-president in charge of ad- 
vertising, publicity and sales promo- 
tion. Other stories in the lineut) in- 
clude "That's Life," by Whitney 
Bolton; "The Substitute Prisoner," 
by Max Marcin; "That Hollywood 
Redhead," by Tom Gibson; "The 
Engen'c Baby," by Gerald Bacon: 
"The ,* dventurous Sex," by Howard 
Estabrook; "School for Scandal," by 
R. B. Sheridan; "Stepsisters," bv 
Gilbert Seward: "Sorcery," by Louis 
Joseph Vance; "Beauty Contest." by 
Edward I. Green; "Angels Without 
Wirier." bv Paul Perez; "Auctioned 
Off," by Vivian Grey. 



MINNESOTA REOPENS AUG. 15 

Minneapolis — Reopening of the 
Minnesota, largest in the northwest, 
which has been dark for the past 
two years, has been set for about 
Aug. 15. The Minnesota Amuse- 
ment Co., controlling Publix thea- 
ters in Minneapolis and other north- 
west cities is reported to have sign- 
ed a 10-year lease. 



Smash Opening 

San Francisco — With such a crush in 
the box-office line that four women 
fainted and eight extra ushers had to 
be put on by Manager Allan Warshaur 
to handle the crowds, Warner's "Gold 
Diggers of 1933" shattered every at- 
tendance and box-office record in its 
local opening at the Paramount. A 
terrific campaign, in which Harry Maiz- 
lich and George Bilson of the Warner 
coast staff cooperated, preceded the 
opening. Governor Rolph and Mayor 
Rossi were among the notables present. 



J..A 



THE 



■Z*H 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 18, II 



YOU WILL 
LIKE THE 
"NEW DEAL" 
NUMBER OF 
FILM DAILY 
BECAUSE IT 
WILL BE 
A LIBERAL 
EDUCATION 
IN THE PAST 
PRESENT and 
FUTURE OF 
THIS GREAT 

INDUSTRY 

• 




Utica, N. Y. — Viola Bunce, cashier 
at the Colonial, eloped a few days 
ago with Ashley Fadding, her boy- 
hood sweetheart. 



Sarasota, Fla. — Reorganization of 
the Sarasota has resulted in the 
granting of a corporation charter to 
the Sarasota Theater and Amuse- 
ment Co., Inc. Directors are Flossie 
S. and G. M. Ragan and W. H. Sur- 
rency. 



Charlotte, N. C— Herbert F. Kin- 
cey, executive of the Publix-Kincey 
chain of theaters, has been appoint- 
ed to membership on the vocational 
service committee of the Charlotte 
Rotary Club. 



Charlotte, N. C. — Don Nichols, 
manager of Warners' Broadway the- 
ater, has been elected "tail twister" 
of the Charlotte Lions Club. 



Charlotte, N. C— The Paramount 
at Farmville has reopened under the 
management of Worth Stewart. 



East Rochester, N. Y.— The Rialto 
is now managed by Harold Raives, 
who formerly managed the Regent 
Century in Rochester. 



Williamson, N. Y.— The Star has 
been taken over by Townsend & 
Pickerell, formerly managed by L. 
Astrachan and B. Freedman. 



Baldwinsville, N. Y. — The Variety 
has been purchased from the Bald- 
winsville Bank by Leavensworth 
Steele, who has renamed it Steele's 
Paramount. 



New Brunswick, N. J. — The Opera 
House has reopened. 



Waterloo, la. — The Palace here, 
a unit of the Blank circuit, has 
closed for the summer. It will re- 
open about Sept. 1. 



Greenville, 111. — Sunday shows will 
be permitted here. The city council 
has amended a, city ordinance to 
eliminate restrictions. 



Boosting Admission Scale 
Considered by Ohio Exhibs 

{Continued from Page 1) 

creased costs of operations the su- 
burban and small town exhibitor is 
seriously hurt by the prevailing low 
admissions. If theater owners are 
successful in forcing higher admis- 
sions, it will not become effective 
until Sept. 1, Wood says. 

Managers of downtown houses de- 
clared that, although all necessities 
are advancing, no change would be 
made in admissions for the present. 
The top figure is 40 cents, which 
avoids the federal tax and will like- 
wise avoid the new 10 per cent state 
tax on everything above 40 cents. 
The top will not be advanced, it is 
believed, but there may be advances 
in the lower brackets at the start 
of the winter season. 



Texas Exhibitors Agree 
On New Film Code Points 

{Continued from Page 1J 
tion and zoning would be fair and non-dis- 
criminatory if based on admission charges; 
unreasonable discrimination in favor of cir- 
cuits (whether producer owned or individu- 
ally owned) in booking is unfair; compul- 
sory block booking is unfair; no new the- 
ater should be built unless the need for it is 
first established before proper authorities to 
be set up in the code ; fixing prices of ad- 
mission so low as to make impossible fair 
wages or fair rental of product is unjust; 
overbuying of pictures to prevent a competi- 
tor from getting them is unfair; double fea- 
turing or too many changes of program to 
keep competitors from obtaining pictures is 
unfair. 

The Texas code was framed by a 
committee comprising Col. H. A. 
Cole, True Thompson of Dallas, 
Mrs. Martha McSpadden of Electra, 
Rubin Frels of Victoria and Hardy 
Cluck of Victoria. 



May Appeal to Governor 
On Cutthroat Competition 

Columbus — In view of the strong 
statement issued by Governor White 
that he would not hesitate to use 
the drastic powers in the Carney 
Law, the Ohio legislative act sup- 
plementing the National Recovery 
Act to bring Ohio industries in line 
if he sees fit, P. J. Wood, business 
manager of the M.P.T.O., de- 
clared that if the cutthroat competi- 
tion among certain exhibitors in 
Ohio is continued he will urge upon 
the governor that the situation 
among exhibitors is cleared up. The 
Ohio law gives the governor almost 
unlimited powers in regulating in- 
dustry within the state. 



Columbia Names Officials 
In British Organization 

London — Columbia Pictures' new- 
ly organized British unit has been 
registered as a private company un- 
der the title of Columbia (British) 
Productions, Ltd., with nominal capi- 
tal of $120,000, and the following 
directors have been announced: 
Henry H. S. Wright, Harry Cohn, 
George R. Webb, Jack Cohn, Wil- 
liam P. Webb, Joseph Friedman and 
Charles Coles. 



BROCK COLOR FOR FILM 

Brock, well known artist and 
hand color expert for film, has com- 
pleted coloring a number of se- 
quences in Ideal Pictures' "The Next 
War." The production was com- 
piled by Morris J. Kandel, presi- 
dent of Ideal, and the narrative 
written by Forrest Izard. Alyn B. 
Carrick handled the editing. 



THEATER CHANGES! 

Reported by Film Boards of Trade] 



VIRGINIA 
Closings 

LOUISA — Louisa. OCCOQUAN — 1 
WYTHEV1LLE— Opera House. 

WASHINGTON 
Changes in Ownership 

SEATTLE— Royal, transferred to G. 
Cooper by Creary & Tucker; Roy> 
transferred to W. B. Ackles by Far 
Theaters. VANCOUVER— Castle, 1, 
i erred to Evergreen Amusement Co. bjj 
West Coast 

Openings 

FORKS— Forks, by Mrs. Grace Flet' 
10NE— lone, by G. E. Widger. KEf 
WICK— Liberty, by Inland Theaters, , 
ODESSA— Empress, by Bragg & OtttJ 
SOAP LAKE— Sunset, by John CI| 
TEKO A— Empire, by Rex Hevel. \l 
BUR— Liberty, by Peter Faldberg. WAl 
BURG— Neace, by D. D. Neace. YAKI 
— Liberty and Majestic, by First Natl 
Theaters. GOLDENDALE— Star, by 1 
man Ward. 

Closings 
OROVILLE— Oro. SPOKANE— Post Si 
WEST VIRGINIA 
Changes in Ownership 

HUNTINGTON— Strand, transferred to 1 
Roomer by Third Ave. Amusement ' 
MARLINTON — Seneca, transferred tc| 
G. Hoover by C. C. Clendenin. OAKH 
— Lyric, transf erre dto S. D. Morton , 
Lyric Theater Co. PARKERSBUR 
Strand, transferred to P. W. Barrett ' 
Publix. 

Openings 

BROWNTON— Cosmar. HARMON—., 
gheoy. MARLINTON— Seneca. Nl 
BURG— Crystal. NEW CUMBERLAN : 

Manos. 

Closings 

BLACKVILLE— Blackville. HUNTING! 
—Strand. INSTITUTE— Institute. MA 
SON— Rialto. THOMAS — Sut 

WHITES VILLE— Liberty. 

WISCONSIN 
Changes in Ownership 

CUDAHY — Cudahy, transferred to Otto 
ders by Martin Grimm. ELLSWORTI 
Ellsworth, transferred to H. L. Med 
by Conrad Mohr. FOND DU LAC— F 
du Lac, transferred to Fond du 
Amusement Corp. by Fox-Midweico. LA' 
MILLS — Majestic, transferred to Tho» 
Lees by M. Wodke. MILWAUKEE 
Columbia, transferred to Sam Kaplan 
Jule Kaplan; Oriental, transferred 
Oriental Theater Corp. by State Wide Ti 
aters; Tower, transferred to Tower Ttj 
ter Corp. by State Wide Theaters; Vio 
transferred to R. J. Patterson. NEW L, 
BON — Home (formerly New L 15 "" 1 
transferred to G. F. Baker by Viola F< 

Openings 

3ENTON — Blende, by C. M. VaiL ELI 
WORTH— Ellsworth, by H. L. McGoi! 
GREEN BAY — Columbus Auditorium, 
M. Cunningham. MUSCODA— Musco 
by Andrew Peterson. 

Closings 

MARSHFIELD— Adler. MILWAUKEE 
Frrn and Majestic. 

WYOMING 
Opening 

EVANSTON— Orpheum, by Harmon Pfl 

" 

WENDELSCHAEFER DIES 

Providence — Col. Felix R. We 
delschaefer, 65, manager of the I 
Providence Opera House for 
years, died last week at his coul 
try estate in Thompson, Conn. 



Repeal Operator Law 

Sheboygan, Wis. — An ordinance re- 
quiring that one operator for each pro- 
jection machine has been repealed by 
the common council. The vote was 
13 to 3. 



"sday, July 18, 1933 



—JZfr* 



DAILY 



13 



A. TO START MOVE 
FOR HIGHER PRICES 



(Continued from Page 1) 

I achtman at yesterday's opening 
on of the U. A. convention at 
Drake Hotel here. 
chtman said the film business 
ot be monopolized, that theaters 
ot be operated from swivel 
ps in New York, and that the 
I're of this business rests with 
i indent exhibitors. Pictures 
be sold like bunches of bana- 
uand block booking must go, he 
li .red. The entire industry is 
I starting from scratch and the 
[ important thing is a good pic- 
i Lichtman said. 
i the opening session Al Licht- 
i spoke on the 1932-33 pictures. 
) y's speakers, in addition to 
I man, will include Harry Gold, 
b is to talk on "The United Ar- 
! Salesman"; S. M. Horowitz, on 
United Artists Branch Man- 
[,'; Hal Home, on "Advertising, 
l Ditation and Publicity"; Ed Fin- 
Ijon "The Press"; Monroe Green- 
on "Exhibitor Cooperation," 
i' Jim Mulvey and Walt Disney. 
] htman today will outline the 
t 34 United Artists product and 
e give instructions on the Dis- 
C eleases. 



le Elliott Brings 
459,000 Feet of Film 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Tatsuta Maru. The film is 

[Man Eater," a Fox release. 
Spearing, who wrote the con- 
f, returned in the Elliott party. 



. 



n Houses Reopened 
ii Northwest Territory 

(Continued from Page 1) 

lore, and Opera House, St 
'las, N. D. R. K. Paul is the 
)wner of the Ivanhoe, while 
pera House in St. Thomas is 
)wned by McCarthy Bros. 



900 BOSTON HOLDUP 

on — Manager Joseph Marquis 

Egyptian and his wife were 

yesterday in a Brighton 

ent hall by bandits who 

i them to go to the theater 

djiand over about $900 in re- 



C *MEL MYERS IN SHOW 

F adena, Cal. — Carmel Myers 
M in a stage show at the Play- 
li here today with a company 
sjfeen players. 



Culbertson On Air 

i Culbertson, the bridge expert who 
; some shorts for RKO to be re- 
Isd next season, will broadcast to- 
t from London in connection with 
international bridge contest. 



SHORT SUBJECT REVIEWS 



"We're On Our Way" 

Ideal 9 mins. 

Travel Novelty 

Lively and interesting film that 
depicts the modes of travel in coun- 
tries circling the globe, showing how 
ancient modes of locomotion still sur- 
vive in the Orient, and coming down 
to the modern western methods with 
fast planes, the German rocket car, 
modern flyers on the steel rails, and 
some freak methods of transporta- 
tion. Forrest Izzard delivers a good 
interpretative narration. 



"Canal Gypsies" 

Ideal 8 mins. 

Rural Scenic 

A beautiful scenic showing some 
gorgeous rural scenery in England 
as the camera traces the course of 
a canal boat as it wends its leisurely 
way along the winding waterway. 
Prepared by Allyn B. Carrick, with 
an appropriate narration by Forrest 
Izzard. The photography is excep- 
tionally good, and it carries the at- 
mosphere of Old England perfectly, 
showing how this old-fashioned canal 
system still survives as it was a 
hundred years ago. 



"Following the Horses" 

Fox 7 mins. 

Exciting Horse Stuff 

The first contribution in a new 
Fox series entitled "Adventures of 
a Newsreel Cameraman" offers a 
compilation of library shots dealing 
with horses in all sort of exciting 
action. Thrilling races, jumps, etc., 
occupies the footage. The narrator 
impersonates a newsreel cameraman 
making the scenes. 



"Desert Patrol" 

Fox 7 mins. 

Fine Camera Art 

Another gloriously - photographed 
unit in the "Magic Carpet" series. 
This concerns itself with an Italian 
desert patrol in northern Africa. 
There's not much action in it but the 
camera work is exquisite. Class 
audiences in particular will cheer 
for this one. 



"Playtime At the Zoo" 

(British Instructional) 

Gaumont-British 10 mins. 

Animal Pix 

One of the British series with an 
English narrator taking you through 
a visit to the Zoo, where the various 
animals are seen mostly disporting 
themselves at play. Some very good 
camera work and unusual shots of 
animals that will please the kids, 
as well as their parents. 

"The Next War" 

Ideal 26 mins. 

War of the Future 

A very well edited film with nar- 
rative by Burnet Hershey and edited 



by Allyn B. Carrick which is a pow- 
erful document against war. It 
shows shots of the earliest types of 
known warfare from ancient Rome 
with the gladiators down through 
the centuries to the knights in ar- 
mor, and finally modern warfare as 
exemplified in the World War. Then 
comes the sequences visualizing what 
is to be expected in the war of the 
future, with the new types of tanks, 
bombing planes, submarines, poison 
gas, etc. 



"Goofy Games" 

Ideal 8 mins. 

Novelty Sports 

Good compilation of a variety of 
short shots covering all sorts of 
modern sports, as well as many lit- 
tle known outdoor pastimes indulged 
in by various nationalities the world 
over. Here are games that have 
never been screened before, which 
to us may appearly slightly goofy, 
but the participants seem to take 
them very seriously. Good novelty 
reel that should click. 



"Betty Boop's Big Boss" 

(Betty Boop Series) 

Paramount 7 mins. 

Pep Cartoon 

Max Fleischer's cartoon hotcha girl 
Betty Boop has an adventure with 
her new boss who tries to make love 
to her the first day she is on the 
job as his secretary. Betty sends in 
.he alarm, and the navy, fire brigade 
and police reserves rush to her 
'•escue, along with the state troopers. 
But by the time they tear the build- 
ing down they find Betty likes the 
boss' attentions and is perfectly rec- 
onciled. Good and jazzy with the 
modern touch. 



JAMES R. GRAINGER 
JOINS UNIVERSAL 



(Continued from Page 1) 
this possible. Laemmle, R. H. Coch- 
rane and Grainger tried to induce 
Schlaifer to remain with Universal, 
it was stated, but he preferred to 
resign and will leave in a few days 
for a vacation before announcing his 
new plans. 

Laemmle, in making the announce- 
ment, said: 

"I am delighted to have the op- 
portunity of announcing James R. 
Grainger as our new general sales 
manager. I have admired him and 
his work for years. I feel too that 
this is a very auspicious time, both 
for Universal and for Mr. Grainger. 
It is a time when leadership of the 
type of which he is capable may pro- 
duce unbounded good, not only for 
Universal but for the industry. I 
feel confident that we are entering 
a bullish market and one in which 
this industry will make a marked 
advance if properly led and if given 
the proper product." 



Oscar Hanson to Handle 
Educational in Canada 

(Continued from Page 1) 

in Canada in 1922 and remained in 
charge until 1930, when he resigned 
to become sales manager of Tiffany. 

The new distribution arrangement 
becomes effective next Monday, at 
which time the Empire Films organ- 
ization will move into the six offices 
maintained by Educational in To- 
ronto, Montreal, St. John, Winnipeg, 
Calgary and Vancouver. 

Hanson is associated in Empire 
Films with Mr. N. L. Nathanson, 
president of Famous Players Cana- 
dian Corp. Empire Films handles 
B.I. P. product in Canada and also 
holds a franchise for Majestic Pic- 
tures. Hanson will also continue 
his activities as general manager of 
Associated Theaters, with more than 
100 houses in Canada. 



U 



HELL'S HOLIDAY 

9l F_9JW.4. s -_A ve S t o r m ing 
To Sensational Business 



Distributed by 
SUPERB PICTURES, 729 Seventh Ave., New York 



M 



»„«. 



THE SONG OF SONGS/' a magic melody 
that brought her three loves — love of the 
senses, love of the heart, love of sacrifice and 
pity — each she found and each she yielded 
to. MARLENE DIETRICH in "THE SONG OF 
SONGS/' A Rouben Mamoulian Production 
with Brian Aherne, Lionel Atwill, Alison 
Skipworth. A Paramount Picture. 





The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Now Fifteen Years Old 



>L. LXIII. NCX15 



v3J NEW yCCr, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 1933 



<S CENTS 



linimumbT&&&tnnounced by U. A. —May Go to 40 

fARNERSJO HOLD 3 ROUND-TABLE SALES MEETS 

roducers Must Adopt A Universal Policy—Thalberg 



Two Signs 

. drawing 'em without blare 

— By Don Carle Gillette 



' PPING for a night in a down-east vil- 
' ige while vacation touring, we noted 
i lovie houses almost next door to each 
r advertising their current attractions. 

2 displayed a conservative printed 
; with only the words "Jean Harlow 

lark Gable in 'Hold Your Man'," and 

i packing them in. 
I) other had "most daring drama," 
h s," "shocking" and other sex-implying 
F atives emblazoned all over its front, 
c le cashier was reading "True Stories." 



l LEAST a couple of good pointers 
an be taken from this incident. 
1 is that when you have something 
the public wants, you don't need to 

I ird them with adjectives in order to 

I leir patronage. 

jither is that exclamatory catchlines 
will not pull people in to see a pic- 

< vhich lacks intrinsic appeal in story, 

I ir production. 

• 
I will note also that the first theater 
is not running any risk of alienating 
lodwill of its customers, 
nade no claims or representations that 
not deliver 100 per cent, 
dvertised Harlow and Gable in "Hold 
Man" and the folks received Har- 
fd Gable in "Hold Your Man"; wheth- 
not the picture was as good as folks 
ed, they had no kick coming against 
leater. 

| those who fell for the "most sensa- 
theme ever filmed" bunk could have 
six kinds of a liar out of the man- 
and taken their business elsewhere 
time. 

>l| k APS one of the best rules to fol- 
h in movie advertising is to avoid all 
irives which cannot be visualized into 
ling concrete by those who read 



nsational," "astounding" and "stu- 
■ js are just wasted words because 
Rpnjure up nothing definite in the 

in,! 

jwhen you advertise that you're show- 
fae West or James Cagney or Janet 
Ir, boy, you're really talking the 
, fan's language! 



M-G-M Executive Plans 

to Offer New Method 

in Production 

Producers must adopt a universal 
policy in production technique, treat- 
ment and general presentation be- 
fore films will be acceptable to the 
now very critical public, Irving Thal- 
berg told The Film Daily yesterday 
upon his return from Europe with 
his wife, Norma Shearer. 

Thalberg has formed a new plan 
(.Continued on Page 6) 



FRANKLIN PREDICTS 
ATTENDANCE SPURT 



President Roosevelt's reconstruc- 
tion policy and the results of the In- 
dustrial Recovery Act will tremen- 
dously benefit the motion picture 
industry, Harold B. Franklin de- 
clared to The Film Daily yesterday. 

"Increased wages and shorter 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Kuykendall Urges Support 
Of Hollywood-at-the-Fair 

Chicago — Declaring that Hol- 
lywood exhibit at the Century 
of Progress offers an unusual 
opportunity for the film indus- 
try to meet its public and create 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Television Group Formed 

Chicago — National Television Ass'n, 
with Martin J. Wade, Jr. of Chicago as 
president, John V. L. Hogan of New 
York as vice-president, and Arthur 
Stringer of Chicago as secretary-treas- 
urer, was formed at a meeting of 50 
television manufacturers and experts 
here. Wade said the group will work 
to protect the television industry in 
allotment of wave bands by the fed- 
eral radio commission. 



RICHARDS AWARDED 
SALARY AS RECEIVER 



New Orleans — A salary of $600 a 
month dating from January 27 was 
ordered paid E. V. Richard as re- 
ceiver for Saenger Theaters, with an 
additional $270 a month for services 

(Continued on Page 8) 



21 Exhibits Already Set 
For Supply Dealers' Meet 

Chicago — About 25 firms already 
have engaged exhibit space at the 
convention of the Independent The- 
ater Dealers Ass'n to be held July 
28-31 at the Hotel Stevens. Among 
the companies, as reported by J. E. 
Robin, president of the organiza- 
tion, are Holmes Projector, Da-Lite 
Screen, Wenzel Co., Enterprise Op- 
tical, Continental Electric, Imperial 
Electric, Brenkert Light Projector, 
Neumade Products, National Car- 
(Continued on Page 8) 



United Artists Announces 

Minimum of 30 for 1 933-34 



Motion Picture Division 
Continuing Under Golden 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Though reduced in 
personnel to two members, the Mo- 
tion Picture Division of the Depart- 
ment of Commerce will be continued 
with N. D. Golden now acting as 
chief. C. J. North, chief of the Divi- 
sion for years, has left. Golden, who 
was his assistant, will endeavor to 
keep up all phases of the service. 



Chicago — In announcing the larg- 
est program in the history of United 
Artists, Al Lichtman yesterday told 
the sales convention at the Drake Ho- 
tel that the organization would re- 
lease a minimum of 30 features next 
season, with a likelihood that the 
total might run to 35 or 40. This 
means an output three times as 
large as that of any previous U. A. 
year. 

Mary Pickford, Charles Chaplin 
(Continued on Page 6) 



Only District and Branch 

Managers to Attend 

Warner Confabs 

Three straight-from-the-shoulder 
business meetings, attended only by 
district and branch managers, will 
be held by Warner-First National 
this year for discussion of new sea- 
son's sales policies and product. The 
sessions will take place at the Wal- 
dorf-Astoria Hotel, New York, July 
31-Aug. 1; Drake Hotel, Chicago, 

(Continued on Page 4) 



MISSISSIPPI EXHIRS 
APPROVE MPTOA CODE 



Jackson, Miss. — Unanimous ap- 
proval of the iproposed exhibition 
code drawn up by the M.P.T.O.A. 
executive committee was voted at the 
meeting of Mississippi exhibitors 
held here Monday. The gathering, 
called by President Ed Kuykendall 
of the M.P.T.O.A., was primarily a 
protest meeting against the state 
admission tax, and 90 per cent of 
all exhibitors in the state attended, 
with Kuykendall presiding. Speak- 
ers included Gov. Conner, Lieut.- 
Gov. Murphree and Tax Commis- 
sioner Alf Stone, as well as many 
prominent exhibitors. Score charges 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Para. Wins Dismissal 

Of Bondholder's Suit 

Motion by Paramount Publix for 
dismissal of the suit brought by 
Robert S. Levy, bondholder, against 
the company and various banks in- 
volved in a loan, has been granted 
in the State Supreme Court. 



May Boost Prices in Fall 

Canton, 0. — Although downtown 
houses may retain present prices for 
the time being, it is indicated that 
suburban exhibitors will probably boost 
admissions in the fall. Four local 
neighborhood theaters have been grind- 
ing at a dime for several months, with 
owners complaining that they can't 
make any money at it. 



THE 



■3&>*. 



DAILY 



Wednesday, July 19] 




V*L LXI1I. No. 15 Wid.Jily 11.1S33 PriciSCints 



JOHN W. AUCOATE 



Editir and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holid»y» 
at 1650 Broadway, New York, N. V, 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
and General Manager; Arthur \V. Eddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at N.w York, 
N. Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, >650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
Phone, Circle 7-4736, 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London — 
Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wardour St., \V. I. Berlin — Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
— P. A. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK 



Am. Seat 

Columbia Picts. vtc. 

Con. Fm. Ind 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. 

East. Kodak 

Fox Fm. "A" 

Loews. Inc 

Metro-Goldwyn, pfd. 
Paramount ctfs 

Pathe Exch 

do "A" 

RKO 

Warner Bros 



High 
6Vi 

23? 8 
4% 

12 

875g 
4% 

30? 8 

20 
2V 8 
23 8 
9% 

45/8 
83 8 



MARKET 

Net 
Low Close Chg. 



6'/4 
23 
45/8 

11V& 



6!'2 + 

23 — 
434 -f 
HV2 - 



B5% 863i 



43 8 + Vs 

293 8 

20 

2 — i 8 
23 8 — ! 8 

9V 2 

4'/ 2 + Vb 
8—14 



NEW YORK CURB 

Gen. Th. Eq. pfd. . . 3 4 1 

Technicolor 85 8 

Trans-Lux 3}'s 



4' 8 
29 
20 

2 

2 

9 

43 8 

71/2 

MARKET 
1-16 11-16 —1-16 



V-. 



51 i 



1 



NEW YORK BOND MARKET 



Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40. 
Gen. Th. Eq.6s40ctfs. 

Keith A-0 6s46 

Loew 6s 41 ww 

Paramount 6s 47 ... 
Para. 6s 47 ctfs . . 
Par. By. 5' 2 s 51. 
Par. 5' 2 s 50 .... 
Par. 5 Vis 50 ctfs... 
Pathe 7s 37 



9 

73 4 
57' 2 
83'i 
31 
30 
37 
31 
30 
86 



Warners 6s39 40 



7 
55 

82' 8 
287 8 
26' 2 
36 
28' 2 
30 
85 
39 



7'/ 8 
57' 2 
83' 4 
31 
30 
37 
31 
30 
86 
39 



- 45 S 

+ y 4 

+ 23/ 4 

+ 3 

+ VA 

+ 3 

+ 3 

+ 1 

— Vi 



NEW YORK PRODUCE ECXHANGE 
Para. Publix 2' 8 2 2' 8 



CHESTERFIELD 

Announces 

THAT THE TITLE OF 

LOVE IS LIKE THAT 

HAS BEEN CHANGED 

TO 

LOVE IS DANGEROUS 



1540 B'wav. 



N. Y. C. 



Czech Film Executive 
Studying U. S. Methods 

Josef Hlinomaz, director of Fu- 
turum-Film-Co., distributing com- 
pany, and also head of Legiafilm. 
producing company, is in New York 
from Czechoslovakia for a study of 
the American film market. He also 
may. acquire some product suitable 
for showing in his country. Czecho- 
slovakia now has about 1,000 sound 
theaters, in addition to some 800 
still silent, says Hlinomaz. He also 
is looking over television appara- 
tus and other equipment. During 
his three weeks' stay in New York, 
he will make his headquarters at the 
William Sloane House. 



REUBENSON AGAIN WINS 

The State Court of Appeals has 
handed down a decision declaring 
the arrest of Reginald Reubenson on 
July 9, 1932, on the charge by Rich- 
ard J. Pearl for failure to account, 
was improperly obtained. The arrest 
previously was held illegal by the 
Appellate Division of the Supreme 
Court last February. Malcolm Wolf 
is Reubenson's attorney. 



OPERATORS ASK RECEIVER 

Newark, N. J. — An order direct- 
ing Operators' Local 244 to show 
cause on July 25 why a receiver 
should not be appointed has been 
obtained by 11 junior members, who 
charge the union officials with being 
beneficiaries of various sums of 
money from the organization's 
funds. 



MISS BARRYMORE LUNCHEON 

Ethel Barrymore will be guest of 
honor at a luncheon given tomorrow 
at the Hotel Gotham by Major Ed- 
ward Bowes, managing director of 
the Capitol, where Miss Barrymore 
opens Friday for her first personal 
appearance in a movie house. 



LOWE-McLAGLEN TEAMED 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Edmund Lowe and 
Victor McLaglen will be reunited 
for one picture next season, a 
Charles R. Rogers production called 
"No More Women," by E. Richard 
Schayer. 



HARRY D. WILSON DEAD 
West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Harry D. Wilson, 
veteran film press agent, died yes- 
terday following an operation. 



"HELL'S HOLIDAY" HOLDS 

"Hell's Holiday," war film re- 
leased by Superb Pictures, is being 
held a second week at the Mayfair. 



M-G-M TITLE SET 

"Beauty For Sale" is announced 
as the final title of the M-G-M pic- 
turel formerly known as "Beauty 
Parlor." 



SUPREME ADDS 5 SALESMEN 

Supreme Screen Service has just 
placed five new salesmen in east- 
ern territories on its New Deal 
Trailers, it is announced by M. 
Wax. 



Eight Exploitation Men 
Assigned for "Captured" 

Eight exploitation men, operating 
under the supervision of S. Charles 
Einfeld, Warner executive in charge 
of advertising and publicity, have 
been instructed to hold themselves 
in readiness to shoot out on the road 
at an hour's notice to handle the 
road show campaigns on "Captured" 
in key situations. The men are Lee 
Blumberg, Bert Perkins, Charley 
Curran and Arnold Albert, operat- 
ing out of New York; George Bilson 
and Harry Maizlish, Los Angeles; 
Allen Glenn, Dallas, and Sam Clark, 
Chicago. 



BOOKED FOR BROADWAY 

"Strange Case of Tom Mooney" 
and "Shriek in the Night," First Di- 
vision releases, will be double-fea- 
tured at the Cameo starting Fri- 
day. 

"Savage Gold," instead of "Sav- 
age Girl," will be the next attrac- 
tion at the Mayfair. Hollywood Ex- 
change is releasing it. 



BRITISH FILM FOR RIALTO 

"Sleepless Nights," British pro- 
auction with Stanley Lupino and 
Polly Walker heading the cast, opens 
at the Rialto with a preview to- 
morrow night. Arthur Mayer also 
has booked a two-reel special, 
"World's Greatest Thrills," for the 
same program. 



,oming a 



nd G 



on 



TOM MEIGHAN, IRVING THALBl 
NORMA SHEARER were among arrival' 
day on the Majestic from abroad. 
MERSEREAU also arrived by the same 
a temporary leave from the Joinville s 

MRS. EDDIE CANTOR and five 1 
are aboard the Virginia en route fro 
fornia to New York. Eddie will follow 
two months, with plans for a Broadw 
role with a view to transferring it late 
screen. 

E. M. LOEW, New England independ 
cuit operator, is on his way back from 

GEORGE KAMEN of Walt Disney's N 
offices sails today on the Manhattan 
don. 

MORT BLUMENSTOCK left by pla 
terday for Pittsburgh to confer with Hi 
mine and Joe Feldman about the camp 
"Voltaire" which will have its world 
at the Stanley there Aug. 4. 



KAMEN TO LOCATE IX LO. 

George Kamen, connected 
Walt Disney's New York offic 
some time, sails today on the 
hattan for London to establish 
quarters as European represer 
for Disney. He will confei 
Murray Silverstone, London 
sentative for United Artists, r< 
to duplicating the same ar 
ments in Europe that preva 
tween Disney and U. A. over- 



FOR THE GREATES 
STORY EVER SCREENE 



THIS MAN 

condemned to 
death .... 



THIS MAN 

who stole the, 
sweetheart of 



THIS MAN 

. . . his greatest 
friend .... 



..The Greatest Cast Ever Capture 




for Warner Bros 



CAPTURED! 



Who Are They 

See TOMORROWi 
Page Announcemei 

VITAGRAPH. IMC. DISHUBUTOES 



■ 



^HE STRANGER'S 
RETURN" -that's 

a good title... 

| hope it's a 
good picture 



it 






"OKAY I This 

is a story of real 
American people, 
close to the 
soil... well, lets 
see... " 




HABERE 



,^Gee, I ho Pf. . _ 
nobody is not.cmg 

e ... |- m actually 



weeping- 
picture's 



this darn 
trot m€- 



ouess I'm really 

6 not so hard-, 

boiled / 



.'♦.*, 



"That fellot 

llOiMEL BARRYMORE^ 
certainly can act- 
my heart's beating 
so loud I bet 
everybody can 
hear it., this is 
Shrilling!* 



'Seems to be 
fjust what exhibitors' 
have been asking 
for... good clean l( 
homespun drama * 



"The public will 
love this picture.} 
Oh boy, Miriam 

HOPKINS sure makes 
love realistically... 
lucky Franchot Tone.., 
ah there, behave jl 



(Gosh 



fep ***Ǥ dog! 






fo^ s 



or 



tbi« 



one 



"WelU 

wonoert 



n °r fbe novel 

bY 4-Wat wrote 

•State MJ vlD0 R 
v<we»> *" p ; c ture 



3Bk. 






THE 




WARNERS TO HOLD 3 
MEETINGS ON SALES 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Aug. 3-4, and Royal York Hotel, 
Toronto, Aug. 7-8, with A. W. Smith 
presiding over the New York and 
Chicago meetings and Gradwell 
Sears conducting the Chicago gath- 
ering. 

Smith and Sears will outline and 
discuss the feature product and sell- 
ing plans for the new season, while 
Norman H. Moray, sales manager 
for Vitaphone short subjects and 
trailers will present the short sub- 
ject line-up. S. Charles Einfeld will 
acquaint the meetings with the 
ambitious national advertising back- 
ing that his department has already 
prepared for the new season's pic- 
tures. 

After thoroughly discussing the 
new product, together with the gen- 
eral sales policies before the general 
meetings, Sears and Smith, will then 
hold individual private conferences 
with each District and Branch 
Managers relative to the selling of 
the new feature and short subject 
product in the important situations 
in each man's territory. 

Through these private, individual 
conferences, Smith and Sears feel 
that their men will be able to func- 
tion even more efficiently than ever 
before. 

Thus the Warner sales meetings 
will take on the air of serious round 
table conferences without the un- 
warranted expense and loss of time 
by the entire sales staff, that would 
be occasioned by the usual sales con- 
vention. 

Last year Warners were the first 
to dispense with the sales conven- 
tion and held four regional meet- 
ings in New York, Chicago, New 
Orleans and San Francisco. All 
salesmen in the respective territories 
attended. 

This year the salesmen will be 
given their information relative to 
the new product and the sales poli- 
cies in their own branches which 
will be visited by Sears and Smith. 
Conferences will be held by Smith 
and Sears, not only with their sales- 
men, but with the exhibitors in each 
territory. Through this progressive 
innovation in the industry, the Wai - - 
ner field men will be able to con- 
tinue their efforts on current prod- 
uct with a minimum amount of time 
lost. 



CONTINUES BUFFALO RUN 

Buffalo — "Forgotten Men" has 
been shifted by McFaul from the 
Century to the Hippodrome. 



4 Warners Out of 7 

Chicago — Warner pictures are occu- 
pying four out of seven first-runs here, 
with "Baby Face" at the Chicago, 
"Gold Diggers" at the Oriental, "Mayor 
of Hell" at the United Artists and 
"Narrow Corner" at McVickers. "Gold 
Diggers" has set a record run at the 
Oriental by being held a fourth week. 






THE 

RIALTO 



WITH 

PHIL M. DALY 



• • • WE ARE submitting the following as what we 
consider an example of a darn good yarn from a theater press- 

agey the same being Jimmie Macfarland of the Rivoli 

who writes about a preview for a mixed audience which 

producer Frederic Ullman, Jr. gave for his pix, "This Is Amer- 
ica," now current at the Rivoli Jimmie spills it about as 

follows 

* * * * 

• • • "ACTORS AND politicians, janitors and editors 

were all invited Fanny Brice sat next to General Har- 

bord Ted Husing watched the film beside Ferdinand 

Pecora Tom Noonan, the "Bishop of Chinatown," and 

Peggy Fears rubbed elbows Arthur Garfield Hays kept 

audibly murmuring 'It's great 1 ' John Haynes 

Holmes applauded at its completion Morton Downey said 

'It's in the bag' others who attended the pre- 
view were Graham McNamee, Alfred E. Smith, Rudy Vallee, 

John J. Raskob, James Montgomery Flagg after such 

demonstration by a typically American audience the sponsors 
feel that all others who see it will agree with Alfred E. Smith 
that 'It's a perfectly swell picture — tremendously entertaining' 

it must be, when hard-boiled film salesmen, janitors 

and elevator men spontaneously applauded at its completion." 



• • • HERE IS a model bit of pressagey stuff from 
Mister Macfarland it's Concise it tells an In- 
teresting Yarn. ., it mentions Names of Importance 

and plugs over their Personal Opinions of the Pix and 

what more can any pressagey cram into a Few Lines? 



• • • A CHALLENGE has been received by the Empey 

Club from the Independent Theater Owners Association 

to compete in the 440 yard relay race at the outing to Bear 

Mountain on Aug. 2 the I.T.O.A. are also donating a 

large silver cup as a permanent trophy to be competed for an- 
nually by the I.T.O.A. and the M. P. Club the M. P. 

Club in accepting the challenge, asked that it be made a three- 
cornered event by inviting the A.M. P. A. to compete 

Louis Nizer has been elected captain of the Empey tennis team 

to compete against the A.M. P. A Hal Home wires from 

Chi that he will act as captain of the A.M.P.A. tennis team 

he doesn't know any more about tennis than Mister 

Nizer so that makes it perfect 



• • • THAT IS a very handsome campaign book issued 
by Martin Starr as managing director of the International 

Beauty Pageant the remarkable thing about it is its 

Sincerity Mister Starr comes out flatfooted and advises 

exhibs not to tie in with the Pageant unless they are convinced 
it will produce constructive goodwill in their communities as 

well as B. O. results the book gives a complete history 

of Beauty Pageants ancient and modern it has been 

sent to over 1600 city editors of big newspapers throughout the 

nation theater owners desiring a copy can secure one 

from Martin Star, 729 Seventh Ave., N. Y. City 



• • • STARTING TONIGHT, Mary Charles, the continen- 
tal singer just arrived from London, will appear at the Sky 

Gardens of the St. Moritz hotel, appearing nightly 

Paramount's first on the new program opens tonite at the Cri- 
terion Marlene Dietrich in "The Song of Songs" 

Fred Denes, who formerly ran "The Denes" at Long Beach, 
has taken over the "rill and restaurant at the Friars Club. 



« « « 



» » » 



FRANKLIN PREDICTS 
ATTENDANCE SPU 



(Continued from Page 1) 

working hours will help theater ,. 
ronage considerably," said Frankj 
"If we will consider the exceln: 
reports that come from England 
to theater grosses over there, 
can more readily understand w 
this reconstruction policy will do 
us. I have no doubt that the c 
has much to do with the fine thea 
attendance in England. Our ind 
try will cooperate to the utmost w 
Washington, but it will give s 
greater cooperation to the Presid' 
when it realizes just what th> 
benefits mean to our business." 



Kuykendall Urges Suppoii 
Of Hollywood-at-the-Fa 

(Continued from Page 1) 

a vast amount of goodwill, Pre 
dent Ed Kuykendall of the M.P.T 
A., before leaving here at the c 
elusion of conferences on the co 
visited the exposition and later 
sued a statement urging the ent 
industry's support of the Hollywc 
display. Kuykendall pointed out tl 
all other industries are represent 
at the fair, and the neglect of nr 
tion picture interests in combini 
to make a favorable showing f 
their industry would result to th'j 
discredit. 

Jack Miller, head of the Chical 
Exhibitors' Ass'n, also issued 
statement endorsing Kuykendal 
views. M. A. Lightman, Dave P< 
freyman, Love Harrell and othe 
likewise visited the exhibition wh 
the M.P.T.O.A. meeting was 
progress. Officials on the Hollywo' 
lot say that interest in the exhil 
is gradually gaining and almo 
every day sees either some exec 
tive or star there. Bert Wheel 
paid a couple of visits, on one occ 
sion posing for some shots wi" 
Grant Withers and Olive Borden. 



L. B. COOL RESTING 

Akron, 0. — L. B. Cool has clost 
the Fulton, Pittsburgh, and retun 
ed here to spend several weeks res 
ing. He plans to reopen the housi 
about Aug. 10. 



■ 




MANY HAPPY PITuTO 



Best wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 

July 19 

Merlin Hall Aylesworth Edward Sloman 



OMING 



UGUST 

THE 

"NEW 
DEAL" 

IUMBER 

OF THE 

FILM 
lAILY 



• 



THE eclipse of the legitimate stage 
1 by pictures. A new era of the 
amusement world comes into being. 
Pictures move from store show to 
a giant industry. Extras rise to film 
stars to win fame and fortune. The 
de-luxe 5000 seat house comes to 
all big cities 



nlCTURE house presentations rise 
' to super spectacles. Color films 
come in with a bang and then go 
quickly out. Much ado about wide- 
film that comes for unusually short 
stay. Warners make talking pic- 
ture and sound revolution is on. A 
hundred film folk become famous 
and rate as millionaires . 



THE romantic story in full of the 
■ motion picture industry. Stock 
market teems with activities in film 
securities. Chain operation domi- 
nates theater situation for period. 
Unusual exploitation stunts that 
cause international comment. The 
sound news reel becomes a national 
institution 



INDIVIDUALS grow into promi- 
' nence then fade into oblivion. 
Famous fights of the film industry 
that have made history. America 
becomes music minded through the 
help of the screen. Hollywood 
grows like a mushroom into inter- 
national prominence. The industry 
quickly does its duty in national 
emergency 



Film Daily 

will BE 

FIFTEEN 

YEARS 
OLD 



• 



AUGUST 

AND IS 

HAPPY 

ABOUT IT 



riLM DAILY is happy with the 
modest part it has played in the 
progress of this great, international 
motion picture industry during the 
past fifteen years. Its policy has 
been constructive, fearless and in- 
dependent, and it prides itself upon 
the fact that through all these years 
it has been able to keep a step 
ahead of this romantic and inter- 
esting industry. It has two con- 
stant primary objectives. To print 
a daily newspaper whose integrity 
will ever be beyond question and to 
mind its own business in doing so. 



THE old industry is gone and we 
are facing a new era. President 
Roosevelt and his NEW DEAL policy 
has the country well started on the 
road back to prosperity. Old faces 
are gone and new blood is coming 
in. The little company to-day may 
be an industry leader tomorrow. 
The opportunity is here once again 
for everyone to start from scratch. 
Film Daily will do its share to move 
things along. Its staff was never 
more alert, its columns never more 
breezy and its heart never more 
optimistic ....... 



THE 



■£££1 



DAILY 



■ : 



Wednesday, July 19, 19k 



30 FEATURES MINIMUM 
FOR U. A. NEXT SEASON 

(Continued from Page 1) 

and Douglas Fairbanks will each 
have one starring vehicle. Samuel 
Goldwyn will contribute five; 20th 
Century Pictures, organized by 
President 'Joseph M. Schenck of U. A. 
and Darryl Zanuck, will make a 
minimum of 12; the Edward Small 
company, Reliance Pictures, will 
have four. There will be several 
pictures from independent units and 
the Walt Disney short features, the 
Mickey Mouse pictures and the Silly 
Symphonies, of which there will be 
13 subjects in each series. 

Mary Pickford has several stories in mind 
and expects to be able to make a definite 
announcement about the title of her new pic- 
ture and facts connected with direction and 
cast within the next two weeks. 

For the first time in his life Charles Chap- 
lin has written in full the story for a pic- 
ture prior to beginning production. Dealing 
with the adventures of the character he has 
made known to millions, Chaplin's new pic- 
ture is laid in the industrial center of a 
big city. 

Douglas Fairbanks plans to make a sequel 
to the "Mark of Zorro," called "Zorro Rides 
Again." 

Zanuck will confine his production activ- 
ity to headline themes and stories, in ac- 
cordance with the unit's slogan, "Headline 
Pictures." Already signed for appearance 
under the 20th Century banner are George 
Arliss, Constance Bennett, Loretta Young. 
"The Bowery" will be the first picture. In 
it are Wallace Beery, George Raft and 
Jackie Cooper. Raoul Walsh is directing. 
It is based on the book by Michael L. Sim- 
mons and B. R. Solomon, "Chuck Conners." 

The first Arliss picture will be "Red Tape," 
by Sam Mintz and Maude T. Howell, a mod- 
ern comedy drama. "The Great Rothschild," 
based on the lives of the famous bankers, 
is the second Arliss picture. 

Constance Bennett will be seen in two 
pictures, the first of which is "Moulin 
Rouge." Al Dubin and Harry Warren are 
doing the music. There will be a chorus 
of 75 girls. 

Walter Winchell's "Broadway Thru a Key- 
hole" is also on the 20th Century schedule 
for early production. 

Other Zanuck-Schenck pictures are "Blood 
Money," an original story by Roland Brown, 
exposing the bail bond and income tax racket, 
"Miss Lonelyhearts," comedy of the adven- 
tures of an "Advice to the Lovelorn" editor, 
authored by Nathanael West; "Trouble 
Shooter" by J. R. Bren and Elmer Harris, 
an original story based on the daredevil ex- 
periences of a telephone man; "Born to Be 
Bad" by Ralph Graves, a drama based on 
the lives of "Customers' Girls" in the gar- 
ment trade; "P. T. Barnum," an epic of the 
life of the famous showman, based on his 
own story; and "The Unnamed Woman," by 



Desirable double unit with film vault, 
seventh floor Film Center Building, 
completely equipped, available. At- 
tractive terms for early occupancy. 



CASTLE FILMS 
630 Ninth Ave. New York City 



A LITTLE from "LOTS" 



By RALPH WILK 



HOLLYWOOD 

ThOX officials have just given 16 
contracts to players for parts in 
"Charlie Chan's Greatest Case," 
which has gone into production with 
Hamilton MacFadden directing. The 
list, besides Warner Oland and 
Heather Angel, includes Roger Im- 
hof, Robert Warwick, Virginia Cher- 
rill, Francis Ford, Frank McGlynn, 
Clara Blandick, Claude King, and 
others. This story is from the novel 
by Earl Derr Biggers. 

Henry Kolker has been substituted 
for Edmund Breese in Chesterfield's 
"Notorious But Nice." In addition 
to Kolker, Jane Keckley, Wilfred 
Lucas, and Rochelle Hudson have 
been added to the cast to support 
Marian Marsh, Betty Compson, Don- 
ald Dilloway and J. Carroll Naish 

who handle the leading roles. 

* * * 

M-G-M cast assignments: Una 
Merkel for "Bombshell," Fred As- 
taire for "The Dancing Lady," 
Charles Butterworth and Mae 
Clarke for "Penthouse." 

jj; ^s sj: 

Ruth Chatterton has gone to Lake 
Arrowhead to recuperate, and First 
National has again postponed pro- 
duction of "Female." 

Howard Hawks will direct Wal- 
lace Beery in "Viva Villa" for 
Metro. 

Jack LaRue has been given a new 
contract by Paramount. He is now 
working in "To the Last Man." 

* * * 

Norman Krasna has been borrow- 
ed from Columbia by Metro to write 

originals. 

* * * 

Francis Martin, Paramount writer 
for a year, has been given a long- 
term contract as director. "Tillie 
and Gus," W. C. Fields vehicle, is 
his first assignment. 

* * * 

Victor Milner will do the camera 
work on "Design For Living," which 
Ernst Lubitsch is to direct for Par- 
amount. Franklin Pangborn is a 
cast addition. 



Charles R. Rogers' "Golden Har- 
vest" unit of 40 headed by Richard 
Arlen, Chester Morris and Gene- 
vieve Tobin, has left for location at 
Pendleton, Ore. Ralph Murphy is 
director. 

* # # 

RKO cast assignments: Sam 
Hardy for "Ann Vickers," Douglas 
Montgomery for "Little Women," 
Irene Dunne as star of "Behold We 
Live." 

Norman Foster has sailed for 
Hawaii to finish a play he started 
before beginning work in Fox's 
"Pilgrimage." He plans to return 
to Hollywood after a month to play 
the leading role opposite Clara Bow 
is "Hoopla." 

i£ %. % 

Roy Hunt, the flying cameraman 
and his staff, dispatched to Rio de 
Janiero by Louis Brock, associate 
producer at RKO Radio studios, to 
secure background scenes for "Fly- 
ing Down to Rio," hopped off Mon- 
day from Rio de Janiero on his re- 
turn journey to Hollywood by plane. 
Hunt is due to arrive Saturday. 

^ ^ ^ 

"Paddy, the Next Best Thing," 
has been finished by Fox and is now 
in the process of cutting. Janet 
Gaynor, Warner Baxter, Walter 
Connelly, Harvey Stephens, Mar- 
garet Lindsay, Mary McCormic and 
Roger Imhof are featured in the 
cast, which was directed by Harry 

Lachman. 

* * * 

Kathleen Shepard, novelist, will 
write additional dialogue for RKO's 
"Blonde Poison." McGrew Willis 
will adapt "Rodney" and Sidney 
Buchman will do the same for 
"Family Man" at the same studios. 

"The Happy Valley Express," di- 
rected by George Stevens and pro- 
duced by Louis Brock for RKO, at- 
tracted much favorable attention at 

its preview. 

* * * 

Charles Lamont, comedy director, 
is trying to lure the golden trout at 
Virginia Lakes, Calif. 



Willard Roberton, to be directed by Gregory 
La Cava. 

Samuel Goldwyn's productions for United 
Artists already have the opener on hand — 
Ronald Colman in "The Masquerader.'' It 
will inaugurate the selling season for the 
company. Going into production this week, 
Goldwyn has his annual Eddie Cantor song- 
and-dance festival, "Raman Scandals," with 
Ruth Etting as the love interest. 

Anna Sten makes her American screen de- 
but in "Nana," and then in "Barbary Coast," 
from an original by Frances Marion. An 
all-star feature production that will picture 
a story through the succeeding generations in 
an American family will be the fifth and 
last of Goldwyn's pictures this year. 

From the Edward Small unit will come 
"Joe Palooka," featuring Jimmy Durante, 
Lupe Velez, Stuart Erwin and many well- 
known stage and screen stars. Following 
this picture, the Small-Reliance company will 
make "The Count of Monte Cristo," based 



on the world-famous novel by Alexander Du- 
mas; "The Shanghai Gesture,'' the famous 
play by John Colton, and "Style," a dra- 
matic story of the lives of the men and wo- 
men who plan the trend of style. 

"The Emperor Jones" starring Paul Robe- 
son, famous colored opera and stage star, is 
now being filmed at the Astoria Studios on 
Long Island, New York, by producers John 
Krimsky and Gifford Cochran for United 
Artists release. 

Noel Coward's "Bitter Sweet," produced 
by the English affiliations of United Artists at 
the Boreham Wood studios in London, is 
finished and will shortly be shown in this 
country by United Artists. 

There will also be two spectacular produc- 
tions made under the direction of Alexander 
Korda and a rip-roaring super comedy star- 
ring Syd Chaplin. "The Queen," with 
Jeanette MacDonald and Herbert Marshall, 
also is being made in England for U. A. 
release. 



THALBERG PROPOSE 
NEW PRODUCTION PLA 



(Continued from Page 1) 

for future production which he v| 
announce within the next we< 
When asked whether the plan woi 
apply to M-G-M productions, 
stated that he was not in a positi) 
at this time to make any defin 
statement. While in Europe, Th 
berg tentatively signed several ph 
ers who will be brought to Amer ' 
as prospective star material. ,| 
will be signed with M-G-M, Th| 
berg said. The young producer 11 
entirely recovered from his rectj 
illness and says he "never fi 
better." 



ACADEMY'S ROSTER UP 17«j 
West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAIi 

Hollywood — For the current I 
months' period ending July 1, * 
Academy of Motion Picture Arts ai 
Sciences has shown the greatest 
crease in active membership o' 
any other six-month period in 1 
existence of the organization desp 
some criticisms of its policies. 

With the Academy now well <r 
the 1,000 mark in general memb 
ship the records show a general 
crease of total active members! 
in excess of 17 per cent for U 
period. 



■I 
HOLLYWOOD 

PLAZA 




SUMMER 
RATES, Now 

$2 per day single! 
$2.50 per day double! 

Special weekly and monthly rates 
All rooms with bath and 
shower. Every modern 
convenience. 
Fine food* at reasonable 

S 1 '• prices in the Plaza's Rus- 
sian Eagle Garden Cafe. 
Look for the"Doorway of Hoipltalltv" 
QwiDanyfUiAty. fycmSkmBuA' 
VINE AT HOLLYWOOD Biyft 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFO R N_j- 





DAILY 



''UNDER THE TONTO RIM" 

with Stuart Erwin, Fred Kohler, 
Raymond Hatton 
imount 63 mins. 

WELL COMEDY WESTERN FROM 

NE GREY STORY HAS PLENTY OF 

JGHS AND ACTION. 

his is the type that westerns should 

>w in order to regain their hold on the 

It has an intelligent story, finely 

>d by a very competent cast, and car- 

a fine brand of humor all the way 

.ugh. Stuart Erwin plays one of his 

ib roles as a cowhand who fails at 

•y job they give him. Finally he lands 

as part owner of a detested pig farm 

g with his partner Raymond Hatton. 

inwhile he is pining of unrequited love 

the daughter of his former boss. The 

er is being fleeced by his crooked fore- 

i and another chap who are rustling 

cattle. The fun really commences 

in Stuart's partner and a pal give him 

uild-up as a notorious bad man, and 

i makes good when the girl appears on 

scene and he has to vindicate him- 

He cleans up the crooks, and in- 

: ntally stumbles upon the stolen cattle. 

Hast: Stuart Erwin, Fred Kohler, Ray- 

i id Hatton, Verna Hill ie, John Lodge, 

: .zy Knight, George Barbier, Patricia 

: ey, Marion Bardell, Edwin J. Brady, 

! n Garcia. 

irector, Henry Hathaway; Author, Zane 
'■.■/; Adaptors, Jack Cunningham, Gerald 
iaghty; Cameraman, Archie Stout. 

irection, Very Good. Photography, Ex- 
: ant. 



"GIGOLETTES OF PARIS" 

with Madge Bellamy, Gilbert Roland 

Equitable 64 mins. 

FALLS FLAT WITH RAMBLING STORY 
THAT FAILS TO BUILD ANY DEFINITE 
INTEREST. 

This is a very disjointed tale of gold- 
diggers in Paris. Madge Bellamy and her 
pal start out to take the men for all 
they can get after Madge has been thrown 
over by a gent whom she expected to 
marry (Theodor Von Eltz). She meets a 
gigolo in the cabaret where they work, 
played by Gilbert Roland. Then follows 
a very mixed and rambling series of 
episodes wherein the gigolo is interested 
in the girl who has married Madge's for- 
mer fiance, and the husband begins to 
pay attentions to his former sweetheart 
again. There is much to-do about a brace- 
let and a ring and a watch, all part of 
the loot the girl has gathered from various 
gentlemen admirers. Finally the watch 
which was stolen from its original owner 
gets the gigolo in jail, but it all works 
out happily with the little golddigger find- 
ing happiness with her gigolo sweetheart. 
Pretty much of a washout in acting, story 
and direction. 

Cast: Madge Bellamy, Gilbert Roland, 
Natalie Moorhead, Theodor Von Eltz, 
Molly O'Day, Henry KoJker, Paul Porcasi, 
Albert Conti, F. Schumann-Heink. 

Director, Alphonse Martell; Author, 
same; Dialoguer, same; Editors, Tom Per- 
sons, Otis Garrett; Cameramen, Henry 
Cronjager, Herman Schopp. 

Direction, Weak. Photography, Good. 



"I HAVE LIVED" 

with Alan Dinehart and Anita Page 
Chesterfield 65 mins. 

GOOD DRAMA OF STAGE LIFE WITH 
REALISTIC PUNCH AND INTERESTING 
HUMAN INTEREST ANGLE. 

This drama is nicely paced and balanced 
and is forcefully put over by Alan Dinehart 
and Anita Page who are well teamed. The 
story concerns Dinehart, a hardboiied the- 
atrical producer in search of a girl "who 
has lived" and therefore capable of prop- 
erly interpreting his play of a girl who 
knows life and men. He believes he has 
found her in Anita Page, a young woman 
of questionable reputation whom he "dis- 
covers" acting as a hostess in a "percent- 
age" house. He bails her out when the 
place is raided and immediately begins to 
groom her to portray the leading part in 
his forthcoming play. A contrasting love 
interest is introduced with Dinehart's friend 
falling in love with the girl whom he 
drops when her past becomes known. Then 
Dinehart steps in and confesses his love 
for her. Interest is sustained throughout. 
Women will be particularly interested as 
Anita Page gains sympathy from the start 
and also displays some gorgeous gowns as 
the film progresses. 

Cast: Alan Dinehart, Anita Page, Allen 
Vincent, Gertrude Astor, Maude Truax, 
Matthew Betz, Eddie Boland, Florence Dud- 
ley, Gladys Blake, Dell Henderson. 

Director, Richard Thorpe; Author, Lou 
Heifetz; Adaptor, Winifred Dunn; Dia- 
loguer, same; Cameraman, M. A. Anderson. 

Direction, Excellent. Photography, Very 
Good. 



"HELL'S HOLIDAY" 

Superb Pictures 88 mins. 

COMPILATION OF WORLD WAR 
SCENES MAKES AN INTERESTING SUB- 
JECT OF ITS KIND. 

Like the several official World War films 
already presented, this compilation shows 
in a very vivid way the destruction and 
suffering caused by modern warfare. The 
picture makes some attempt to present its 
material in more or less chronological order, 
from the start of hostilities to the jubila- 
tion that followed the signing of the arm- 
istice. In between there are the views of 
land, sea and air combat, much firing of 
big and small guns, sinking of merchant 
ships by German submarine raiders, bring- 
ing down of airplanes, troops on the march 
and advancing in battle formation, etc. 
Most impressive in this particular produc- 
tion are the scenes of infantry making ad- 
vances during actual combat, with numer- 
ous soldiers seen shot down and stretcher- 
bearers being kept as busy as the com- 
batants themselves. Running commentary 
is supplied by Eugene Dennis, whose fervor 
sometimes is a little irksome, and there is 
an excellent musical score supplied by 
Joseph Finston. Due to the difficulties un- 
der which the army cameramen took these 
pictures, the photography is not always as 
good as it might be. But in a picture of 
this kind the matter of fine production de- 
tails is not the prime consideration. As a 
record of what war actually is like, this 
film depicts the horrors and mock glory 
as impressively as almost any other picture 
of its kind. 

Outside of the names already mentioned, 
no production credits are given. 



N-E-W-S O-F T-H-E D-A-Y 



hicago — A. H. McLaughlin, of 

Hollywood-Universal contest, an- 

nces the appointment of two ad- 

onal division managers. A. W. 

oils was made district manager 

the territory comprising Minnea- 

lis, western Wisconsin, North 

llkota and northern South Dakota. 

ilk L. Hildreth was made division 

rihager for Sioux Falls, southern 

frith Dakota, Des Moines and 

(aha. District Manager Ekidie 

lion has appointed Eddie Lurie and 

jjirge Benji representatives in the 

I waukee territory. 



Rochester, N. Y. — George Verlain 
has closed the Lincoln. 



; Iristol, N. H. — The Gem has been 
t pened with Leonard Follansbee in 
e rge. 



Issex Junction, Vt. — The Colonial 
not open as previously planned, 
Drding to latest reports. 



Itoston — George Hager and Lou 
chsler have joined the United 
,ists sales force. 



i alt Lake City — A default judg- 
nlit for $62,500, plus $5,000 attor- 
m's fees, was granted the Marshall 
Hare Building Co., San Francisco, 
Minst RKO Western Corp. and the 
EjO San Francisco Co., recently in 
ti;| Third District Court here. 



Addison, N. Y. — The Star, oper- 
ated by B. S. Newman, is open Sun- 
day and Monday only. 



Fairport, N. Y. — Don R. Stevenson 
has closed the Rivoli. 



Buffalo — The Roosevelt, taken 
over by George Rosing from the 
Shea circuit, has closed for the sum- 



Binghamton, N. Y.- — Mrs. Bessie 
B. Blair has taken over the Laurel 
from D. Conklin. 



Hammondsport, N. Y. — - N. H. 

Wood is the new manager of the 
Park. 



Buffalo — F. G. Hohm is out at the 
Avon, and his former partner, J. 
Propis, is now managing the house 
alone. 



Cleveland — Bert Hensen is back 
as head of the local RKO publicity 
and exploitation department. Hen- 
sen was transferred last winter from 
this post to manager of an RKO in 
Troy, N. Y. 



Buffalo — Alec Weisman, well 
known in Buffalo's film row, is now 
covering the Syracuse territory for 
Metro. 



Detroit — The Lyric, downtown 
house operated by Ernest Blasdell, 
has closed for the summer. 



Detroit — J. J. Norris, manager of 
the Michigan Film Library, has 
moved to the Insurance Exchange 
Bldg., opening a downtown office for 
the first time in several years. The 
"Freiburg Passion Play" is now be- 
ing booked through Michigan, after 
playing a large part of the Butter- 
field circuit of houses. 



Detroit — "Doc" G. E. Holmes, for- 
merly manager of the Dawn, has 
been made manager of the Hoover, 
Wes,t Side house, by Simon Leja, 
owner. 



Clovis, N. M.— The R. E. Griffith 
Theaters, Inc., and Russell Hard- 
wick have pooled their Lyceum and 
Mesa theaters here. Hardwick will 
be manager. 



Del Norte, Colo. — Everett Cole, 
mayor of Alamosa and owner of the 
Rialto theater there, has installed 
Western Electric sound and reopen- 
ed the house, closed for a ye&v. 



Wallingford, Conn. — Abraham 
Kofman of Norwich, Conn., and Alec 
Horwitz, of Brockton, Mass., have 
leased the Strand from Mrs. Fannie 
Ginsburg and plan to reopen the 
house, which has been closed for 
three years, in the late fall. New 
sound equipment will be installed. 
The house is now under lease to 
George H. Wilkinson, Sr., owner of 
Wilkinson's, until Dec. 1. 



Detroit — Robert Bartlett has been 
promoted as assistant to Alfred 
Lane, manager of the Alhambra, 
succeeding Carl Winckler, who is 
now with the original Roxy, New 
York, as lighting technician. 



Detroit — The Monroe, downtown 
house, has closed for the summer. 



Boston — A projection room for the 
Hub Film Exchange and American 
Pictures is being outfitted on Pied- 
mont St. with RCA sound equipment 
and two Simplex machines. 



THE 



<^ 



DAILY 



Wednesday, July 19, 



RICHARDS AWARDED 
SALARY_AS_RECEIVER 

(Continued from Page 1) 

in connection with Saenger Realty 
Corp., according to a federal court 
order just signed. Archie M. Smith, 
accountant, was awarded $4,450 for 
services rendered. 



21 Exhibits Already Set 
For Supply Dealers' Meet 

(Continued from Page 1) 
bon, Strong Electric, Chicago Cin- 
ema Equipment, General Seating, 
Standard Transformer, Ideal Seat- 
ing, Illinois Seating, Herman De- 
Vry, and others. 

Formal authorization for the 
drafting of a code, which is one of 
the purposes of the meeting, has 
been received by Robin from Ad- 
ministrator Hugh S. Johnson. 

The Association is growing to be 
a leading source of distribution for 
theater equipment, with members 
operating their businesses individ- 
ually and giving personal attention 
in contacts with theater owners. 
Many new developments in the 
equipment line will be announced at 
the convention. Annual banquet 
will be held the night of July 29, with 
important industry personalities 
among the speakers. 



STOP SUNDAY MOVIES 

Ambridge, Pa. — A ban has been 
placed on Sunday movies here by 
the council following receipt of let- 
ters of protest from pastors of four 
Protestant churches. 



RKO DETROIT REOPENING 

Detroit — The RKO Downtown, 
now closed for the summer, is book- 
ed to reopen with "A Bed of Roses" 
on July 30, two weeks ahead of 
original schedule. The house will 
book in a stage show headed by Jack 
Benny, radio entertainer. This will 
give the major houses two having 
stage shows, with the Fox the only 
one now open on this policy. 



Short Shots from Eastern Studios 



<By CHARLES ALICOATE 



AJATALIE BROWNING, recently 
seen on Broadway in "Twenty- 
five Dollars an Hour," has been 
signed by Herman Ross for the 
feminine lead in "The Wandering 
Jew," the first of a series of Jewish 
art pictures in which Jacob Ben Ami 
is to be starred under the direction 
of George Roland. Miss Browning 
was previously leading woman for 
Maurice Schwartz in the English 
version of "If I Were You" and was 
also a featured player in the Theater 
Guild's production of Eugene 
O'Neil's "Marco Millions." 
• 

Shooting on "The Wandering 
Jew," which was adapted from a 
story by Jacob Mestel, will begin to- 
morrow. Other principals in the 
cast are M. B. Samuylow, Abraham 
Teitelbaum and Benjamin Adler. 
• 

Casting is in progress on the new 
Fannie Brice short to be made by 
Vitaphone. Script has been com- 
pleted by the studio writing staff 
under Herman Ruby. Roy Mack will 
direct. 



Synchronizing of "The Sleuth," 
the first of the series of 12 Stan 
Laurel one-reeler re-issues, has been 
completed by Perfex Pictures Corp. 
Work on "Monsieur Don't Care" and 
"Mandarin Mixup" is expected to 
get under way next week. 
• 

Dick Willis, makeup man at Vita- 
phone's Brooklyn plant, is making a 
hit with the stars because of his ex- 
pertness. Dave Rubinoff and Jean 
Sargent, starring in "Black and 
White," declared that Dick does the 
finest makeup either of them has 

yet seen. 

• 

Filming at the Brooklyn Vita- 
phone studio is concentrated today 
on a new short subject featuring 
"Easy Aces," the comic radio pres- 



Something New in Vacations 

Before you decide where you will spend your vacation this summer ask your friends 
about Hotel Uncas, situated directly on the most beautiful part of Lake George, Queen 
of American Lakes. 

This unique hotel offers features of tremendous appeal to those who seek a vacation 
that really re-creates mind, body, and soul . . . every facility for rest and recreation. 

SPORTS 

Finest swimming from our private dock (longest on Lake George) or bathing from 
private sandy beach. The water is so clean, clear and pure that you can drink it — or 
read this advertisement through three feet of it. 

Boating — canoes, sailboats, speed boats, out-board motor boats, aquaplaning. 

Tennis — Splendid courts maintained in best of condition. Golf, fishing, mountain 
climbing, horseback riding, dancing, billiards, bowling. 

1933 RATES 

Rates at Hotel Uncas have always been so moderate no drastic reductions have been 
made this season. Inasmuch as rates depend on location and type of accommodations 
desired it is suggested that prospective guests send for details. The clientele is restricted. 
Booklets upon request. 

Address 

HOWARD V. DAYTON 

HOTEL UNCAS 

UNCAS-ON-LAKE GEORGE 

NEW YORK 



entation. This is the first movie ef- 
fort of the team, actually Goodman 
Ace and his wife, Jane. The story 
is an original by Ace, a former 
Kansms City newspaperman, written 
in collaboration with Glen Lambert 
of the studio scenario staff. Fred 
Harper and Lucille Sears are also 
in the film. Joseph Henabery will 
direct. 

Jimmie Barton, Nick Lucas, 
Adelaide Hall, Leon Belasco, four 
Mullin sisters and Lord Oliver 
Wakefield will be featured in "The 
Little Broadcast," second of the se- 
ries of shorts being iproduced by 
Mentone Pictures for Universal. 
Lynn Shores will direct at the West 
Coast Service Studio. 

Ed Du Par, head cameraman at 
Warner's Vitaphone studio, is tak- 
ing up golf. Ray Foster, one of his 
assistants, says that except for keep- 
ing his left arm straight, his head 
down and his follow through, Ed 
would be a good golfer. 

9 

Work on the script "One Good 
Urn Deserves Another," the first of 
the series to feature Tom Howard 
supported by George Shelton, to be 
produced by W. K. D. Productions, 
headed by I. N. Weber, has been 
completed with production arrange- 
ments now being made. 

George Ackerson's wail at the 
Brooklyn Vitaphone studio is "al- 
ways an assistant, never the head 
man." George is directorial assis- 
tant to Roy Mack, Joseph Henabery 
and Roy McCary. 

Kathrine Mauck, Chesterfield and 
Wrigley poster ad girl, has been 
signed by United Artist to appear 
in the next Eddie Cantor picture. 
Ted Green of the Models Guild 
negotiated the deal. 

The third of the series of Goofy 
Tone News Reels being produced by 
Gem Productions for Universal re- 
lease has been completed. 



AD FILM AT FAIR 

Chicago — "Golden Years of Prog- 
ress," a 30-minute talker portraying 
the place of advertising in raising 
the standards of living during the 
past 50 years, is the advertising in- 
dustry's exhibit at the Century of 
Progress. It is being shown con- 
tinuously in the Cinema Theater, 
specially built and donated to the 
Exhibition by the organizations 
sponsoring the picture. The picture 
was adapted by Trade Pictures, Inc., 
from a story by Earnest Elmo Cal- 
kins, and made under the general 
direction of a group including P. L. 
Thomson of Western Electric. Af- 
ter the Exposition closes, the pic- 
ture is scheduled to be shown 
throughout the country before ad- 
vertising clubs, rotary and women's 
clubs, etc. 



MISSISSIPPI EXHIBS 
APPROVEMPTOA CO 

(Continued from Page 1) 

were condemned. A vote of 
fidence was given the national 
hibitors' organization and the rr 
ing was declared the most re[ 
sentative and constructive in the 
tory of Mississippi theater owr 



CHI. PLAYHOUSE GOES FI1 

Chicago — The Playhouse, forrl 
ly legit., has reopened as a ml 
under the management of Joe \ 
domini. A. Teitel and associ. 
have taken over the house. F 
picture is "The Rebel." 



NED 
WAYBVRIi 



Announces Summer Classes in all Type 

Stage and Social Dancing at Greatl 

Reduced Rates 



• ADULT GIRLS' AND WOMEN'S CLASS 

Ages 16 years and over. Enroll now. Start- 
Monday. Also special one-hour evening d 
1, 2, or 5 times weekly. Mondays to Fric 

• WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY FOR CHILD 

— Ned Wayburn is famous for his work 
children. Classes for boys and girls, ages 
16. Thorough training in all types of dan 
Classes meet Saturdays. Also special one- 
weekly classes after school hours. 

• BODY PROPORTIONING— Is there ar« 

around you overweight? Ned Wayburn can 
them. Weight reduced or increased. A mo 
that has been perfected after years of trak 
the most celebrated stars of stage and sc 
Utmost of privacy. Whatever your age or 
Ned Wayburn can help you. 

• BROADCASTING INSTRUCTION — Classll 
private instruction in diction, song rendition] 
microphone technique for radio and talkies. | 

• THE NED WAYBURN 1933 ANNUAL DA 
FROLIC AND RADIO REVELS will be held: 
year in the Auditorium of the A. W. A. C 
house, 361 West 57 th Street, New York (| 
Saturday, June 17th. This is one of the I 
important social and theatrical functions of 
year. Matinee and evening performance, 
ervation for seats should be made well in 
vance. 

NOTE TO MEN AND WOMEN ENGAGED! 
MOVIE INDUSTRY 

If members of your family or friends arei 
terested in a career on stage, screen, radioi 
in having a beautiful figure, have them cor 
Ned Wayburn. He has helped up the ladde' 
fame such outstanding stars of the stage, sc 
and radio as Al Jolson, Marilyn Miller, Fred , 
Adele Astaire, Eddie Cantor, Jeanette McDoH 
Ed Wynn, Nancy Carroll, Clifton Webb, 
Leroy, Ann Pennington, Jack Whiting, Patri 
Ellis (the latest — seen with George Arlisa 
"The King's Vacation"), and hundreds of oft) 



NED WAYBURN INSTITUTE OF DANCH 
AND RADIO BROADCASTING SCHO 
Dept. F, 625 Madison Avenue, New York, N 
Bet. 58th & 59th Sts. Tel. Wlckersham 2-4J 



** 




J. R. McDonough Named General Manager of RKO 

ILL GROUPS TO BE HEARD ON CODE, SAYS JOHNS J 

Reorganization of Publix and Sparks Units is Completed 



'anagement Corporation 
Will Operate Houses 
in Partnership 

leorganization of Publix-Sparks 
ater operations in Florida has 
>n completed at conferences in 
w York between S. A. Lynch and 
l J. Sparks. The operation of the 
aters will continue under part- 
,'ship arrangements. The general 
•eement states that there is to be 
non-profit management corpora- 

(Continued on Page 4) 



6,000 Repeats on "She Done Him Wrong" 

Paramount's Mae West picture, "She Done Him Wrong," has already played about 
6,000 repeat engagements and is still going strong, according to the company's sales 
department. This is said to be a record not equalled since Griffith's "Birth of a 
Nation." 



IB. ASS'N AGREES 
ON 40-HOUR WEEK 



/[embers of th Motion Picture 
^oratories Ass'n of America have 
eed to a 40-hour week clause in 

industry code now being for- 
iated. The code committee will 
mit its findings regarding mini- 
pi wage scale at the next meet- 

of the association at the Hotel 
or tomorrow. 



Companies Now Working 
M Florida Movie Colony 

Bt. Petersburg, Fla. — From a sin- 
I company in April the movie 
fr here has been built up until 
Ore are now four permanent com- 
plies at work. The pioneer com- 
{Continued on Page 8) 



U. A. Convention Fable 

Chicago — Speaking at the United 
\rtists convention, Abe Lehr, Sam Gold- 
wyn's veteran business manager, told 
\ne of Aesop's fables. It concerns 
;he animals of the forest gathered to- 
gether to boast, not of how many pie- 
ces they had sold, but of their young, 
he wolf had two pups, the fox had 
j |hree, the gorilla five, the rabbit eight, 
find so on. Only the lioness was silent. 
jll the animals asked why. "How many 
iave you?" they demanded. She shook 
;er mane and answered: "One, only 
|ne, but he is a lion!" "And that," 
aid Lehr, "is how I feel about Gold- 
j/yn's pictures." 



U. A. Will Share Prosperity 

With Personnel, Says Schenck 



Mayfair Set on Twelve 
For the Coming Season 

Mayfair Pictures is set on 12 fea- 
tures for next season, with stories 
already bought for at least half of 
the program, according to Robert 
S. Mapletoft. The resignation of 
George W. Weeks will have no effect 
on Mayfair's future plans, Mapletoft 
says. Production starts soon on the 

(.Continued on Page 4) 



Chicago — All of the United Ar- 
tists staff will share in the new 
prosperity which looms for the or- 
ganization, President Joseph M. 
Schenck told the sales convention 
here. 

"When things start picking up 
and we begin to make money, you 
will make money, too," declared 
Schenck. "My concept of the duty 
of an employer to employee is that 

(Continued on Page 6) 



Administrator Will Not 

Allow Agreement to be 

Rushed Through 

By WILLIAM SILBERBERG 
Wash. Correspondent, THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Replying to a tele- 
gram from a former M.P.T.O.A. unit 
to Allied haedquarters and relayed 
to General Hugh Johnson, express- 
ing anxiety over certain exhibitor 
leaders attempting to rush through 
a code covering theater owners, the 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Freuler Calls Code Teeth of Decentralization 



Characterizing the industry code 
as the teeth of decentralization, John 
R. Freuler, president of Monarch, 
sees an end to paternalistic tenden- 
cies in exhibition before the end of 
the year. 

"Exhibition, freed of its control- 
ling influences, would offer both 
major and independent production 
its most valuable stimulus, and 

(Continued on Page 4) 



N. L. Nathanson Denies 
Canadian Circuit Changes 

Vancouver, B. C. — No personnel 
changes are to be made in the Fam- 
ous Players Canadian circuit, de- 
clared President N. L. Nathanson 
on his arrival here. Denying re- 
ports of contemplated shifts, Nath- 
anson stated emphatically that J. J. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Aylesworth Puts RCA Exec 
In RKO Management Post 



K. C. Ass'n Launches Fight 
Against Liability Racket 

Kansas City — Due to increase in 
number of moviegoers making 
fraudulent liability claims against 
theaters for alleged injuries, the In- 
dependent Theater Owners' Ass'n is 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Appointment of J. R. McDonough 
as general manager of Radio-Keith- 
Orpheum Corp. and subsidiary com- 
panies was announced yesterday by 
President M. H. Aylesworth. Mc- 
Donough, executive vice-president of 
Radio Corp. of America, has been 
given a leave of absence from his 
executive duties in RCA during the 

(Continued on Page 8) 



MAY SELECT WARNER 
AS ADVISOR ON CODE 



A change of policy on the part of 
the National Recovery Administra- 
tion from its previously announced 
intention of choosing only disinter- 
ested advisors to assist it in work- 
ing out code agreements seems to 
have taken place, and prominent 
members of various industries are 
being appointed in connection with 
their respective codes. These ap- 
pointments give rise to the belief 
that during consideration of the film 
code, an outstanding man from with- 

{Continued on Page 8) 

Vitaphone Studios 

Four Months Ahead 

By Aug. 1, the Brooklyn Vita- 
phone studio under the head of 
Sam Sax will have completed 36 of 
its 1933-34 program of short sub- 
jects and will be four months ahead 
of release dates with completed 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Indies Discuss Confab 

A meeting of the board of direc- 
tors of the Federation of the Motion 
Picture Industry of America, Inc., held 
at the Park Central Hotel last night 
discussed the forthcoming conference to 
be held at the Hotel Astor on July 31 
and August 1. Brief details are being 
formulated and will be published to- 
morrow. 



THE 




DAILV 



Thursday, July 20, 19 




»iL IXIII, No. 16 Th«n„ July 20. 1833 Price 5 Cents 
JOHN W. M.IC0ATE : : : Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
it 1650 Broadway, New York, N. V., 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
and General Manager; Arthur W. Eddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at N«w York, 
N. Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, >650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
Phone, Circle 7-4736, 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London — 
Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
— P. A. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



Vitaphone Studios 

Four Months Ahead 

(Continued from Page 1) 
product. Norman H. Moray, sales 
manager, says he will have 20 of 
the 1933-34 subjects in the branches 
no later than Aug. 15. National pre- 
views of these short subjects for the 
trade will be held in every exchange. 



Net 

Chg. 

Va 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

High Low Close 

Am. Seat 6'/ 2 6'/ 4 6i/ 4 - 

Columbia Picts. vtc. 24'/ 2 23 23 

Con. Fm. Ind 5'/g 4'/i 4% + Vs 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd... 11% 1 1 y 8 11% + Vs 

East. Kodak 86% 83 y 4 85'A — V/i 

Fox Fm. "A" 45/g 4 4 — % 

Loew's, Inc 323/ 8 27l/ 2 28 1/4 — 1 V 8 

do pfd 781/s 78'/ 8 78'/ 8 + 3y 8 

Metro-Goldwyn, pfd. 19y 2 19Vi 19'/ 2 — V2 

Paramount ctfs 2% 2 2 

Pathe Exch 23/ 8 2 2'/ 8 — Vs 

do "A" 9V4 87/ 8 9 — Vl 

RKO 41/2 4l/ 8 41/4 — % 

Warner Bros 8'/ 8 7'/ 8 7V 8 — Vs 

do pfd 193/s I8I/4 I8V4 — 21/4 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. pfd. ...11-16 11-16 11-16 

Technicolor 9'A 8'/ 2 8% + Va 

Trans-Lux 3 2% 2% — Vs 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40.. 9'A 8 8 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 ctfs. IVi 6l/ 2 6'/ 2 — % 

Keith A-0 6s46 . . . 61 58 61 + 3i/ 2 

Loew 6s 41ww 84V 4 83 83 — Va 

Paramount 6s 47 32'/ 2 30 30—1 

Par. By. 5V 2 s51 40 37% 40 +3 

Par. 5V 2 s50 32 293^ 2934 — 1 1/4 

Par. 5'/ 2 s50 ctfs.... 29l/ 4 29l/ 4 29 1/4 — % 

Pathe 7s37 87 87 87 +1 

Warner's 6s39 39y 8 38V 2 38 Vi — Vi 

N. Y. PRODUCE EXCHANGE 

Para. Publix 2V 8 2 2 — V 8 



New Incorporations 



Resolute Pictures Corp., Manhattan. Motion 
picture films, 200 shares. Harold J. Sherman. 
Eleanor Klein and Anne Kahn. Attorneys: Fitel- 
son & Mayers, 1619 Broadway. 

Solar Talking Pictures, Ltd., Manhattan. All 
branches of the motion picture business; S10.- 
000; Jac Ladau, Charles Goldman and Lillian 
Parson. Attorneys: Roeder, Roeder & Mopper 
10 E. 40th St. 

W. K. D. Productions, Inc., Manhattan. Mo- 
tion and sound pictures; $10,000; Isaac N. 
Weber, Larry Kent and Daniel Dorand. Attor- 
ney, Samuel W. Airman, 11 W. 42nd St. 



Godfrey- Wynn Agency 

Plans Branch Offices 

Branch offices in various impor- 
tant cities will be opened by Amal- 
gamated Booking Service, headed by 
George A. Godfrey and affiliated 
with Amalgamated Broadcasting 
System, of which Ed Wynn is head. 
Wynn also is chairman of the exe- 
cutive committee of the agency, 
with Ota Gygi as vice-president. 
The plan is to interchange talent 
between radio and theaters. God- 
frey, who formerly was prominent 
in RKO, has already lined up a 
string of independent houses for his 
new venture. 



BANCROFT WITH 20th CENTURY 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — George Bancroft has 
signed a long-term contract with 
20th Century Pictures. His first 
starring vehicle will be "Blood 
Money." 



STATEWIDE CREDITORS' MEET 

Milwaukee — Creditors of the bank- 
rupt Statewide Theaters,, Inc., op- 
erators of 12 houses in Wisconsin, 
will hold their first meeting July 27 
in district court in the federal 
building here. Schedules of the 
bankrupt concern filed by G. N. 
Blatchford, treasurer, show liabili- 
ties of $65,303 and assets of $354,- 
981. Of the assets, $113,379 is in 
cash and $212,559 is theater equip- 
ment. 



DENVER SALES CHANGES 

Denver — J. S. Hommell, former 
M-G-M exchange manager here, is 
now selling for United Artists; Sam 
Feinstein, former manager for Radio 
exchange, is on the Universal sell- 
ing staff, and Guy Bradford, form- 
erly with Metro in Kansas City, has 
been moved to Denver, where he will 
sell. 



WILL HAYS, JR., UNDER KNIFE 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Will H. Hays, Jr., 
underwent an emergency operation 
yesterday for appendicitis. It was 
a success and young Hays is re- 
ported making satisfactory progress. 



CLEVELAND BUSINESS UP 

Cleveland — Local theater manag- 
ers report large increases in busi- 
ness for the past two weeks. The 
rise, against the season trend, re- 
flects increased industrial employ- 
ment. 



PERMIT MEN TO FIGHT 

Louis Waldman, attorney, has 
been retained by the permit men of 
Local 306, operators' union, to con- 
duct their fight for recognition as 
full members. 



K. C. Ass'n Launches Fight 
Against Liability Racket 

(Continued from Pane 1) 

taking steps to combat the racket. 
In compiling data on all damage 
cases for comparative purposes, the 
association found that one person 
may be involved in several suits, or 
several suits may be filed by one 
firm of lawyers. 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



Larry Darmour Starting 
New "McGuire" Series 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — First of the new se- 
ries of 12 "Mickey (Himself) Mc- 
Guire" comedies to be produced by 
Larry Darmour for release next sea- 
son by Columbia will go into work 
in about ten days. Addition of these 
two-reelers adapted from Fontaine 
Fox's popular comic strip was hailed 
by Sales Manager Abe Montague at 
Columbia's convention in Los An- 
geles last week. Montague stressed 
the value of suitable pictures for the 
kids and declared that seldom has 
there been so great a demand for 
sound and wholesome entertainment 
of this kind. 



Says European Studios 
, 5 Years Behind H'wood 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Although production 
in Europe has advanced greatly in 
the past year, studios over there are 
still about five years behind Holly- 
wood, according to Richard Blumen- 
thal, who arrived recently to super- 
vised the French version of Maurice 
Chevalier's "The Way to Love." 



W. E. PASCHALL MOURNED 

Dallas — Expressions of condolence 
from all branches of the industry 
have been coming in for W. E. 
Paschall, head of Paschall Texas 
Theaters, killed in an auto crash 
Tuesday. Grover S. Campbell, dis- 
trict manager of the circuit of about 
60 houses, also was injured. Paschall 
is survived by his wife and three 
sons. 



JACK McGOWAN AT M-G-M 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Jack McGowan, 
Broadway playwright, has been 
signed by M-G-M to write originals 
and dialogue. 



USHER KILLED IN HOLDUP 

Minneapolis — An attempted hold- 
up of the Uptown Theater resulted 
in the killing of a former usher, Ted 
Fisher, who grappled with the 
bandit. 



STAUB TO DIRECT COMEDIES 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Ralph B. Staub, di- 
rector and supervisor of Hollywood 
Screen Snapshots, will direct George 
Sydney and Charlie Murray in the 
new series of two-reel productions 
for Columbia. 






July 21-22: Fox Film Corp. special stockho 

ers' meeting, home office, New York 
July 21: Adjourned meeting of Publix I 

terprises creditors at office of Refei 

Henry K. Davis. 
July 22: Minneapolis film row employe 

picnic, Waconia, Minn. 
July 24-25: Code convention at Hotel Asl 

under auspices of National Association 

the Motion Picture Industry. 
July 25: Meeting of Allied Theaters of Ne 

Jersey at 2 P. M. 

July 28-29: Monogram western sales meetir 

San Francisco. 
July 28-31: Meeting of Independent Theat 

Supply Dealers' Association at Steve 

Hotel, Chicago. 

July 31 -Aug. 1: Warner sales meeting, Waldor 

Astoria Hotel, New York. 
Aug. 2: Outing at Bear Mountain under au 

pices of Motion Picture Club. 
Aug. 2-3: Monogram Canadian sales meetin 

Toronto. 
Aug. 3: Adjourned meeting of Fox Metropolis 

Playhouses' creditors. 
Aug. 3-4: Warner sales meeting, Drake Hote 

Chicago. 
Aug. 7-8: Warner sales meeting, Royal Yor 

Hotel, Toronto. 
Aug. 8: Third Annual Film Golf Tournamer 

of New England industry at Pine Broo 

Valley Country Club, Weston, Mass. 
Aug. 23-24: First annual convention of Inde 

pendent Motion Picture Owners Associate 

of Delaware and Eastern Shore of Marylan 

at Hotel Henelopen, Rehoboth, Del. 
Sept. 5-6-7: Allied Mew Jersey conventio 

at Atlantic City. 
Sept. 13: A. M. P. A. holds annual election 

officers 



RKO-Skouras Pool 

Two Newark Houses 

Negotiations have been com- 
pleted betwen RKO and Skouras for 
the pooling of the Fox Terminal and 
Proctor's, Newark. Skouras will 
operate both houses. RKO will 
book the programs. 

NEW TAUBER FILM OPENING j 

Richard Tauber in "The Golder] 
Goal" ends its run at the Vander-| 
bilt tomorrow and another Tauber! 
musical film, "The Big Attraction/'! 
opens there Saturday. 



RKO SIGNS SARI MARITZA 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY] 
Hollywood — Sari Maritza has 
been signed by RKO for a role with 
Ann Harding in "Beautiful." Al- 
fred Santell will direct. 



THEATRE OWNERS 
ATTENTION! 



1 



We have in stock 

over 50,000 yards 

CRESTWOOD & 

PREMIER CARPETS 

Largest variety of 

THEATRE PATTERNS 

ever assembled 



Greater N. Y. 
Export House/ Inc. 

250 West 49th Street New York 

LAckawanna 4-0240 

Theatre Carpets Our Specialty 



WARNER R R S. 
CAPTURED.... 



THIS GREAT 
CAST 




.For a Drama Too Big for the Pages of History 



CAPTURED! 



Who Are TheyT 

Save The Sections Daily— Fit 
Tbem Together Wednesday 



Will Capture The Heart of the World 



CAPTURED! 



" Who Are They? 

Save The Sections Daily Fit 
Them Together Tomorrow 



FOR THE GREATEST 
STORY EVER SCREENED 



m TH|S MAN - 

£^& condemned to 
I death . . . . ' 



THIS MAN- 

b.J| who stole the 
sweetheart of 



: THIS MAN- 

... his greatest 
friend .... 






.The Greatest Cast Ever Captured 



"CAPTURED!* 



Who Are TheyT 

TOMORROW'S 
Announcement 



Fit Together ~he 
Only Stars Who 
Could Fit Picture 
As Great A 
"CAPTUR* I 



Now You Know How BIG It Is.. .WARNER 
BROS. Gave It the Greatest Cast of the Season 



\ 

K 

J 



APTURED! 



FOR RELEASE AUGUST 19 



A 1 9 3 2 -' 3 3 SPECIAL 



WITH 





SUE HOWARD 



K riumphan t appearance 
a i Warner Bros. Star 



D0U6.FAIRRANKSJR. 



in one of the finest perform- 
ances of his young life 



PAUL LUKAS 



seldom has any actor had a 
chance for a part so poignant 



MARGARET LINDSAY 



sensational beauty of 
"Cavalcade" 



WHAT A CHANCE FOR SHOWMEN ... to capture on-the-spot 
interest with a picture packed with end-to-end action. Show up the name . . . 
blow up the cast . . . play up the angle. Make them know that this is the most 
exciting screen event of 1933 from ill i n II r Fl fl ft ft O 



VITAGRAPH, INC., DISTRIBUTORS 



Mi 



THE 



PUBLIX AND SPARKS 
CONCLUDE NEW SETUP 



(Continual I • om Page 1 ) 
tion formed for the purpose of 
operating and managing the the- 
aters of the corporations owned 50- 
50. E. J. Sparks will be president 
and general manager on a weekly 
salary from the corporation and an 
additional weekly stipend will be paid 
Sparks for not longer than three 
years in consideration of his cancel- 
lation of his present four per cent 
management contracts. M. C. Tal- 
ley will be elected treasurer. Pub- 
lix will elect a vice-president and 
also a secretary-assistant treasurer. 
Sparks and Publix will each have 
two representatives on the board of 
directors. The present agreement is 
for one year. 

A deal between S. A. Lynch, the 
Paramount trustees and R. B. Wilby 
and H. F. Kincey, southern theater 
operators, will be worked out within 
the next month. This deal will in- 
volve 43 Wilby-Kincey theaters in 
the Carolinas, Atlanta, Birmingham 
and the Tennessee Enterprises. Wil- 
by and Kincey have been in New 
York ready to consummate the deal, 
but have agreed to delay discus- 
sions until other circuit deals have 
been completed. 

Another deal involving 10 Para- 
mount Texas houses and five Hob- 
litzelle theaters is now pending. 
Both factions are in full accord with 
the present terms to be submitted 
to the trustees. It is expected that 
the deal will be signed within the 
next two weeks. 

The Detroit deal in which George 
Trendle acquires ten Publix houses 
in partnership has been completed. 

N. L. Nathanson Denies 
Canadian Circuit Changes 

(.Continued from Page 1) 

Fitzgibbons is remaining as direc- 
tor of theater operations with the 
full confidence of Nathanson and all 
present directors of the corporation. 



K. C. FILM CLUB 

Kansas City — Talk of a film club 
for all those who earn a living from 
the industry, and club rooms on the 
Row where they can congregate, 
talk, and secure light refreshments, 
apparently is coming to a head here. 



.oming a 



nd G 



omg 



AMEROSE DOWLING, head of RKO's export 
depairment, and SOL G. NEWMAN of London 
wi.l arrive from the coast Sunday. 

V. F. SMIRNOV, president of Amkino, leaves 
tomorrow for Moscow to confer with the Soviet 
film Trust on plans for purchases in the U. S. 
during the coming year and to decide on Soviet 
films to be shown here next season. 

FRANK J. WILSTACH of the Hays Office 
is back from vacation. 

CRESSON SMITH of RKO returned yesterday 
from Australia. He will take up his duties 
as western and southern sales manager with 
headquarters in New York. 

SALLY EILERS is en route to the coast. 






^^■"u" |uiln£Ai 



WITH 

PHIL M DALY 



• • • SOME MONTHS ago explorer George M. Dyott 
returned from a trip through the wilds of the Amazon country 
and Ecuador where he had gone in search of a friend of 
his named Schweitzer a gold prospector who had pene- 
trated the land of the head-hunters and never returned 

Dyott with two other men contacted the head-hunters 

;>nd established the fact that Schweitzer had met his fate at 
the hands of these primitive barbarians who were determined 
to guard their gold from the white man 



• • • NOW IT seems that Dyott had plenty of camera 

evidence of his unusual adventure but it had not been 

shot with the idea of presentation as an entertainment feature 

for the theaters Harold Auten saw the material 

realized its showmanship possibilities if properly treated 

and sold the idea to Walter Reade of the Mayfair Theater 

so the two put their heads together and collaborating 

with Dyott they have reconstructed a really unusual adventure 

in the Amazon wilds without a single studio shot 

an excellent explanatory narration and fine sound effects have 
made of it a real Showman Pix which only needs exploi- 
tation to send it over strong and the authentic story of 

Schweitzer headlined in the newspapers gives it the Realistic 

slant so "Savage Gold," soon opening at the Mayfair 

looks like a strong adventure pix 



• • • THE TRUE story of how Lou Goldberg of the 
RKO Theater division has been made a Major in the Chinese 

army on the personal staff of General Ma years 

ago Lou befriended a Chinaman by name of Wum Long 

while he was operating the Palestine Theater on the east side 

(we mean Lou. not the Chink) now it seems 

that Wum returned to China became a big political shot 

......and had General Ma confer the honor on his ole pal 

Lou so now the boys are calling him Major Loo Gold 

Hung 

• • • A BROADSIDE message advertising the 

Empey Club's big outing up the Hudson on Aug. 2 will 

soon land on the desks of all execs in the biz the fea- 
ture of the poster is a drawing showing Admiral Lee Ochs, 
Commander of the Empey Club's floating forces, and Com- 
modore Hal Home of the AMPA Marines looks as if this 

shindig will be the largest gathering in the interests of Whoopee 
ever held in Movieland in the East 



• • • FIFTEEN YEARS Is A Long Time In Pictures 

we can remember 15 years ago a pix titled "Cheating 

the Public" that pix has been seen in various versions 

many times in the past 15 years in theaters throughout the 

land of course it has appeared under various box-office 

titles but the Original Idea amounts to the same thing 

oh, well it is just a sample of the interesting 

things that will be discussed in our forthcoming Fifteenth An- 
niversary Issue 



• • • A SERIES of eight Spanish talking films made by 

the organization of Rafael A. Frias in Mexico City will 

be distributed in the next ten months by the Inter-Ocean Film 

Corporation controlling world rights Over at the St. 

Moritz Hotel Bob Reud is doing a news gossip spiel over the 

radio every eve at 6 o'clock specially designed to keep 

the guests informed on what's goin' on and Bob is get- 
ting all kinds of writeups in the air kolyums 



NO RUSHING OF CODE 
JOHNSON PR0MIS1 



(Continued from Page 1) 

following reply was received: 
"No code or agreement of 
kind will be approved without 
widest notice and opportunity 
every person interested to be he 
fully." 

Abram F. Myers refuses to c< 
ment on Allied's status in the pi 
aration or submission of a code, 
though it is believed Allied is wo! 
ing on a draft. He had no comm 
to make on the tentative M.P.T.O 
code, copies of which had not b 
received here up to yesterday. Ii 
understood, however, that Allied | 
strongly oppose the block-book 
and double-feature provisions. 



Freuler Sees Film Code 
As Ending Paternalis 

(Continued from Page 1) 

would result in substantial rewar 
unhampered by unprofitable and 1 
flung exhibition interests," ss 
Freuler. "Among other highly i 

portant probabilities is the reopening 
hundreds of closed houses placed on eg 1 
contractual footing. 

"While the houses now actually owned c 
right and operated by the major produci 
may not be inimical to their interests, or 
the good of the entire industry, the thousait 
of theaters operated so-called 'independent' 
with paternalistic control — either directly 
by a coercive policy — defeat the purpose i 
all concerned. 

"The intent of the proposed legislation 
fore the country's business interests is 
self-de.ermination that the good of the u 
may effect the greater benefit for the gro\ 
Thus, when its findings are actually compute 
it w 11 be clear to all that exhibition, divoM 
from production, will be of greatest value 
all branches of this industry.'' 



Mayfair Set on Twelve 
For the Coming Seaso 

(Continued from Page 1) 

new lineup, titles of which will 1 
announced in a few days, and fir 
of the group is to be finished by tl 
latter part of August. 



LEASE BROOKLYN HOUSE 

Thomas Stamatis and Emil Cana 
have added the Garden Theater am 
Airdrome in Brooklyn to their ci» 

cuit. 



« « « 



» » » 




MANY UAPPY RETURNS 




Best wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 

July 20 



Joe Brandt 



NOT A 'NEXT SEASON' 
PROMISE . . .BUT A 
DELIVERY TODAY . . 
IN JULY! 



BIG SHOWS NOW! 

We're not keeping 'em on ice! 



wmm 



*Wltiani 



.^' 






WH 



liiiSHt 



illUftiii 



^M^S 



■ 



SSBBBS 



JMERIAN C. COOPER! 

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER 



HENRY STEPHENSON ..LILIAN BOND 
GEORGE MEEKER . . . REGINALD OWEN 



tFROM THE PLAY BY EDWARD POOR MONTGOMERY . . . DIRECTED BY JOHN CROMWELL . . • ASSOCIATE PRODUCER KENNETH MacGOWAN 







DAILY 



Thursday, July 20 



NOWADAYS 

"NEW DEAL" 
STANDS FOR 
PLENTY AND 
THAT'S WHY 
FILM DAILY 
HAS CHOSEN 
"NEW DEAL" 
AS A NAME 
FOR ITS DIG 
FIFTEENTH 
ANNIVERSARY 
CELEBRATION 
N-U-M-B-E-R 



N-E-W-S O-F T-H-E D-A-Y 



Boston — Harry Spingler, manager 
of the Warner exchange, is on vaca- 
tion. Thomas Spry, district manager, 
is in charge. 



Freeport, Me. — The Mordica has 
closed. 



Denver — William Rosenfeldt, 
formerly booker for Sheffield, is 
handling the booking of Tiffany fea- 
tures and shorts for Amity. 



Birmingham — The Homewood has 
been reopened after being closed 
many months and is being operated 
by Steve Fundenberg. 



Davenport, la. — James J. Lamb, 
receiver for the Columbia, has turn- 
ed over the house to Mrs. Gabriella 
Walsh, owner. 



Boston — Arthur L. Tuohey, pub- 
licity contact man and assistant 
manager at Loew's Orpheum, has 
left for a sojourn in North Conway, 
N. H. 



Boston — Charles Stern, manager 
of United Artists here, has returned 
after a month's illness. 



Greensburg, Pa. — Joe Freeman, 
formerly with Loew has been named 
manager of the Warner's Manos 
Theater here. 



Denver — J. K. Powell, owner of 
the Oliver, Palisades, Neb., has 
bought the Wray Theater, Wray, 
Colo., from Mrs. Myrtle Blanchard. 



Prairie du Chien, Wis. — George 
Panka, operator of the Metropoli- 
tan, also has taken over operation 
of the Regent. 



Neenah, Wis. — Remodeling work 
has started on the Neenah prepara- 
tory to opening Sept. 1. Gilbert 
Courshon of the Drake Theaters 
Corp., Chicago, will act as resident 
manager. 



Cleveland — Jack Greenbaum, once 
with Loew's Ohio Theaters, is now 
with Manley and Brown, Inc., new 
company formed to distribute inde- 
pendent product. Their first release 
is "The Face on the Bar Room 
Floor." 



Zanesville, O.— The Weller thea- 
ter, formerly in Caldwell Brown's 
circuit, has been acquired by M. A. 

Shea. 



Sandusky, 0. — Receivership for 
the State theater, asked by George 
B. Seitz, was withdrawn pending 
new action to be taken by Seitz to 
repossess the house, now operated 
by Warners. 



Delphos, 0. — Roger Scherer of 
Fort Wayne has notified exchanges 
that he has acquired the Star from 
Leo Jones and will reopen it. 



North Attleboro, Mass.— The Com- 
munity has been closed by Publix. 



Leipsig, O. — C. J. Stechschulte has 
been appointed receiver for the Mys- 



U. A. Will Share Prosperity With Personnel 

(.Continued from Page 1) 

of the idealist. When I was a pro- I are very fortunate in acquiring 
ducer I operated with partners or | Darryl Zanuck as associate.^ Zanuck 
associates and paid better salaries 



than any other producer. When 
conditions were such that I could 
not afford to operate on this ba- 
sis, I stopped producing. Your fu- 
ture depends on yourself. We will 
supply good product, sparing noth- 
ing. It will require great effort on 
your part to realize a .proper re- 
turn. Mr. Lichtman and I hope to 
pay you handsomely. There is no 
desire to keep you down. As my 
brother Nick Schenck said last 
year, 'there is no ill in this indus- 
try that good pictures cannot 
cure.' " 

Schenck flew in from the coast 
and his stirring talk was greeted 
with enthusiasm. Speaking of pro- 
duction plans, he soid: 

' "We don't have to talk about the 
Samuel Goldwyn and Charles Chap- 
lin pictures. They don't know how 
to produce in any other way than 
the way they do. Goldwyn is only 
interested in getting great pictures. 
I have pleaded with him to save 
money, but he feels he knows bet 



.iow has the capital to produce just 
as he pleases. He doesn't have to 
make as many pictures as on the 
Warner schedule. He formerly 
made 65 in a year. Now he has 
only 12. Mathematically, the pic- 
tures should be five times as good. 
If he does three times as well, we 
will be satisfied." 

Schenck reiterated his earlier 
statement that the policy of selling 
pictures on their merit would be 
continued. He left unexpectedly by 
plane yesterday for New York. 

Al Lichtman reviewed the entire 
lineup to much applause. Harry 
Goetz of Reliance arrived from New 
York by Twentieth Century, while 
John Krimsky came in his own 
plane with a party of two. 

Walt Disney announced that he 
would produce 13 "Mickey Mouse" 
cartoons and 13 "Silly Symphonies." 
For "Mickey Mouse" material he 
will delve into old Greek tales and 
old fairy stories. At the banquet 
last night at the Drake Hotel, clos- 
ing the convention, Disney distrib- 
uted Mickey Mouse watches to the 



ter how to make his pictures. We I delegates as souvenirs. 



tic. Under the management of 
Wanamaker, the house is beinj 
erated three days a week with 
changes. 



Minneapolis — St. Paul To* 
which Joe Friedman has taken I 
has reopened after being dark 
some time. 



Delphos, 0. — A receiver has 
appointed to operate the Star 
and the house is dark until fui 
notice. Leo Jones and Ted Ye 
had been operating the theater. 



New Salem, O. — Norman Br 
previously identified with the 
House here, is now in charge ol 
Ohio in Belleville, 0. C. E. 
was its former owner. 



Akron, O.— 0. F. Ellser, for r 
years manager of the old Grand 
era House, here, is now idem 
with Springfield Lake Park, s 
of here, in an executive capacity 



Dallas — Louis Charninsky, 
manager of the Capitol, has arr 
to take over his duties. Charr.ii 
has been manager of the Quec 
Austin. 



Columbus, O.— The Ohio has 
augurated an hour concert on i 
days starting at 12:30 previou; 
the first showing for a period o: 
weeks. 



Boston — Tom Donaldson has r. 
appointed local M-G-M city sa 
man. 



Boston — Nathan Oderman, 
merly head shipper for the M-( 
branch, has been elevated to boo 



Tabloid Reviews of 
FOREIGN FILMS 



"MAMA," in Spanish, with Catalina 
rena, Rafael Rivelles, Jose Nieto, Andre 
Segurola, Julio Pena, Maria Luz Callejo 
Enriqueta Soler; directed by Benito Per 
distributed by Fox. 

A goad performance by Catalina Bjt 
and the supporting cast put over th:s 5- 
ish romance which moves briskly along, 
cept for some moralizing at the end. Si 
tells of the designs of the villain on 
daughter of a matron who has borrot 
money after losing at roulette, but is foi 
when his money is returned. 



"ISLAND OF DOOM." Russian talk 
directed by Semen Timoshenko; with < 
lina Kravchenko, Peter Solobevski, Vl» 
mir Kruegar. Distributed by Amkino. 

Plenty of old-fashioned thriller actii 
combined with excellent photograp 
marks this production as somewhat diff' 
ent from the usual run of Soviet pro» 
ganda films. Story is about three politi' 
enemies, two men and a woman, maroon; 
on an island with only four hours to Ifl 



IGN ON.YE SAILOR LADS 



Get the old bell-bottomed pants out 
o' the moth balls . . . brush the 
bilge and brine from your blouse . . . 
for, Matey, it's bound to be a big 
blow-out! 



Pack your lousy parrot in a cage 
. . . polish up your wooden leg 
. . . kiss "good-bye" to the gals in 
port ... for all Filumland is go- 
ing down to the "Sea" in ships for 



THE MOTION PICTURE CLUB'S 

great 1st Annual 

OUTING and UP-THE-HUDSON 



Wednesday, n Ud u 9 i ^J 

— Our good vessel sails from the Foot of West 46th Street (Pier 84, North River) 

Promptly at 10 o'clock A. M. — 



DECK GAMES — FIELD SPORTS 
LUNCHEON ABOARD SHIP — MUSIC 



BRIDGE — BEER 
SWIMMING — PRIZES 



HUGE SHORE DINNER AT BEAR MT. INN 
BASEBALL: MOTION PICTURE CLUB vs A. M. P. A. 



ALL THIS FOR $5.00 



PER 



TICKET! 



Make your reservations NOW by phoning 
"the motion picture club 

BRYANT 9-7664 




THE 



Little 
from "Lots" 

i By RALPH WILK ^^^ 




HOLLYWOOD 
J^EW LEVENSON, writer, has been 
awarded a renewal of contract 
by Columbia. He came to Holly- 
wood last December from New 
York. 

* * * 

Laura Hope Crews and George 
Brent will appear in First Nation- 
al's "Female," which will have Ruth 
Chatterton as star. 



Charles Butterworth has been 
given a leading role in M-G-M's 
"What a Liar." 

* * * 

Eugene Pallette, Hugh Herbert, 
George Blackwood, Robert Barrat 
and Arthur Hohl are cast additions 
to Warner's "The Kennel Murder 
Case." 

% * * 

Ginger Rogers and Joel McCrea 
will be teamed by RKO in "Chance 
at Heaven," Vina Delmar story. 

* * * 

Ralph Bellamy has been assigned 
one of the two male leads in War- 
ner's "Ever in My Heart," starring 
Barbara Stanwyck. 

* * * 

Margaret Morris and Grady Sut- 
ton are additions to the cast of "Ace 
of Aces," Richard Dix vehicle at 

RKO. 

* * * 

Frank McHugh and Dorothy Spen- 
cer Mclsaacs have applied for a 

marriage license. 

* * * 

Patricia Dawn Barry, daughter of 
the late Tom Barry, playwright and 
scenarists, has inherited his estate 

of $25,000. 

* * # 

Henry King will fly to Carolina 
and Georgia to view location sites 
for "The House of Connelly," which 
he will direct for Fox. W. F. Fitz- 
gerald, Max Larey and Jack Otter- 
son, members of King's unit, left 

last week for the southern locations. 

* * # 

Dick Powell is convalescing at his 
Tolucca Lake home, following an at- 
tack of pneumonia. 

sfc ♦ # 

Andy Clyde is motoring to Van- 
couver to visit his brother, who man- 
ages a dramatic stock company. 
Andy is stopping and trying out all 
the golf links en route from Los 
Angeles to Vancouver. 

* * * 

Ricardo Cortez has added a new 
saddle mount to his stable. 




"A Day in Moscow" 

Amkino 26 mins. 

Very Interesting 

Many of the most interesting 
highlights of Moscow are presented 
with photographic ingenuity in this 
Soviet short. In addition to 
glimpses of the customary native 
folk and their activities both do- 
mestic and industrial, the subject 
shows backstage scenes of the Mos- 
cow Art Theater, the Opera, a meet- 
ing at the Kremlin where Stalin and 
other outstanding Soviet personali- 
ties appear, sports, festivals, the 
part being played by women in the 
working world, and other incidents 
in the life of present-day Moscow. 

Andy Clyde in 

"Loose Relations" 

Educational-Fox 20 mins. 

Good Domestic Comedy 

Mother-in-law serves in good 
stead again as the principal comedy 
motivator in this Andy Clyde com- 
edy. Never having met his ma-in- 
law, Andy eagerly awaits her visit 
and goes to a lot of trouble prepar- 
ing the spare room, only to be given 
the cold shoulder by the bossy old 
woman. It's the old reliable domestic 
slp.pstick that gets the laughs f^om 
general audiences. 



ground. In an effort to discourage 
his son from pursuing a screen ca- 
reer, Craig's father plots with the 
studio gang. They assail Craig with 
a lot of goofy antics, all of which is 
just up Craig's alley. Plenty of 
laughs. 



SHORT SHO": 
EASTERN SI 

By CHAS. ALICO T . t 



Richy Craig, Jr., in 

"Say It Isn't So" 

Columbia 19 mins. 

Lots of Laughs 

Authored by Richy Craig, Jr., for 
himself, this is a continuously amus- 
ing skit in a movie studio back- 1 



ZaSu Pitts and Thelma Todd in 

"One-Track Minds" 

M-G-M 19 mins. 

Swell Comedy 

With Thelma Todd playing the 
role of a laundress who has won a 
movie contest and is on her way to 
Hollywood, this comedy in the day 
coach of a coast-bound train is a 
highly entertaining affair. In addi- 
tion to the teamwork between Miss 
Todd and ZaSu Pitts, a fellow-pas- 
senger, the plot involves a Holly- 
wood director, a sprightly kid 
nephew and a Dutch conductor. Lu- 
cien Prival plays the director, doing 
a take-off on Von Stroheim. Gus 
Meins directed and did a fine job. 



Leon Belasco and His Orchestra in 

"The Name Is Familiar" 

Vitaphone 10 mins. 

Nice Musical Novelty 

Pulling the old flirtation gag of 
"Haven't I met you somewhere?" 
Leon Belasco herewith goes into a 
series of musical flashbacks to va- 
rious foreign capitals in an effort to 
recall where he met the girl before, 
the place finally turning out to be 
the hotel where the orchestra is 
playing. A rather neat idea, and 
the music is good. 









Originals Lead 






Orig 


ina 


stories are 


in the 


b 


g ma- ! 


jorify 


on 


Paramount's 


1933-34 


program. 


an analysis of the lineup shows 


Out 


of 38 


pictures, 21 are origin; 


Is. 


seven 


are f 


■cm 


plays, only 


three 


of 


which 


were 


bou 


ght recently, 


and 10 


are from 


novels 


an 


d magazines. 











4 Companies Now Working 
At Florida Movie Colony 

(.Continued from Page 1) 

pany, Kennedy Productions, has 
been joined by Flamingo Film Corp., 
with Buster Keaton, president; 
Eagle Productions and the Comet 
Productions, headed by Adolph Pol- 
lak and Morris Shiller. Included in 
the growing movie colony are Bus- 
ter Keaton, Marshall Neilan, Linda 
Watkins, George Melford, Josephine 
Dunn, Lew Lipton, Molly O'Day, 
Ford Sterling, Jess Cavin, Pollak 
Shiller, and many others. 



GENE FOX GOES TO BOSTON 

Boston — Gene Fox, Paramount 
publicity man from the coast, has 
been brought east to manage exploi- 
tation for the Metropolitan. Floyt* 
S. Bell, manager for a number of 
years, has not yet been re-assigned. 
Angeline Maney stays on as execu- 
tive assistant. 



LEW MAREN RESIGNS 

IVcst Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Lew Maren has re- 
signed as director of publicity at 
the Hal Roach studio. 



J. R. McDonough Named 
RKO General Manager 

(Continued from Page 1) 

period of receivership of the RKO 
and its re-organization. McDonough 
will devote his full time to the activ- 
ities of the various organizations of 
RKO and will report directly to the 
president. 

McDonough was formerly presi- 
dent of the RCA-Victor and re- 
signed to become executive vice- 
president of RCA. Aylesworth states 
that the executive officers of the 
RKO organizations will continue to 
function as at present. 



May Select One of Warners 
As Advisor on Film Code 

(Continued from Page 1) 

in this industry itself will be chosen. 
It is not known whether that man 
will be someone who has already 
been appointed to the board such 
as Frank R. Wilson or a man not 
yet mentioned, but it is considered 
not unlikely that one of the Warner 
Brothers might be selected. The 
Warners have been very close to this 
administration, being outright Dem- 
ocrats in their views and having 
played an important part in the 
Roosevelt campaign. 



pRED J. ROBERTS, 

the Chamberlain 
and recently with t. 
Casting Directory ol 
succeeds Ted Green, 
charge of the moving 
theatrical departments 
els Guild. 



S?, 



"The Little Broacfcas .'" 
duced by Mentone Pict^ 
to production today ot 
Coast Service Studio und 
rection of Lynn Shores 



Work of enlarging the 
at the new Hayes & Beal) 
Oceanside, Long Island, I 
pleted this week. 



John Doran, stage main 
the Eastern Service studk 
on the job after having 
vacation visiting the 
Progress Exhibition in C 
• 

Tom Patricola is makin 
short for Vitaphone at I 
lyn studio this week und^r 
tion of Roy Mack. 

• 

Bill Bradley, architect I 
phone studio, is not only 
chitect but an accomplish 
man. Bill navigated the \ 
n his class in the N. Y. t 
races off Block Island tu< 
igo. 

• 

Ray McCarey, out of I 
and completely recovered 
recent operation for sinus, 
sume directing at the Vitaph 
dio with a short scheduled 
the comedy team of Char 
and George Givot. Gl 
and Jack Henley are coi-i 
script. 



Filming of a fuel econo 
the Ford Motor Co. and ' 
fining Co. has been start, 
Ruby Film Co. Edward I 
big the camera work. 

EDWIN BLUCK TO THE 

Denver — Edwin BIu.k 
of the Hiawatha, is takii 
months' vacation in wc ■ t 
rado and California for I 
R. S. Post, former manage! 
bing. 



Union Lockout U?r 

Denver — The district courr 
the mandamus writ it had i 
Harry Huffman, Joe Dekker a 
Archer, directing them to f 
men back to work pendin; 
notice and investigation by t 
industrial board. The dec : 
that a strike or lockout can 
in any industry or business m 
ing public interest. 




?att in DoliftrTfoosts Foreign Income About 40% 

iLARKE FAILS IN MOVE AGAINST FOX REFINANCING 



Bood Fellowship is Industry's Great Need — Dubinsky 



The Parade 



... as we see it 

; By JACK AL1COATE- 



jiOKS like the U. A.— 20th Century— 
■ — Joe Schenck-Darryl Zanuck-AI Lichr- 
n combination is off to a running start 
b he 1933 Cinema Derby. Further, that 
» n the coming season gets into full stride 
H will most likely be out there near the 
h r or thereabouts. Young and aggressive 
I Zanuck has the old United Artists stu- 
i n Hollywood effervescing with enthusi- 
Experienced and dynamic Al Licht- 
r has lost no time in bringing back the 
o fighting U. A. spirit at both the Coast 
i< Chicago conventions. Place a gold star, 
k on the report card of Joe Schenck for 
9 ;ing back an outfit that some of the 
* boys had counted out. 



GENTLE masculine courtesy to 'Roxy' 
Still the greatest and grandest show- 
of 'em all. Again definitely established 
lace as "Head Man" by packing them 
the Music Hall this past week through 
lersonal popularity. We spent an eve- 
with the reminiscent Roxy a few nights 
]nd it was sheer delight to see his eyes 
kle while recalling some of the many 
ful incidents of his early pioneering 
ts. Few know that he started in a 
ng rink. Or am I giving away state 
(its? 



( 



•ID while reminiscently watching the 
passing parade it seems that every 
>any in the industry might well copy 
exploitation page from the Metro- 
wyn-Mayer merchandising book. Par- 
tly as to consistency of policy. The 
-M field force of exploitation was sent 
ie front line trenches back in 1923-24. 
s functioned aggressively and with the 
' degree of evenness of policy ever 
Nothing is as helpful to the exhibi- 
is well planned exploitation campaigns. 
I the necessary wallop that puts the 
' ones over with a bang and helps, not 
He, as the fair-to-middlin' ones come 
i,. No company has done better work 
i these lines, over a period of years, 
"M-G-M. 



Sees Most Difficulties Due 

To Lack of Mutual 

Sympathy 

By KENNETH FORCE 
Staff Correspondent, THE FILM DAILY 

Kansas City — "The greatest sin- 
gle source of difficulty in the film 
business today is the lack of good 
fellowship among those engaged in 
it." 

So it seems to Ed Dubinsky, who 
has been an exhibitor 16 years, and 
in the legitimate theater business 14 

(Continued on Page 4) 



COMBINE MAY SEW UP 
AUSTRALIAN FIELD 



By JACK PERCIVAL 

Special Cable to FILM DAILY 

Sydney — Negotiations have been 

started to bring the Prince Edward, 

Sydney, and Capitol, Melbourne, 

Australia's two most important in- 

(Continued on Page 6) 

Pathe Likely to Finance 
Independent Productions 

Restricted from entering into ac- 
tual production by its contract with 
RKO, Pathe Exchanges, Inc., may 
indirectly finance independent fea- 
tures next season, Stuart W. Webb, 

(.Continued on Page 4) 



"New Deal" Short Okayed 

Wash. Bur. of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — Vitaphone has received 
official okay from National Recovery 
Act officials for a two-reeler entitled 
"New Deal" to be made and released 
without cost to the Government and 
distributed to exhibitors at a rental to 
cover expenses. The Government heart- 
ily approved the scenario. 



SYNDICATE WILL HOLD 
660,900 LOEW SHARES 



As an outcome of the joint ac- 
tion of noteholders owning the $20,- 
000,000 notes of Film Securities 
Corp., holding corporation for the 
660,900 Loew common shares ob- 
tained from Fox, this stock, which 
represents controlling interest in the 
company, will be deposited with a 
syndicate to be held indefinitely for 
account of the noteholders. When 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Tax on Film Imports 

Looms in Australia 

Sydney (By Cable) — Results of 
deliberations by the Federal House 
of Representatives on the proposed 
tax of a shilling per lineal foot on 
foreign films are anxiously awaited 
by the trade. The bill was kicked 
out by the Senate. 



Foreign Income Up 40 Per Cent; 
July Grosses Are Ahead of '32 



4 Chatf eld Ohio Houses 
Start Operation Sept. 1 

Cleveland— E. C. Prinsen, former 
manager of Publix houses in this 
territory and now general manager 
of the new Chatfeld circuit, expects 
to have his four houses in operation 
about Sept. 1. Theaters include the 
Palace, Akron; Palace, Youngstown; 
Paramount, Steubenville, and Capi- 
tol, Wheeling. 



Decline of the dollar and the cor- 
responding rise of the British pound 
and other foreign currencies will 
add about 40 per cent to film dis- 
tributors' income from abroad, it is 
estimated by Dow-Jones in a survey 
of current motion picture conditions. 
Many of the important film com- 
panies are making sure of these 
profits by selling foreign exchange 
futures, and industry officials esti- 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Loses in Effort to Stop 

Voting of GTE Stock 

For New Fox Plan 

By NORMAN M. MacLEOD 
Staff Correspondent, THE FILM DAILY 

Wilmington, Del. — Efforts of Har- 
ley L. Clarke, former Fox president, 
to stop the receiver for General The- 
ater Equipment, Inc., from voting its 
Fox stock in favor of the reorganiza- 
tion plan to be acted upon by stock- 
holders at a meeting in New York 
coday and tomorrow were unsuccess- 

(Continued on Page 6) 

$65,000,000 ASKED 
IN SUIT AGAINST W.E. 

Suit for $65,953,125, triple dam- 
ages under the Clayton Act, was 
filed in Federal Court yesterday af- 
ternoon by the Vocafilm Corp. of 
America against American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co., Western 
Electric and Electrical Research 
Products. The plaintiff, through its 

(Continued on Page 4) 

High Film Rentals Assure 
Better Product — Schaef er 

Success or failure of the inde- 
pendent exhibitor depends upon his 
vvillingness to invest in a maximum 
rather than a minimum film rental, 
George J. Schaefer stated to The 
Film Daily yesterday. 

"The exhibitor who insists on 
.paying the least possible film rental 
is operating on a short-sighted and 
iuicidal policy," Schaefer said. "He 
must support the producer. Quality 
pictures must be encouraged for 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Film Broadcasts 

Starting Aug. 7 the new Ed Wynn 
radio chain, Amalgamated Broadcasting 
Co., will broadcast air versions of Co- 
lumbia pictures as a weekly feature. 
About a dozen stations are affiliated 
with the chain. Broadcasts will be timed 
with the release of the films in the 
various localities. 




DAILY 



Friday, July 21,] 




Vol. LXIII.No.17 Fri., July 21.1933 Price 5 Cents 



JOHN W. ALICOATE 



Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
it 1650 Broadway, New York, N. V., 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
and General Manager; Arthur W. Eddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at Naw York, 
N Y„ under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 1-650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
Phone, Circle 7-4736, 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London- 
Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 22S. Paris 
—P. A. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 6 6 6 — y 4 

Columbia Picts. vtc. . 23 20'/ 4 20'/ 4 — 2% 

Con. Fm. Ind 47/ 8 4% * 3 /s — Vl 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd.. 1 1 1/ 4 lO'/s lO'/g — 1 % 

East. Kodak 86 79i/ 2 80y 4 — 5 

Fox Fm. "A" 4l/ 8 35/ 8 35/ 8 — % 

Loew's, Inc 303/ 8 25 26 — 2i/ 4 

do pfd 77 73i/ 4 73i/ 4 — 4% 

Metro-Goldwyn, pfd. 19i/ 2 19'/ 2 19V2 

Paramount ctfs. ... 2'/ 8 1% 1%— Vs 

Pathe Exch 2'/ 8 1 % 1%— Vi 

do "A" 87/ 8 75/s 75/ 8 — 1% 

RKO 41/4 33/ 4 3% — V, 

Warner Bros 7% 6 6i/ 2 — % 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. pfd... % 34 13-16 + Vs 

Technicolor 9 8% 8'/ 4 — y 4 

Trans-Lux 3 27/ 8 3 + Vs 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40. 8 7% 8 + Vk 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 ctfs. 6% 6'/ 2 6'/ 2 — 1/4 

Loew 6s 41 ww 82% 82'/ 8 827/ 8 — % 

Paramount 6s 47... 30 28 30 +1 

Par. By. 5'/ 2 s51 40 37 37 — 27/ 8 

Par. By. 5'/ 2 s50 .... 30 29% 297/ 8 — % 

Par. 5V 2 s50 ctfs 29% 29% 29% + l/ 4 

Pathe 7s37 87 86 86 

Warner's 6s39 39 37 37% — % 

N. Y. PRODUCE EXCHANGE 

Para. Publix 2 13,4 1%— % 



Wilson Will Direct Recovery Act Propaganda 

Washington Bureau of TIIF. FILM DAILY 
Washington — Frank R. Wilson, newly appointed Recovery administration official, 
together with Charles Francis Horner will direct the entire publicity campaign 
and press releases on the Industry Recovery Act propaganda, surpassing the Liberty 
Loan publicity drive during the war. 



INVINCIBLE 

STARTS THEIR 

SECOND PICTURE 

1933-34— SOON 

"WHERE THE 

PROMISE I S 

FULFILLED" 

1540 B'way. N. Y. C 



First Phil Meyer Release 
Booked by Mayer, Reade 

"The Faithful Heart," starring 
Herbert Marshall and Edna Best, 
first of the grou,p being released by 
Phil Meyer through his recently 
formed Helber Pictures, has been 
booked by Arthur L. Mayer for the 
Rialto and by Walter Reade for his 
entire New Jersey circuit. The 
Rialto showing will open the first 
week in August. 

Meyer's sceond release, "White 
Face," an Edgar Wallace thriller, 
also has been completed. 



Neufeld and Heenon Open 
New Phila. Exchange 

Philadelphia — Oscar Neufeld and 
Bill Heenon, veteran film men in 
this territory, have opened a new 
independent exchange under the 
name of Peerless Distributing Co. 



PAT O'BRIEN AT WARNERS 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Pat O'Brien has been 
signed by Warners to a long term 
contract. His first picture will be 
with Ann Dvorak in "The Varsity 
Coach." O'Brien and Dvorak will 
be supported by a cast of 18 other 
well known names. 



"VOLTAIRE" PREVIEW ON SHIP 

Warners will give a preview of 
George Arliss in "Voltaire" to a 
specially invited audience of guests 
aboard the French Line's He de 
France next Wednesday evening. 
Prominent leaders of society, art 
and education, as well as the press, 
will be present. 



HARRY ALAN POTAMKIN DEAD 

Harry Alan Potamkin, one of the 
keenest critics and writers of the 
screen and stage, died yesterday in 
Bellevue Hospital. He was 32 years 
old. Potamkin was actively identi- 
fied with various groups sponsoring 
films for class audiences. 



Desirable double unit with film vault, 
seventh floor Film Center Building, 
completely equipped, available. At- 
tractive terms for early occupancy. 



CASTLE FILMS 
630 Ninth Ave. New York City 



Theaters' $150,000 Note 
Ordered Sold for $85,000 

Boston — By order of Federal 
Juce Lowell a $150,000 promissory 
note signed by Rhode Island The- 
aters, Inc., endorsed by Olympia 
iheaters, Inc., secured by mortgage 
on the Paramount Theater in New- 
port and held by the closed Federal 
National Bank of Boston, was sold 
for $85,000 to Leon David of Bos- 
ton and Nathan David of Newport. 



DREISER'S "MOONEY" PROLOG 

After pre-viewing the feature, 
"The Strange Case of Tom Mooney," 
yesterday, Theodore Dreiser con- 
sented to make a special talking 
prologue which will accompany the 
film during its run at the Cameo 
starting today. The iprologue was 
made last night. 

WILK ON STORY HUNT ABROAD 

Jake Wilk, Warner story head, 
sails today on the Rex for Europe 
to look over story material for the 
remaining 30 Warner productions 
not as yet set in the 1933-34 sched- 
ule of 60 features. Wilk will be 
away three weeks. 



PLANS FOR INDEP'T MEETING 

Directors of the Federation of 
Motion Picture Industry of America 
continued yesterday drawing up 
plans for the meeting to be held 
July 31-Aug. 1 at the Hotel Astor. 
Formal announcement of the meet- 
ing will be made tomorrow. 



NEW G-B RELEASE 

"The Lucky Number," comedy- 
drama with music produced by Gau- 
mont-British, has been received by 
the New York offices of the com- 
pany and will soon have its Broad- 
way premiere. 




^President 



ATLANTIC CITY'S 

NEWEST BOARDWALK 

HOTEL 

Five Hundred Rooms with Sea Water 
Baths — American and European Plans. 
Also Beautiful Furnished Housekeeping 
Apartments with Complete Hotel Service 
by the Week, Month or Year. 

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MARINE SUN DECK 

TURKISH BATHS 



Ready Reference Direct 

With Addresses and Phono Numbers 
Recognized Industry Concerns 



What To Buy And 
Where To Buy It 



Distributors • 



'EASY 
MILLIOM 



BOX-Olfl 



A MONAMX 

Production- 

of coursa 



• Engravers • 



CALL— 

PHOTOENGRAVING 
(Day and Night Service) 
250 W. 54th St., N. Y. 

Tel. COIumbus 5-6741 



Equipment 



VORTKAMP AND COMPAtv 

Lamps and Carbons 

ALL OTHER THEATER SUPPLIE! 

1600 B'way, CH. 4-5550 N. Y. 



• Hand Coloring • 




HAND COLORING 

of POSITIVE PRINTS 

528 Riverside Drive New York Cit 

UNiversity 4-2073 



Foreign 



AMERANGLO 
CORPORATION 

EXPORTERS— IMPORTERS 

Cable: Chronophon 

226 WEST 42ND STREET 

NEW YORK CITY 

LONDON PARIS BERLlhi 



• Scrap Film 



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WE BUY JUNK FILM 

Guarantee No Piracy 
BEST MARKET PRICES 




WOODRIDGE 



NEW JERS| 



Hay, July 21, 1933 



THE 



-%tl 



DAILY 



M 

3 



JMELY TOPICS 

V Argument Against 
lire Charges 

i 1 ALL companies had been in- 
"~ -sistent on score charges in all 
• rts of the country their ar- 
m iments for retention of this 
-~fF; of the selling arrangement 
J ght carry weight. It is a 
w'tWn fact, however, that score 
Jjarges are not being paid in 
__-rious sections and probably 
w l[v-er will, code or no code, 
"ere is no reason, therefore, 
_ \y this mild form of high- 
"assure racketeering, as it has 
Hen classed by the exhibitors, 
* "ould be retained. In the early 
Ijys of the talkies, the electrics 
ght have been held up as the 
; ful ogre that caused the 
l\\, 'ipre charges to be continued. 
,. , < t of the baby, era, however, 
r s business does not scare so 
t;ily. Score charges should be 
olished. They are a carry- 
^r from an era when there 
s plenty of money and the 
siness didn't mind paying for 
ot of gadgets it can't afford 
Irw. ExceDt where it is a con- 
actual obligation on the part 
Ithe producer with the record- 
f company (and it is reported 
exist in only one case), there 
no alibi on earth to prove 
y the score charge should be 
licted on the exhibitor. It is 
-fair. Already a formidable 
tt of exhibitor organizations 
,/e definitely committed them- 
5 ves against the practice; and 
W- (l in all probability insist that 
\ s clause be incorporated in 
t code. Furthermore, there is 
| tson to believe that if this 
use becomes a debatable point 
I [ore the government body at 
) hearing, the exhibitor can 
:'dly expect that he will be 
the losing end. 

— Jay Emanuel, 
The "National Exhibitor." 




J? 

31 

»/. 

lori 

he 

^lusi 

01 

piciv 1 

f USS 



i WILK sails for Europe today on the 

ilETTE MACDONALD is due back from 
I in a few days aboard the lie de France 
. sojourn of eight months abroad. ROBERT 
IE, her husband, and her mother also 
with her. Miss MacDonald has post- 
.British film plans to hurry to Hollywood 
f:ar in "Cat and the Fiddle" for M-G-M. 

I TERRISS arrived in New York yester- 
the Lafayette. 

?Y MORRIS returned Wednesday to New 
!om Hollywood where he has been busy 
£ for four weeks in conjunction with 
Jisic in "Footlight Parade." Warner 
| production. 

|ER M. SAYLER, critic, author and pub- 
flrepresentative, returned yesterday from 






IONCthe 

sf0 



PHIL M. DALY 



• • 9 QUITE THE swankiest luncheon of the current 
social season in honor of Ethel Barrymore's first per- 
sonal appearance on the stage of a picture house which 

is about to take place at the Capitol with that most 

genial and gracious host, Major Bowes at the Gotham 

Hotel 



• • • THE MAJOR set the delightful informal atmos- 
phere by chatting casually to his guests from his chair at the 

table with his arm draped lightly over the shoulder of 

Miss Barrymore he reminisced 'way back to the days 

of John Drew as he grew sentimental, he kissed Ethel 

gallantly on the cheek the lady blushed delightfully 

and Belle Baker announced sotto voce that THAT was the 
Major's excuse for giving the party 

^ sj; ^j % 

• • • IN TURN our host introduced various personalities 

Bob Montgomery, "a young aspirant for film honors 

who had to rush away to take a screen audition" Charles 

Dillingham, the Dean of the American theater, a red-cheeked 

youth with tousled white hair who remembered as far 

back as the time when the Duke of York, now the British kink, 
useter attend the Lunnon theater every nite to marvel at the 
histrionics of a slip of a girl named Miss Barrymore from the 

States and Nellie Revell, who spilled all the dirt about 

Mister Dillingham's early days when he was a cub reporter in 

Chi then Bernard Sobel told some tales about both Miss 

Barrymore and Mister Dillingham while Bessie Mack 

fluttered hither and thither like the perfect hostess she is, see- 
ing that all the newspaper girls and boys got the best the house 
had to offer 



• • • IN A gay mood we ambled out with Florence 

Browning, the Perfect Sec to J. Robert Rubin a Sec who 

Sees All, Hears All, Knows All — and Tells Nothing 

as we fumbled for the taxi fare Florence and ourself 

almost dropped dead as Scotty Billy Ferguson in a spendthrift 

mood declared that HE would stand for the Extravagance 

as Miss Browning recovered her breath in the taxi she 

whispers to us "I'll bet the taxi bill will be on my desk 

in a half hour for my okay." so we called Florence up 

in a half hour to see if the bill had arrived it HAD 

Bill overlooks nothing yes, yes, it was a gorgeous after- 
noon's relaxation the Gang has delegated us to ask the 

Major When is the NEXT Party? 



• • • HAVE YOU heard the current yarn of the Film 
Heel who got a half dozen key men to help him promote a 

Proposition and when he thought he had grabbed off the 

King Pin he gave 'em all a royal shellackin' and left 

'em in the Cold? then the Discards went out and dug 

up the Real King Pin that the dumb mug had Overlooked ..... 

and started their own Proposition it's the Screen Scream 

of the Season 



• • • WINNERS ARE announced in United Artists' ship 
news and marine reporters' contest in connection with "I Cover 

the Waterfront first and second prizes to Francis Kester 

of the Oakland "Tribune" and Frances G. Durham of the Mobile 

"Press-Register" and eight other prizes for some swell 

Waterfront Yarns from which U. A. may grab off sev- 
eral fine screen stories 



« « « 



» » » 



EXPLOITETTES 

Royal Coach for 
Street Ballyhoo 

£)ILLON DAMEN, Warner 
Bros.' advertising and pub- 
licity director in London, ar- 
ranged for an extremely effec- 
tive ballyhoo in connection with 
the showing of "The King's Va- 
cation" at the Regal Cinema, 
Marble Arch, London. The stunt 
was the parading about town of 
a royal coach drawn by four 
horses. The coach paraded 
through the streets of London 
amid the trumpet blowing of 
the royal looking gentleman sit- 
ting on top of the coach. Need- 
less to say the ballyhoo created 
a rather big stir in London, 
where picture exploitation of 
this type has been a very rare 
sight to the Londoners. 

— Regal Cinema, London. 



Lucky Number 
Drawing on Fashions 

JnASHION stills of Diana Wyn- 
yard in "Rasputin" were dis- 
played in Roos Bros, window. 
A tie-up was also arranged 
with this store for a Monday 
night "Fashionette Revue" 
whereby eight girls made a one- 
costume appearance on theater 
stage in regular style show 
manner. Patrons were given 
numbered tickets upon entering 
theater and a stage drawing 
took place immediately follow- 
ing the revue. The lucky num- 
ber holder for women was per- 
mitted to select any one of the 
dresses and accessories as fea- 
tured by the stage model. A 
merchandise order was present- 
ed to the lucky number holder 
for men. 

— California, San Jose. 




MANY UAPPY RETURNS 




Best wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 

July 21 



Lenore Ulrich Ken Maynard 

Lawrence A. Urbach 




THE 



&&« 



DAILY 



SEES GOOD FELLOWSHIP 
CHIEF INDUSTRY NEED 

(Continued from Page 1) 
years before that. Dubinsky and 
his brother operate the Dubinsky 
circuit in Kansas and Missouri. 

"The exhibitor thinks, and not 
without some cause, that the dis- 
tributor is a so-and-so; and the dis- 
tributor thinks, likewise not without 
some cause, that the exhibitor is a 
so-and-so. An attitude of mutual 
distrust and irritability character- 
izes most of the relationships aris- 
ing in the discharge of the indus- 
try's affairs. 

"If I were running a dinky cloth- 
ing store on a back street, and 
bought as little as $1,500 worth of 
merchandise a year," Dubinsky com- 
ments, "when I went to New York, 
the manufacturers and wholesalers 
would wine, dine and dance me. They 
couldn't do enough to express their 
appreciation for my business. But 
as an exhibitor, when I go to New 
York, no one has time to be both- 
ered. 

"The producer or distributor 
writes an exhibitor that he can do 
this and that or he won't get any 
more pictures; and, because those 
in the offing look good, he toes the 
line. But they never write him a 
letter of thanks or encouragement! 

"Most exhibitors are human, if 
they are treated that way, and do 
go along, through bad years and 
good, with the distributor who gives 
them friendly and fair service. 
When the distributor offers them 
any other kind of treatment, they 
dislike buying: even the best of pic- 
tures from him. 

"Producers have been too hungry 
for quick big profits. They forget 
that the old circus grafter who 
gypped as much from as many as 
he could, and had his pride in be- 
ing successful at it, was always 
broke at the end of a season. 

"Why shouldn't distributors go 
along with the exhibitor and give 
him a chance to live in the face of 
difficulties as important, if not as 
great, as theirs ? 

"General Motors does not sell a 
Chevrolet to one customer at a high- 
er price than to another. Some 
years ago I was offered a picture 
for $1,500 which I bought for $50. 
Of course this is an extreme case, 
but it is, nevertheless, an accurate 
indication of a bad practice. 

"There is no real necessity for 
gypping, for high-handed tactics. 
Why not let everybody make a lit- 
tle money? If an exhibitor doesn't 



Market Value 

"Beauty is worth a dollar an hour, 
but there is no price tag on brains," 
declared Darryl Zanuck in a radio inter- 
view from Hollywood the other night. 



$100,000 Crooning Insurance for Bing Crosby 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Bing Crosby, radio and screen headliner, has taken out $100,000 in- 
surance on his voice. A growth between his vocal chords gives him the huskiness 
that is peculiar to his crooning, Crosby said, and if the growth disappears the insurance 
companies will have to fork over. 



Pathe Likely to Finance 
Independent Production 

(Continued from Page 1) 

president, stated yesterday. The 
company, which has not entered ac- 
tively in any branch of the industry 
for the past two years, will imme- 
diately begin active operation of its 
Bound Brook Laboratories under the 
supervision of Arthur W. Miller. 
Officers of the company remain the 
same with Arthur Poole as vice- 
oresident and treasurer. Webb told 
The Film Daily yesterday that he 
has received permission from RKO 
executives to finance independent 
oroductions iprovided the company 
itself does not actively produce. 
Plans for resumption of activity by 
Pathe were first reported in The 
Film Daily on June 6. 



High Film Rentals Assure 
Better Product — Schaefer 

(Continued from Page 1) 
they are the only type that will do 
business. They cannot be produced 
in a pinch-penny budget, although 
this is by no means to be taken in 
support of extravagance. The era 
of wild spending is past in every 
industry." 



More Spending for Shows 
Predicted by W. A. Finner 

Columbus — As a result of losses 
sustained through investments, clos- 
ed banks and in other directions 
during the last few years, the pub- 
lic will be more prone to spend 
money as it is earned, and a good 
deal of it will go for amusements, 
in the opinion of W. A. Finner, 
Loew division manager. He predicts 
less saving and more spending. 



COMPOSER MAKING SHORT 

Roy Turk, a Tin Pan Alley tune- 
smith, will appear in a Vitaphone 
short subject which goes in work 
today at the Brooklyn studio under 
Roy Mack's direction. Script was 
written by Herman Ruby and Cy 
Wood of the studio writing staff. 
Kay Hamilton, Madelyn Killeen, 
Barnett & Clark and Mario & La- 
zerin are in the supporting cast. 



want to play the game according 
to fair rules, give him another 
chance; and then if he continues an 
ill-natured maverick, penalize him. 
Don't penalize the whole group. 

"In the end it all comes back to 
the lack of good fellowship. Those 
in the business have soured. They 
have outgypped each other until 
they have no sympathy left, and 
without sympathy there is no under- 
standing." 



$65,000,000 Asked in Suit 
Against Western Electric 

(Continued from Page 1) 

attorney, Col. Lewis Landes, charges 
that the three defendant companies 
constitute a monopoly in restraint of 
trade and that, through contracts 
with producers whereby pictures 
were released only to exhibitors 
using sound reproduction apparatus 
controlled by the defendants, 
strangled competition and forced ex- 
hibitors to use the defendants' prod- 
ucts. 

David R. Hochreich, a motion pic- 
ture man for 20 years, former presi- 
dent of Vocafilm before it suspended 
operations in 1929, and W. Harry 
Williams, retired Pittsburgh capi- 
talist, are the individuals in the 
Vocafilm fight. 

"The story behind the suit," Hochreich told 
the press in the offices of Attorney Landes, 
"goes back to 1927, when my business part- 
nership with Mr. Williams began. We had 
sole rights to make, use and license Vocafilm 
Recording apparatus and make Vocafilm pro- 
ductions. 

"We invested $600,000 to produce our 
sound reproducing units. The reproducing 
units were made to sell to exhibitors for 
$4,000 as against the $15,000 to $20,000 for 
an installation of Western Electric units. 

"We opened offices and studios at 122 Fifth 
Avenue, with 100 employees, and a factory to 
manufacture our producing units in Long 
Island City. 

"We made eighty short subjects and pre- 
pared to make 1000 more. We demonstrated 
our apparatus and attracted much interest 
among the independent exhibitors. We made 
a contract with Educational Pictures to dis- 
tribute our sound units, under a guaranteed 
distribution of 250 sets a year, and on a 
distribution plan expected to put out 2,000 
units. 

"That contract was to run 5 years and 
the estimated profit to Vocafilm was $1,676,- 
875 annually or $8,384,375 for the life of 
the contract. 

"Our contracts for pictures included, in 
addition to our short subjects, production of 
the current hits of the Shuberts, William A. 
Brady and A. H. Woods. Our estimated 
profits from production of both shorts and 
features, all contracted for and covering a 
total of 5 years, would have been $2,600,000 
annually, or $13,000,000 for the time of the 
contracts. 

"The reasons for the suit developed after 
Vocafilm had gone into the field. We found 
that the three defendant companies were in 
effect a single unit, Western Electric stock 
being practically all owned by American 
Telephone & Telegraph and Electrical Re- 
search Products being the outlet for pool of 
patents controlled by the other two com- 
panies. 

"We found that Western Electric and the 
other defendants had tied up the producers. 

"Paramount, Fox, Warner Brothers, United 
Artists, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Universal and 
Columbia pictures, among others, were using 
Western Electric sound equipment. And in 
their contract was a provision which barred 
them from releasing pictures to exhibitors 
using other than the reproduction apparatus 
controlled by the three defendant companies. 

"Vocafilm by 1929 had been muscled out of 
all but two places in which its pictures might 
be shown. We rented the Longacre Theater 
and ran a show there for twelve weeks, 
demonstrating the equipment. And in George 
White's Scandals of 1929, Vocafilm apparatus 
was used during the 10-month run of the 
show. 

"Since that date it has been decided in 
court, before Federal Judge John P. Nields, 



Friday, July 21, 1933 



DOLLAR'S FALL LIFTS 
FOREIGN INCOME 40% 



(Continued from Page 1) 

mate that the exchange situatio 
may make a difference of from $12 
000,000 to $15,000,0000 in favor o! 
the American film companies th 
year, according to Dow-Jones. ] 
both Great Britain and South Amer ■ 
ica, chief markets for U. S. filnu 
the exchange situation has operate' 
greatly in favor of American ii 

In the U. S., attendance and gros 
so far in July has exceeded th< 
previous year's business for the fin 
time in several years, the surve; 1 
adds, and with expenses cut, leasc- 
and mortgage interest rates reduce' 
and other economies effected, then, 
are indications that the downwan 
trend in earnings has been halted 



Syndicate Will Hold 

660,900 Loew Share* 

(Continued from Page 1) 

the stock is distributed, it will bij 
on a pro rata basis. The Film Se I 
curities notes matured last April 
but were not paid. 
' Although holders of the note; 
have agreed that they individually 
may withdraw from the syndicate 
and sell their holdings in the oper! 
market, it is not considered likel> , 
that this will be done. Investment! 
trusts who are big holders of the 
notes have indicated that they will 
remain with the syndicate pendinp! 
favorable market conditions when) 
they may withdraw at a better price 
Several overtures are understood tr 
have been made for purchase of the 
block of Loew stock, but they were; 
turned down because the price was 
out of line with the market. 



ISSUING LONDON SONG HITS > 

Movietone Music Corp. shortl} 
will publish "Three Wishes" and 
"Let Me Give My Happinness tc 
You," current British song hits. 



in Wilmington, Delaware, on June 28 of this 
year, that the exhibitors cannot be barred' 
from receiving films of the big producing' 
companies because of the contract between the 
producing companies and the manufacturers' 
of Western Electric, American Telephone tc 
Telegraph and Electrical Research Products; 
Company equipment. 

"That decision was in the case of Genera! 
Talking Pictures, the Stanley Company i 
America and the Duovac Radio Company 
against the named three companies that are 
made defendants in the Vocafilm suit. 

"The case Judge Nields decided in favor: 
of General Talking Pictures parallels our.' 
case, except that our company is no longer' 
in business. We were forced out by the| 
operations of this trust, comprised of the 
three defendant companies." 

Western Electric officials late yesterday said 
that they had not yet been served with papers 
in the action and therefore had no comment 
to make at that time. 



Creditors' Meet Adjourned 

Meeting of Paramount creditors has 
again been postponed by Referee Henry 
K. Davis to Aug. 10. 



f: 



THE SILENT FACTOR IN 

SOUND 



BEHIND every talkie stands 
your original sound record... 
unknown, unseen, unheard by 
the public, but arresting in its im- 
portance. For clear superiority . . . for 
highest fidelity under all conditions 
of variable-area and variable-density 
recording... use Eastman Sound 
Recording Film. It is a vital though 
silent factor in today's sound suc- 
cesses. Eastman Kodak Company. 
(J. E. Brulatour, Inc., Distributors, 
New York, Chicago, Hollywood.) 



EASTMAN 



SOUND RECORDING FILM 



THE 



-%2H 



DAILY 



Friday, July 21, 19: 



CLARKE FAILS IN MOVE 
AGAINST NEW FOX PLAN 



(Continued from Page 1) 
ful yesterday, when Chancellor Wol- 
cott in Chancery Court here refused 
to rescind a previous order granting 
Senator Daniel 0. Hastings, receiver 
for G.T.E., the right to allow a 
proxy for G.T.E. holdings of Fox 
stock to be voted in favor of the 
plan. 

Clarke, who also formerly was 
president of G.T.E., appeared be- 
fore the court yesterday afternoon 
as a stockholder of G.T.E. and asked 
that the order be rescinded, contend- 
ing that the refinancing plan is un- 
fair and inequitable and not to the 
best interests of G.T.E. He stressed 
that he did not wish action on the 
plan enjoined, but suggested that the 
20-day time limit for subscription 
to new stock to be issued by Fox 
under the plan be extended. He held 
that G.T.E. is not now in a position 
to take the new stock to be issued 
under the plan. 

Senator Hastings held that the 
refinancing plan is a fair one, and 
one that is to the best interests of 
G.T.E. 



REPEAT AT CARNEGIE 

"Un Soir de Rafle" ("Night 
Raid"), French talker starring Al- 
bert Prejean, opens a week's return 
run today at the Little Carnegie 
Theater. 



SHORT SUBJECTS 



Betty Boop in 

"Mother Goose Land" 

Paramount 8 mins. 

Cute Novelty 

Betty is discovered reading in bed. 
The book is "Mother Goose" and as 
the cartoon progresses the various 
immortal characters come to life. 
Betty enters the fable and in trying 
to protect Miss Muffett, she is 
chased by the spider. All the other 
characters come to her rescue and 
the picture fades back to Betty in 
bed reading the book. Animation 
is fine and synchronization very 
satisfactory. 



"Hollywood Promenade" 

with Eddie Garr and Phyllis Barry 

M-G-M 19 mins. 

Good Musical 

This short is all in Colortone. It 
is a brief musical revue featuring 
Eddie Garr who impersonates Ed 
Wynn, Stan Laurel and Jimmy Du- 
rante. Garr's work is fair, but the 
musical and dance numbers carry 
the release to a fine climax. It's a 
good one. 



A LITTLE from "LOTS 



►// 



By RALPH WILK 



HOLLYWOOD 
£ARRY DARMOUR, who produced 
58 "Mickey McGuire" comedies 
for RKO release, will start produc- 
tion next month on the initial com- 
edy in the new Mickey McGuire se- 
ries, which he will make for Colum- 
bia. 

* * # 

Lloyd Bacon used about 400 extras 
in "Footlight Parade," Warner mu- 
sical. 

* * * 

Lee Tracy, whose penchant for 
taking kodak snapshots has become 
stronger for bigger "game," has 
permitted an inventor to install an 
automobile camera which takes mo- 
tion pictures as the car moves along 
by simply stepping on a gadget with 
his foot. The lens of the camera 
projects through the hood. 

* * * 

"Without Glory," the original 
story now being written by Jane 
Murfin is announced by Merian C. 
Cooper as the vehicle selected for 
Constance Bennett's next RKO 
Radio picture. George Archainbaud 
will direct and Worthington Miner 
will handle dialogue direction. Pro- 
duction is slated to begin shortly. 

* * * 

Kenneth Macgowan has been as- 
signed by Merian C. Cooper as as- 
sociate producer of the story of the 
gay nineties which will star Irene 
Dunne. This RKO Radio Picture 
is slated to go into production fol- 
lowing the completion of "Ann Vick- 
ers" on which Miss Dunne is now 
engaged. 

* * * 

Clyde Scott, formerly art director 
of Hamman-Lesan Co., San Francis- 
co agency which suspended opera- 
tions the first of this year, has 
joined Fox. 

% * * 

The cast of "Show World," which 
Willard Mack is directing for M- 
G-M, has been completed and the 
roll-call reads as follows: Alice 
Brady, Frank Morgan, Jimmy Dur- 
ante, Jackie Cooper, Weber and 
Fieds, Madge Evans, Eddie Quillan, 
Fay Templeton, May Robson and 
Russell Hardie. 

* * # 

Fox officials announce that Mimi 
Jordan's contract had been renewed 
and after her vacation in New York 
she will return to Hollywood for 
work in Fox production. 

* * * 

Nils Asther and Pat O'Brien have 
been added to the cast of "Bomb- 
shell," Jean Harlow-Lee Tracy pic- 
ture which is now in production at 
the M-G-M studios. "Bombshell" is 
an adaptation of an unproduced play 
by Caroline Francke and Mack 
Crane and is being directed by Vic- 
tor Fleming. 



Mary Rogers, only daughter of the 
famed Will Rogers, who, under the 
name of Mary Howard, recently ap- 
plied at the Fox casting office for a 
job and won a part in the Lilian 
Harvey production "My Weakness," 
has decided to use her own name 
now that her secret is out. She 
plans to continue in a picture career. 

* * * 

Merian C. Cooper, executive pro- 
ducer of RKO Radio Pictures, has 
bought "Letters of an Unknown Wo- 
man," written in German by Stefan 
Zweig and translated into several 
languages. 

* * # 

Kay Francis will be starred by 
Warners in "The House on 56th 
Street," instead of Ruth Chatterton 
as has been previously announced. 

* * * 

Another change, the fourth final, 
as distinguished from the third final, 
will give Walter Lang, who directed 
"No More Orchids," the megaphone 
assignment on Richard Barthel- 
mess's next First National picture, 
"Shanghai Orchid." The latest 
change was again necessitated by a 
conflict in the company's production 
schedule. "Shanghai Orchid" is the 
picture which will bring Ann Dvorak 
back to the screen after an absence 
of over a year. 

* * * 

"Bureau of Missing Persons," in 
production at the Warner studios in 
Burbank, will be completed today or 
tomorrow. Bette Davis and Pat 
O'Brien have the two leading roles 
in this picture, which is based on 
an original story by Robert Presnell. 
Roy Del Ruth is the director. Lewis 
Stone heads the supporting cast, 
with Glenda Farrell, Gordon West- 
cott, Allen Jenkins, Ruth Donnellv. 
Marjorie Gateson, Wallis Clark. 
Hugh Herbert and Noel Francis also 
in the cast. 

Will Mahoney will be starred in 
"The Entertainer," Columbia's next 
Sunrise Comedy, which will be di- 
rected by Ralph Staub. 

* * * 

Camera work on "I Loved A Wo- 
man," starring Edward G. Robinson 
and with Kay Francis and Genevieve 
Tobin in the leading feminine roles, 
will be completed at the First Na- 
tional studios today. Alfred E. 
Green is director. The cast of fea- 
tured players includes Murray Kin- 
nell, George Blackwood, Robert Bar- 
ratt, Robert McWade, J. Farrell 
MacDonald, Henry Kolker, Walter 
Walker, Sam Godfrey, E. J. Rat- 
cliffe and Paul Porcasi. 

Gabriel Scognanillo, former art 
director of Braunberger - Richebe 
studios, Paris, has been appointed 
artistic adviser for the DeMille or- 
ganization. 



COMBINE MAY SEW UP 1 
AUSTRALIAN FIELL 

(Continued from Page 1) 

dependent houses, under control <i 
the General Theaters combiil 
formed last year with the amalg.L 
mation of Hoyt's Theaters, coi 
trolled by Fox, and Greater Unic 
Theaters. If the present deal mat] 
rializes, the combine, which no 
controls 160 houses, will sew up tl 
entire continent. Paramount, no 
leasing the Melbourne Capito 
awaits okay from New York. 

United Artists' head here is n 
mored negotiating to lease capit; 
city town halls to get first-runs fc 
U. A. product. "Secrets," "K 
from Spain," "Hallelujah I'm 
Bum," "Perfect Understanding 
"I Cover the Waterfront" and "Wit 
Williamson Beneath the Seas" ai, 
among pictures not yet released. 



OPEN PUBLICITY OFFICE 

National Theaters Publicity Sen 
ice have opened a new office wit 
Miss A. A. Lock representing then 



NEWS of the DAY 



Boston — Rolf Heffener, local Fo 
salesman, has been given the Main 
territory. 



Canton, O.— E. R. Colvin, ident.f 
fied for several years with Loew'l 
theater here, has been promoted t 
assistant to Manager Adolph BuerJ 
rig, Jr. 



Green Bay, Wis. — Marian Andr: 
ansen, ticket seller at the Colonia 
was robbed of $62 when a bandi 
poked a pistol through the windo\i 
hole and demanded the money. 



Milwaukee — Recent Wisconsin 
closings include the Opera House 
Princeton; the Marinuka, Galesville| 
Butterfly, Sheboygan, and Muscoda 
Muscoda. 



Riverside, R. I. — The Lyric ha| 
been closed by Herman Relselner. 



Kansas City, Mo. — After being 
dark for some time the former Penit 
Valley is to be opened in Septembei 
by Walter Isenhart, who leased the, 
theater and equipment for five years: 



Kansas City — Arthur Friemeli 
Paramount salesman, has beenj 
transferred back to Kansas City. ! 



r 




Jay, July 21, 1933 



-. &ZW; 



DAILY 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



h 21-22: Fox Film Corp. special stockhold- 
ers' meeting, home office, New York. 
I 22: Minneapolis film row employees' 
[picnic, Waconia, Minn. 
24-25: Code convention at Hotel Astor 
under auspices of National Association of 
the Motion Picture Industry. 
25: Meeting of Allied Theaters of New 
.Jersey at 2 P. M. 

28-29: Monogram western sales meeting, 
San Francisco. 
28-31: Meeting of Independent Theater 
Supply Dealers' Association at Stevens 
Horel, Chicago. 

31 -Aug. 1: Federation of Motion Picture 
Industry of America, Inc., conference at 
Hotel Astor, New York. 
31 -Aug. 1: Warner sales meeting, Waldorf- 
Astoria Hotel, New York. 
2: Outing at Bear Mountain under aus- 
ices of Motion Picture Club. 



2-3: Monogram Canadian sales meeting 






f! 

Toronto 

3: Adjourned meeting of Fox Metropolitan 
Playhouses' creditors. 

3-4: Warner sales meeting, Drake Hotel, 

Ihicago. 
3 7-8: Warner sales meeting, Royal York 
Hotel, Toronto. 

Third Annual Film Golf Tournament 
if New England industry at Pine Brook 

alley Country Club, Weston, Mass. 

10: Adjourned meeting of Publix En- 
terprises creditors at office of Referee 
Henry K. Davis. 

23-24: First annual convention of Inde- 
pendent Motion Picture Owners Association 
of Delaware and Eastern Shore of Maryland 
-at Hotel Henelopen, Rehoboth, Del. 
' 5-6-7: Allied New Jersey convention 

Kt Atlantic City. 
13: A. M. P. A. holds annual election of 
fficers 



BOOKED FOR RIALTO 

[.rthur Mayer has booked three 

aires for the Rialto to be played 

ing the next three weeks. They 

i i, "Don't Bet on Love," Universal; 

tmbia's "The Wrecker," with 
Holt, and Majestic's "Sing, 
er, Sing." The Universal fea- 
opens a week from today. 

NAZIS BAR NEGRI FILMS 

erlin — Pola Negri's name is on 
st of Jewish actors and actresses 
se pictures the Government has 
teed must not be shown in Ger- 

y. 



Ai 
ota 
k 
vii 



Up from Publicity Ranks 

West Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Theater and motion pic- 
ture publicity ranks have supplied Para- 
mount with a number of studio execu- 
tives. They are A. M. Botsford, execu- 
tive assistant to Emanuel Cohen; B. P. 
Schulberg, producer; Harold Hurley asso- 
ciate producer; Jeff Lazarus, head of 
editorial board; Charles West, assistant 
film editor; William H. Wright, assistant 
to Schulberg; Joseph Krumgold, assistant 
associate producer, and Jack Cunning- 
ham, AI Jackson, Charles Legue and 
Gilbert Pratt, writers. 



3,000,000 Persons Saw 
Gov't Bu. Films in Year 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Washington — Approximately 3,- 
000,000 persons in the past year 
viewed the films dealing with vari- 
ous phases of the mineral and allied 
industries, produced with funds sup- 
plied by the industries themselves, 
and circulated by the Bureau of 
Mines, Department of Commerce, it 
is shown in the Bureau's annual re- 
port. During this period, the Bureau 
received 34,638 requests for its films, 
according to M. F. Leopold, super- 
vising engineer of the Motion Pic- 
ture Production section, and the de- 
mand for the various films has 
greatly exceeded the supply. 

Although the industries pay the 
expenses incident to production un- 
der strict Government supervision, 
no advertising material of any kind 
is permitted in the films. More than 
$1,000,000 already has been appro- 
priated by industrial concerns for 
this work, which in many instances 
teaches the principles of safety and 
first aid. 

Leopold believes the time is op- 
portune for some large producing 
company to get out a complete series 
of one-reel subjects depicting every 
American industry. He is of the 
opinion that such films would not 
only be a valuable addition to every 
theatrical program, but that the 
majority of the 300,000 educational 
institutions of the country would 
avail themselves of the opportunity 
to use them. 



SCO! 

Hoi 
esvi 



Something New in Vacations 

Before you decide where you will spend your vacation this summer ask your friends 
bout Hotel Uncas, situated directly on the most beautiful part of Lake George, Queen 
UP American Lakes. 

This unique hotel offers features of tremendous appeal to those who seek a vacation 
hat really re-creates mind, body, and soul . . . every facility for rest and recreation. 

SPORTS 

Finest swimming from our private dock (longest on Lake George) or bathing from 
rivate sandy beach. The water is so clean, clear and pure that you can drink it — or 
ead this advertisement through three feet of it. 

Boating — canoes, sailboats, speed boats, out-board motor boats, aquaplaning. 

Tennis — Splendid courts maintained in best of condition. Golf, fishing, mountain 
limbing, horseback riding, dancing, billiards, bowling. 

1933 RATES 

Rates at Hotel Uncas have always been so moderate no drastic reductions have been 
ade this season. Inasmuch as rates depend on location and type of accommodations 
esired it is suggested that prospective guests send for details. The clientele is restricted. 
ooklcts upon request. 
\ Address 



HOWARD V. DAYTON 

HOTEL UNCAS 

UNCAS-ON-LAKE GEORGE 

NEW YORK 




SHIC 



COVERS 
EVERYTHING 



LONDON 



HOLLYWOOD 



NEW YORK 



PARIS 



BERLIN 



Fifteen Years Ago, before 
the Capitol, Roxy and 
Paramount Theaters Were 
Thought Of, When Mary 
Pickford was working for 
Artcraft and when the 
picture industry was helping 
America to win the war The 
Film Daily received industry 
congratulations because it 
was founded upon a policy 
of service, independence 
and clean journalism. It has 
not changed during the past 
15 years except to realize 
more fully its responsibilities 
of accurately reflecting in- 
dustry activities both to film 
folk and the outside world, 
— and to mind its own busi- 
ness in doing so, 



• • • • • 




PARAMOUNT 

PRODUCT ANNOUNCEMENT 
BOOK FOR 1933-34 ...which 

contains as always the foundation on 
which all exhibitors will build the r 
programs for the coming year . . . 



TtVttTvTv 




deadlock o 



Abolishing Service Charges 



f)X STOCKHOLDERS RATIFY NEW FINANCIAL PLAN 

Earner Cuts Third Quarter Loss 50% Under Last Year 



N >79,448 Operating Deficit 
Shown for 13 
Weeks 

pt operating loss of $1,579,448.82 
It deducting all charges, includ- 
ai ' interest, amortization and de- 
>r iation, is reported by Warner 
ii . and subsidiaries for the 13 
I :s ended May 27. This com- 
>a s with loss of $2,975,056.08 for 
r* jorresponding period last year, 
m loss of $3,418,830.73 in the first 
» quarters this year. The net 
» t from operations before amor- 

(Continued on Page 2) 



l]-H0UR WORK WEEK 
M ACADEMY'S CODE 



By RALPH IVILK 
Coast Manager, THE FILM DAILY 

)llywood — A maximum working 
: of about 48 hours is specified 
ig the clauses now under con- 
ation by the code committee of 
\cademy of Motion Picture Arts 
Sciences. With a view to fur- 
aiding the employment situa- 
the committee also has been 

(.Continued on Page 2) 



anor Holm to Films 
After Breaking Record 

yeanor Holm, who broke her 
Bract with Warners so she could 
ft east to appear in the swimming 
phes, yesterday broke her own 
Ir record and will now return 
i ollywood for a new feature film 
tract being negotiated by her 
lit, Leo Morrison. 



I Writes Book on Stars 

; Chicago — A booklet of biographies 
pd photos of 92 stars, with introduc- 
es by Will H. Hays, has been corn- 
ered by James Gilchrist Lawson, 

thor, editor and anthologist, most of 
hose literary works heretofore have 

en of a religious nature. 



Two-Way Benefits 



Dorain, O. — When Warner's "Gold Diggers of 1933" played the Palace here, Man- 
ager Ben Wallerstein sold the Mayor the idea of proclaiming a "Gold Diggers of 
1933" Day with the cooperation of the merchants. Result: Not only did the theater 
cash in, but the merchants reported better business than they had done in two years. 



Federation of the Independents 

Will Be Permanent Organization 



Work of the Federation of the 
Motion Picture Industry of Amer- 
ica, Inc., will not end with the pres- 
entation of a code of fair compe- 
tition to General Hugh S. Johnson, 
says P. S. Harrison, president, in 
announcing the program for the 
two-day convention to be held July 
31-Aug. 1 at the Hotel Astor. The 
group will hold together as a per- 
manent organization devoted to 
furthering of the independents' in- 
terests, he declares. 



The codes drafted by the M. P. 
P. D. A. and M. P. T. 0. A. are be- 
ing opposed by the Federation as 
unfair to the independents. News- 
papers of the country are being 
asked by the Federation to help the 
independents in their fight, the con- 
tention being that it will mean more 
open houses and more advertising. 
Delegates from all organizations in- 
terested in the industry have been 
invited to attend the convention, 

(.Continued on Page 2) 



$197,177 Quarter Profit by Consolidated Film 



Consolidated Film Industries, for 
quarter ended June 30, reports net 
profit of $197,177 after depreciation, 
federal taxes, etc., equivalent to 49 
cents a share on the $2 preferred 
stock. This compares with $265,400, 
equal after preferred dividend re- 
quirements to 12 cents a share on 
the common stock in preceding quar- 
ter, and $192,457 or 48 cents a share 



on preferred stock in June quarter 
of previous year. 

For six months ended June 30, 
1933, net profit was $462,577 after 
charges and taxes, equal after pre- 
ferred dividend requirements to 12 
cents a share on 524,973 common 
shares, comparing with $486,609 or 
16 cents a share on common in first 
half of 1932. 



■een years is a long time in pictures, corn- 
covered in the forthcoming "New Deal" 
.t of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



Stanley -E. R. P. I. Decision 

Deferred by Federal Court 



Md. State Censor Plans 
"For Adults Only" Tag 

Baltimore — Believing that some 
pictures should be approved "for 
adults only," Bernard G. Gough, 
Maryland film censor, is going to 
ask the next legislature for that 
authority. Gough is strict in elimi- 
nating anything that strikes him as 
indecent. 



Bv NORMAN M. MacLEOD 
Staff_ Correspondent, THE FILM DAILY 

Wilmington — As opposing attor- 
neys were unable to agree on the 
form of decree to be entered in the 
suit of Stanley Co., General Talk- 
ing Pictures and Duovac Radio 
Corp., against the American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co., and E. R. 
P. I., Judge Neilds in Federal Court 
yesterday stated that early next 

(Continued on Page 2) 



S. R. Kent Gratified Over 

Favorable Action of 

Shareholders 

By a vote of more than two- 
thirds, Fox stockholders yesterday 
ratified the management's financial 
reorganization plan. The vote was 
1,737,652 Class "A" common and 
96,720 Class "B" common in favor 
of the plan, and 755 Class "A" and 
900 Class "B" opposed. 

Under this action of the stock- 
holders' meeting, it was voted to 
change the previously authorized 

(Continued on Page 4) 



THEATERS TO JOIN 
IN NIRA PUBLICITY 



By WILLIAM SILBERBERG 
Staff Correspondent, THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Frank R. Wilson 
who has been designated as "sales 
manager" for the National Recovery 
Act has planned a campaign by which 
shorter hours and minimum wage 

(Continued on Page 4) 



William Hamm Takes Over 
Big Minneapolis House 

Minneapolis — William Hamm, re- 
ceiver for Minnesota Amusement 
Co., has leased the 4,000-seat Minne- 
sota theater for 10 years under a 
contract which requires him to keep 
the house open at least six months 
a year. Minnesota Amusement Co. 
formerly operated the $2,000,000 
theater for Publix. 



Buying Now 



Kansas City — Anticipating higher 
prices, exhibitors are in a buying frame 
of mind, convinced that they can profit 
by signing now, according to Harry Tay- 
lor, Columbia manager here. The Co- 
lumbia branch has just established a 
record of closing 12 outstanding con- 
tracts in the first five days of selling 
the new product. 



Fifteen years of production, distribution and 
exhibition completely covered in the "New 
Deal" number of the FILM DAILY.— Advt. 



VoL IXIII, No. 18 Sat., July 22, 1933 Price 5 Cents 
JOHN W. ALICOATE : Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
it 1650 Broadway, New York, N. V ., 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk. Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher: 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
«nd General Manager; Arthur \V. Eddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at New York, 
N. Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 1-650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
Phone, Circle 7-4736, 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filraday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London — 
Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
—P. A. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 

High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 5'/ 2 3Vi 3'/i — 2'/ 2 

Columbia Picts. vtc. 20 18 18 — 2'4 

Con. Fm. Ind 43/ 8 33A 3y 8 — V 2 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd... 10% SV& 8% — 1 y 4 

East. Kodak 8034 69 70y 2 — 9% 

Fox Fm. "A" 3% 23^ 3 — % 

Loew's, Inc 273' 8 19y 2 23 —3 

do pfd 75 70 70 — 3' 4 

Metro-Goldwyn, pfd. 19 19 19 — l/ 2 

Paramount ctfs 1 % 1 y 2 1 5/ 8 — i/ 4 

Pathe Exch 1 Va 1 ] A 1 14 — % 

do "A" 7l/ 2 43/ 8 5V 2 — 2V 8 

RKO 37s 2i/ 2 25/ 8 — 1% 

Warner Bros 6'/i 33^ 5 — n 2 

do pfd 17 17 17 — 1 1/ 4 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Columbia Pets. Vtc. 20 20 20 — 2' 4 

Gen. Th. Eq. pfd.... % 11-16 % —1-16 

Technicolor 8'/ 8 7% 714 — V? 

Trans-Lux 25/ 8 214 2V4 — Vi 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40. 7'/ 2 5 5V 2 — 1 % 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 ctfs. 6 5 5 — 1 14 

Keith A-0 6s46 55 547/ 8 55 2'/ 2 

Loew 6s 41ww 81 V 2 79% 81 — 1% 

Paramount 6s 47 283/ 8 21 V 8 25 3 

Par. By. 5V 2 s51 36 33 33 — 4 

Par. 5V 2 s50 28 20 22% — 6% 

Warners 6s39 35'/ 2 30 32 3 

N. Y. PRODUCE EXCHANGE 
Para. Publix 13^ 114 ] y 2 



ELEANOR 
HOLM 

"Tarzan of the Water" 

Direction — Leo Morrison 



fi^ 




Stanley-E.R.P.I. Decision 
Deferred by Federal Court 

(.Continued from Page 1) 

week the court will accept either 
one of the two decrees submitted by 
counsel or write a decree of its own. 

The question arose over the matter of en- 
joining service charges on talking picture ap- 
paratus installed in the 47 Stanley houses. 
Recently the court handed down an opinion 
holding that the part of the agreement be- 
tween Stanley a»d E.R.P.i. which required 
the theaters to purchase replacement parts 
from E.R.P.I. was a violation of the anti- 
monopoly act, and granted a preliminary in- 
junction. Yesterday the court was ready to 
enter a decree in line with its opinion* but 
counsel for complainants and defence were 
unable to agree on the form of decree. Coun- 
sel for the defence held that the decree should 
not enjoin imposition of the servicing charge, 
pending tinal hearing of the case. The servic- 
ing charge on talkie equipment in the 47 
Stanley houses amounts to about $1,100 a 
week. Counsel for the defendants held that 
imposition of the servicing charge would affect 
a total of about 5,500 theaters that have in- 
stalled the equipment. Both sides presented 
forms of decree to the court. 



DAILV 

Warner Reduces Loss 
50% Under Last Year 

(Continued from Page 1) 

tization and depreciation of prop- 
erties was $425,795.46. 

During the period deficit account 
was credited with $93,624.08, profit 
on redemption of bonds of subsidiary 
companies, and was charged with 
$191,134.17, loss on sale or aban- 
donment of property and write- 
down of investment in an affiliated 
company. 

The financial statement shows 
current assets of $13,873,466.31, in- 
cluding $2,738,795.44 in cash, and 
current liabilities of $11,959,032.45. 

All bank loans were paid off prior 
to May 27, 1933, and the company 
has anticipated the retirement of 
Optional 6^ Convertible Debentures 
required for the purchase fund on 
August 1, 1933. 




Independent Federation 
Will Be Permanent Unit 

(Continued from Page 1) 

tentative program of which follows: 

Opening address by a man in public life 
whose impartial interest in the film industry 
is unquestioned. 

Welcome and registration of delegates. 

Organization and appointment of confer- 
ence committees by President P. S. Harrison. 

Reading and analysis of Codes of Prac- 
tice now drafted with consideration to their 
effect on the future of the independent in- 
terests of the industry, if they should be 
accepted as now presented. 

Luncheon. 

Reading of the proposed independent dis- 
tributors' code as made up in a draft in- 
corporating the requirements of the inde- 
pendent distributors as presented in each or- 
ganization's draft. 

Reading and consideration of the proposed 
code for the independent producers as pre- 
sented by such organizations. 

Reading and consideration of the proposed 
code of the independent exhibitors as pre- 
sented by the delegates of such exhibitors 
organizations. 

Reading and consideration of the proposed 
codes of all affiliate branches of the Motion 
Picture Industry. 

Banquet at 7:30 o'clock, July 31. 

On the second day of the convention, morn- 
ing session will open with a discussion and 
ratification of the final draft of the distribu- 
tors' code. 

Discussion and ratification of the final draft 
of the producers' code. 

Luncheon. 

Discussion and ratification of the final draft 
of the theater owners' code. 

Discussion and ratification of the final draft 
of codes of all Affiliates. 



"FAITHFUL" FOR MAYFAIR 

Broadway premiere of "The Faith- 
ful Heart," starring Herbert Mar- 
shall and Edna Best, will be at the 
Mayfair, instead of the Rialto as 
inadvertently stated yesterday. This 
is the first release by Phil Meyer of 
Helber Pictures. 



48-Hour Working Week 
In M. P. Academy's Code 

(Continued from Page 1) 

considering the spreading of work 
hours, minimum wages for extras 
and low bracket employes, penalty 
for overtime, no centralized booking 
office, and other measures. Other 
clauses in the code include protec- 
tion of small producers, elimination 
of unfair trade practices in produc- 
tion, distribution and exhibition, 
elimination of the practice of using 
temporarily off-,pay studio workers 
as extra, protection of individuals' 
rights under fair competition 
and safeguarding of showmanship 
values. 



Coming and Going 



LAURENCE OLIVIER, signed by M-G-K 

play opposite Greta Garbo, has arrived in n 

York on his way to Hollywood. JILL ESMej 
his wife, is with him. 

HARRY GRAHAM, district manager for I 
versal in Kansas City, and WILLIAM HE 
MAN, western division representative, fle»| 
New York this week for conferences. 

MORT BLUMENSTOCK of the Warner fil 
returned yesterday from Pittsburgh, wherr 
was engaged on the "Voltaire" opening c 
paign. 

BENITA HUME, British actress now in Hi 
wood, is expected in New York next ml 
on her way to London to marry Jack [] 
fee, sportsman. 

JEANETTE MACDONALD, who is retur 
from abroad aboard the He de France, an 
in New York on Tuesday. 

AL SCHWALBERG, in charge of Wa 

branch operation, returned yesterday i 
Dallas. 



HALL MADE B. & H. VICE-PR1 

Fred M. Hall has been elec 
vice-president of Bell & Howell ( 
Chicago motion picture equipm- 
manufacturers, and will have chai 
of the eastern offices with headqu 
ters in New York. Hall has b» 
with the company five years. 



"MASQUERADER" RELEASJ 

General release date of "The Ml 
querader," Goldwyn picture starr 
Ronald Colman, has been postpoi 
from Aug. 18 to Sept. 1, it is ; 
nounced by Al Lichtman of Uni- 
Artists. 



Now Accepting Dates 
WARNING! 

■Do not confuse with the so-called war 
pictures. There is nothing like 



Forgotten Men 

For State Rights and Bookings 

KARRY CUMMINS 

JEWEL PROD. Jnc. N 2 / w 7 ; h ork A ^ 




MAJOR 
FACTORS 

SCREEN ILLUMINATION 

AMPERAGE 

CARBON LIFE 

NATIONAL HIGH INTENSITY 
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DAIB.V 



% s 



* i "STORM AT DAYBREAK" 

1 with Kay Francis, Nils Asther, 

Walter Huston 
4 i-M 68 mins. 

'5MANTIC DRAMA WITH HUNGARI- 
SETTING HAS A LOVE STORY THAT 

FEMMES WILL LIKE. 

Japted from the stage play "Black 

med Cherries." The love romance is 

ally continental and finely handled, 

ing up to some very dramatic situa- 

The film has an historical back- 

nd, opening with the assassination of 

duke Ferdinand of Austria at Sarajevo, 

.started the World War. Nils Asther 

the role of a Hungarian officer who 

his friend, Walter Huston, playing 

part of a Serb nobleman, from the 

y mob. Later visiting Huston's estate 

arch of deserters, he meets his friend's 

and they fall in love. They both 

against it, and the development of 

irresistible passion is beautifully and 

ately handled in some finely restrained 

;s that both Kay Francis and Asther 

«e well. It culminates in a tense scene 
Huston finally realizes his best friend 
won his wife's affections. He sacri- 
himself to save the life of Huston 
is threatened with a firing squad 
jealous Serb officer, driving himself 
the other over an embankment. 
jst: Kay Francis, Nils Asther, Walter 
on, Phillips Holmes, Eugene Pallette, 
ifenry Gordon, Louise Closser Hale, Jean 
;r. 

■ector, Richard Boleslavsky; Author, 
rpr Hunyadi; Adaptor, Bertram Mil- 
;;r; Editor, Margaret Booth; Camera - 
•j George Folsey. 

•ection, Very Good. Photography, Ex- 
ht. 



Charlie Ruggles and Mary Boland in 

"MAMA LOVES PAPA" 

Paramount 70 mins. 

ENJOYABLE DOMESTIC COMEDY 
HANDING OUT PLENTY OF LAUGHS 
PLUS A LITTLE DRAMATIC AND HU- 
MAN INTEREST. 

This picture demonstrates how much 
good fun can be extracted from a simple 
domestic situation without having to de- 
pend upon illicit relations, violence, sex or 
other sensationalism. Therefore, it comes 
as a refreshing touch. Charlie Ruggles, as 
a simple office worker, and Mary Boland, 
his wife, are still turtle doves after 20 years 
of marriage. Then an idealistic lecturer puts 
elevating social ideas in the wife's head 
and she proceeds to practice them on her 
husband, accidentally resulting in his being 
fired and immediately falling into a politi- 
cal appointment engineered by a racketeer 
who intends to use him. Charlie and Mary 
soon find they are misfits in society, and 
their happiness is nearly wrecked by Lilyan 
Tashman, flirtatious wife of the racketeer, 
but it all ends happily with Charlie return- 
ing to his old job at a raise in pay. Ruggles 
and Miss Boland, past masters in comedy, 
do a fine job, with good teamwork by the 
entire cast. 

Cast: Mary Boland, Charlie Ruggles, 
Lilyan Tashman, George Barbier, Morgan 
Wallace, Walter Catlett, Ruth Warren, An- 
dre Beranger, Tom Ricketts, Warner Rich- 
mond, Frank Sheridan, Tom McGuire. 

Director, Norman McLeod; Authors, 
Keene Thompson, Douglas MacLean; Adap- 
tors, Nunnally Johnson, Arthur Kober; Cam- 
eraman, Gilbert Warrenton; Editor, Richard 
Currier; Recording Engineer, John A. Good- 
rich. 

Direction, A-l. Photography, Fine. 



"ARIZONA TO BROADWAY" 

with James Dunn and Joan Bennett 
Fox 67 mins. 

GENERALLY AMUSING COMEDY DRA- 
MA OF THE CROOK CATEGORY MAKES 
OKAY ENTERTAINMENT FOR THE POP 
HOUSES. 

Constructed along the "cheating cheat- 
ers" lines, this yarn depicts the efforts of 
a troupe of medicine show grifters, led by 
James Dunn, in recovering $20,000 swindled 
from a small-towner by a couple of other 
con men. Jimmy is impelled to go straight 
after he meets Joan Bennett, sister of the 
bank clerk from whom the money was 
taken. Their trail takes them first to New 
Orleans, where one crook has half of the 
dough, and then to New York for the 
other half. Among those in Jimmy's gang 
are Herbert Mundin, playing a med. show 
doctor, a southern colonel and a British 
merchant, as the occasion requires, and 
Sammy Cohen, who cuts up comedy capers 
to regale the audience with plenty of laugh 
punches. Though the plot is neither very 
original nor is the mixture of ingredients 
likely to show up well under a critical 
microscope, the production as a whole 
nevertheless is entertaining in its way. 

Cast: James Dunn, Joan Bennett, Her- 
bert Mundin, Sammy Cohen, Theodore Von 
Eltz, Merna Kennedy, Earle Foxe, David 
Wengren, J. Carrol Naish, Max Wagner, 
Walter Catlett, Jerry Lester. 

Director, James Tinling; Authors, William 
Conselman, Henry Johnson; Adaptors, same; 
Dialoguers, same; Cameraman, George 
Schneiderman; Recording Engineer, E. Clay- 
ton Ward. 

Direction, Good. Photography, Good 



Marlene Dietrich in 

"SONG OF SONGS" 

with Brian Aherne and Lionel Atwill 
Paramount 90 mins. 

MARLENE DIETRICH'S APPEALING 
PERFORMANCE PLUS CLASSY PRODUC- 
TION SHOULD PUT THIS OVER. 

Although Hermann Sudermann's novel, 
also dramatized for the stage by Edward 
Sheldon, seems a bit out of date as a ve- 
hicle for Marlene Dietrich, the star plays 
the role of the heroine in a fashion that 
should provide ample satisfaction for her 
fans. She is at her best in point of glam- 
our, and what the plot doesn't provide her 
in the way of emotional opportunities it 
supplies in pictorial directions. The picture 
is strong on sex, and in the role of a model 
Miss Dietrich has a chance to reveal more 
than just her legs, so the production is for 
adult rather than for juvenile audiences. 
Story is about a simple country lass who 
goes to Berlin after her father's death, falls 
in love with a young sculptor, who later 
allows a rich baron to take her away frpm 
him on the plea that it is for her own ad- 
vantage, with eventual shattering of her il- 
lusions, followed by degradation and finally 
a happy reunion. Brian Aherne as the 
sculptor and Lionel Atwill as the baron 
give expert performances. 

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Brian Aherne, 
Lionel Atwill, Alison Skipworth, Hardie Al- 
bright, Helen Freeman. 

Director, Rouben Mamoulian; Author, 
Hermann Sudermann; Scenarists, Leo Birin- 
ski, Samuel Hoffenstein; Art Director, Hans 
Drier; Cameraman, Victor Milner. 

Direction, Artistic Photography, Excel- 
lent. 



1 



bsi 



hel 
Uli 



Richard Barthelmess in 

"HEROES FOR SALE" 

h Loretta Young, Aline MacMahon 

National 73 mins. 

THER HEAVY DRAMA WITH TOO 
:H SEAMY STUFF TO MAKE IT 
.SING FOR GENERAL AUDIENCES. 

is is in some respects a post-war study 
le effects of the war upon the youth 
took part in it. It deals chiefly with 
ird Barthelmess, who becomes a drug 
t as a result of narcotics taken while 
ided. Believed dead, a buddy takes 
credit and medals for Dick's heroism 
te front, and when they meet again 

later Dick gives in to the phoney's 
, not to expose him. Dick makes ef- 

to re-establish himself as a citizen, 
he dope habit proves his scourge. He 

to work, marries, gets involved with 
als, goes to jail, loses his wife and 
y lands on the bum again. As a hobo 
nee more meets his army pal and they 
things over, coming to the conclusion 
perhaps the "new deal" will straighten 
thing out. 

st: Richard Barthelmess, Loretta Young, 
■ MacMahon, Gordon Westcott, Berton 
chill, Robert Barratt, Grant Mitchell, 
|es Grapewin, Robert McWade, George 
Collins, James Murray, Edwin Maxwell, 
?aret Seddon, Arthur Vinton, Robert 
l t, John Marston, Willard Robertson, 
^las Dumbrille, Ward Bond, Tammany 
|g, Hans Furberg. 

J-ector, William A. Wellman; Authors, 
"rt Lord, Wilsom Mizner; Adaptors, 
; Editor, Howard Bretherton; Camera- 
| James Van Trees. 
fection, Good. Photography, Fine. 



Charles (Buck) Jones in 

"CALIFORNIA TRAIL" 

Columbia 67 mins. 

ACTION STORY OF SOUTHERN CALI- 
FORNIA IN EARLY DAYS GETS AWAY 
FROM THE USUAL WESTERN FORMULAS. 
This is an unusual western as the locale 
is Southern California in the 1832s. Plenty 
of action is included and it should please 
the folks. Buck Jones is a caravan rider 
in charge of a supply of food to be de- 
livered to a Spanish settlement where the 
crops have failed. En route the wagons 
are attacked by Indians and the owner 
is shot, but before he dies he commissions 
Buck to deliver the supplies. Meanwhile 
the mayor of the town and his brother, 
who commands the troops, are conspiring 
to starve out the settlers so they can take 
over their land. When Buck arrives with 
his wagons he is arrested on a trumped up 
charge and the food confiscated to be sold 
at high prices for gold only. Jones escapes, 
holds up the mayor's messenger and takes 
his gold to distribute to the starving peo- 
ple. He then sets out to rob the rich of 
the country so the poor may be fed. One 
of his victims later proves to be the gov- 
ernor of the territory who makes Jones 
commander of the troops after arresting the 
former leader. 

Cast: Charles (Buck) Jones, Helen 
Mack, George Humbart, Luis Alberni, 
Charles Stevens, Emile Chautard, Evelyn 
Sherman, Chrispin Martin, Carmen La Roux, 
Carlos Villar, Angil Gomez, John Paul Jones, 
Alan Garcia, Juan Du Val, Bob Steele. 

Director, Lambert Hillyer; Author, Jack 
Natteford; Adaptor, Lambert Hillyer; Di- 
alogues same; Cameraman, Ben Kline; Re- 
cording Engineer, Lambert Day. 

Direction, Okay. Photography, Okay. 



"SLEEPLESS NIGHTS" 

with Polly Walker and Stanley Lupino 
Remington Pictures 66 mins. 

SPRIGHTLY BRITISH MUSICAL FARCE 
IS VERY AMUSING, TUNEFUL AND AT- 
TRACTIVELY PRODUCED. 

Here is another bit of evidence that the 
British studios are gradually catching up 
with Hollywood in the matter of turning 
out entertainment of the pep and action 
variety. Though essentially a musical, this 
production unfurls itself at a lively gait, 
mixing comedy action with an amusing 
romance, all carried along in a rhythmic 
sweep against an elegant background. The 
proceedings are held together by a typical 
musical comedy plot, which means it was 
concocted strictly for amusement and need 
not be taken seriously, and yet it is a farce 
situation that is basically very funny. Stan- 
ley Lupino, an expert song-and-dance com- 
edian, plays a reporter sent to get a story 
from an American millionaire, whose daugh- 
ter, Polly Walker, is being annoyed by a 
crook scheming to steal a valuable statuette 
from the American's yacht. Stanley and 
Polly accidentally fall into a compromising 
situation, the only escape being for them 
to pretend they are married. Their diffi- 
culties in carrying out the bluff, until they 
finally are married, supply most of the fun. 

Cast: Polly Walker, Stanley Lupino, Ger- 
ald Rawlinson, Frederick Lloyd, Percy Par- 
sons, Charlotte Parry, David Miller, Hal 
Gordon. 

Director, Thomas Bentley; Author, Stan- 
ley Lupino; Adaptor, Victor Kendall; Com- 
poser, Noel Gay; Film Editor, Walter Stok- 
vis; Recording Engineer, A. E. Rudolph; 
Cameraman, John J. Cox. 

Direction, Lively Photography, Fine. 



"A SHRIEK IN THE NIGHT" 

with Ginger Rogers, Lyle Talbot 

Allied 63 mins. 

GOOD MURDER MYSTERY MELLER 
FOR THE POP CROWDS HAS PLENTY OF 
THRILLS AND SUSPENSE. 

Made for the thrill-lovers, this one 
should go over nicely in the neighborhood 
houses. It involves a series of mysterious 
murders in an apartment hotel. Ginger 
Rogers and Lyle Talbot are sweethearts 
but rival reporters on two local newspapers. 
Ginger poses as the secretary of the first 
murder victim in order to get the inside 
line on the criminal. The police inspec- 
tor goes off on a false lead, till the girl 
sets him straight. Talbot steals her scoop 
and sends it in to his paper. The various 
victims are notified of their impending 
fate by the receipt of a card bearing the 
drawing of a coiled serpent about to strike. 
Miss Rogers is getting close to uncovering 
the criminal, when he is about to make 
her his next victim. Talbot and the police 
break in just in time to save her. The 
murderer proves to be the janitor who is 
seeking revenge for the electrocution of 
his kid brother on a frame-up. Has lots 
of kick in the suspense and thrill action. 

Cast: Ginger Rogers, Lyle Talbot, Arthur 
Hoyt, Purnell Pratt, Harvey Clark, Lillian 
Harmer, Maurice Black, Louise Beaver, 
Clarence Wilson. 

Director, Albert Ray; Author, Kurt Kern p- 
ler; Adaptor, Frances Hyland; Editor, L. 
R. Brown; Cameramen, Harry Neuman, 
Tom Galligan. 

Direction, Okay. Photography, Good. 



THE 



<2^ 



DAILY 



Saturday, July 22, 193; 



SHORT SUBJECTS 



"World's Greatest Thrills" 

Universal 12 mins. 

Newsreel Thrills 

In this compilation of clips, Uni- 
versal glorifies the exploits of its 
newsreel organization in the haz- 
ardous work of filming some of the 
material that goes into the reels. 
It is largely a succession of shots 
showing various catastrophes, such 
as big fires, with trapped victims 
jumping out of high windows ap- 
parently to their death; sinking of 
a battleship, with the crew splashing 
around like rats just before drown- 
ing; a stunt aviator dashing to 
death, fatalities on the auto racing 
track, battlefront scenes, mob scenes, 
etc. The risks taken by the camera- 
men are described in a running talk 
by Graham McNamee. Allyn But- 
terfield assembled the material with 
ingenuity, putting some real kicks 
into the subject. 



"The Strange Case of Tom 

Mooney" 

First Division 20 mins. 

Strong Mass Appeal 

This is the history of the famous 
Tom Mooney case, who has been in 
a California jail for 17 years fol- 
lowing the bomb outrage of which 
he was accused. It is composed of 
newsreel shots principally, along 
w r ith photos of the various partici- 
pants in the case from Governor 
Rolph down. Documents and other 
data are also reproduced. It opens 
with a resume of the case by Theo- 
dore Dreiser who has been a steady 
champion in trying to secure the re- 
lease of Mooney. Mooney himself 
makes an impassioned plea for jus- 
tice, which gives a dramatic kick to 
the climax. Here is a film that be- 
cause of its w T orld wide interest and 
front-page headlining will go strong 
in industrial cities, and in any the- 
ater with a patronage of the work- 
ing class. It is being backed by 
all labor organizations and unions 
as part of the Mooney Defense 
League to free Mooney, so has the 
support of all labor union men. 



MANY HAPPY RETU 



Best wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 

July 22-23 



Fernando Mendez 
Phillips Holmes 



Joseph Seiden 
Gerald K. Rudulph 
Ray Cozine 
Aileen Pringle 



Dan Tothero 
Marjorite White 

Harry Cohn 

Albert Warner 

Florence Vidor 

Lewis Innerarity 





■f/Blu&H lrK>VIM, 



IK THE 



PHIL M. DALY 



• • • THAT EMPEY Club party for a boat ride up the 

Hudson on Aug. 2 is growing beyond all bounds looks 

as if they will have to charter a larger steamer if the tickets 

keep selling the way they are going right now all branches 

of the industry in the East are actively co-operating to make 
this outing a whizz-bang three baseball games are sched- 
uled Empey vs. AMPA Warners vs. RKO 

Erpi vs. Columbia the ticket sales are 'way over the 200 

mark a letter is being sent to the prexy of every film 

organizashe asking 'em to give the hired help the day off if they 

want to attend the shindig and who doesn't? Film 

Row will look like Desert Gulch on Aug. 2 the Gang will 

be up at Bear Mountain disportin' among the daisies and poison 
ivy 

• • • ONE OF the classiest publicity stunts of the sea- 
son is the brain child of Joe Weil of Universal to plug 

"Moonlight and Pretzels" a cutie-musicale and 

what cuties! Joe presents a series of 15 panel photos 

of the cuties appearing in the pix, on heavy gloss paper 3% 

inches by 9 fit to decorate even Al Friedlander's boudoir 

or that of any other cutie connoiseur these Art 

Studies in the Nude Deal manner come in a neat folder with 

a Magnifying Glass attached, no less! we're bettin' that 

a load of exhibs will be yelling for duplicate sets 

:Jc ;£ :je :£ 

• • • ONE OF the major companies has installed an 

official Title Changer at the home ossif and the gink is 

busy every minute! in the first week he checked six pix 

that finally went back to the original selected titles after various 

changes and he is already speculating on the Futility of 

it All 



Fox Stockholders Okay 
New Financial Setup 

(Continued from Page 1) 

shares of no par value Class "A" 
common stock from 2,425,660 shares 
to 404,276 2/3 shares and to change 
the 99,900 shares of no par value 
Class "B" common stock to 16,650. 

Each of the present holders of the 
Class "A" common stock and the 
Class "B" common stock will have 
and retain shares of the respective 
classes of stock now held by them 
in the ratio of one share in place of 
six shares. 

At the conclusion of the meeting, 
President S. R. Kent, who had 
worked hard to put the plan over, 
expressed himself as gratified by the 
action of the stockholders and bond 
holders in supporting the manage- 
ment in its plan to reorganize the 
company. 

"They did this rather than throw 
it into bankruptcy," said Kent, 
"which is in accordance with the 
trend of the times to save business 
rather than destroy it." 

Another meeting: is schedv^ed for 
1 1 o'clock this morning at the Fox 
home offices. 



HANDLING B. I. P. FILM 

Captain Harold Auten has sold 
the United States rights to the 
B.I.P. production, "Money Talks." 
to Syndicate Pictures. It features 
Julian Rose and Kid Berg. 



All Theaters Will Join 
In NIRA Publicity Drive 

(Continued from Page 1) 

scales will be "sold" to the public 
through specially prepared trailers 
for use in every theater in the coun- 
try. Formal codes are wanted by 
President Roosevelt by September 1, 
or he is expected to request them 
from companies and organizations. 
The smallest movie house is under 
the provisions of the proclamation. 
Film salesmen who work on the out- 
side will be exempt. 



MUSIC FOR "GET THAT VENUS" 

Dubbing of music on the "ITrst 
production by Starmark, Inc., "Get 
That Venus," is in progress under 
the supervision of Director Grover 
Lee. Musical setting has been ar- 
ranged by Joseph Finston. Release 
will be through Regent Pictures. 
Cast includes Ernest Truex, Jean 
Arthur, Tom Howard, Herbert 
Rawlinson, May Vokes and Molly 
O'Day. 



ED OLMSTEAD AT COLUMBIA 

Ed Olmstead has joined George 
Brown's department at Columbia as 
a member of the exploitation staff 
which is under the supervision of 
Lou Goldberg. Olmstead was with 
Paramount for 13 years. 



A Little 

from "Lots" 

^HBy RALPH WILK — 



HOLLYWCJ 
^LF GOULDING has been sigij 
by Lou Brock to direct the fi| 
Ruth Etting short at RKO. 

* * * 

Pat O'Brien gets long-term Wl 
ner contract, next picture "Varsl 
Coach." 

* * * 

David Lewis will supervise RK] 
"Stingaree." 

* * * 

Clark Gable is resting comfoj 

ably after a tonsil removal. 

* * * 

Arthur Richman writing 1] 
screen play of RKO's "Dance of l| 
sire." Dr. Hyman Cohen, father I 
Lester Cohen, signed to come wl 
and work with his son on a n 
story, "Breaker of Hearts." 

* * * 

Jean Parker for M-G-M's "Mel 
bu," which Chester Franklin aj 
Nick Grinde will co-direct. 

* * * 

Wynne Gibson gets lead in RKi, 
"Aggie Appleby." 

* * * 

Warner has assigned Ruth D«| 
nelly in place of Dorothy Terms ( 
in "Footlight Parade," and J2» 
LaRue and Ralph Morgan in "Kti 
nel Murder Case." 



nan 

HOLLYWOOD 

PLAZA 




SUMMER 
RATES, Now 

$2 per day single! 
$2.50 per day double I 

Special weekly and monthly rates 

All rooms with bath and 
shower. Every modern 
convenience. 
Fine foo Is Jit reasonable 
prices in the Plaza's Rus- 
sian Eagle Garden Cafe. 

, I Look for the "Doorway or Hofpitalitv 

VINE AT HOLLYWOOD BLVj 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 




ufoO\4*&f 



The Daily N 
Of Motion 
Now Fifteen 


ewspa per 

Pictures 

Years Old 



-^PDAILY- 



EW yCCI\, MCNDAy, JULY 24, 1933 



5 CENTS 



7 irst Six Mo 



'Feature Releases Exceed 1932 



IAYS AND ALLIED PLEDGE SUPPORT OF WORK DRIVE 

roved By Fox Sharehc Hers 



:lew Stock Issue 



1 



More Leisure 

..and competition for it 



i By Don Carle Gillette — — 

iOVIE business has been taking it rather 
'complacently for granted that the ex- 
leisure resulting from shorter work hours 
higher pay will throw a lot of additional 
ronage in its lap as a natural matter of 
rse. 

lut it's beginning to look as though it 

Vt be as easy as all that. 

dany others are casting their lines to 

k some of this leisure. 

Educational institutions want folks to put 

i| some of those hours improving their 

Iliads, civic welfare groups are pondering 
WVs of diverting the new leisure into 
.. iLnnels productive of better citizenship, 
•lurches feel that religion is entitled to a 
lie more attention, book publishers see 
i •» re time for reading, the radio expects 

I i iig increase in listeners. 

I knd these are only a few. 

II [o the movies will have to fight, and 
•lit hard, for that extra business. 

• 
favVO things will largely determine the 
IF amount of increased patronage accruing 
lithe screen. 

fPne is the cooperation extended public 

•lanizations which will be most active in 

cfing that the new leisure is not misused; 

jj fj making more films that these groups 

• f*l boost and less of those they are likely 

II knock. 

, [The other is the classification of theaters 

wording to different types of taste and 

jlligence, and going after these specific 

k liences along such lines as will win them 

r. 9 

' REATER diversification of programs to 

avoid monotony is of prime impor- 

ce. 

l> n this respect the screen has the scope 

' outstrip its closest competitor, the radio. 

I As an example of how quickly the radio 

r> y become monotonous, take the case of 

i sic, mainstay of the ether programs. 

|A count-up by this statistically-minded 

Mlumn on a recent rainy day revealed 31 

: Additions of "Cabin in the Pines," 27 of 

Hying in the Hay," 26 of "We're in the 

■finey," 16 of "Sweetheart Darling" and 

,; Wof "Isn't It Heavenly" — all in the course 

ijthe same afternoon and evening over 

' t 'i\ three networks and not counting 

\ 5|ormy Weather." 

\ Will they talk about cycles and sameness 




Common Stock Increase, 

Issuance of Rights Are 

Ratified 

Concluding step in the ratification 
of the new Fox financial setup was 
taken Saturday, when stockholders 
by almost unanimous vote approved 
the increase in number of authorized 
shares of new Class "A" common 
stock from 404,276 2/3 to 2,800,000 
(Continued on Page 8) 



PLAN LONGER SHORTS 
AS SECOND FEATURE 



To take the place of the second 
feature on a dual bill, several pro- 
ducers plan special series for 1933- 
34. Principal Distributing will is- 
sue at least 12 three- and four- 
reelers, while William Steiner will 
make 13 three-reel westerns co- 
starring Bud and Ben. The first, 
"Girl Trouble," has been completed. 
A series of four four-reelers will 
be made by Walter Futter of Wa- 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Trendle Houses to Get 

Break Over the Radio 

Detroit — George W. Trendle, who 
has taken over the 10 Publix houses 
here, is expected to retain his inter- 
est in Station WXYZ, which he has 
been running with John H. Kunsky, 
and the Trendle houses thereby will 
have the advantage of regular 
breaks over the air. Kunsky will 
have no connection with the theaters. 



Allied and the Code 

Says Abram F. Myers in his current 
bulletin to Allied members: 

"Various proposed codes for the mo- 
tion picture industry have been made 
public. Allied has received the well- 
considered comments of a few leaders 
on these and now urges all leaders to 
get in their objections (if any) to 
these drafts. The time is now ap- 
proaching when Allied must formulate 
a final policy for the exhibitors based 
on these comments, on information sent 
in as a result of the regional meet- 
ings held and to be held, and on the 
various proposals and agreements made 
•o and with representatives of the dis- 
tributors in the past." 



SUMMER CLOSINGS 
FEWER LAST MONTH 



Summer closings last month show- 
ed a sizable drop, the country as a 
whole losing only 106 houses, ac- 
cording to the reports of the Film 
Boards of Trade. Theaters going 
dark in the month actually totalled 
174, but this figure was offset by 68 
openings. In the first six months 
of 1933 there were 910 closings, 517 
openings and 1,288 transfers. 



Nine Exchanges in Britain 
Being Opened by Columbia 

London — Eight or nine exchanges 
in the British Isles, including offices 
in Manchester, Leeds, Cardiff, Glas- 
gow, Dublin, Liverpool and New- 
castle, besides London, will be 
opened by Columbia, said Harry 
Cohn in announcing the company's 
(Continued on Page 8) 



324 Feature Films Released 
In First Six Months of 1 933 



First Six Releases Set 
In New Educat'l Lineup 

First releases on Educational's 
1933-34 line-up have been set with 
three two-reelers and three one- 
reelers scheduled for distribution 
during August and September. The 
two-reelers are "Blue Blackbirds," 
Moran and Mack comedy; "Hooks 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Contradicting the much talked 
about product shortage, Film 
Daily's record of features released 
in the first six months of this year 
shows a total of 324, compared with 
321 in the same period of 1932. Of 
the 324 films, 184 were from major 
companies, who had the same figure 
last year; 76 from independents, 
against 77 last year, and 64 from 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Will Cooperate With Gov't 
in Emergency Employ- 
ment Program 

Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — Both the Hays Office 
and Allied have advised the National 
Industrial Recovery administration 
that they will give full support to 
the blanket code governing working 
hours and wages. 

President J. C. Ritter and Chair- 
man Abram F. Myers of Allied 
States Ass'n, in a wire to Admini- 
strator Hugh S. Johnson, pledged 
the association's support of Presi- 
dent Roosevelt's emergency reem- 
ployment drive by endeavoring to 
bring all motion picture theaters 

(Continued on Page 7) 



AD FILM PRODUCERS 
WORKING ON A CODE 

Following a meeting of advertis- 
ing and industrial film producers of 
the New York district to consider 
advisability of organizing a national 
association of non-theatrical pro- 
ducers and to formulate a code in 
compliance with the National Indus- 
trial Recovery Act, other non-theat- 
rical firms throughout the country 
are being notified of steps being 
taken here and requesting their re- 
actions in the matter. 

Those attending the local confer- 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Warners to Increase 

National Advert'g 43% 

Convinced that strong national ad- 
vertising, publicity and exploitation 
campaigns pay big dividends, War- 
ner Bros, announce they will in- 
crease by 43 per cent the national 
advertising budget on their 1933-34 
product. In addition to this boost 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Foreign Talent Scouts 

Permanent scouts for stories and tal- 
ent for Warner Bros, will be established 
in London. Paris, Vienna and Rome by 
Jacob Wilk, who sailed Saturday on a 
story and talent hunt. Wilk will visit 
England, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, 
Austria and possibly Russia. 



THE 



-c&a 



DAILY 



Monday, July 24, 




VoL LX1II, Ho. 19 Mm., July 7.4, 1933 Price 5 Cents 
JOHN W. ALICOATE \ \ \ Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
at 1650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
and General Manager; Arthur W. Eddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at N«w York, 
N. Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, M50 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
Phone, Circle 7-4736, 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London — 
Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin — Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
— P. A. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues. 19. 



FINANCIAL 



(QUOTATIONS AS OF SATURDAY) 
NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close dig. 



3 3'/ 2 

171/s 18 

33/4 33/4 — 1/8 

8 8 V4 — Va 

651/2 671/2 — 3 

23/ 4 3 

21 1/4 — 1 3/ 4 

1 1/2 — Va 

11/2 + Va 

51/2 

21/2 — Va 



1V4 
43/g 
21/2 

41/4 



-1-16 



'/a 



52% 


53 


76 


76 


22 


25 



Am. Seat 3% 

Columbia Picts. vtc. 18 

Con. Fm. Ind 4! a 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. . 9 

East. Kodak 72 

Fox Fm. "A" 3 

Loews, Inc 22V 4 20 

Paramount ctfs l 5 /s 1 V2 

Pathe Exch 1% 

do "A" 51/2 

RKO 3 

Warner Bros 5 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 
Gen. Th. Eq. pfd. ...11-16 9-16 11-16 

Technicolor 7l/ 2 V/s T>A 

Trans-Lux 2V 4 2'/ 8 2i/ 8 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 
Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 ctfs. 6 5 5 

Keith A-0 6s46 55 

Loew 6s 41 ww 81 Vi 

Paramount 6s 47. .25 

Par. By. 5i/ 2 s51 33 Vi 33 Vi 33 Vi + Vi 

Par. 5'/ 2 s50 263/ 8 24S/ 8 263/ 8 +31/4 

Par. 5!is50 ctfs. . . 22Vi 22Vi 22Vi — 7 
Warner's 6s39 31 28Vi 30 —2 



Coming and Going 



JANET GAYNOR leaves Hollywood on Wed- 
nesday with her mother for a vacation auto 
trip to New York, stooping over at the 
Century of Progress in Chicago. She returns 
to the Fox studios in about six weeks. 

HARRY H. THOMAS has returned to New 
York from Washington. 

COLLEEN MOORE, who recently arrived in 
New York after finishing work in Fox's 
"Power and the Glory," returns tomorrow from 
a short yachting trip with her husband. Al 
Scott. 

BUDD ROGERS has left on a business trip 
to various First Division Exchanges in Wash- 
ington. Buffalo, Albany, etc. He will be away 
two weeks. 

VERA ALLEN, who played opposite Will Rog- 
ers in Fox's "Doctor Bull," arrived from the 
coast Saturday. 

WILLIAM FRAWLEY left for the Paramount 
coast studios Saturday. 

LOU SMITH of the Paramount publicity staff 
left Saturday for a two-weeks' vacation in Ver- 
mont. 



• The Broadway Parade • 

4 FIRST RUNS ♦ 

Picture Distributor Theater 

Double Harness RKO Music Hall 

Bed of Roses" RKO RKO Roxy 

Private Detective 62* Warner Bros Palace 

Heroes for Sale First National Strand 

Sleepless Nights Remington Pictures Rialto 

Mama Loves Papa Paramount Paramount 

Arizona to Broadway Fox 7th Ave. Roxy 

This Is America Beekman Rivoli 

Storm at Daybreak M-G-M Capitol 

Gold Diggers of 1933 (8th weekl Warner Bros Hollywood 

Shriek in the Night First Division Cameo 

Hell's Holiday (2nd week) Superb Pictures Mayfair 



Subsequent runs. 



♦ TWO-A-DAY RUN ♦ 



Pilgrimage (2nd week) Fox 

Song of Songs Paramount. 



Gaiety 
Criterion 



♦ FOREIGN PICTURES ♦ 



Soir de Raf le Unknown Little Carnegie 

The Big Attraction Bavaria Film Co Vanderbilt 

Born Anew Amkino Acme 



"Savage Gold" Opening 
De Luxe at the Mayfair 

"Savage Gold," Commander Dy- 
ott's picture of the head hunters and 
head shrinkers of the Amazon, will 
be given a de luxe premiere at the 
Mayfair tonight with all the fan- 
fare and trimmings of a Hollywood 
presentation. A display of real hu- 
man heads, shrunken to the size of 
oranges, will be part of the lobby 
ballyhoo. 



U. A. CONVENTIONEERS BACK 

Hal Home, Ed Finney, Harry 
Gold, Monroe Greenthal and Leon 
Lee returned to New York yester- 
day by plane from Chicago, where 
they attended the United Artists 
convention last week. Walt Disney 
also arrived. Sam Cohen got in 
Saturday, while Joseph M. Schenck, 
Al Lichtman and William Phillips 
arrived Friday. 



SELLING TWO WEEKS AHEAD 

Advance sale of reserved seats for 
Paramount's "Song of Songs," star- 
ring Marlene Dietrich, was extended 
to two weeks ahead on Saturday in 
response to demands for tickets at 
the Criterion box-office. The fea- 
ture, which opened Wednesday, has 
played to capacity since the pre- 



M-G-M STARTS TWO 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Two new produc- 
tions, "Stage Mother," with Frank 
Morgan, Alice Brady, Maureen 
O'Sullivan and Franchot Tone, and 
"Penthouse," with Warner Baxter, 
Myrna Loy and Phillips Holmes, 
have just gone in work at M-G-M. 
Lee Tracy's new picture, "Turn 
Back the Clock," has been finished. 



R. F. BRANON RKO WINNER 

Charlotte — R. F. Branon, local 
representative of RKO, has just 
been announced as one of the com- 
pany's six representatives in the 
United States and Canada who made 
a record of 100 per cent in his sales 
last year to theaters. 



Film Cartoon Talent In 

New Vaudeville Act 

James Rodgers has placed in re- 
hearsal a new vaudeville unit fea- 
turing Little Ann Little, the 
Voice of Betty Boop, and Pauline 
Comanor, the artist responsible for 
some of the antics of Max Fleisch- 
er's Betty Boop. The unit, built 
around the cartoon studio idea, 
opens this week. 



PARA. SIGNS WM. FRAWLEY 

William Frawley, who played the 
press agent in the stage play. 
"Twentieth Century," was signed 
Saturday by Paramount and left 
immediately for the coast. 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



July 25: Meeting of Allied Theaters o I 
Jersey at 2 P. M. 

July 28-29: Monogram western sales m 

San Francisco. 
July 28-31 : Meeting of Independent 7| 

Supply Dealers' Association at Si 

Hotel, Chicago. 

July 31 -Aug. 1: Federation of Motion II 

Industry of America, Inc., conferer I 

Hotel Astor, New York. 
July 31 -Aug. 1: Warner sales meeting, W. 

Astoria Hotel, New York. 
Aug. 2: Outing at Bear Mountain uncle j 

pices of Motion Picture Club. 
Aug. 2-3: Monogram Canadian sales ml 

Toronto. 
Aug. 3: Adjourned meeting of Fox Metroi] 

Playhouses' creditors. 
Aug. 3-4: Warner sales meeting, Drake j 

Chicago. 
Aug. 7-8: Warner sales meeting, Royal 

Hotel, Toronto. 
Aug. 8: Third Annual Film Golf Tour 

of New England industry at Pine I 

Valley Country Club, Weston, Mass [ 
Aug. 10: Adjourned meeting of Publi>! 

terprises creditors at office of R 

Henry K. Davis. 
Aug. 23-24: First annual convention of 

pendent Motion Picture Owners Asscm j 

of Delaware and Eastern Shore of Ma 

at Hotel Henelopen, Rehoboth, Del. I 
Sept. 5-6-7: Allied Mew Jersey conv- 

at Atlantic City. 
Sept. 13: A. M. P. A. holds annual elect 

officers 



BEAUTY CONTEST AT RO 

Elimination contest for the s 
tion of Miss New York for the 
anuual International Beauty 
test will be held at the orij 
Roxy. Celebrated artists will ap 
as judges. 



* * * 



BUILDING BIGGER BUSINESS EXTRA 



GOES 
EVERYWHERE 




LONDON 



HOLLYWOOD 



NEW YORK 



PARIS 



PRESCRIPTION 

If you are becoming dizzy from being carried along too swiftly in 
merry whirl of this ever changing motion picture industry I we 
suggest the following treatment: Plenty of sleep, work hard, keep t 
feet on the ground and read THE FILM DAILY from cover to c« 
first thing every morning. By doing this you will never be cai^ 
napping with what's going on in your industry. 

■J Old Doc Experience 



12 



NEW YOKK. EVENING JOURNAL * 



HELL'S HOLIDAY' 



Vivid Official Photographs of 
A. E. F. in Action, at Mayfair 



Jftnerica's Part in World War 
Stressed in Grim Picture; 
I Terror in Clock'-s Tick 

Modern warfare, grim and horrible, but strangely com- 
,-e.ng, is on view' at the Mayfair Theatre this week. 

All the instruments devised by ingenious science for the 
c: t ruction of men and cities are there — the poison gas and 
.„. qict flame, the bombs hurled from speeding planes, the tor- 
|)es of the dread U-boats, the impervious tanks, the machine 
! u r s and hand grenades with their messages of death. 
& All the sad results of these instruments are shown, too — 
|( ti homes shattered and desolate, the pitiful refugees trudging 
i< g dusty roads, the wounded and maimed soldiers, the d< 
: y;g sprawled on, war-torn fields, the rows of tiny 

The picture is "Hell's Holiday /^nesaifctf^iB^fc uy movie 
itjdM m j^ mam mmmfmmmWlmm m /tK9^u m T a compilation o^)fi'icial 

rcture scenes filmed overseas during the WorhjfWar- 
the best of its kind to appear o n Broad wa 

rates in 1871, 

ending with the Army of Occupation marching into Coblenz 

ir the Armistice, "Hell's Holiday" stresses especially Amer- 

part in the conflict. The scenes preceding "Woodrow 

;on's proclamation of war— : a literary classic flashed on the 

en — are merely preludes to the entrance of the A. E. F. 

"Hell's Holiday," incidentally, 
offers a clearer knowledge of the 
routine of war — the attacks and 
counter-attacks, victories and de- 
feats — than most soldiers and 
civilians possessed while the great 
conflict was on. S.ome effects and 
music have been nicely interpo- 
lated. 



^ ChateauThierry 

1 rticularly vivid are the action 
n ographs of Chateau-Thierry 
l St. Mihiel, the numerous shots 
nking ships, the pictures of 
,1 conflict, the representation 
aughboy life behind the front 

gene Dennis, the narrator, in- 
naj'j.the spice of emotion into his 

jiatic recital, which explains 
JiL .clarifies what might other- 
•4? be a Confusing medley of un- 
Vtsfied scenes. 

-^'Hell's Holiday' 

4|iic Mayfair Theatre. A realistic 
= «tcring of the World War. presented 
% Superb rictures. 

J»a ted by Eueene Dennis 

In | and sound effects under the 
I |'sonal direction of .. .Joseph Finstnn 



The Mayfair also has a mother- 
in-law comedy called "Loose Re- 
lations,", starring Andy Clyde, and 
a funny cartoon picture, "Bea 
Best," with Oswald the Rabbit 



MarshaIL£i 



Le^ 



rheCaJ M 

11 

■l U wJ wm km i m^^mJmm 1 




mwM 'mm mm W* M*\ Mm 1 

mmmmWtAjmmmt^ 





A 'GOLD DIG* 



1M 



VJF, 



wPa 



For direct bookings - 
or territorial rights 

Write or wire 

SUPERB PICTURES 

729 Seventh Ave. New YotkN.Y 



THE 



•2&H 



DAILY 



Monday, July 24, 193] 



TIMELY TOPICS 

All-Star Casts 
Easy to Handle 

•"QYNAMITE!" is the ex- 
pressive word whispered by 
Hollywood folk when two or 
more film stars are cast in the 
same picture. "Their clashes of 
temperament will make the di- 
rector's life miserable," is the 
usual prediction. But this view 
is contradicted by every film di- 
rector who has had two or more 
stars to put through their paces 
at the same time. Players of star 
calibre today are interested in 
contributing their talents to one 
ultimate end — the attainment of 
a good picture. No one heard a 
complaint during the entire film- 
ing of "If I Had a Million." And 
just take a look at the talent in 
that picture. Gary Cooper, 
George Raft, Wynne' Gibson, 
Fredric March, Jack Oakie — 
that's mentioning only a few in 
the cast. Not only that, but 
seven famous directors had a 
hand in the production. The har- 
monious working order of that 
unit is still being talked about 
in Hollywood. Such successful 
pictures as "Grand Hotel," and 
"State Fair" were produced with 
complete cooperation by mem- 
bers of the all-star casts. Right 
now I'm directing two of the 
biggest stars of the screen in 
"Midnight Club." They are Clive 
Brook and George Raft. Both 
command a sensationally large 
audience throughout the coun- 
try. Here's sufficient proof that 
the old theory is out. 

— Alexander Hall- 



M. BURNETT VACATIONING 

Dayton, 0. — Marty Burnett, man- 
ager of the local Loew house, is 
away for a two-week vacation in 
Michigan. Ray Jones, Loew reliei 
manager, at the helm. 




"Genevieve Tobin is one of Holly- 
wood's few harp players and the only 
sfar who can actually elicit music 
from the strings." 

—FIRST NATIONAL 



P^V#" r 


>. : 


L-w' I 

} 1»E — 

M*m Mr 





MONGTHE 




• • • THEY USED Showmanship in those M-G-M sales 
conventions at Kansas City and Detroit the Big Smash 

of both conventions was a beaucoup showman stunt 

"Dramatizing the Product" it literally knocked the boys 

right off their seats at both cities and brought 'em to 

their feet cheering at the curtain here's how it was 

done 



• • • THE LIGHTS went out complete darkness 

Felix Feist on stage under a baby spot speaking 

"You gentlemen are in the DARK on our new season's product. 

We will now enlighten you." then came a ruffle of drums 

as a brigade of smart young boys in snappy red uniforms with 
brass buttons and gold braid marched across the platform in 

single file as each youngster took his place a spotlight 

played on him revealing the silk banner he carried 

each banner listed one of the series in the M-G-M pro- 
gram for the coming season for instance Sevefl 

Specials Two Dresslers Three Harlows 

etcetera till the entire 28 units of production had been 

displayed 



• • • AS THE youngsters filed on the stage singly 

and their bannered message was revealed under the spotlight 

. sales manager Felix Feist gave the subject matter on 

the banner a snappy build-up, explaining concisely just what 

the particular product would embrace then came the 

Dramatization of the Shorts Product with big six-footers 

in uniform and plumed hats carrying banners flashing the series 

of M-G-M shorts 9 series Feist explained these 

also then full lights on stage revealing the Parade of 

Product a brass band blared a drop curtain came 

down in the form of an immense banner 20 x 30 bearing in 
enormous letters the current slogan of Leo Lion: "OUT FOR 

OUTPUT!" it was then that the assembled boys of 

Emgeem came to their feet yelling and stamping the 

surprise show literally had 'em gasping it lasted very 

briefly and that was the only reference practically to 

the Product but were they SOLD ! Felix Feist's 

own idea staged as usual by Billy Ferguson 



• • • TO THE Roxy 7th Avenue theater has fallen the 
honor of holding the elimination contests for the selection of 

"Miss New York" for the 14th Annual International 

Beauty Pageant the eliminations will be held over a 

number of nights with girls from the metropolitan and 

suburban sections competing among the judges who will 

appear on the Roxy stage to select "Miss New York" will be 
such celebrated artists as Haskell Coffin, Penrhyn Stanlaws, 

Leslie Thresher and Jules Cannert the winner has a 

chance to become "Miss Universe" in competition with girls 
from all over the United States and Europe 

* * * * 

• • • THE ONLY holdover on Broadway this week is 

"Hell's Holiday" at the Mayfair Fred Waring and His 

Pennsylvanians return to Broadway Friday after a year's ab- 
sence from local stages they will headline the Para- 
mount stage show in their own Radio Revue in addition 

to Fred the entertainers will comprise Tom Waring, Evalyn 
Nair, "Babs," "The Three Smoothies," The Lane Sisters, "Poley" 

McClintock, Johnnie Davis and Stuart Churchill A swell 

yarn on the Inside Story of Charlie Chaplin starting in the 

current issue of "Liberty" by Carlyle Robinson 

in which he shows what a prominent part John R. Freuler 
played in Charlie's career 



EXPLOITETTE 



Theater Front 
Uses Mirrors 



« €< « 



» » » 



J-[OWARD WAUGH of th. 
Warner Memphis, pulled ; 
real classy bit of advance ex 
ploitation for "Gold Diggers o 
1933." Taking advantage of the 
fact that the Cotton Carniva 
which takes place yearly ir 
Memphis draws thousands ol 
out-of-towners as well as Mem-! 
phis crowds, Waugh set up a 
special display on the Warneil 
musical special covering the en-l 
tire front of the theater build-| 
ing. Huge letters announcec 
the coming of "Gold Diggers of 
1933" across the roof of the 
building. Underneath, Waugh 
had 12 large mirrors in the form 
of stars, suspended across the 
face of the building. Right 
across each mirrored star, he 
had signs carrying the name of 
the 12 stars in the picture, using 
one mirror to a name. By day, I 
the reflection of the sun on thel 
mirrors attracted the eye to the! 
building. At night, Waugh 
trained a battery of floodlights 
on the building, making the re- 
flection of the lights visible for 
blocks. 

— Warners, Memphis 



Bannered Street Car 
Plugs "42nd Street" 

J^ STREET car completely cov- 
ered with "paper" on "42nd 
Street" was used to sell the mu- 
sical when it played at the Cap- 
itol in Calgary. The display was 
a most pretentious one and sold 
the immensity of the picture's 
production, its 14 stars and the 
200 beautiful girls, besides an- 
nouncing that the picture was 
showing "At the Capitol Thea- 
ter Today!" This stunt created 
quite a furore in Calgary, as the 
car passed through the busiest 
sections of the locality fairly 
screaming "42nd Street" to the 
onlookers, of whom there were 
thousands. 

— Capitol, Calgary. 



«,&, 



MANY UAPPY RETUM 



Best wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 

July 24 

Nick Tronolone 



'day, July 24, 1933 



11 



>mphis — M. A. Lightman, who 

been planning to reopen the 

id, is meeting with opposition 

the unions. Plans for the open- 

t to take place Saturday, July, 

indefinitely postponed, while 

-temodeling still goes on to show 

niii there is yet hope 

ly 



i\ 



lie: rniston, Ala. — A city ordinance 
up i would have legalized Sunday 
'art ;.s here was defeated recently by 
lies 7 unanimous vote of the City 
,cil. 



lip:. 



THE 



-<^ 



DAILY 



N-E-W-S O-F T-H-E D-A-Y 



Teyville, Kan. — Despite strenu- 
., Opposition from church interests, 
J1 h conducted a series of meet- 
r }n an effort to maintain a closed 
ay, repeal of the ordinance 
st Sabbath movies here was 
by 2,463 to 1,509. 



ir,! 



USE 



'. mingham — Removal of union 
j'from the Wilby houses, in the 
between unions and theaters 
alleged "unfair competition" 
Bed by the Jefferson, has been 
[ e ; [oned another week. Wilby con- 
the Jefferson, operated by 
hands and musicians coopera- 
i and showing pictures and 
iville for 15 cents, is unethical. 



"onto — Ernest Marks of Osh 
.vas re-elected president of As 
ifed Theaters, Ltd., at the an 
meeting here. Thomas Moore- 
Brampton, Ont., re-elected 
resident; W. A. Baillie, Toron- 
,/e-elected secretary-treasurer; 
R. Hanson, re-elected general 
er, with Nat C. Taylor as as- 
at general manager and J. Earl 
,pn, as legal advisor, 

wi 

^ nsas City— Don R. (Hi Fidel- 
■ji pavis has just closed contract 
'£ ew RCA sound equipment with 
g jMozark theater, Springfield, 
ji i Moran & Isley have just re- 
led. The Prospect here has re 
d with new RCA equipment. 



Falo — A. Charles Hayman, 
executive of the Lafayette, is 
ling a month at Jiis summer 
at Rutter, Ontario. 



i;;roit — The Calvin, premier 

of Dearborn, western suburb 

etroit, has been sold by the 

ward Theater Co., operating 

ny for the Henry S. Koppin 

it, to Frank A. Wetsman and 

isper. 



Cflahoma City — Attendance at the 



'ty has shown an increase for 
last two weeks, according to 

:e Y. Henger, Warner man- 
Both of the last two attrac- 

at the house were held over. 



Athens, Ala — For the first time in 
more than a score of years Athens 
has no theater. The Ritz, only local 
house, has closed. 



Detroit — Herman and Walter 
Kramer, for many years operators 
of the Kramer theater, West Side, 
have sold the house to Leon and 
Sol Krim, former Mount Clemens 
exhibitors. The Kramers are now 



running the Aragon Beer Garden 
adjoining the theater. 



Kansas City — Walter Isenhart has 
leased the 875-seat Penn Valley the- 
ater, closed for some time, and will 
open it the middle of September. 



Indianapolis — The name of the 
Terminal theater will be changed to 
the Ambassador, according to Carl 



Niesse, manager. In the future the 
house will show the first second- 
runs of M-G-M pictures. 



Oklahoma City — A charter has 
been granted to R. & R. Theater, 
Inc., Watonga, by the secretary of 
state. The incorporators are C. G. 
Richardson and E. D. Rook, both of 
Sayre, and C. C. Rook of Watonga. 
The capital is $7,500. 



ASK US! 

How can I reseat my 
theatre economically?' 






ave you 
figured ike 
cost of discomfort ? 



• Do they limp when they go out? And 
stamp their feet to restore circulation 
and relieve the chair paralysis resulting 
from hard, lumpy and decrepit seats? 
If so, you need new chairs NOW! 



American Seating Company 



Makers of Dependable Seating for Theatres and Auditoriums 

General Offices: Grand Rapids, Michigan 

BRANCHES IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES 




Features Reviewed in Film Daily Jan. 1 to July 22 



Title Review** 

A Kek Balvany-XX 4-19-33 

Adorable-F 5-19-33 

After the Ball-F 3-18-33 

Air Hostess-COL 1-21-33 

Alimony Madness-MAY . . . 5-5-33 

Almas Encontradas-XX ..7-7-33 

Ann Carver's Profession-COL 

6-9-33 

Arizona to Broadway-F. 7-22-33 

Baby Face-WA 6-24-33 

Barbarian, The-MGM ... 5-13-33 

Bed of Roses-RKO 7-1-33 

Bedtime Story, A-PAR. .4-22-33 
Behind Jury Doors-MAY .3-15-33 

Below the Sea-COL 6-3-33 

Be Mine Tonight-U 3-16-33 

Berlin Alexanderplatz-XX 

5-13-33 

Best of Enemies-F 7-17-33 

Between Fighting Men-WW 

2.8-33 

Big Drive-FD 1-20-33 

Big Cage. The-U 5-10-33 

Billion Dollar Scandal-PAR 

1-7-33 

Blondie Johnson-FN 3-1-33 

Bondage-F 4-22-33 

Breed of the Border-MOP 

5-10-33 

Broadway Bad— F 3-7-33 

By Appointment Onlv-INV 

7-1 2-33 

California Trail-COL 7-22-33 

Cavalcade-F 1-7-33 

Central Aifport-FN 3-29-33 

Charles XII— XX 4-3-33 

Cheating Blondes-CAP. .. 5-20-33 

Cheyenne Kid-RKO 7-13-33 

Child of Manhattan-COL. 2-1 1-33 
Christopher Strong-RKO 3-11-33 
Circus Queen Murder-COL 

5-6-33 

Clear All Wires-MGM 3-4-33 

Cocktail Hour-COL 6-3-33 

Cohens and Kellys in Trouble- 

U.. 4-15-33 

College Humor-PAR 6-14-33 

Come On Danger-RKO. .2-16-33 

Come on Tarzan-WW 1-4-33 

Constant Woman, The-WW 

5-23-33 

Cornered-COL 2-1-33 

Corruption-IMP 6-21-33 

Cougar, The King Killer- 

SNO 5-23-33 

Cowboy Counsellor-FD . . . 2-1-33 
Crime of the Century-PAR 

2-18-33 

Dangerously Yours-F 2-24-33 

Daring Daughters-CAP. .3-25-33 
Das Lickende Ziel-XX ... 6-20-33 
Das Nachtigall Maedel-CAP 

1-28-33 

Deadwook Pass-FR 6-6-33 

Death Kiss-WW 1-28-33 

Deception-COL 1-10-33 

Der Hauptman Von Koepe- 

nick-AMR 1-20-33 

Der Liebling von Wien-XX 

6-14-33 
Der Schuetzen Koenig-GER 

5-10-33 
Destination Unknown-U. . .4-8-33 

Devil's Brother-MGM 6-10-33 

Diamond Trail-MOP 4-19-33 

Die Frau von Der Man 

Spricht-XX 4-26-33 

Diplomaniacs-RKO 4-29-33 

Disgraced l-PAR 7-17-33 

Dos Noches-HOF 5-10-33 

Double Harness-RKO. . .7-13-33 
Drei Tage Mittelarrest- 

XX.. 5-18-33 

Drum Taps-WW 4-26-33 

Dude Bandit-ALD 6-21-33 

Eagle and the Hawk-PAR. 5-6-33 
Ein Maedel Der Strasse-XX 

4-10-33 
Eine Liebesnacht-XX ...5-18-33 
Eine Nacht Im Paradise-AMR 

2-23-33 
Eine Tuer Geht Auf-PRX 2-8-33 
Eleventh Commandment-ALD 

3-25-33 

Elmer the Great-FN 5-26-33 

Emergency Call-RKO 6-24-33 

Employees' Entrance-FN 1-21-33 
End of the Trail-COL. . .2-23-33 

Ex-Lady-WA 5-13-33 

Face in the Skv-F 2-18-33 

Fargo Expres»-WW 3-1-33 

Fast Workers-MGM 3-18-33 

Fighting for Justice- 

COL.. 5-17-33 





KEY TO DISTRIBUTORS 


ABC— Arkay Film Exch. 


FX— The Film Exchange 


POL— Bud Pollard Productions 


j AE — Aeolian Pictures 


GB — Gaumont-British 


POR — Portola Pictures 
PRI — Principal Dist. Corp. 


AG — Agfa 


GEN — General Films 


PRX — Protex Dist. Corp. 


ALD — Allied Picturet 


GER — Germania Film Co. 


REG — Regent Pictures 


ALX — William Alexander 


GOL — Ken Goldsmith 


REM — Remington Pictures 


AM — Amkino 


GRF — Garrison Films 


RKO— RKO-Radio Pictures 


AMR — American Roumanian 


HOF— J. H. Hoffberg Co. 


SCR — Screencraft 


Film Corp. 


ICE — Int. Cinema Exch. 


SHO — Showmen's Pictures 


ARL — Arthur Lee 


IMP — Imperial Dist. 


SNO— Sidney Snow. 


AU — Capt. Harold Auten 


INA — Inter-Americas Films 


SUP — Superb Pictures 


BEE — Beekman Film Corp. 


INT — Interworld Prod. 


SYA — Synchro Art Pictures 


CAP — Capitol Film Exchange 


INV — Invincible Pictures 


SYN— Syndicate 


CHE — Chesterfield 


JE — Jewell Productions 


TF — Tobis Foreign Film 


COL — Columbia 


JRW— J. R. Whitney 


TOW — Tower Prods. 


COM — Compagnie Universelle 


KIN — Kinematrade 


U — Universal 


Cinematographique 


LEV — Nat Levine 


UA — United Artist! 


EC— Enrico Cutali 


MAD — Madison Pictures 


UFA— Ufa 


EQU — Equitable Pictures 


MAJ — Majestic Pictures 


WA — Warner Bros. 


F — Fox 


MAY — Mayfair Pictures 


WK— Willis Kent 


FAM — Foreign American Films 


MO — Monopole Pictures 


WOK— Worldkino 


FD — First Division 


MGM — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 


WW— World Wide 


FOR — Foremco Pictures 


MOP — Monogram Pictures 


XX — No distributor set 


FR — Freuler Film Associates 


PA R — Paramount 


ZBY — Zbyszko Polish-American 


FN — First National 


PO — Powers Pictures 


Film Co. 



Title Reviewed 

Fighting President. The-U. 4-8-33 

Fires of Fate-PO 4-4-33 

Footsteps in the Night-INV 

5-10-33 

Forbidden Trail-COL 4-10-33 

Forgotten-INV 5-20-33 

Forgotten Men-JE 5-13-33 

42nd Street-WA 2-4-33 

Flaming Guns-U 6-17-33 

Flaming Signal-INV 5-25-33 

Four Aces-SYN 2-24-33 

Fourth Horseman-U 2-8-33 

Frisco Jenny-FN 1-7-33 

From Hell to Heaven- 

PAR.. 3-18-33 
Gabriel Over the White House 

MGM 4-1-33 

Gambling Ship-PAR 7-13-33 

Gefahren Der Liebe-MAD .5-1-33 

Uhost Train-AKL 2-18-33 

Gigolettes of Paris-EOU 

7-19-33 

Girl in 419-PAR 5-20-33 

Girl Missing-WA 3-18-33 

Glos Pustyni-XX 4-26-33 

Gold Diggers of 1933- 

WA.. 5-25-33 

Goldie Gets Along-RKO . .6-3-33 

Grand Slam-WA 2-23-33 

Great Jasper. The-RKO . .2-17-33 

Gun Law-MAJ 7-13-33 

Hallelujah I'm a Bum-UA, 

1-27-33 

Haunted Gold-WA 1-11-33 

He Learned About Women 

PAR.. 3-2-33 

Hell Below-MGM 4-27-33 

Hell on Earth-AE 3-31-33 

Hello Everybody-PAR ..1-28-33 

Hello, Sister-F 4-14-33 

HeU's Holidav-SUP 7-19-33 

Heroes for Sale-FN 7-22-33 

her Resale Va.ue-M AY . .6-21-33 
Hertha's Erwachen-UFA. 3-13-33 
Heute Nacht-Eventuell-XX 

7-7-33 

Hidden Gold-U 3-22-33 

High Gear-GOL 3-22-33 

His Private Secretary-SHO 

6-6-33 

Hold Me Tight-F 5-20-33 

Hold Your Man-MGM 7-1-33 

Holzapfel Weiss Alles-MO 

1-12-33 

Hotel Variety-SCR 1-4-33 

Hot Pepper-F 1-21-33 

Horizon-AM 5-13-33 

Humanity-F 4-22-33 

Hyppolit A Lakaj-ICE ..1-20-33 
Ich Will Nicht Wissen Wer 

Du Bist-INT 2-17-33 

I Have Lived-CHE 7-19-33 

Ihre Majestaet Die Liebe- 

W A.. 2-8-33 
I Love That Man-PAR. . .7-8-33 
1 Loved You Wednesday-F 

6-16-33 

India Speaks- RKO 5-6-33 

Infernal Machine-F 4-8-33 

I Cover the Waterfront- 

UA.. 5-19-33 
International House-PAR. 5-27-33 

Intruder, The-ALD 3-13-33 

Iron Master-ALD 2-4-33 

Island of Doom-AM ... .7-20-33 



Title Reviewed 

Island of Lost Souls-PAR 

1-12-33 
It's Great to Be Alive-F. . 7-8-33 

Ivan-GRF 2-23-33 

Jennie Gerhardt-PAR 6-9-33 

Jungle Bride-MOP 5-13-33 

Justice Takes a Holiday- 

MAY.. 4-19-33 

Kadetten-FX 3-31-33 

Kazdemu Wolng Kochac-XX 

5-24-33 

Keyhole, The-WA 3-31-33 

King Kong-RKO 2-25-33 

WA.. 2-18-33 
King of the Jungle-PAR 2-25-33 

King's Vacation-WA 1-20-33 

Kiss Before the Mirror-U 

5-13-33 
Korvettenkapitaen-AG ...3-25-33 

Kuhle Wampe-KIN 4-26-33 

La Donna D'Una Notte- 

POR.. 3-13-33 
Lady's Profession, A. 

PAR.. 3-25-33 
Ladies They Talk About-WA 

2-25-33 
La Ley del Haren-XX .. .6-20-33 

Laubenkolonie-GEN 6-9-33 

Laughing at Life-LEV . .7-12-33 
La Voce del Sangue-SYA. 4-19-33 
Law and Lawless-MAJ. .4-12-33 
Les Trois Mousquetaires- 

COM.. 5-1-33 

Life Is Beautiful-AM 2-17-33 

Life of Jimmy Dolan-WA 

6-14-33 

Lilly Turner-FN 6-15-33 

L'italia Parla-EC 2-20-33 

Little Giant-FN 4-14-33 

Long Avenger-WW 6-30-33 

Looking Forward-MGM . .4-29-33 

Love in Morocco-GB 3-20-33 

Love Is Like That-C HE. 4-29-33 

Lucky Devils-RKO 1-28-33 

Lucky Larrigan-MOP ..3-15-33 

Luxury Liner-PAR 2-4-33 

M — FOR 4-3-33 

Madame Wuenscht Keine 

Kinder-XX 6-3-33 

Malay Nights-MAY 2-1-33 

Mama-F 7-20-33 

Mama Loves Papa-PAR 

7-22-33 

Man Hunt-RKO 5-5-33 

Man of Action-COL 6-6-33 

Man They Couldn't Arrest- 

GB.. 3-13-33 

Man Who Won-PO 2-25-33 

Mano a Mano-INA 2-23-33 

Marius— PAR 4-19-33 

Matto Grosso-PRI 1-14-33 

Mayor of Hell-WA 6-23-33 

Melodv Cruise-RKO 6-16-33 

Men and Jobs-AM 1-6-33 

Men Are Such Fools- 

RKO.. 3-13-33 

Men of America-RKO 3-1-33 

Men Must Fight-MGM . .3-11-33 
Midnight Marv-MGM ... 7-17-33 

Mindreader-FN 4-7-33 

Mistigri-PAR 1-20-33 



Title Reviewed 

Mon Coeur Balance-PAR 2-8-33 
Monkey's Paw, The- 
RKO.. 6-1-33 

Morgenrot-PRX 5-18-33 

Murders in the Zoo-PAR. .4-1-33 
Mussolini Speaks-COL ..3-11-33 
Mysterious Rider — PAR... 6-1-33 
Mystery of the Wax Museum- 

WA. .2-18-33 
My Mother-MOP (Reviewed ad 

Self Defense) 2-17-33 

Nagana-U 2-11.. 33 

Namensheirat-FAM 1-12-33 

Narrow Corner. The-WA. 6-20-33 

Night and Day-GB 5-27-33 

Night of Terror-COL 6-7-33 

No Other Woman-RKO. . 1-1 3-33 
Noc Listopadowa-PRX . . . 5-1-33 
Nuisance, The-MGM ...5-27-33 
Obey the Law — COL. . .3-11-33 

Officer 13-FD 1-27-33 

Oliver Twist-MOP 2-25-33 

On Demande un Compagnon- 

XX. .6-9-33 

Our Betters-RKO 2-24-33 

Out AU Night-U 4-8-33 

Outlaw Justice-M A J 2-23-33 

Outsider, The-M-G-M 3-29-33 

Over the Seven Seas-XX. 5-24-33 
Parachute Jumper-WA ..1-27-33 

Paris — Beguin-PRX 1-6-33 

Parole Girl-COL 4-10-33 

Past of Mary Holmes-RKO 

4-29-33 
Peg O' My Heart-MGM.. 5-20-33 

Penal Code, The-FR 1-6-33 

Peitect Understanding-UA 

2-24-33 
Phantom Broadcast-MOP 

4-4-33 
Phantom Thunderbolt-WW 

6-14-33 

Pick-Up-PAR 3-25-33 

Picture Snatcher-WA 5-19-33 

Pilgrimage-F 7-17-33 

Piri Mindot Tud-ABC ..1-28-33 

Pleasure Cruise-F 4-1-33 

Potemkin-KIN 4-3-33 

Primavera en Otono-F. .. 5-24-33 
Private Detective 62-WA. .7-8-33 

Private Jones-U 3-25-33 

Professional Sweetheart- 

RKO.. 5-27-33 

Racetrack— WW 3-7-33 

Reform Girl-TOW 3-4-33 

Renegades of the West 

RKO 3-29-33 

Return of Casey JonesMOP 

6-3033 
Return of Nathan Becker- 

WOK. .4-19-33 
Reunion in Vienna-MGM . .5-2-33 
Revenge at Monte Carlo-MAY 

4-26-33 

Rivals-AM 4-10-33 

Robber's Roost-F 3-18-33 

Rome Express-U 2-25-33 

Sailor Be Good-RKO 3-1-33 

Sailor's Luck-F 3-17-33 

Samarang-UA 5-18-33 

Savage Girl, The-FR 1-6-33 



Title Reviru, 

Savage Gold-AU 5-23! 

Scarlet River-RKO 5-24, 

Second Hand Wife-F 1-14- 1| 

Secrets-UA 3-16-1 

Secret of Madame Blanche 

MGM. ...2-4 
Secrets of Wu Sin-CHE. .2-3- 

Self Defense-MOP 2-17- 

Shadow Laughs-INV 3-27- 

Shame-AM 3-15-. 

She Done Him Wrong- 

PAR..2-10-; 
Shriek in the Night. A-ALD 
7-22-: 

Silk Exoress-WA 6-23-3 ! 

Silver Cord-RKO 5-5^ 

Sister to Judas-MAY . . .1-18-3 
S eepless Nights-REM ..7-22-3 

Smoke Lightning— F 5-12-:' 

So This Is Africa-COL. .4-22-: 
Soldiers of the Storm- 

COL. .S-18--J 
Somewhere in Sonora-WA.6-7^ 
Song of the Eagle-PAR. .4-27-2 

Song of Life-TF 3-17-3| 

Song of Songs-PAR 7-22-3 J 

Sous La Lune Du Maroc- 

PRX 1-28-31 

Speed Demon-COL 1-7-3 1 

State Fair-F 1-27-3, 

State Trooper-COL 3-27-3 

Storm at Davbreak-MGM 

7-22-2 ) 
Story of Temple Drake- 

PAR 5-6-3 

Strange Adventure-MOP 2-8-3 

Strange People-CHE 6-17-3 

Strictly Personal-PAR ...3-18-3, 

Study in Scarlet-WW 5-26-3 

Sucker Money-WK 3-1-3 ' 

Sundown Rider-COL 6-9-3 I 

Supernatural-PAR 4-22-3 , 

Sweepings-RKO 3-22-3 

Taming the Jungle-INV. .6-6-3 > 

Taras Triasylo-XX 3-15-3 

Tatra's Zauber-PRX 2-20-3, 

Telegraph Trail-W A 3-29-3 

Terror Abroad-PAR 7-3-33 ' 

Terror Trail-U 2-1 1-3 » 

Theodore Koerner-XX ... 5-10-3 ; 
There Goes the Bride- 

GB.. 3-1-3' 
They Just Had to Get 

Married-U 2-10-3: 

This Is America-BEE. . .6-23-32 
Today We Live-MGM ..4-15-3 

Tombstone Canyon-F 7-3-33 ( 

Tomorrow at Seven-RKO 

7-12-32' 
Tonight Is Ours-PAR . . 1-21-33' 

Topaze-RKO 2-10 33 

Trailing North-MOP 5-17-3: ( 

Traum von Schoenbruhnn 

X X.. 6-3-3:; 

Treason-COL 5-4-31, 

Trick for Trick-F 6-10-33, 

Truth About Africa-ALX .4-19-33 
20.000 Years in Sing Sing 

FN.. 1-11-33 

Una Vida Por Otra-INA 

2-17-33 
Under the Tonto Rim-PAR 

7-19-33- 

Vampire Bat-MAJ 1-10-33 

Via Pony Express-MAJ. .5-4-33' 
Victims of Persecution-POL 

6-17-33 ; 
Warrior's Husband-F ...5-12-33 
West of Singapore-MOP. .4-1-33 

Western Code-COL 1-12 33! 

What, No Beer-MGM. ..2-11-33 i 
What Price Decency?- 

MAJ..3-2-3> 
What Price Innocence-COL 

6-24-33! 
When a Man Rides Alone-FR 

2-1-33 
When Ladies Meet-MGM 

6-24-33 

When Strangers Marry- 

COL. .5-25-33 
Whistling in the Dark-MGM 

1-28-33 

White Sister-MGM 3-20-33 

Wild Horse Mesa-PAR. .. 1-6-33 i 

Wives Beware-REG 5-2-33 1 

Woman Is Stole-COL. .. 6-30-33 
Woman's World-AM ...1-28-33, 
Women Won't Tell-CHE 1-3-33 
Woman Accused-PAR. . .3-11-33 I 
Working Man, The-WA. .4-12-33 
World Gone Mad-MAJ. .4-15-33 I 
Yanko Muzykant-ZBY . .3-13-33 
Young Blood-MOP ...1-18-33 j 
Zapfenstreich Am Rhein- 

JRW.. 2-8-33 I 
Zoo in Budapest-F 4-12-33 I 



i 



Hiday, July 24, 1933 




DAILY 



IAYS, ALLIED PLEDGE 
/YORK PLAN SUPPORT 



(.Continued from Page 1) 

untarily into line regardless of 
hnical questions of jurisdiction 
ler the Recovery Act and by urg- 
-" theaters to make their screens 
liable for dissemination of au- 
rized information concerning the 
ve. 

The emergency employment cam- 
Jgn is to extend from Aug. 1 to 
31, with maximum working 
ars and minimum pay for both 
ite collar workers and others, and 
ers has advised Allied exhibitors 
bough employment conditions in 
aters have no possible relation to 
effect upon interstate commerce, 
I hence there is no power under 
Recovery Act to compel a thea- 
owner to observe the proposed 
ndards of wages and working 
irs, all theaters should take steps 
comply with the President's 
;hes for the following reasons: 
^irst — As a matter of patriotism 
'jit is obvious that the depression 
')not be lifted without the united 
1 unstinted efforts of all business 
;n under the leadership of Presi- 
Ijt Roosevelt. 

'Second — As a matter of self-pres- 
ation since the publicity and 
ypaganda to be released will con- 
fute a thinly-veiled blacklisting of 
employers who do not get in step 
h the program. 

[Tie President has, in effect, di- 
ed all workers into two classes, 
, white collar workers and me* 
mical workers. The first category 
ludes ticket sellers, doormen. 
iers, bookers, elevator conductors 
L, and managers receiving $35 a 
gk or under. Whether operators, 
gehands and electricians are "ser- 
e employees" under the first cate- 
y or "mechanical workers" undei 
second is not clear and Allied 
:js asked for a ruling on this, al- 
ugh it is not important as em- 
f j jyees of the latter class already 
ri'eive pay over the minimum and 
v rk hours equivalent to or under 
'.' maximum in most localities. 
Working hours for the white col- 
i ' class must not be more than 40 
r irs in any one week; mechanical 
■tes: Not more than 35 hours a 
>ak, except that they may work 40 
nfcrs for six weeks within the pe- 
iid, but not more than eight hours 
i'any one day. 

Che foregoing applies to all es- 
f'lishments employing two or more 
I .'sons, except, that it does not 
i ply to establishments employing 
; more than two persons in towns 
cless than 2,500. Other exceptions 



. 



. 



Say Films Deter Crime 

| Charlotte — North Carolina prisoners 
say motion pictures have been a deter- 
ment rather than an encouragement to 
icrime. "The Prison News." official 
(publication in the North Carolina State 
penitentiary, recently questioned the 
prisoners on this point and nearly all 
(votes were cast for motion pictures as 
iflan aid in fighting crime. 



Good Pictures and Good Entertainment 

By DENNIS R. SMITH 
Amusement Editor, "Canton Repository," Canton, 0. 



/"^ERTAINLY the main purpose of a picture is to give entertainment 

and if it accomplishes this it has accomplished its aim. To deserve 
commendation and support, however, it must provide this entertainment 
without violating the rules of decency, without bringing needless offense 
to anyone of normal tastes and without going into vulgarity or immor- 
ality for the mere sensational appeal which such material is supposed 
to have. 

Objectionable matter sometimes appears in unexpected places. Last 
week Canton saw one of the Walt Disney "Silly Symphonies" which top 
the whole field of cartoon artistry but it burlesqued the Biblical story of 
Noah and the flood so broadly that it contained an affront to persons who 
consider such things above travesty. 

Good pictures and good entertainment are not necessarily synonymous. 
"Reunion in Vienna" and "Strange Interlude" were splendid pictures, 
brilliantly written and expertly played but they were not especially good 
entertainment because the subject material is not of the kind which 
holds general appeal. In this regard the screen differs radically from 
the stage which directs its appeal to a select class while the pictures must 
draw from the great mass with its interesting cross section of divergent 
tastes. 

Some pictures are fortunate enough to achieve greatness both in 
their intrinsic worth and in their entertainment. "State Fair," "Smilin' 
Through," "Cynara," and "The Working Man" reach this distinction. 

"Me and My Gal," "Parole Girl," "No More Orchids" and "Private 
Jones" were not great pictures but they were good entertainment and 
therefore to be commended. 

The problem of producing a picture which will be equally pleasing 
to the sophisticates of the big cities and the family trade of the outlying 
towns has always been one of the things to make film executives turn gray 
prematurely. 

The attitude of reviewers in the key centers has been especially try- 
ing to the industry. Frequently they have gone into raves over films 
which held practically no hope of success for general showing while 
snubbing the clean and human films which bring the greatest response 
from the general public. 

It is this department's policy to value films almost entirely on their 
quality as entertainment, holding to the opinion that patrons are not 
greatly concerned in the psychological problems involved excepting as 
they affect the dramatic development of the story. 

On this basis "Zoo in Budapest" should rate as high as the same 
producers' "Cavalcade," "Evenings For Sale" has more general appeal 
than "A Farewell to Arms" and "Fast Life" will give real entertainment 
to more people than "Strange Interlude." 

When it comes time to nominate the year's best films other measures 
must be employed in making the valuations for "Cavalcade," "Farewell" 
■and "Strange Interlude" are incomparably the better pictures from every 
technical point of view but in attempting to give readers a current impres- 
sion as to how well they will be entertained, the smaller and less impor- 
tant pictures deserve at least equal rating for, in the final summation 
they have accomplished their purpose of bringing wholesome and pleasant 
amusement which, after all, is the reason why pictures are born. 



do not affect theaters and, therefore, 
need not be mentioned. 

Children under 16 may not be em- 
ployed, except that children between 
16 and 14 may be employed (but 
not in mechanical or manufacturing 
industries) for three hours a day 
between 7 A. M. and 7 P. M., pro- 
vided it does not interfere with 
school. 

In the matter of wages, white col- 
lar class, minimum pay is to be $15 
a week in cities over 500,000 or in 
immediate trade areas; $14.50 in 
cities between 250,000 and 500,000 or 
i.t.a.; $14.00 in cities between 2,500 
and 250,000 and i.t.a.; and in towns 
of less than 2,500 an increase in 
wages of not less than 20 per cent 
provided that this shall not require a 
wage in excess of $12 per week. 

Mechanical class: Minimum pay 
40 cents per hour unless the hourly 
rate for the same class of work on 
July 15, 1929, was less than 40 cents, 



in which case the rate shall be not 
less than the hourly rate on that 
date, but in no event less than 30 
cents per hour. 

Wages now paid in excess of such 
minima are not to be reduced. 

Theater owners will receive from 
the postman or other functionary a 
form of agreement between them- 
selves and the President which they 
will be expected to sign, pledging 
themselves to the foregoing pro- 
gram of wages and hours and other 
matters which need not be mentioned 
here. 

The signing of these agreements 
will entitle the theater owners to 
obtain from their postmasters signs, 
posters, badges (believe it or not!) 
attesting that they are cooperating 
in the emergency campaign. 

The theater owner who does not 
equip himself with these trappings 
may find himself in a worse posi- 
tion than the merchant with a Ger- 
man name during the war. 



Plan Longer Shorts 

As Second Feature 

(Continued from Page 1) 

films. These will be sold in block. 
The first, a dog and bear story titled 
"Sandy," is ready. The second, 
"The Jewels of Baboulah," and the 
third. "Sin Ship," are now being 
completed. 




DIRECTION: S. GREGORY TAYLOR 

These Celebrated Film Stars 
Make 

THE ST. MORITZ 

On-the-Park 
Their New York Home 



Greta Garbo 
Joan Blondell 
Joan Crawford 
Estelle Taylor 
Racquel Torres 
Gilda Gray 
Judith Anderson 
Gloria Stewart 
Alice White 
Lil Dagover 
Edith Fitzgerald 
Edith Roake 
Philip Cook 
Phillips Holmes 
George Givot 
Monroe Owsley 
Nancy Carroll 
Gloria Swanson 
Ruth Roland 
Laura La Plante 
Lita Grey Chaplin 
Helen Twelvetrees 
June Clyde 
Billie Dove 



James Klrkwood 
Walter Slezak 
Douglas Montgomery 
Pat O'Brien 
Philip Lord 
Lotti Loder 
Cliff Hall 
Lanny Ross 
Maurice Chevalier 
Fifi D'Orsay 
Blanche Sweet 
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. 
Marion Marsh 
Borah Minnevitch 
Georges Carpentier 
Alexander Kirkland 
J. C. Flippen 
Richard Cromwell 
Chester Hale 
Lawrence Gray 
Jose Rubin 
Owen Moore 
Benny Rubin 
Ben Bard 



A WIRE WILL EFFECT A RESERVATION AND 

YOU WILL BE MET AT THE TRAIN ON YOUR 

ARRIVAL IN NEW YORK. 




THE 



"<%&H 



DAILV 



Monday, July 24, 



NEW FOX STOCK ISSUE 
APPROVED BY HOLDERS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

shares, which with the 16,500 shares 
of Class "B" common stock will 
make a total of 2,816,650 shares, all 
of no par value. 

The action includes approval for 
subscription to the new stock at 
$18.90 a share on the basis of five 
shares of the new Class "A" for each 
share of such outstanding "A" 
and/or "B" stock held by each stock- 
holder, with the unsubscribed shares 
to be taken up by underwriters of 
the company's debentures and bank 
loans at $18.90 a share in considera- 
tion of their indebtedness. 

Commenting on the successful 
conclusion of the reorganization 
plan, President Sidney R. Kent said: 
"With our financial decks cleared 
we are now in a position to develop 
the Fox Film Corp. along construe-* 
tive lines that will prove a benefit 
to all phases of the industry. We 
shall probably make a statement in 
greater detail this week." 



324 Feature Releases in 
First Six Months of 1933 

(Continued from Page 1) 

the foreign market, against 60 in 
1932. 

Inasmuch as many production pro- 
grams have been speeded up in the 
last several weeks after a period of 
lagging incident to the banking sit- 
uation, output for the second half 
of the year is expected to show 
a much greater increase over 1932. 



Nine Exchanges in Britain 
Being Opened by Columbia 

(Continued from Paae 1) 
plans here. Executives of the new 
Columbia distributing organization 
here are Joseph Friedman, manag- 
ing director; Max Thorpe, sales 
manager; Angus N. Trimmer, assis- 
tant to Friedman, and George Ayre, 
■publicity director. In the matter of 
production, Cohn said the companv 
would first concentrate on one film 
for international release, and if it 
proves satisfactory a studio may be 
acquired. 



MONOGRAM FILM FOR ROXY 

"The Phantom Broadcast," Mono- 
gram melodrama of radio, starring 
Ralph Forbes and Vivienne Osborne, 
opens Friday at the original Roxy. 




24 talkies were made in Bengal last 
year, an increase of 100 per cent over 
the year before. 



A LITTLE from "LOTS 



►// 



By RALPH WILK 



HOLLYWOOD 
JOHN MILJAN, who was the villain 
J in Maurice Chevalier's initial 
talkie, "Innocents of Paris," is play- 
ing an important role in Chevalier's 
current picture, "The Way to Love." 

Guy Kendall, who was a dancing 
partner of the Dolly Sisters and 
who staged production for Flo Zieg- 
feld, C. B. Dillingham, Comstock and 
Gest and the Shuberts, directed the 
dance numbers in "Waffles," which 
has just been completed for Helen 
Mitchell, Ltd. Kendall staged sev- 
eral extravagances in Europe. 

Warren Duff, who wrote several 
screen plays for KBS and M-G-M, 
has joined Edward Small's scenario 
staff on a short term contract. 



David Manners has joined the cast 
of "The Torch Singer," which stars 
Claudette Colbert. The Paramount 
picture is being directed by George 
Somnes and Alexander Hall. 



An unusual contract is held by 
Hugh Herbert, now with Warner 
Bros, as a featured player. As soon 
as his work is completed on the set, 
Herbert, with his makeup still on, 
reports to his office, where he is 
writing for the Warners. He is often 
called in to give ideas, as his expe- 



rience includes directing, as well as 
acting. "The Bureau of Missing 
Persons" is his second picture under 
the new contract. 

* * * 

Columbia gives Donald Cook the 
male lead with Nancy Carroll in 
"Goin' to Town," while Victor Jory 
goes into "Fury of the Jungle." 

* * * 

Edward H. Griffith, much in de- 
mand for directorial assignments 
since he started free-lancing, has 
turned down six different stories — 
which he says he couldn't have done 
if under contract. 

* * * 

Margaret Lindsay has been given 
one of the most important roles in 
Warners' "The Varsity Coach." 

Robert Benchley's option has been 
taken up by RKO. 

* # * 

Reversing the order of the bride's 
parents giving the wedding couple a 
handsome gift, Mr. and Mrs. Benn 
W. Levy (Constance Cummings) re- 
cently married in London, bestowed 
upon Mrs. Kate Cummings, mother 
of Constance, a trip all over Europe 
as a wedding present from them. 
She is now in Vienna, having visited 
Paris and Berlin, and will travel for 
two months before returning to 
Hollywood. 



SHORT SUBJECT REVIEWS 



"The Old Man of the Mountain" 

with Cab Calloway's Orchestra 

Paramount 6 Mins. 

Good Betty Boop Cartoon 

To the tune of Cab Calloway's 
music and vocalizing, this Max 
Fleischer animated unreels some 
amusing antics having to do with 
the kidnaping of Betty Boop by the 
Old Man of the Mountain and her 
rescue by the forest animals. A 
nicely concocted subject of its kind, 
the Calloway musical background be- 
ing distinctive and the cartoon stuff 
amusing. 



"Knockout Kisses" 

Paramount 18 mins. 

Amusing Slapstick 

A Mack Sennett comedy well 
punctuated with rough and tumble 
laughs. Plot concerns a ring bat- 
tle in which a couple of twins do 
a relay in fighting a tough oppo- 
nent, who isn't wise to the fact that 
a different scrapper is coming at 
him in alternate rounds. A femin- 
ine manager adds another quirk to 
the proceedings. 



"Main Streets" 

(E. M. Newman Adventure) 

Vitaphone 10 mins. 

Interesting 

As the title implies, this E. M. 
Newman short presents a collection 
of main streets in various parts of 
the world, principally the colorful 
Orient. Some of the material has 
been seen before, but the compila- 
tion has an angle of interest. 



First Six Releases Set 
In New Educat'l Lineup 

(Continued from Page 1) 

and Jabs," Mermaid comedy starring 
Harry Langdon, and "Dora's Dunk- 
ing Doughnuts," with Andy Clyde. 
The single-reelers include a Terry- 
Toon cartoon, "As a Dog Thinks," 
and "Battle for Life." Meanwhile 
story preparations and casting are 
under way on the first Tom Howard 
two-reeler and on the first of the 
"Frolics of Youth," "Song Hit 
Stories" and "Baby Burlesk" series. 






AD FILM PRODUCER! 
WORKING ON A C( 

(Continued from Page 1) 

ence included representatives of 
vertising Film Associates, Ca; 
Films, Castle Films, Films of 
merce, William J. Ganz, Get 
Business Films, J. Alexander 
gett Co., Pathescope Co. of Ame 
RCA-Photophone, Seiden Films 
Trade Pictures. Others who 
not be present expressed symp 
for the movement. 

Various suggestions were 
for the elimination of unfair 
practices, and proposals for br 
ening the scope and improving 
standard of business films were f| 
ly discussed. 

A steering committee to pre] 
initial plans for a code was 1 
pointed, consisting of William ' 
Lough, E. W. Castle, J. Alexar 
Leggett and the temporary offic 
A committee on organization 
by-laws was appointed, consistin 
Francis Lawton, Jr., W. G. Nier, 
Don Carlos Ellis and the tempoi 
officers. 

William J. Ganz was elected t 
porary chairman of the meeting, 
Clinton F. Ivins of the Pathesc 
Co. of America was elected ten 
rary secretary. The latter 
instructed to get in touch \ 
other non-theatrical film prodw 
throughout the country. 



Warners to Increase 
National Advert'g 4cJ 

(Continued from Page 1) 

over last year's expenditures, i 
Charles Einfeld, chief of adverl 
ing-publicity operations, has two I 
tional exploitation stunts of 
"42nd Street" magnitude which| 
says he will spring at the pr« 
time. Eight Warner exploitatl 
men are at present cooperating wj 
exhibitors playing the conipaiij 
product. 



MAY BE NEW VA. CENSOU 
Richmond — Thomas Lomax Ht'l 
er, newspaperman and columnist!' 
prominently mentioned as possi 1 
successor to Richard C. L. Monc; : 
as Virginia censor. Moncure is c 
didate for collector of internal 
enue. 




SHOW- 
MAN'S 

REMINDER 

Inspect seats regularly. 




The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Now Fifteen Years Old 



w yccr, TtESCAy, jlily 2<s, 1933 



.5 CENTS 



'chenck Wires President Supporting Work Code 

ENERALlTUDIO STRIKTCALLED BY I.TT. S. E. 



ilm Intakes Covering RKO Production Needs— Depinet 



— 

'it «« 



Mr. Kent 

. . who does things 

By JACK ALICOATE— 



JT of a week bristling with industry 
lews there is drama and unusual sig- 
nce back of the complete financial 
anization of Fox. When the plan of 



lent was adopted by stockholders on 
f and Saturday last the great Fox 

2iny was again placed in a command- 
osition in the field. Once again an 
jnding constructive industry achieve- 
can be credited to the square-shoot- 
id industrious Mr. Kent. Writing down 
I forty million, adding new confidence 
imposing list of thousands of stock- 
rs, and placing Fox once more on firm 
:ial ground, with a minimum of dis- 
lg voices, was a man-sized job. Espe- 
I so in view of the great amount of 
red litigation that had gone before. 
1 Sidney Kent entered Fox there were 
who shook their heads and said it 
not be done. So Sidney Kent went 
and did it 

ANGE as it may seem, no amount of 

"''odes, conferences or co-operation will 

I] a single thing to this great industry 

ii s the exhibitor is a success. The ex- 

>"b ir can only be a success if he makes 

"by. In other words, for this industry 

a jntinue, the theater owner must take 

I ire at the box-office than he pays out 

n tpenses and taxes. And the latter, 

» , is most important. The industry is 

3\My carrying more than its share of 

K but is bravely carrying on. Contrary 

neral impression this business is threat- 

ii with additional taxation this year in 

I states. This should not, and must 

a.be. Another straw may break the 

:»fl's back. ~ 

AID while on the subject of general 
' economics, it is essential that admis- 
I prices, following the Washington 
1 y, be raised all along the line. It was 
•^wholesale compatitive cutting of ad- 
•nfipn prices, during the low ebb of the 
■ssion, that almost wrecked the indus- 
try It is quality, and not price, that will 
bril them into the theaters from now on. 
A,; mce through the production programs 
of ! e major outfits assures a steady flow 
of ijass pictures for fall and winter. Raise 
pri s now. 

■r 



Says Company is in Best 

Position Since First 

of the Year 

RKO is now in a better position 
financially and also in regard to ac- 
tual productions ready and in work, 
than it has been since the first of 
the year, Ned E. Depinet stated to 
Film Daily yesterday. He claimed 
that film grosses have been suffi- 
cient to provide for all the needs of 
the production department for mak- 
ing the rest of the 1932-33 schedule 

{Continued on Page 7) 



AMERICAN FILMS HIT 
BY NEW FRENCH QUOTA 



Paris — Only five Paris houses are 
permitted to show original versions 
of Hollywood talkies under a new 
quota law just put into effect to run 
until next July, unless the Ministry 
of the Interior decides otherwise. 
Dubbed films are limited to 140. 
American distributors supplied about 
{Continued on Page 7) 

Romberg and Harbach 
Are Signed by Fox Film 

Sigmund Romberg, composer of 
numerous operetta successes, and 
Otto Harbach, equally prominent as 
a librettist and playwright, have 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Fox Plans 4 in Germany 

Berlin (Special Cable to THE 
FILM DAILY)— Plans for the pro- 
duction of four German pictures 
were announced yesterday by Fox. 



RAISE PAY, CUT HOURS 
FOR S.O.S. PERSONNEL 



In support of President Roose- 
velt's recovery campaign, the S. 0. 
S. Corporation, equipment manufac- 
turers and distributors, yesterday an- 
nounced a blanket increase of 10 per 
cent in salaries, with reduced work- 
ing hours, effective July 31. In ad- 
dition, S.O.S. had already raised 
wages in some departments and also 

{Continued cm Page 7) 

Cartoon Comedy Feature 
Contemplated by Disney 

Theme songs, color, stories devel- 
oped from Greek myths and an art 
school for animators were discussed 
by Walt Disney in an interview yes- 
terday at the United Artists offices. 
Disney has plans worked out for a 
feature-length cartoon picture, but 
has been unable to find response 
from United Artists executives, he 
said. However, the creator of 
Mickey Mouse claims that the idea 
has merit and he will continue to 
{Continued on Page 8) 



United Artists, 20th Century 
To Support Gov't's Work Plan 



Harding, Bancroft Films 
Set by Twentieth Century 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Darryl Zanuck has 
concluded arrangements for borrow- 
ing Ann Harding from RKO to star 
in "Gallant Lady," which Gregory 
La Cava will direct as a Twentieth 
Century production for United Ar- 
(Continued on Page 7) 



By WILLIAM SILBERBERG 
FILM DAILY Staff Correspondent 

Washington — Approval and ac- 
ceptance of the President's blanket 
code specifying maximum hours of 
work and minimum wages was con- 
tained in wires received at the 
White House yesterday from Jos- 
eph M. Schenck, of United Artists, 
and Twentieth Century Productions. 
Pledges of support previously had 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Walkout of Coast Sound 

Men May Extend 

to Theaters 

By RALPH WILK 
West Coast Mgr., THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Charging producers 
had broken the basic agreement with 
the unions by employing non-union 
men for sound work, Richard J. 
Green, coast representative of the 
I.A.T.S.E., called a general strike 
against major studios effective at 
midnight last night. Cameramen, 
projectionists in studios, film editors, 
laboratory workers and mechanics 

(Continued on Page 8) 

EDDIE BONNS HEADS 
T SHORTS SALES 

Eddie Bonns, formerly Warner 
theater executive and recently spe- 
cial sales representative for Fox, has 
been appointed Universal short sub- 
ject sales manager by James R. 
Grainger, general sales manager. 
Bonns, who left Fox about seven 
months ago, accompanied Grainger 
on his recent tour of the country 
and also his European trip. The 

(Continued oh Page 8) 



Union Officials Held 

In Seattle Bombings 

Seattle — Following eight weeks of 
secret investigation ordered by May- 
or Dore, the president and busi- 
ness agent of the local operators' 
union are among five arrested in a 
roundup of persons wanted for ques- 
tioning about four recent theater 
bombings here and one in Spokane. 



Pals 

Freddie Myers of RKO caught a 
stranger going through his office desk 
one day last week. The mug happened 
to be a racetrack bookmaker. At the 
court hearing, Myers was asked what 
his business was, and he replied, "I'm 
a film booker." Whereupon the prisoner 
exclaimed, "Oh, so you're a bookmaker 
too!" 




-. ■&&* 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 25, H 

■■■■■■im 



VoL IXIII, No. 20 Tubs., July 25, 1933 Prici 5 Cents 
JOHN W. ALICOATE : : 



Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
it 1650 Broadway, New York, N \., 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk, Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
and General Manager; Arthur W. Eddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at N«w York, 
N Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year) 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months. $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, 1-650 Broadway, New York, N. Y., 
Phone, Circle 7-4736, 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London- 
Ernest W. Fredraan, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Pans 
—P. A. Harle, La Cinematographie Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 

High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Seat 4% 4y 4 4l/ 4 + % 

Columbia Picts. vrc. 19 18 19+1 

Con. Fm. Ind 43/ 8 3% 4'/ 4 + Vz 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. . 9% 85/ 8 9 + V 4 

East. Kodak 78 '/ 4 73 y 2 78 V 4 +10y 4 

Fox Fm. "A" iVi 3i/ 4 3y 4 + V 4 

Loew's, Inc 243/ 8 22 243/ 8 + 3'/ 8 

do pfd ...72 72 72 +2 

Paramount ctfs T3/ 4 15/ 8 13^ + l/ 4 

Pathe Exch 1% 1% 1% + Vs 

do "A" 6'/2 6 63/ 8 + 7/ 8 

RKO 33/ 8 3 3l/ 2 + l 

Warner Bros 53,4 5 5 3 A + 3 A 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 

Columbia Pets. Vrc. 21 21 21+1 

Gen. Th. Eq. pfd... 9-16 9-16 9-16— Vs 

Technicolor 8y 4 8Vs 8l/ 4 + 1 

Trans-Lux 23 /8 2i/ 4 2'/ 4 + Vs 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 6 5'/ 2 5% + 5 /s 

Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40 ctfs. 5 5 5 

Keith A-0 6s46 ... 53 52 53 

Loew 6s 41ww 77 77 77+1 

Paramount 6s47 ... 27 26 27 +2 

Par. By. 5y 2 s51 35Vi 35 35 + I 1 /. 

Par. 5y 2 s50 28 25y 8 28 + iy 8 

Par. 5'/ 2 s50 ctfs 28 28 28 + 5'/ 2 

Warner's 6s39 32y 4 30'/ 4 32'/ 8 + 2'/ 8 

N. Y. PRODUCE EXCHANGE 

Para. Publix 1% 1 3 /8 1% + % 



Levy Sees Duals Fading 

Lessening of economic stringency 
coupled with a constant improvement 
in product will gradually bring about 
the elimination of double-featuring, 
Jules Levy stated to FILM DAILY yes- 
terday. "Dual bills resulted more from 
poor pictures than from the depression," 
said Levy. "A diversified program, 
rather than a continuance of sex pic- 
tures is necessary for better response 
from the public." 



Alexander Leftwich 

Joins Magma Pictures 

Alexander Leftwich, formerly a 
leading Broadway director and late- 
ly active in Hollywood, has joined 
Magma Pictures in New York and 
starts tomorrow on the direction of 
"That's the Captain," musical pro- 
duction. Among those in the cast 
are Arthur Tracy (The Street Sing- 
er), Baby Rose Marie, Freddie 
Rich's Orchestra, Ray Knight and 
the Cukoos, Sisters of the Skillet 
and others. Burnet Hershey, form- 
er Vitaphone staff writer, is supply- 
ing material for the picture, while 
Monroe Shaff, one time assistant 
production chief at Vitaphone, is 
supervising. 



Berk Denies Closing 

Of Atlas Sound Studio 

Likelihood of the Atlas Sound Re- 
cording Studios in Long Island City 
being closed by the authorities due 
to certain violations of the fire code 
was denied yesterday by Ben Berk, 
general manager of the studios. He 
said the necessary alterations would 
be made and the plant would con- 
tinue in operation. 



MOURN W. C. HUBBARD 

A message of sympathy has been 
sent by Dr. Alfred N. Goldsmith, 
president of the S.M.P.E., to Mrs. 
W. C. Hubbard, widow of one of the 
Society's most ardent supporters, 
who died last week at his home in 
Plainfield, N. J. Hubbard, who was 
connected with General Electric, was 
at one time treasurer and member 
of the board of governors of the 
S. M. P. E. 



MONARCH FOREIGN DEALS 

Deals have been closed with Freu- 
ler Film Associates, for distribu- 
tion of a Tom Tyler Western, "The 
Forty-Niners," for Scandinavian 
countries through Ernest Mattsson; 
also for distribution of "The Sav- 
age Girl," throughout Siam, by the 
United Cinema Company of Bang- 
kok. Negotiations were conducted 
by Captain Harold Auten. 



LEE OCHS BOOKS "JO-LO" 

The new game called "Jo-Lo" will 
be given its premiere showing and 
tryout at Lee Ochs' Ogden Theater 
on July 27, at 9 p. m. "Jo-Lo," the 
first of a series of 13 one-reel sub- 
jects, is a game which the audience 
plays with the screen. No assistance 
of a Master of Ceremonies is neces- 
sary. 



NUDIST FILM WINS 

Chicago — As a result of an in- 
junction granted by the Superior 
Court against police interferences 
with the showing of "This Nude 
World" at the Castle, the daily ar- 
rest of Manager C. E. Beck has 
ended. 



B. & K. AFTER CLEVE. HIPP 

Cleveland — Reports persist that 
Balaban & Katz are negotiating for 
the Hippodrome, former RKO house 
now operated independently. 



Florida Studio Finishes 
"Playthings of Desire" 

St. Petersburg, Fla. — With no 
retakes necessary for "Playthings 
of Desire" which was completed 
Tuesday, Director George Melford 
released the cast Thursday. 

Josephine Dunn left for Philadel- 
phia, where her husband, Eugene J. 
Lewis, is a lawyer. 

Linda Watkins entrained for New 
York. 

Jess Cavin left by auto Friday for 
Hollywood to bring his family to 
Florida, where they will establish a 
residence. 

Molly O'Day and James Kirkwood 
will remain here for roles in "Hired 
Wife," to be directed by Melford 
starting this week. 

Work on the new Buster Keaton 
studio is progressing rapidly and 
will be ready about Aug. 1. 



GOLDSTEIN CLOSES N. E. DEAL 

E. H. (Manny) Goldstein an- 
nounces the signing of a contract 
with William Shapiro, president of 
Franklin Productions, Boston for 
distribution rights to series of B. & 
D. Productions covering the New 
England territory. The first of the 
series, "The Blarney Kiss," will 
open in Providence early in August. 



EUGENE HEMMINGS DEAD 

Milwaukee — Eugene Hemmings, 
42, operator of the Atlas and form- 
er operator of the Violet, neighbor- 
hood houses, died of a heart attack 
last week. He had been in the the- 
ater and film business here for 20 
years and is survived by his wife, a 
son, his parents and a brother. 



SCALE UP FOR "DIGGERS" 

Omaha — The World Theater, 
which has been playing two features 
regularly at 35 cents admission, 
jacked up its prices to 45 cents and 
went on a single picture standard 
when "Gold Diggers of 1933" moved 
in following a week at the Para- 
mount. 



PHIL HARRIS ORCH. FOR N. Y. 

Phil Harris, California maestro 
and singer who appears in RKO's 
musical, "Melody Cruise," will bring 
his orchestra to New York on July 
31 for an engagement at the Penn- 
sylvania Roof. 



O'SULLIVAN WITH CIRCUS 

Columbus — Burns O'Sullivan, for 
many years identified with Ohio the- 
aters, has been named superinten- 
dent of the Walter L. Main Circus, 
now touring the east. 



BOOKED FOR STRAND 

"She Had To Say Yes," First Na- 
tional picture starring Loretta 
Young, will have its New York pre- 
miere at the Strand on Thursday. 



"THE REBEL" FOR RIVOLI 

Universal's "The Rebel," with 
Vilma Banky, Victor Varconi and 
Luis Trenker, opens tomorrow at the 
Rivoli. 



.oming a 



nd G 



oing 



WALT DISNEY leaves New York today 
airplane for the coast. 

VERA ALLEN, who recently finished » 
with Will Rogers in Fox's "Doctor Bull, 
in New York for a vacation. 

PHILIPPE DE LACY and his foster mot 
Edyth de Lacy, are en route East from Ho 
wood by automobile via Canada and 
World's Fair. Philippe plans to appea 
Broadway stage productions this Winter. 



Warner Studios Finish 3 
Five Others Go in Woi 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAI 
Hollywood — Three pictures \rc 
completed at the Warner studios h 
week and five others went into wo - ' 
The finished films include "I Lovl 
a Woman," with Edward G. Rob 
son and Kay Francis; "Bureau 
Missing Persons," with Bette Dav 
Pat O'Brien and Lewis Stone, a 
"Wild Boys of the Road," wi' 
Frankie Darro. Those just plac' 
in work are "Female," with Rui 
Chatterton and George Brent; "TJ 
World Changes," with Paul Mut" 
"Ever in My Heart," with Barba 
Stanwyck; "Kennel Murder Ca»j 
with William Powell and Mary A' 
tor, and "House on 56th StreeM 
with Kay Francis. 

Work on the third Warner musicj 
special, "Footlight Parade," also ] 
expected to be finished this week.| 

PARTY FOR FILM CAST ' 
Grover Lee, who recently coi 
pleted the direction of "Get Th. 
Venus!", a Starmark production f 
Regent Pictures release, is giving' 
press party for Ernest Truex, To, 
Howard and other members of I 
cast in the South Room of the Hot 
Warwick tomorrow, from 4 to 
o'clock. 



DISCUSS ADMISSION BOOST 

Akron, O. — Akron neighborho» 
theater owners and operators a 
interested in proposals to increaj 
admission prices. Meetings of ma; 
agers and owners are now bene 
held, with discussions of plans 
increase the scale according 
house classification. 



SPONSOR INDUSTRIAL SHOW 

Canton, O. — Palace theater * 
sponsor a four-day industrial e: 
position starting Wednesday, 
large tent will be erected alongsio 
the theater, where industrial at 
commercial exhibits will be presem 
ed. 



Equity Protests Nazi Ban 

A protest against the action of the 
Hitler regime in barring Jews from 
the German stage has been forwarded 
by Frank Gillmore on behalf of the 
Council of the Actors' Equity Ass'n 
to the headquarters of the International 
Union in Vienna. The Nazis also havff 
barred Jewish actors in films, with a 
Pola Negri picture being banned. 



.Villiam 

: ROWLAND 



I 



Monte 

BRICE 



\ appreciation for the splendid co- 
eration given us in producing our 
t musical feature — 



^oot^ 1 



an 



i 






pB^ 6 * 



E EXTEND OUR SINCERE THANKS TO- 

)BBY CONNOLLY, STANLEY BERGERMAN, 
KRL FREUND, SID HERZIG, Y. P. HARBURG, 
\Y GORNEY, ARTHUR JARRETT, Sr., ROBERT 
IODY, THE CAST, TECHNICAL CREW and to 

others who helped make 

MOONLIGHT a„d PRETZELS 

N OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION 

• 

William Rowland and Monte Brice Production . . . 
Piduction Numbers and Ideas by Bobby Connolly . . . 
Siry by Monte Brice, Sig Herzig and Arthur Jarrett 

. Music Supervision by Jay Gorney . . . Most of the 
sigs and lyrics by Y. P. Harburg and Jay Gorney . . . 

ditional songs by Herman Hupfeld, Al Siegel, Sammy 

jn . . . Directed by Monte Brice and Karl Freund . . . 




UNIVERSAL 




RELEASE 



THE 



•c@ti 



DAILY 



Tuesday, July 25, lj 




THE 



iruesday, July 25, 1933 



DAILY 




SIG HERZIG 

Screen Play 

"MOONLIGHT 
and PRETZELS" 




IIO Years of Service 

to the Motion Picture Industry 

and . . 
the Legitimate Theatre 



e^y© 



Costumers for: 

Special Attractions 
Cochran & Krimsky 
Universal, Paramount 
Warner Bros., Fox 



Q^yo) 



Eaves Costume Co., Inc. 

Eaves Building 
151 WEST 46th ST., NEW YORK BRyant 9-7212 



THE LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED SERVICE SOUND STUDIOS EAST OF HOLLYWOOD" 



€ 



Every facility available 
for the producer, with 
Highly-Trained person- 
nel. 




€ 



The Logical place to 
make theatrical, com- 
mercial, industrial, edu- 
cational subjects. 



The studio pictured above formerly operated by Paramount is located in Astoria, L. I., 15 minutes from Times Square, 
consists of five stages, the main stage being 217 feet by 120 feet. Stages, projection rooms, cutting rooms, dressing 
rooms, etc., are equipped to the highest degree for productions, regardless of their size. Productions recently completed 
at the above plant include "Moonlight and Pretzels" and "The Emperor Jones." 






Western Electric Im- 
proved Wide Range, 
noiseless recording and 
re-recording. 




€ 



This studio is located in the Bronx, New York, consists of two stages, the main stage measuring 98 by 72 feet in size, 
with same modern facilities available as offered in the Astoria plant. Recent productions completed at the above studio 
include "Midnight," series of Lambs' Club shorts. Tom Howard shorts, and a series of Two-reel Musicals for Universal 
release. 

Eastern Service Studios, Inc. 



MAIN OFFICES 



Cutting Rooms, Projec- 
tion R o om s , Ample 
Vault Space. 



€) 



FISK BLDG., BROADWAY at 57th STREET, N. Y. C. 



Telephone COIumbus 6-6074 



. 



«day, July 25, 1933 




DAILY 



IERICAN FILMS HIT 
NEW FRENCH QUOTA 

(Continued from Page 1) 

) ubbed pictures last year but 
p been looking forward to great- 
■ mand for such films. They plan 
j )test to the Government on the 
wad that they cannot continue in 
isiess here under such restric- 
■k Independent exhibitors al- 
■k have complained to Premier 
'a iier that they will suffer a 
u age of product. 



st Pay, Cut Hours 

r or Personnel of S. 0. S. 

(Continued from Page 1) 

1 to its force in the last few 
hs. The company, organized 
; five years ago, has built up a 
nail order supply business in 
novie industry. It maintains 
r actories and an export division 
aw York. 



II UIT ADDS MEMPHIS HOUSE 

I mphis— G. C. S. Theater Cir- 
ri )f Chicago has acquired the Or- 
n< m on a 15-year lease and will 
I sn it about Sept. 1. Mort D. 
I )erg, Aaron Carushon and Leo 
. )lomon are the head of the cir- 
i which is understood to have 
3C ; 40 houses. 



DIA SPEAKS" IN SPANISH 

Spanish dialogue version of 
sr Futter's "India Speaks" has 
completed for world-wide re- 
by RKO. 



Y LEE TAKES PARTNER 

J. Ross, for 14 years associated 

Ivy Lee, leading public rela- 

counsel handling the Rocke- 

; interests among others, has 

tie a partner with Lee, the firm 

being changed to Ivy Lee and 

Ross. 



Tabloid Reviews of 

OREIGN FILMS 



E GROSSE ATTRAKTION" ("The Big 
tion"), German musical romance, with 
4 titles. Produced by Tobis-Tauber- 
a. Directed by Max Reichman. With 
d Tauber, Marianne Winkelstern, 
Lyon, Siegfried Arno, Teddy Bill, 
mted by Bavaria Film Co. 
<stage story, giving Richard Tauber 
of vocal opportunities in the role of 
br and band leader. Romance is pro- 
by a girl dancer who succeeds not 
i her stage ambitions but in winning 
.■ro's love. 



>RN ANEW," Soviet silent production 
jstokkino. Directed by E. Gryaznof. 

by "a cultural shock brigade" of the 
ry Workers' Club. Distributed by 
jo. 
y of a young ruralite who goes to the 

r vengeance but is converted into a 

worker under the Soviet industrial- 
and cultural program. The picture 
naturally acted and has a human 

t angle. 



long™ 



f4aafriEfiaaaw 






PHIL M DALY 



• • • IT WILL be interesting to watch the developments 
in the Warners' experiment of holding their Round Table Con- 
ferences in lieu of the usual annual sales conventions 

these will take place at New York, Chicago and Toronto 

Andy Smith will outline the product and sales policies at the 
New York and Toronto meets, and Grad Sears will have charge 
of the Chicago meeting the salesmen will not attend 

only the district and branch managers Andy and 

Grad will then go into private huddles with each individual man- 
ager, covering the special problems that each man must face 

in the coming selling season 

* * # # 

• • • LATER ON the salesmen will be contacted by 

Messrs. Sears and Smith in their own branches not only 

the salesmen, but every member of the branch staffs will be in 

on these local sales conferences Warners feel that the 

bookers and the boys in the poster rooms are a part of the 
sales force they contact the exhibitors, and their opin- 
ions are very much worth while whatever other results 

may be achieved by the new policy, there will be a definite 
economy in the saving of time and expense in pulling the sales- 
men in from their territories to attend the sales conventions as 
in the past 

'•$ ^ ^ ^ 

• • • IT MAY interest you gents who are planning to 
participate in the Empey Club Boat Ride up the Hudson on 
Aug. 2 to learn that the boat that will convey you to 

Bear Mountain is called "Ossining" to carry out the 

prison atmosphere they are trying to borrow a platoon of 
"trusties" from the Sing Sing warden but this will hard- 
ly be necessary, as a lotta ginks from 630 Ninth Avenoo will 
be on board 

*K v -P 't* 

• • • SHE TOOK a gamble on her manager's advice 

and copped plenty that is the interesting story 

of Eleanor Holm for manager Leo Morrison persuaded 

her to get a release on her Warner contract so she could come 
east and compete in the recent swimming meet at Jones Beach 

Eleanor broke her own Olympic record for the back- 
stroke and the sport pages of the nation's newspapers 

have been filled with the news that makes the girl a 

natural right now for a big feature production which 

will probably be announced shortly RKO was smart 

and grabbed her for a circuit clout she opens Aug. 4 at 

the Palace in Chi Eleanor gets more fan mail than many 

Hollywood stars, for this yere country is athletic crazee 

the gal happens to be a "looker," as well as an athlete 

•P SfC (|* sfs 

• • • BACK IN the film game is Charlie Giegerich, 
handling the publicity on "Savage Gold," now current at the 

Mayfair Pathe News rushed out a special on Wiley 

Post's arrival home and had it in the local and nearby theaters 
on Sunday the Arkayo theaters in the Metropolitan dis- 
trict cashed in immediately on the special clip by putting bark- 
ers out front A dinner will be given this week at the 

Fraternity Club for Mary Spaulding and Jl L. Tortosa, who 
collaborated on the Spanish version of Walter Futter's "India 
Speaks" 

ip If! Jp S(E 

• • • AT THE PREVIEW of "Voltaire" starring George 
Arliss to be given by Warners tomorrow eve on board the He de 
France in connection with a dinner given by the French Line. . . 
the guests will include Alfred EL Smith, Mayor O'Brien, Mr. and 
Mrs. Irving Thalberg, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Montgomery, Will 
H. Hays, S. L. Rothafel, William Gillette, H. M. Warner, Major 
Warner and others 



« « « 



» » » 



FILM INTAKES COVER 
PRODUCTION NEEDS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

and the completion of eight new sea- 
son pictures to date. 

"We have more pictures completed 
and in work than ever before," said 
Depinet, "and our run of summer 
product is living up to all expecta- 
tions. We can only judge business 
by actual box office receipts and 
therefore when we see that 'Double 
Harness' played to $10,850 in Wash- 
ington last week against an average 
weekly business at the same house 
for June of $3,900, we know that 
the product is satisfactory and that 
we can continue to chalk up suffi- 
cient for our studio needs." 

RKO now has the last six pictures 
on the 1932-33 line-up completed and 
five on the new schedule. Three 
others on the 1933-34 line-up are 
finishing this week. Release dates 
are set up to Nov. 10. 



Harding, Bancroft Films 
Set by Twentieth Century 

(Continued from Page 1) 

tists release. George Bancroft also 
has signed a term contract with the 
Schenck-Zanuck unit. His first ve- 
hicle will be "Blood Money," by Ro- 
land Brown. 



Four M-G-M Features 
On August Release List 

Four feature vehicles are set for 
August release by M-G-M. They in- 
clude "Tugboat Annie," with Marie 
Dressier, Wallace Beery, Maureen 
O'Sullivan and Robert Young; 
"Show World," with Alice Brady, 
Jackie Cooper, Frank Morgan, Jim- 
my Durante, Russell Hardie, Madge 
Evans, Eddie Quillan, Weber and 
Fields, Fay Templeton and May 
Robson; "Turn Back the Clock," 
with Lee Tracy, Mae Clarke, Otto 
Kruger and Peggy Shannon, and 
"Night Flight," with John and Lio- 
nel Barrymore, Helen Hayes, Clark 
Gable and Robert Montgomery. 



imany happy mm, 






William DeMille Philippe De Lacy 

Johnny Hines Arthur Lubin 

Harry H. Zehner Lila Lee 

Bob Wolff Mortimer D. Sickowitt 



« 



! 



THE 



-%2H 



OAILV 



Tuesday, July 25, 



SCHENCK SUPPORTS 
EMERGENCY DRIVE 



(Continued from Page 1) 
been received from the Hays Or- 
ganization, asking that all producers 
be included under the blanket code. 

Similar wires from various corpo- 
rations and industries have been 
coming in at the rate of dozens per 
hour, with all classes pledging sup- 
port. 

A statement in the latest Allied 
States Ass'n bulletin by Abram F. 
Myers, to the effect that dissatisfac- 
tion with the failure of the Adminis- 
tration to deal frankly with busi- 
nesses caused the blanket order, was 
sharply denied by Frank R. Wilson 
of the National Industrial Recovery 
Act staff. Wilson declared the pur- 
pose of this order was to include 
both high and low of every business. 



Cartoon Comedy Feature 
Contemplated by Disney 

(Continued from Page 1) 

plan for the production. No animal 
characters will be used in the film. 

All 13 Silly Symphonies on the 
new line-up will be in color and the 
13 Mickey Mouse cartoons in black 
and white. Theme songs for car- 
toons that warrant musical num- 
bers, will be written by Frank 
Churchill and Leigh Harline of his 
musical department. 

Disney has started an art school 
for his entire staff of 130 artists and 
also for artists who desire training 
in animation. The class meets twice 
a week. The cartoonist claimed that 
Mickey Mouse releases were cost- 
ing $20,000 each to make, exclusive 
of print cost. 



Eddie Bonns New Head 

Of "U" Shorts Sales 

(Continued from Page 1) 

post of short subject sales manager 
at Universal has been vacant for the 
past year. Universal's 1933-34 line- 
up of shorts includes five serials, 52 
two-reelers and 59 one-reelers. 



MINIATURE MOVIES DIGEST 

A periodical bulletin dealing with 
16 mm. film product, equipment and 
activities is being issued by A. D. V. 
Storey under the title of "Miniature 
Movies Digest," to be followed later 
by a "Miniature Movies Year Book 
for 1933-34." The bulletin is dis- 
tributed to members of the Minia- 
ture Movies Institute and 16 mm. 
Motion Picture Board of Trade. 

The third annual Miniature 
Movies conference will be held in 
New York, Sept. 28-29. 



Luncheon to Disney 

United Artists will tender a luncheon 

today to Walt Disney, producer of the 

"Mickey Mouse" and "Silly Symphony" 

cartoons distributed by U. A. 



A LITTLE from "LOTS 



►// 



By RALPH W1LK 



HOLLYWOOD 
"£RADLE SONG" will be Doro- 
thea Wieck's first picture for 
Paramount, rather than "White Wo- 
man," the studio announced yester- 
day. It goes in work next week. 
"White Woman" also starts produc- 
tion immediately with Charles 
Laughton, the Nero of "The Sign 
of the Cross," in the leading male 
role. The feminine lead will be 

selected within a few days. 

* * * 

Adele St. Maur, formerly of the 
New York Theater Guild, has been 
signed for Jesse L. Lasky's produc- 
tion, "The Worst Woman in Paris?". 
Others engaged in support of 
Adolphe Menjou, Benita Hume and 
Harvey Stephens include Leonard 
Carey, Torben Meyer, John Trent 

and Theresa Harris. 

* * * 

Marc Connelly has had his con- 
tract renewed by Paramount, and, at 
his own request, will work on the 
screen play for "Alice in Wonder- 
land" with Joseph Mankiewicz and 

Director Norman McLeod. 

* * * 

RKO cast assignments: Ferdinand 
Gottschalk and Edwin Maxwell for 
"Ann Vickers"; Morgan Wallace, 
Leon Waycoff, Bruce Warren, Sam- 
uel Hinds, Jimmy Flaven and Clar- 
ence Geldert for "Shanghai Mad- 
ness"; Gilbert Roland opposite Con- 
stance Bennett in "Without Glory"; 
Betty Grable and Leif Erickson for 
a musical short featuring Ted Fiori- 
to and his band. 

* * # 

Herbert Marshall and his wife, 
Edna Best, have arrived in Los An- 
geles from England. Marshall will 
begin screen work soon for Para- 
mount. 

4c $ afc 

William S. Hart is resting easy in 
the hospital after undergoing a 
major abdominal operation. 

* * * 

George Archainbaud will direct 
Constance Bennett in RKO's "With- 
out Glory." Miss Bennett has two 
other pictures to make for RKO next 
season. 

Paramount cast assignments: 
Bobby Arnst, William B. Davidson 
and Kathleen Burke for "Torch 
Singer"; Edwin Maxwell and Ed- 
mund Breese for "Duck Soup"; 
Matsui for "Captain Jericho"; Harry 
Akst, Cyril Ring, Billy Bevan and 
Sammy Cohen for "Too Much Har- 
mony." 

Will Rogers' daughter, Mary, who 
was discovered on the Fox lot act- 
ing under the pseudonym of Mary 
Howard, and who decided to revert 
to her father's name, has switched 
back again to Mary Howard and will 
appear in the role of Diana in "My 
Weakness" under her assumed name. 
She wants to make good on her own. 



Charles Stumar, ace cameraman 
who photographed "The Secrets of 
the Blue Room," for Universal, is 
doing the camera work on "Satur- 
day's Millions," also for Universal. 

* * * 

Johnny Guedel, former U. C. L. A. 
student, has joined the Hal Roach 
scenario staff. Two of his original 
stories attracted the attention of 
the comedy producer and he was 
placed under contract. 

Lew Collins, who directed "Sky- 
ways" for Monogram, is directing 
"The Ship of Wanted Men," for 
Screencraft Productions. The story 
is an original by Ethel Hill, with 
screen play and dialogue by Joseph 
O'Donnell and Collins. The cast in- 
cludes Dorothy Sebastian, Leon 
Waycoff, Jason Robards, Fred Koh- 
ler, James Flavin and others. 

Fred Niblo, Jr., the scenarist, for- 
merly with Paramount and Univer- 
sal, recently returned from Italy and 
is working on "Flying Down to Rio," 
which will be made by Louis Brock, 
with Mark Sandrich directing. 

* * * 

Monaei Lindley has completed an 
important role in "Waffles," which 
was produced by Helen Mitchell, 
Ltd. Miss Lindley appeared in 
"Ship 13" and was also featured in 
"Between the Sheets," which was 
staged in Los Angeles. 

*i ; ^ H< 

Gus Meins is directing "Beauty 
and the Bus," starring Thelma Todd 
and Patsy Kelly. He also directed 
"We're in the Dough" in the All- 

Star series at the Hal Roach studios. 

* * # 

Our Passing Show: Jack Holt, 
Lois Wilson, Ben Alexander, Ray- 
mond Hatton, Estelle Taylor, Elea- 
nor Fair, Leatrice Joy, Jeanie Mac- 
Pherson, Tom Fortune at the dinner 
given by Cecil B. De Mille to mark 
the twentieth anniversary of his ad- 
vent into the motion picture busi- 
ness. 

* * * 

Jean Muir, who recently started 
her screen career at Warners by 
playing a corpse in "Bureau of 
Missing Persons," now has a role in 
"The World Changes," with Paul 
Muni. Production started this week 
with Mervyn LeRoy directing. Mary 
Astor, Guy Kibbee, Aline McMahon 
and Anna Q. Nilsson are among the 
supporting players. 

* * * 

Edward Manson, head of Mon- 
arch's story department, is busy 
reading novels, plays and originals 
for submission as material on the 
coming year's program. 

* * * 

Richard Barthelmess begins work 
this week in First National's 
"Shanghai Orchid," by Gene Towne 
and C. Graham Baker. Walter Lang 
will direct. Ann Dvorak has the 
feminine lead. 



CALL GENERAL STRII 
IN STUDIOS ON GO/ 



(Continued from Page 1) 

are effected by the order. G 
refused to comment on reports 
theater projectionists would 
called out. 

Warner Bros., Metro-Gold\ 
Mayer, Fox, United Artists and ) 
operated yesterday with unempl: 
sound workers, radio service 
and telephone men. Union men 
clared a poll of radio stations 
vealed that radio technicians had 
fused studio offers. The sound m 
union had agents with 40 indep 
ent producers unaffected by 
strike. 

Initial steps to replace al 
660 sound men who went on st 
; Sunday were taken yesterday bjj 
studios through the insertion 
newspaper ads for "men capabh 
doing any kind of work in the I 
duction of movies." The controvt 
revolves around demands of 
sound men for a contract includir 
maximum working day of 12 he' 
and a six-day week. In announc 
rejection of the contract, Pat Ca. 1 
representing the producers, bla: 
the trouble on a dispute between 
I.A.T.S.E. and the Brotherhood 
Electrical Workers regarding wK 
group has jurisdiction over the so 1 
men. 

Harold V. Smith, business ag- 
for the sound men, said yester J 
that no progress had been made 
ward a settlement. He also diffe ( 
with Casey on the dispute betw 
the two union locals, declaring t 
the Electrical Workers Brotherh 1 
has only a few members whereas 
Sound Workers Union has more tl 
600. 



Romberg and Harbach 
Are Signed by Fox 

(Continued from Page 1) 

been signed by Fox to write an 
iginal musical for the screen. Prt 
dent Sidney R. Kent stated yest 
day that this production would 
part of Fox's plan to place itself) 
the forefront in the production 1 
film musicals. The company recej 
ly bought "Music in the Air," 
Jerome Kern-Oscar Hammersti 
stage hit. Romberg and Harbs 
will go to the coast soon to con- 
with Winfield Sheehan, who will" 
production, details. Meanwhile 
scenarist from the coast studios 
coming east to assist in prepa: 
tions for the picture, which will 
made in Hollywood. 



Montague Optimistic 

Kansas City— Stepping off the east- 
bound Chief for a brief talk with Harry 
Taylor, local branch manager, General 
Sales Manager Abe Montague of Co- 
lumbia waxed very enthusiastic over 
the fall outlook. Rube Jackter, assis- 
tant to Montague, accompanied him. Ex- 
hibitors are in a better buying mood 
and the company is in a strong financial 
condition, they declared. 




imatc in Cha raccet 
^national in Scope 
cpendcnt in Thought 



: 




The 


Dai 


ly N 


ewspa per 


Of M 


t i o n 


Pict 


u res 


Now 


F.ft 


een 


Years 


Old 



L. LXIII. NO. 21 

— 



NEW Y€Pr, WEDNESDAY, JULY 2C, 1933 



5 CENTS 



<: 



; er:i 



tudios Operate at 60 Per Cent Despite Walkout 

IRA NOWALL SET TO HANDLE AMUSEMENT CODES 

arry M. Warner Wires President Pledging Support 



s Roosevelt Plan Being 
Effected as Speedily 
as Possible 

3 ... 

pport of the Administration s 
)yment program and a promise 
Jt it into effect throughout the 
( ier organization as speedily as 
pie was pledged in a telegram 
yesterday by Harry M. Warner 
,'resident Roosevelt. Studios, 
ers, home offices and subsidiary 
anies are included among those 

(Continued on Page 4) 



rnibi 



! 12 



:s,l 

!tW6 



m 
10 1 



J. ALLIED TO AID 
PRESIDENT'S DRIVE 



motion endorsing President 
evelt's work program and urg- 
ill members to cooperate with 
OHRA, extending the use of their 
ns to aid in furthering the 
lj : gency drive, was passed at yes- 
try's meeting of the New Jersey 
" i unit. The exhib group also 
id a resolution declaring it is 
ir for any producer to charge an 
)itor 50 per cent of his gross as 
price of any one picture. 



ie Theater Corp. 
Formed in Cincinnati 

icinnati — Albee Theater Corp. 

been incorporated to acquire 

cers by purchase or lease and 
Operate houses. Incorporators 
\J. Miller Walker, Kenneth B. 

reit and Robert H. Davis. 



olumbia Studio Reopens 

'est Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
I Hollywood — Sam Briskin an- 
(ounced yesterday that Columbia 
| ctures Studio will reopen tomorrow 
I th two feature companies, and one 
fort subject company working. 



Studios Adopt Roosevelt Scales July 31 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Will H. Hays wired President Roosevelt yesterday that pending 
acceptance of an industry code, producers will put minimum wage and 
maximum hour scales for all production people into effect July 31. 



ST. LOUIS EXHIBITORS 
WILL MEET TOMORROW 

St. Louis — Meeting of the M. P. 
T. 0. of St. Louis, Eastern Missouri 
and Southern Illinois at the Coro- 
nado Hotel tomorrow is expected to 
draw a record attendance, President 
Fred Wehrenberg having asked all 
theater owners in this territory to 
attend and participate in discussion 
on the proposed exhibition code. Ac- 
tion will be taken on the draft 
adopted at the recent M. P. T. O. A. 
meeting in Chicago. Wehrenberg is 
a member of the special committee 
of three which will draft a brief to 
be forwarded to Washington along 
with the new code. 



Sam Cohen Appointed 

Roach Publicity Head 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Sam W. B. Cohen has 
been appointed director of publicity 
at the Hal Roach studios. 



OHIO THEATER MEN 
MEET AUG. 1 0N CODE 

Columbus — A meeting to discuss 
the proposed M. P. T. 0. A. exhibi- 
tion code has been called for 10 
A. M., Aug. 1, at the Deshler-Wal- 
lick Hotel by P. J. Wood, business 
manager of the M. P. T. 0. of Ohio. 
All exhibitors in the state are being 
urged to attend. Suggestions nec- 
essary to cover the situation in Ohio 
will be made to the federal admin- 
istrator. 



Independents Would End 
Six Principal Abuses 

Six major abuses are among the 
unfair practices to be discussed by 
independent producers, distributors 
and exhibitors at the conference to 
be held starting July 31 at the Hotel 
Astor under the auspices of the 
Federation of the Motion Picture 
Industry of America. These six 
evils, elimination of which would re- 
open many theaters and go a long 

(Continued on Page 8) 



Studios Expect to Operate 
On Normal Schedule Today 



Ohio Admission Tax 

Now Goes Into Effect 

Columbus — Governor George 
White permitted the special emerg- 
ency tax on admissions, enacted 
by the last session of the Ohio Gen- 
eral Assembly, to become a law 
without his signature and it will be 
effective immediately. The few the- 
aters in the state which will be 
affected by the new law, three in 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Bv RALPH WILK 
West Coast Manager, FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Producers declared 
that the studios worked at fifty to 
sixty percent of normal schedule 
yesterday and that today normal 
level would be reached. Thirty to 
forty percent of cameramen report- 
ed as usual and competent men have 
been found to man the plants. Pres- 
ident Elliott of I. A. T. S. E. with- 
drew his organization from the basic 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Saul A. Rosenblatt Joins 

Johnson Staff to Aid 

on Amusement Codes 

Bv WILLIAM SILBERBERG 
FILM DAILY Staff Correspondent 

Washington — With the addition of 
Saul A. Rosenblatt, New York at- 
torney long identified with the 
Nathan Burkan office, to the staff of 
General Hugh Johnson, the National 
Industrial Recovery Administration 
states it is now prepared to handle 

(Continued on Page 4) 



RALPH STAUB QUITS 
COLUMBIA PICTURES 

W'csi Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
Hollywood — Ralph Staub, head of 
comedy shorts production at Colum- 
bia Pictures and for the past seven 
years producer of "Screen Snap- 
shots" released by that company, 
has resigned. He says he will an- 
nounce a new major studio affilia- 
tion shortly. 



Upstate Exhibs Framing 
Availability Schedule 

Buffalo — As part of the code re- 
quired under the Recovery Act, ex- 
hibitors in Buffalo, Kenmore, Wil- 
liamsville and Lackawanna are 
drawing up a schedule covering 
availability and clearance for the 
season 1933-34. A committee has 
been working for some time on this 
code which, if adopted and agreed! 
upon by a majority of the exhibi- 
tors in these cities and towns, will 
be as binding as the industry code. 



Lab Code Drafted 

Final draft of the laboratory code 
was completed yesterday at a meet- 
ing of the board of directors of the 
Associated Laboratories of America. A 
general meeting of the association has 
been called for Friday noon at the 
Hotel Astor when the code will be 
submitted to the members for approval. 



THE 



-&JW;. 



DAILY 



Wednesday, July 26, 




ToL LXIII, Ho. 21 Wed., July 26,1933 Price 5 Cents 



JOHN W AUCOATE 



Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
at 1650 Broadway, New York. N. \ ., 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk. Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate, President, Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
»nd General Manager; Arthur \V. Eddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21. 1918, at the post-office at N«w York, 
N. Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00 Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, M50 Broadway. New York, N. Y., 
Phone, Circle 7-4736, 7 4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday. New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London — 
Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn, 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 
— P. A. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise, 
Rue de la Cour-des-Noues. 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 
High Low Close Chg. 

Am. Sear 4'/ 8 43/ 4 Vh + Vz 

Columbia Picts. vtc. 2014 19'/ 2 2014 + 1 V* 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd. 10 9 9 

East. Kodak 78 Vi 75 75 — 314 

Fox Fm. "A" 3'/ 2 3'4 314 

Loew's, Inc 24 Vi 23 23% — Vi 

do pfd 72 72 72 

Paramount ctfs. ... 1% lS/ g 134 

Pathe Exch 1% l s /s 1% 

do "A" 7Va 6Vi 7 + % 

RKO 4 35/a 334 + 1/4 

Warner Bros 6Vs 5Vi 5 3 A 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 
Gen. Th. Eq. pfd... 9-16 9-16 9-16 

Technicolor 8'A 8 8 — 1/4 

Trans-Lux 23/ 8 23/ 8 23/ 8 + Vs 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 
Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40. 6'/ 4 6 6 + Vs 

Gen. Th. Eq.6s40ctfs. 5 5 5 

Keith A-0 6s 46... 53 52 52 — 1 

Loew 6s 41 ww 783/ 8 783/ 8 783/ 8 + 1% 

Paramount 6s 47 ... 28'/ 4 28 1/4 28 V4 + 1 1/4 

Par. 5 lis 50 28 265/ 8 27 —1 

Warner's 6s 39 34Vi 32'/ 2 33 + % 

NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE 
Vara. Publix 1 % 1 Vi 1 Vi — Vs 



CHESTERFIELD'S 

Next Production 

"A MAN OF 
SENTIMENT" 

by 

Frederick H. Brennan 



1540 B'way. 



N. Y. C. 



Aubrey Kennedy Brings 
Up First 2 Florida Pictures 

Aubrey M. Kennedy will arrive in 
New York today from St. Peters- 
burg, Fla.. with the first two Ken- 
nedy Sunshine Specials to show as 
samples of the product that can be 
turned out in Florida. The features 
are "Chloe," made bv Marshall 
Neilan with music by Erno Rapee. 
and ''Playthings of Desire,'' made 
by George Melford. Immediate re- 
lease is planned, with distribution 
arrangements to be set by Kennedy 
while here. 

Other re'eases in prospect from 
the Kennedy City studios include 
Buster Keaton's first independent 
production, which goes into work im- 
mediately; "The Tom Cat," by Mar- 
garet Mayo, now in work; "Twin 
Beds," being directed by Ford Ster- 
ling-, and "The Flat Tire," second 
Melford nroduction. 



Distribution Deals 

Closed by Majestic 

Majestic Pictures have closed a 
deal with Jensen & Von Herberg of 
Seattle for the distribution of Ma- 
iestic's 1933-34 schedule. Louis and 
Gene Marcus are the new Majestic 
franchise holders in Salt Lake City 
and Denver. Harry Rucker has been 
appointed branch manager of the 
Jensen-Von Herberg exchange. 



ANITA PAGE, E. HOLM BOOKED 

Anita Page is coming east to head 
the Billy Rose unit, "Crazy Quilt," 
with Charles King and Smith and 
Dale for a 24-week vaudeville tour. 
The Leon Morrison office handled 
negotiations. Morrison also has 
booked Eleanor Holm, aquatic 
:hamp, for personal appearances 
opening Aug. 4 in Chicago. 



GET ST. LOUIS HOUSE 

St. Louis — Metropolitan Theaters 
Corp., controlled by Harry, Sam and 
Nat Koplar, Emil Strauss and the 
Sommers Estate, holders of the sec- 
ond deed of trust, have bought the 
St. Louis Theater under foreclosure 
proceedings. Harry Koplar says the 
house will reopen early in the fall 
as a first-run. 



GEO. LABY TO HOLYOKE 

Boston — George Laby, manager of 
the Fenway theater, left this week 
for Holyoke, where he will take 
charge of the Victory. Laby came 
here five years ago from the Rialto 
New York, and has managed the 
Washington St. Olympia and the 
new Paramount. 



MARIAN NIXON AT RKO 

West Coast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Hollywood — Marian Nixon has 
been signed by RKO for "A Chance 
at Heaven," with Joel McCrea and 
Ginger Rogers. William Seiter will 
direct. 



JOHN EIFERT MARRIED 

Cincinnati — John Eifert, handling 
West Virginia sales for Warner- 
First National, was married a few 
days ago to Florence Fisher. 



Newman Sees 20% Jump 
In Gross from England 

Twenty per cent more cash in dis- 
tribution grosses of RKO pictures 
in England will be sent to the home 
office this year than last, Sol M. 
Newman, managing director of 
Radio Pictures, Ltd.. told The Film 
Daily yesterday. "Theaters are now 
doing about 20 per cent less than 
normal business, but I predict a 
tremendous increase in attendance 
due to a run of better nroduct that 
is about to be released," said New- 
man, who returns to London Satur- 
dav. 



Product Jam May Close 
11 East Side Theaters 

Manhattan Playhouse Circuit will 
close 11 lower east side houses with- 
in the next two months unless film 
booking arrangements, giving the 
theaters a better selection of major 
product, is made, Jack Steinman, 
vice-president of the circuit, stated 
to The Film Daily yesterday. Dif- 
ficulty in buying away from the 
four Loew houses in the same terri- 
tory is the cause for the proposed 
action. 

"I refuse to buy product unless it 
is clear of the Loew houses," said 
Steinman. "Our lesson was learned 
last year. This time it means that 
we buy clear or close the theaters." 
The Manhattan Playhouse theaters 
involved are the Apollo, Palestine, 
Clinton, Hollywood, New Delancey, 
Florida, Rubv, Bijou, Orpheum, 
Sunshine and New 14th St. The 
Loew houses in the territory are the 
Commodore, Delancey, Canal and 
Avenue B. 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



July 27: M. P. T. O. of St. Louis, Ej« 
Mo. 6 Southern III. meeting at Con 
Hotel, St. Louis. 

July 28-29: Monogram western sales met 

San Francisco. 
July 28-31: Meeting of Independent Th< 

Supply Dealers' Association at Ste 

Hotel, Chicago. 

July 31 -Aug. 1: Federation of Motion Pit 

Industry of America, Inc., conferenci 

Hotel Astor, New York. 
July 31 -Aug. 1: Warner sales meeting, Wald 

Astoria Hotel, New York. 
Aug. 2: Outing at Bear Mountain unde 

pices of Motion Picture Club. 



ATTENDING MAJESTIC MEI 

Attending the Majestic Pictu 
3-day sales convention which sts 
Saturday at the Drake Hotel, O 
cago, will be: 

Herman Gluckman and Al Kre! 
York; William D. Shapiro, Boston; J 
Herberg, Seattle; Gene Marcus, Salt' T 
City; Tony Lucchese, Philadelphia; Be 
Mills, Albany; Jack Berkowitz and H; 
Berkson. Buffalo; Mr. Saxe, Detroit; Mr 
Segal. Cincinnati ; J. S. Berkowitz. I. j 
geles; Mel Hulling, San Francisco; Ta» 
A. Branon, Atlanta: Robert Cle" 
R. C. Mcllheran, Dallas; Philip 
and L. Wintroub, Omaha; Allen Burke I 
sas City; Joe Sk;rboll and J. Ciark. 
burgh; Carl Michel, Minneapolis: M 
Brown. Canada; Charles Trampe. Milwj 
and Joe Silverman, Oklahoma City. 

The first three pictures. "Sing 3 
Sing," "Curtain at Eight," and "Tht 
of Nora Moran" of the 1933-34 produd 
be screened for the franchise holders an 
salesmen. 




THIRD SHOWMENS RELEASE 

"Ship of Wanted Men," third 
Showmens Pictures production, will 
be released about Aug. 15, says Da- 
vid J. Mountan, president. Screen- 
craft Productions has placed the 
story in work on the coast. Lew 
Collins is directing under super- 
vision of Al Alt, with cast including 
Dorothy Sebastian, Leon Waycoff, 
Fred Kohler, Maurice Black, James 
Flavin, John Ince, Jason Robards, 
Gertrude Astor, Kit Guard, Herbert 
Evans and George Hayes. 



"GOLD DIGGERS" FOR LOEW 

Warner's "Gold Diggers of 1933," 
now in its eighth week on Broadway, 
has been bousrbt by Loew for its en- 
tire Metropolitan Circuit for a full 
week's rur< starting Sept. 1 and 
playing Labor Day Week. 



BEACH PINCH RILES READE 

Deal, N. J. — Walter Reade, cir- 
cuit operator, arrested for appear- 
ing with his son on the Deal Casino 
beach in bathing trunks without 
shirt, says he plans an action for 
damages. 



COL. FRED LEVY of Louisville arrived. 
New York yesterday for a week's stay. 

LEO MORRISON leaves Friday for the CO 

WILLIAM FRAWLEY, Broadway actor I 
to a term contract by Paramount through 
Morrison office, left yesterday for Hollyw 

AUBREY M. KENNEDY arrives in New I 
today from Florida and will make his h 
quarters at the Park Central. 

WALT DISNEY hops off today (instead 
yesterday) for the coast. 

ANITA PAGE arrives in New York f 
the coast next week for a personal appean 
tour. 

JEROME P. SUSSMAN. special represent* 
of Paramount International Corp., sails 
Vera Cruz on the Oriente today. At I 
Cruz he will be met by Vincente Saiso, I 
will accompany him to Mexico City, wt 
Sussman will make his headquarters for : 
eral months, conducting a complete survey 
analysis of the motion picture situation 
the Republic of Mexico. 

LILLIAN BOND has arrived from Calihn 
and is stopping at the St. Moritz Hotel, f 
Bond came East to take part in the musi 
picture, "Take A Chance," being made »• 
She may also appear in a Broadway show 

SOL NEWMAN sails from New York for L 
don Saturday on the Aquitania. 



STATE-LAKE RESUMES 

Chicago — Vaudeville and pictures 
at 35 cents top is the policy at the 
State-Lake, reopened Sunday by 
Jones, Linick & Schaefer. 



ST. CHARLES 

ATLANTIC CITY 
An Entire Block on the Boardwalk 

A most beautifully appointed resort hot* 
. . . Excellent Cuisine . . . Spacious, sunn 
rooms . . . The homelike atmosphere of tn| 
St. Charles make the days spent there | 
delightful memory . . . Come and enjojj 
RATES GREATLY REDUCED 



A Statement 



THE management of Fox Film Corporation is pleased to announce that 
the stockholders of the company, at meetings held July 21st and 22nd, 
by an overwhelming vote ratified and approved the management's 
plan of financial reorganization of this corporation. Under this plan all the 
bonds of the company (excepting approximately $2,000,000, widely scattered) 
are retired, as well as all bank loans. The successful culmination of this plan 
leaves the corporation in a sound financial position and, with the exception of 
the bonds stated above, practically without debt except for current bills. 

The voting of this plan by the stockholders closes the book on a three- 
year period of litigation and disorganization and will allow the management 
to devote its time to the operating problems of the company which heretofore 
has been impossible. 

The management wishes to thank the debenture holders, The Chase 
National Bank and its officials, all of its creditors and stockholders whose 
loyal participation has made this plan possible. Because of the confidence they 
have shown in us, we pledge to them and to the picture industry that we will, 
to the best of our ability, continue to build along constructive lines. It will be 
our effort not only to make this corporation one of profit for its stockholders, 
but one which will reflect credit on the entire motion picture industry. 

To Fox employees the world over, we express our gratitude for the 
sacrifices made, and the loyalty given during this trying period. 




July 25, 1933 



S. R. KENT 
President, Fox Film Corporation 




DAILY 



Wednesday, July 26, 19.1 



NIRA SET TO HANDLE 
AMUSEMENT CODES 

{Continued from Page 1) 

all amusement codes, including mo- 
tion picture, vaudeville, circus, etc. 
This is the first time the admin- 
istration has been fully set up to 
receive and give assistance on the 
amusement industry codes. Frank 
R. Wilson of the administration staff 
urges all interested parties to com- 
municate with Rosenblatt either 
with codes or for assistance in pre- 
paring them. Rosenblatt probably 
will be appointed deputy adminis- 
trator at the code hearings. 



H. M. Warner Pledges 

Support of Program 

(Continued from Page 1) 

who will benefit, it was stated at 
the Warner offices. H. M. Warner, 
who for many months has been ad- 
vocating action similar to the Presi- 
dent's recommendations, declared 
yesterday that the sooner the entire 
nation gets behind the Administra- 
tion's plan and accepts it whole- 
heartedly, the sooner will the coun- 
try return to normal prosperity. 



Ohio Admission Tax 

Now Goes Into Effect 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Cincinnati and two in Cleveland, 
have started paying the tax, which 
is the same as the Federal tax on 
admissions over 40 cents. 



"COLLEGE HUMOR" HOLDS 

Indianapolis — Paramount's "Col- 
lege Humor" will be held another 
week at the Lyric, business having 
broken records. 



The-SGHOOLMASTER 




To-Day's Lesson 

KNOW 
YOUR 
FILM 
SLANG 



AQUARIUM— Booth in studio in which 
sound mixing is done. 

ASH CAN — Large multiple arc lamp swung 
overhead. 

GAFFER — The studio electrician in charge. 

SOUP — Film developer. 

CANARIES — High-frequency noises in re- 
cording system. 




HANG THE 

WITH 

PHIL M. DALY 



• • • LOOKS AS if all previous records for motion pic- 
ture contests have been smashed in Paramount's International 

"Search for Beauty" contest to date 146,000 entries have 

been received and the contest has just started to get 

going by the time it finishes Paramount officials figure 

that more than a quarter of a million men and women will 
have enrolled in the candidacy for screen fame some 
900 theaters in all parts of the world are conducting the con- 
test for the selection of 30 perfect physical specimens of 

men and women for roles in the pix, "The Search for Beauty" 
and what a B.O. title that one is ! all English- 
speaking nations of the world are entered in the contest 

the first of its kind ever held, so far as we know 

* * # # 

• • • AFTER LISTENING to President Roosevelt's radio 

address Monday eve Paul Terry and Frank Moser wired 

the Chief Executive advising him that they had in- 
creased the salaries of their Terry-Toons staff 10 per cent 

and this may be the first intimation to the boys that 

their pay envelopes have been made heavier as Paul 

Terry commented to us "This entire economic situation 

is purely a Mental Condition on the part of employers. If every 
organization large and small would increase salaries today, 
the nation would experience Prosperity automatically tomor- 
row" 



• • • NICE WORK done by Jack Kemp who di- 
rected the re-recording on Helber Pictures first two releases 

"Faithful Heart" and "White Face" Phil 

Meyer's new departure in dubbing American voices on English 
pix 

* * * * 

• • • THE TRADE and newspaper boys met the adopted 

father of Mickey Mouse the same being Walt Disney 

at a luncheon at the Park Central yesterday 

several novelty surprises were sprung mouse traps were 

concealed everywhere in the dining room the chicken 

salad was composed of cheese Kay Kamen, the New 

York representative of Walt, scared the ladies half to death 
when he released a batch of white mice from his inside pocket 

it was all very unsual and interesting Mickey 

would have been there in person, but Walt explained that the 

rodent is very bashful and was afraid that he might 

be called on to squeak 

* * * * 

• • • BY WIRE to Eddie Golden Ray Johnston 

and Trem Carr thank Don Hancock for selecting their auto 

route to Hollywood it seems they were held up by road 

agents in Nebraska forced into a ditch blind- 
folded taken for a ride into the plains and 

frisked for several hundred dollars cash money through 

it all Trem's radio in the car was playing "I Love You Truly" 

their auto was left 'em by the bandits only slightly 

damaged two tires busted, no spark plugs and battery 

Ray and Trem wired Hollywood for dough, and are 

again on their way and the hell of it is Monogram has 

no pix on their program that sounds like "Holdup" so 

the experience was a total commercial loss 

^ ^ * * 

• • • WAS THAT a press stunt when Al Jolson took a 

smack at Walt Winchell in Hollywood? because of some 

material that Mister Winchell is supposed to have written into 
his script, "Broadway Thru A Keyhole" for 20th Century Pro- 
ductions as Heywood Broun commented, these two lads 

overlooked a bet by not staging a regular bout as there 

are thousands of mugs who would have paid $10 at the gate to 

see Winchell get properly smacked oops 



« « « 



» »l » 



STUDIOS OPERATE AT 
50 TO 60 PER GEN 



(Continued from Page 1) 

agreement. Pat Casey reported 
telegram had been sent to five 1 
ternational labor groups protest*} 
against action of I. A. T. S. E. $1 
demanding that the other four lab | 
groups influence I. A. T. S. E. 
put their men back to work. Loc 
union reported two hundred no 
union workers walked out since mi 
night in sympathy with the still 
and that forty-five of these sigl 
membership applications with Iocs 
and three thousand of the strikp 
are best men available. 



UPSTATE THEATER CHANGE 

Buffalo — The Jefferson and Stran 
Auburn, formerly owned by fltl 
Central New York Theaters Com 
are now operated by the Mange 
Operating Co. 

Alonzo T. Lowden has reopene 
the Star, Williamson. 

The Orpheum, Buffalo, former! 
managed by Arthur Hawer, is close 
while the Lincoln here is runnin 
three days a week during the sun 
mer. The Ritz, Syracuse, is clo* 

Graham and Ludlow, operators c 
the Victoria, Watertown, will soo. 
reopen the Palace in Syracuse. 

N. Basel has reopened the V|j 
toria, Buffalo, after improvements 



FIRST-RUNS ALL WARNERS 

Omaha — All three first-runs her 
are showing Warner-First Nations 
product this week. "Baby Face" i 
at the Paramount; "Mary Stevens 
M.D." at the Orpheum and "Golo 
Diggers" at the World. The onl;| 
other first run in town, the State! 
is dark. 



RKO THEATER NOTES 

Al Beckerich has replaced Ber 
Lowe as manager of the Keith 
White Plains. Beckerich was for- 
merly manager of the Akron. B. D 
Cockrill, formerly manager of tht 
Orpheum, Salt Lake, has replace* 
Bob Harvey as manager of the Coli- 
seum, New York. The Downtown 
Detroit, will reopen July 30 with pic- 
tures and the Jack Benny stag« 
show unit. 



m 



fci 



MANY UAPPY RETURNS 



Best wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 



July 26 



Nat Levine 
C. L. Yearsley 



Emil Jannings 
Charles Butterworth 






FILM DAILY speaks to 
THOSE WHO BOAST 
ABOUT STAR POWER! 



// 






EXTRA! AS WE 
GO TO PRESS! 

Just previewed 
Marie Dressier and 
Wallace Beery in 
"Tugboat Annie." 
Positively their 
grandest show yet I 




You'll have no difficulty identifying the M*Q-M Stars'." 



■1 



WARNER BROS. 
ANNOUNCEMENT 

FOR 1933-1934 

LL 



5 








YOU 
OVER 



Vitagraph, Inc., Distributors 




with its honesty, sincerity, plainness and ab- 
sence of time worn "ballyhoo". We've taken 
our time. We've talked to exhibitors. We've 
got the right thing to say about plans so big 
they don't need bunk. You'll get a straight- 
from-the-shoulder presentation from Warner 
Bros, in this paper next week. 



THE 



sgBfr* 



DAILV 



Wednesday, July 26, 



A Little 

from "Lots" 



By RALPH WILK 



HOLLYWOOD 
EDWARD G. ROBINSON, after a 
rest following completion of "1 
Loved a Woman," will start work in 
"Dark Hazard" and then "Napoleon: 
His Life and Loves," First National 

announces. 

* * * 

Preston Foster's contract has been 
renewed following completion of his 
work in the Fox production, "The 

Man Who Dared." 

* * * 

Lou Ostrow has assigned Edwin 
L. Marin to direct "The Sweetheart 
of Sigma Chi," Monogram college 
picture, which is to be produced un- 
der the supervision of W. T. Lackey. 
George Waggner is preparing the 

screen play. 

* * * 

Jesse L. Lasky has signed Helen 
Chandler for the second leading role 
in "The Worst Woman in Paris?" 
which features Adolphe Menjou, 
Benita Hume and Harvey Stephens. 
Monta Bell wrote and is directing 

the story. 

* * * 

John Miljan, who appeared in 
Maurice Chevalier's first American 
film, "Innocents of Paris," was re- 
united with the star this week when 
Paramount signed him for a role 
in "The Way To Love." Miljan joins 
a cast of sixteen well-known play- 
ers, among them Sylvia Sidney, Ed- 
ward Everett Horton, Arthur Pier- 
son, Minna Gombell, Blanche Fride- 
rici, Sidney Toler, Billy Bevan and 
Grace Bradley. 



Office in Calcutta 

Is Opened by RKO 

RKO's new branch sales office in 
Calcutta, India, was opened last 
week with Reginald Armour, former 
RCA-Victor executive, in charge. It 
is the only RKO-operated sales of- 
fice on the continent. Distribution 
arrangements with local sales com- 
panies have been made in every 
continental country except Norway, 
Ambrose "Bo" Dowling told The 
Film Daily yesterday. 

Regarding the German situation, 
Dowling said, "We shall continue to 
distribute through Tobis in Germany 
with between six and ten American 
pictures sure of release. 'King 
Kong' will receive complete coverage 
not only in Germany but in every 
country with the exception of Nor- 
way." 



"Roxy" Books Wiley Post 

Wiley Post, world flier, was signed 
yesterday by S. L. "Roxy" Rothafel to 
appear at the Radio City Music Hall 
for the week starting tomorrow. Post 
will be introduced by a series of news- 
reel shots of his flight and interviewed 
from the stage. 



Madge Bellamy in 

"THE RIOT SQUAD" 

Mayfair 64 mins. 

WEAK YARN OF COPS AND GANG- 
STERS IS JUST SUITABLE AS A FILLER 
FOR SMALL HOUSES. 

This gangster story has a very rambling 
yarn filled with a lot of incidental detail 
that gets nowhere in particular. It fails 
to develop any real punch or action till 
practically the last half of the final reel. 
Most of the footage is given over to the 
personal squabbling of two detectives who 
are good friends at heart but always rag- 
ging each other and trying to cut each 
ether out in the affections of a girl of a 
rather shady reputation. The part is acted 
by Madge Bellamy, the moll of the gang- 
ster chief, who plays both the dicks for 
suckers in order to further the interests 
of the gangster who is frying to save his 
gambling pal from the electric chair for a 
murder. So the yarn rambles on ineffectu- 
ally to the finale, when the two police 
boys get together and corral the entire 
gang with the help of the riot squad. 
Pretty loose construction in story, direction 
ordinary and characterization of the two 
cops the best part of the film. 

Cast: Madge Bellamy, Pat O'Malley, 
James Flavin, Addison Richards, Harrison 
Greene, Ralph Lewis, Alene Carroll, Bee 
Eddels, Charles De La Motte, Kit Guard. 

Director, Harry Webb; Authors, Jack 
Natteford, Barney Sarecky; Editor, Fred 
Bain; Cameraman, Roy Overbaugh. 

Direction, Weak. Photography, Fair. 



Rex Bell in 

"FIGHTING TEXANS" 

Monogram 55 mins. 

UP TO AVERAGE WESTERN WITH 
ENOUGH ACTION AND LAUGHS TO 
PLEASE THE FANS. 

Action and comedy are well sprinkled 
in this story of a supposedly dry oil well 
which comes through. The plot is breezy 
and should satisfy the western fans. Rex 
Bell is a haberdashery shop salesman who 
is fired for getting fresh with a customer 
and talks himself into the job of oil stock 
salesman in a Texas town. The former 
salesman had been unable to get rid of the 
stock, but Rex breezes into town and soon 
has the people buying. The crooked pro- 
moter then decides to stop drilling on the 
well, which he figures is dry. Just before 
they turn off the machinery the foreman 
discovers oil sand. In the meantime the 
townsfolk have found out that work is 
being stopped and they arrest Bell. The 
sheriff is shot and Bell is accused of this. 
He escapes, finds out about the pay sand 
and manages to bring in the well with 
dynamite before the posse catches him, at 
the same time exposing the one who shot 
the sheriff. 

Cast: Rex Bell, Luana Walters, Betty 
Mack, Gordon DeMain, Lafe McKee, Al 
Bridge, George Nash, George Hayes, Wally 
Wales, Yakima Canutt, Anne Howard. 

Director, Armand Schaefer; Author, 
Wellyn Totman; Cameraman, Archie Stout; 
Recording Engineer, John A. Stransky, Jr. 

Direction, Good. Photography, Good. 




"Hooks and Jabs" 
with Harry Langdon and Vernon 
Dent 
(Mermaid Comedy) 
Educational-Fox 20 mins. 

Good Gags 
Harry Langdon plays the part of 
a goof who wanders into a tough 
beer joint and gets himself in wrong 
with Vernon Dent, the proprietor. 
The latter is managing a prize 
fighter on the side, and Dent sends 
Langdon in for a bout. The come- 
dian knocks the pug cold on a fluke, 
and immediately becomes a great 
guy with all hands among the as- 
sembled pluguglies. But soon they 
discover that Langdon is only a 
phoney, and the film winds up in a 
free-for-all fight. Moves fast, with 
some highly original gags. It should 
please generally. 



"Beneath Our Feet" 

(Battle for Life Series) 

Educational-Fox 8 mins. 

Insect Drama 

One of the series of studies of 
insect life under the microscope, 
showing the tiny animals in their 
bitter struggle for survival. Very 
fine photography, with some unusual 
studies of the spider that builds a 
trap door, encounters to the death 
between various insects, etc. A nar- 
ration by Gayne Whitman explains 
everything in the popular manner. 



Andy Clyde in 

"Dora's Dunking Doughnuts" 

Educational-Fox 21 mins. 

Scores 

Good Andy Clyde comedy, with 
the comic promoting a radio pro- 
gram to get publicity for his girl 
friend, Ethel Sykes, who has in- 
vented a special dunking doughnut 
that will not sink in the coffee. Some 
nice kid interest with a school room 
scene with Andy the teacher. The 
youngsters are members of the 
Meglin Kiddies Band, and appear 
later in a musical number in the 
radio broadcasting sequence. Plenty 
of gags, with Andy scoring strong. 
Directed by Harry J. Edwards. 



Moran and Mack in 

"Blue Blackbirds" 

Educational-Fox 20 mins. 

Plenty Laughs 

Charles Mack and George Moran 
do their blackface work as servants 
to a magician who leaves them in 
charge of his home. A honeymoon 
couple come in to stay overnight, 
also a team of vaude actors who are 
trying to steal the magician's stage 
secrets break into the house. The 
gags are built around the spooky ef- 
fects of the magician's tricks as the 
vaude team try to scare the colored 
lads out of the place. Lively, with 
the laughs coming frequently. 




Cincinnati — W. Gehring, 
branch manager, was operated o 
the Good Samaritan Hospital ai 
now resting easily. His mother c 
on from New York to be at his 
side. 



Cincinnati — The Ufa theater, a 
an eight-week run of "Be Mine 
night," will be closed for remodel 
The house has been leased by M« 
Segal, to be reopened Sept. 1 a 
first-run. 



Cattlesburg, Ky.— E. L. Huxi 
Miami will open a new theater h' 



Chicago — The Chateau, north i 
neighborhood house, now closed, 
been conveyed by Richard D. Shi 
maker of St. Louis to Thomas 
Henning, James L. Westlake 
Samuel A. Mitchell as trustees 
the Broadway Properties trust. 



Independents Would Enc 
Six Principal Abu* 

{Continued from Page 1) 

way toward curing the effects 
these unfair practices, according 
P. S. Harrison, president of I 
Federation, are: 

1. Theater Buying Combinations amonfl 
hibitors for the purpose of coercing: prcla 
and distributors to sell their product at M 
prices. 

2. Block Booking. A method of ul 
competition that results in closing the I 
to worthwhile independent product. 

3. The Right of the Exhibitor to ok 
and of the Distributor to Sell — Pirticl 
right which is denied by the major compa 

4. Dictating Theater Operating Poh-i 
the major companies, which for selfisl 
poses are attempting to ban double fi 

5. Divorce of Exhibition from Prod, 
and Distribution. 

6. Theater Pooling and Mergers. Arm 
fair method of competition and a mono(fl 
practice. 

Reservations to the conference I 
pouring in to the Federation fit 
all parts of the country, and ie 
gates from all branches of the I 
dustry have signified their readiw 
to attend the conference and la 
their aid to draft a code of f» 
competition that will be truly rep 
sentative of the industry as a wh* 
says Harrison. 



Adopt Film Methods 

Wash. Bur. of THE FILM DAILM 
Washington — A page from the fi"* I 
industry has been borrowed by the 
NIRA administration to sell the Presi- 
dent's blanket code to the public. Un- 
der the direction of Frank R. Wilson, 
huge 24-page press books of newspaper 
size, resembling material used by film 
companies on special pictures, have 
been prepared for distribution to pub- 
licity boards in cities and towns 
throughout the country. These press 
books contain layouts, suggestions for 
advertising copy, tieups, and even out- 
lines of speeches for the four-minute 
men. 





The POWER and the GLORY 

Spencer Tracy, Colleen Moore, Ralph 
Morgan, Helen Vinson. 

PADDY the Next Best Thing 

Janet Gaynor, Warner Baxter (immortal 
"Daddy Long Legs" team). 

MY WEAKNESS 

Lilian Harvey, Lew Ayres, Charles 
Butterworth, Sid Silvers, Harry Langdon. 
B. G. DeSylva musical production. 

BERKELEY SQUARE 

Leslie Howard, Heather Angel, Valerie 
Taylor, Irene Browne, Beryl Mercer. 

DOCTOR BULL 

Will Rogers, Louise Dresser, Vera Allen, 
Marian Nixon, Ralph Morgan. From 
"The Last Adam" sensational selling novel 
by James Gould Cozzens. 



ALL these 1933-34 FOX releases are 
completed or nearly completed. Ad- 
vance reports stamp them as the 
greatest group of productions FOX 
has ever made. You will see them soon 
. . . and judge for yourself! 



JOIN THE UPSWING WITH 



W A 



r. ■ 



& 



3'fi' 



THE 



10 



-%£k 



DAILY 



Wednesday, July 26, 19j 



Hi 



THEATER CHANGES REPORTED BY FILM BOARDS OF TRAD 1 



ALABAMA 
Changes in Ownership 

BIRMINGHAM— Norwood, transferred to 
Joe Steed by Brown & Miller. FLO MA- 
TON — Jackson, transferred to S. N. Jack- 
son by Reade & McCoy. MONROE- 
VILLE — Franston, transferred to W. H. 
Hendricks by W. J. Ray. 
Opening 

BIRMINGHAM— Norwood, by Joe Steed. 

ARKANSAS 
Opening 
ENGLAND— Best. 

Closings 

HARTFORD— Emerson. PARIS— Strand. 
VAN BUREN— Rex. 

CALIFORNIA 
Changes in Ownership 

CLOVIS— Sierra (formerly Rex), transferred 
to John W. Hucknall by J. Kenneaster. 
MORGAN HILL — Granada, ransferred to 
J. W. Hill by Paul Reardon. OAKLAND 
— Century, transferred to Golden State 
Theater & Realty Co. by Century Theater 
Co ; Lincoln, transferred to Julian A. Har- 
vey by West Oakland Theater Co. SEBAS- 
TOPOL — Golden Gate (formerly State), 
transferred to S. Casey by N. Rossi. 

Openings 

CLOVIS— Sierra (formerly Rex). MORGAN 
HILL — Granada. 

Closings 
OAKLAND— Century. SANTA ROSA— 
Empire. 

COLORADO 
Changes in Ownership 

COLORADO SPRINGS— Paramount, trans- 
ferred to Westland Theaters, Inc., by Moun- 
tain States Theater Corp. GRAND JUNC- 
TION — Avalon, transferred to Joe Cooper 
by Mountain States Theater Corp. LOVE- 
LAND — Rialto, transferred to J. J. Good- 
stein by Fox West Coast. PUEBLO— 
Colorado, transferred to Westland Theaters, 
Inc., by Mountain States Theater Corp. 

Openings 

DENVER— Plaza, by Plaza Amusement Co. 
GREELEY— Kiva, by Westland Theaters, 
Inc.; Sterling. GRAND JUNCTION— 
Avalon. 

CONNECTICUT 
Changes in Ownership 

BRIDGEPORT — Liberty, transferred to J. 
Corwel by J. Schwartz. MOOSUP— Best, 
transferred to D. C. Hess by J. Fournier. 

GEORGIA 
Change in Ownership 

THOMASTON — Silvertown, transferred to 
Odom & Hardy by C. E. Beach. 
Closing 
CEDARTOWN— Palace. 

IDAHO 
Openings 

CASCADE— Cascade, by F. E. Robb. SPIR- 
IT LAKE — Cozy, by Francis Berry. 

Closing 

GENESSEE— Cozy. 

ILLINOIS 
Changes in Ownership 

CHICAGO — Avenue, transferred to Len Ull- 
rich by Ben Hur Amusement Corp. ; Cameo, 
transferred to Gust Stathis by W. G. Alex- 
ander ; Casimir, transferred to Jack Belke 
by Gust Stathis ; Gold Coast, transferred 
to H. Goldson by Gold Coast Theater Co. ; 
Grandale, transferred to S. Tomaso ; Har- 
vard, transferred to Junior Theater Corp. 
by D. J. Chrissis ; Kosciusko, transferred 
to O. Oelowski ; Mid City, transferred to 
M. L. Stern by P. Rutishauser ; New 
Mabel, transferred to Walter C. Thoss by 
Monroe & Thoss ; Victoria, transferred to 
Joseph Jansen by International Theater 
Corp. LeROY — Princess, transferred to 
H. L. Walsh by Wallace McClaren. MA- 
RENGO — Rio, transferred to Charles House 
by O. E. Shaw and Russell Lamb. 

Openings 

FOX RIVER GROVE— Grove. STOCK- 
TON— Stockton. SYCAMORE — State 
(new theater), by C. S. McBrien. VER- 
MONT — Princess. 

Closings 

CHAMPAIGN— Orpheum. CHICAGO— 

Academy ; Avalon ; Gold Coast ; Grandale ; 



Julian; Karlov ; Midwest; Shakespeare; 
Town Talkies, and Webster. RIVER- 
DALE — Riverdale. ROCKFORD— Capi- 
tol. SOUTH WILMINGTON— White. 
SYCAMORE— Fargo and State. 

INDIANA 
Changes in Ownership 

ALBION — Albion (formerly Mystic), trans- 
ferred to Merchants of Albion by A. J. 
Zollinger. ANDERSON— Granada, trans- 
ferred to Dode Fitzgerald ; Ritz, transferred 
to Wayne R. Harman by Allen Bradley. 
BEECH GROVE— Palace, transferred to 
Edgar C. Seitz. CRAWFORDSVILLE— 
Strand, transferred to H. P. Vonderschmidt 
circuilt. HARTFORD CITY— Orpheum 
& Jefferson, transferred to Mr. & Mrs. F. 
D. Walters and M. Sheidler. LADOGA— 
Fox (formerly Paramount), transferred to 
Denny & Mason. LOGANSPORT— Luna, 
transferred to C. H. Lawshe. NEWCAS- 
TLE — Royal, transferred to William Out- 
land. SELLERSBBURG, Empire, trans- 
ferred to J. Fischer. ZIONSVILLE— 
Zionsville, transferred to R. L. Sheldon. 
Openings 

ANDERSON— Granada. DARLINGTON— 

Sunshine. ELWOOD — Elwood. La- 

GRANGE — Wigton. LOGANSPORT— 

Luna. MARTINSVILLE— State. 

Closings 

ALBION— Albion (formerly Mystic). BOS- 
WELL— Roxy. ALWOOD — Alhambra. 
FT. WAYNE — Lincoln. HARTFORD 
CITY— Dawn. INDIANAPOLIS— India- 
ana and Two Johns. MT. VERNON— 
Empress. LaGRANGE— Wigton. NEW- 
CASTLE — Starette (damaged by fire). 
OAKLAND— Storm. TERRE HAUTE— 
Rex. 

IOWA 

Changes in Ownership 

COUNCIL BLUFFS — Broadway, trans- 
ferred to Ray Felker ; Strand, transferred 
to M. Cohen. DAVENPORT— State 
(formerly Family), transferred to Joe Jac- 
obsen. DYERSVILLE— Plaza, transferred 
to Etta Gray by Eastern Iowa Theater 
Co. FARMINGTON— Farmington, trans- 
ferred to Robert Brown & Alton Smith 
by Ben Brink. GRATTINGER— Opera 
House, transferred to Hawkeye Theater 
Co. by L. W. Mead. PELLA— Pella. 
transferred to W. S. Bailey by Oscar 
Benson. SIOUX CITY — Iowa, trans- 

ferred to Nate Dax by Iowa Theater Oper- 
ating. Co. STATE CENTER— Sun, trans- 
ferred to A. G. Christofferson by Don 
Thornberg. WEST BEND— Opera House, 
transferred to J. G. Fair. 

Openings 

FARMINGTON— Farmington. GUTHRIE 
CENTER— Garden. 

Closings 

CHEROKEE — American and Epress. DAV- 
ENPORT — Davenport and Liberty. MAN- 
SON— Manson. MOVILLE— Moville. 

KANSAS 
Changes in Ownership 

ATWOOD — Electric, transferred to Wayne 
Eggleston and J. B. Roshong by Wayne 
' Eggleston. CANTON — Canton (formerly 
Auditorium), transferred to W. C. More- 
land by J. F. Ledbetter. ELLSWORTH— 
Golden Bell, transferred to C. B. Kelly 
and A. W. Heyl by Ruben Melcher. HOR- 
TON — Liberty, transferred to William 
Schlenkenberger by R. J. Heffner. ST. 
FRANCIS— St. Francis (formerly Elec- 
tric), transferred to J. B. Roshong and 
Wayne Eggleston by Wayne Eggleston. 

Opening 

KINGMAN— Meade. 

Closings 
BENTLEY— Gilchrist. HADD AM— Eddies. 

KENTUCKY 
Changes in Ownership 

FRANKFORT— State, transferred to S. D. 
Lee by Hendrik and Offutt. LONDON— 
Southland, transferred to H. C. McClure 
by Lee Moffitt. LOUISVILLE— Aristo, 
transferred to C. Best. MARION — Ken- 
tucky, transferred to Runyan & Grey. CAVE 
CITY — Ace (formerly Dixie), transferred 
to Conway & Plues. 

Openings 

CAVE CITY— Ace (formerlv Dixie}. MAR- 
ION— Kentucky 



Closings 

CARROLLTON — Richland. DAWSON 
SPRINGS— Strand. GREENVILLE — 
Palace. LOUISVILLE— National. MAR- 
ION— Kentucky. RUSSELL — Russell 
(formerly Regent). 

LOUISIANA 
Changes in Ownership 

NEW IBERIA — Evangeline, transferred to 
K. Sliman by C. A. Fontenot. NEW OR- 
LEANS — Avenue, transferred to Max 
Heine by R. J. Langridge ; Liberty, trans- 
ferred to W. Bannes by Porkony Estate ; 
New Plaza, transferred to Alex Schulman 
by Paul Brunet. WINNFIELD— Bailey, 
transferred to W. W. Page by R. L. Bailey. 
VILLE PLATTE — Evangeline, transferred 
to C. A. Fontenot by Emile Ludeau. MAN- 
DEVILLE — Elks, transferred to D. J. 
Romaine by H. Vautrain. 

Opening 

MANDEVILLE— Elks. 

Closings 

BOGALUSA— Redwood. LAKE CHARLES 
— Louisiana and Paramount. MARRERO 
— Jefferson. 

MAINE 

Opening 

PEAKES ISLAND— Gem. 
Closings 

BRIDGTON— State. FREEPORT — Nor- 
dica. KENNEBUNKPORT — Acme. 
ROCKLAND— Park. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Opening 

HOLYOKE— Suffolk. 

Closings 

EAST WEYMOUTH — Jackson. FALL 
RIVER— Plaza. METHUEN— Methuen. 
RANDOLPH— Stetson. 

MICHIGAN 
Changes in Ownership 

BAY CITY — Tivoli (formerly Rivoli), trans- 
ferred to D. Bernstein by George Pitts- 
ley. BELLEVILLE— Martin, transferred 
to Charles Council by T. A. Yeager. DE- 
TROIT — Buchannan, transferred to John 
O'Dell by William Holland; Chalmers, 
transferred to Jack Dunn by Tony Lom- 
bardo ; Holbrook, transferred to N. B. 
Wells by R. D. Maurice; Mack, trans- 
ferred to L. A. Fill by R. Carmer ; Odeon, 
transferred to Odeon Theater Corp. by A. 
Rob-'nson ; Park, transferred to Leon Krim 
by Oscar Haley ; Plaza, transferred to Ar- 
thur D. Baehr by Leon Krim. 

Openings 

BANGOR— Regent by Mrs. Ethel Norton 
and M. M. Adams. CASSAPOLIS— Co- 
lonial, by L. H. Lerner. DETROIT— 
Empress, by Jack Ballard ; Ritz, by John 
Rose. 

Closings 

CADILLAC— Cadillac. DETROIT — Cour- 
tesy; Dix; RKO Downtown. GRAND 
RAPIDS— Empress; Regent. LAKE 

ORION — Orion. MANCELONA — 
Owego. MARLETTE— Liberty, OWSO- 
SO— SHERIDAN — Community. 

MINNESOTA 
Changes in Ownership 

BAUDETTE— Grande, transferred to J. O. 
Juvrud by George L. Levern. ST. PAUL 
— Tower, transferred to Minn. Amusement 
Co. by Joe Friedman. WARROAD— Fox. 
transferred to J. O. Juvrud by George 
Burglund. 

Opening 

LITTLE FALLS— Falls. LeROY— Cozy 
(new theater), by E. A. Eckstein. 

Closings 

ADRIAN— New (damaged by fire). DE- 
LANO— Comet. DASSELL — Lakeland. 
CALEDONIA— State. COOK — Comet. 
LAN ESBORO— State. LeSUER — Star 
(damaged by fire). ST. PAUL— World. 
SAUK RAPIDS — STATE. MIDDLE 
RIVER — Lyceum. 

MISSISSIPPI 

Changes in Ownership 

LUCEDALE — Palace, transferred to J. B. 
Skinner by Van Cooley. NEWTON— 
Palace, transferred to L. H. Brandon by 
F. X. Skinner. 



Closings 

BATESVILLE— Rex. LAUREL— Arari 
SARDIS— Pastime. TUTWILER— " 
rovansum. 

MISSOURI 
Changes in Ownership 

III' MAN SVILLE— Community, transfer 
to J. Allard by F. V. Silver. KAX.'i 
CITY — Garden (formerly Indiana), tr 
ferred to J. P. Deo by M. O. Hackett. ] 
JOSEPH — Charwood, transferred to Je 
Gershon by McKinney & McManus. 

Opening 

HARDIN— Odeon. 

Closings 
HOLDEN— Lyric. ST. JOSEPH — CI 
wood. 

NEBRASKA 
Changes in Ownership 

HASTINGS — Strand, transferred to Ifc 
Weinberg. KEARNEY — Empress, tai 
ferred to Monroe & Garvin. Lincoln — I 
erty, transferred to Independent The 
Corp. by Lincoln Theater Corp. N( 
FOLK — Granada, transferred to H. 
Schiller. PIERCE— Strand, transferred 
R. P. Seidel by E. Wesselman. 

Openings 

BRUNING— Opera House. DAVID CI 

—City. LINCOLN — Liberty. Nil 

FOLK— Rialo. OTOE— Moon. VERll 

GREE— Empress. WOLBACH— Empr.l 

Closings 

ANSELMO — Community. BURWELJJ 
Electric. COLUMBUS — Pawnee. PC! 
CA— Royal. SPENCER— Moon. STR<| 
TON— Veterans' Memorial Hall. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Changes in Ownership 

LACONIA — Colonial, transferred to Geo! 
A. Giles by T. J. Mclntyre. 

Closings 

BRISTOL— Gem. DURHAM— Franklin 

NEW JERSEY 
Changes in Ownership 

CAMDEN — Star, transferred to Star Araij 
ment Co. by Frank Lysakowski. ELM 
— Elmer, transferred to Kelso Smith 
Edward Rovner. LINDEN — St. GeaBI 
transferred to Emit Kranter and All ] 
Kranter by F. B. Abel and H. Rabi i 
witz. NEWARK — Weequuahic, tnfl 

ferred to Yale Theater Co. by Supei 
Amusement Co. ROSELLE PARK— R( 
lyn, transferred to Rose Theater, Inc. , 
Roslyn Holding Co. UNION CIT^j 
Transfer, Transferred to Transfer Corp. 
George Cohan. 

Opening 

ELMER— Elmer, bv Kelso Smith. 
Closings 

AUDUBON — Highland. CARNEV 

POINT— Y. M. C. A. CLEMENTONI 
Clementon. CARTERET— Palace. MAI 
WAN — Matawan. MORRISTOWM 
Palace. NEWARK— National. TREf 
TON— Park. UNION CITY— SumnJ 
WEST ORANGE— State. 

NEW MEXICO 
Changes in Ownership 

CLOVIS— Lyceum, transferred to R. E. C I 
fith Theaters, Inc. by Hardwick Brottli I 
ROSWELL — Princess, transferred to i 
E. Griffith Theaters, Inc. by Mrs. L. 
Cahoun. 

NEW YORK 
Changes in Ownership 

BEACON— Paragon, transferred to G. P. ,1 
Holding Co., Inc. by B. J. M. Holding 1 
BINGHAMTON — Laurel, transferred 
Mrs. Bessie B. Blair by Dave Conklj 
BUFFALO— Avon, transferred to J. P 
pis by F. G. Hohn and J. Propis; St 
transferred to Phillip J. Gordon and EdJ 
Lemons by Phillip J. Gordon ; Victoiji 
transferred to Basil Bros, by Victoria Tl|' 
ater Co. CARTHAGE — State, transfertl 
to A. E. Curry by B. Ryder; Strand, □■ 
ferred to Schine Enterprises. Inc. by Cql 
tral N. Y. Theaters. CLIFTON SPRING 
— Palace, transferred to E. G. Williai 
by H. W. Van Anken. GLOVERSVILL 
— Glove and Hippodrome, transferred " 
Schine Enterprises, Inc. by Central N. . 
Theaters. HAMMONSPORT — Pa 1 ! 
transferred to N. H. Wood by G. n 



Mnesday, July 26, 1933 




DAILV 



11 



THEATER CHANGES (Continued) 



slii; 



-SI 

1 



. thews. HERKIMER— Liberty, trans- 
1 ed to Schine Enterprises, Inc. by Cen- 
N. Y. Theaters. HIGHLAND— 
< neo, transferred to Ahbros Amusement 
} , Inc., by Walter Seaman. HILTON— 
I tonia. transferred to E. C. Weeks. 
j CKA WANNA — Hollywood, transferred 
Joe Williams-M. Morad Operating Co. 
Joe Williams, Liberty, transferred to 
Iliams-Morad Co. by A. Moses ; Park, 
isferred to Williams-Morad Co. by E. 
cics ; Ridge, transferred to Williams- 
rad Co. bv M. Morad. (LONG ISLAND 
AMAICA — Alden. transferred to Algin 
later Corp.; LONG ISLAND CITY— 
-non. transferred to Schulman Bros, 
usement Co.. Inc., by Tanner Shea 
usement Corp. ; MINEOLA — Mineola, 
isferred to New Deal Amusement Corp. 
A. D. T. Theater, Inc. ; Williston, 
isferred to Garden City Amusement 
p. bv Williston Theater Co., Inc. ; 
;HMOND HILL — New Civic, trans- 
ed to D. & S. Amusement Corp. by 
ishot Amusement Corp. ST. ALBANS 
ft. Albans, transferred to G. H. C. 
usement Corp. by Calvin Perry.) LIT- 
E FALLS — Rialto, transferred to 
ine Enterprises. Inc. by Central N. Y. 
■aters. NEW YORK CITY, BRONX 
•andbox. transferred to Goodwill En- 
irises. Inc., by Bandbox Amusement 
p. ; Hub. transferred to F. Santini. Inc. 
Westbrook Amusement Corp. NEW 
RK CITY. BROOKLYN— Decatur, 
isferred to Decatur Pictures, Inc. by 
)ell & Beck : Graham, transferred to 
ert Y. Holmes by Herman Bloom; 
transferred to Roman Theater Oper- 
g Corp. by Nesor Operating Corp. 
RWICH — Co.linia, transferred to 
ine Enterprises. Inc. by Central N. Y. 
aters. ONEONTA— Oneonta and Pal- 
transferred to Schine Enterprises, Inc. 
'Central N. Y. Theaters. OSWEGO— 
jbe. transferred to H. Simon. ROCH- 
TER — Majestic, transferred to Morris 
timer by Majestic Theater Co. SARA- 
C LAKE — Pontiac, transferred to 
ine Enterprises. Inc., bv Central N. Y. 
;aters. WATERTOWN — Avon and 
fmpia. transferred to Schine Enterprises. 
. bv Central N. Y. Theaters. WATER- 
IET — Family, transferred to Howard 
ore by Cable & Gardner, Inc. 

Openings 

TSON— Star. ALTAMONT— Masonic 
11. CATTARAUGUS— Palace. DE- 
W— Colonial. (LONG ISLAND. FAR 
CKAWAY— Gem. by Haring & Blu- 
vthal: HEMPSTEAD— Cabana, by Ca- 
a Amusement Co.; SEASIDE— St. 
nillus Auditorium - ). LAKE GEORGE 
ake. MINEVILLE — Rialto. OS- 
JGO— State. SPECULATOR — Adiron- 
k. 

Closings 

\NY— Arbor. BUFFALO— Fillmore. 

VER PLAINS — Star. HARRIS- 
LLE— Capitol. OSSINING' — Cameo. 
WEGO — Richardson. PELHAM— 

am. RANDOLPH— Gem. ROCH- 
TER— Lincoln and Palace. TROY— 
ace. WILSON— Gem. WINDSOR— 

ily. NEW YORK CITY— Amphion, 

th Ave. ; Chaloner. Ninth Ave. ; Clin- 
, Clinton St. ; Fifth Ave. Playhouse ; 

le Lenox. E. 78th St.; New Royal, 

thern Blvd.: Regent, Third Ave.; 

al. Tenth Ave. : Savoy. Hughes Ave. ; 

dium. Third Ave. ; Superior, Third 

34th Street, 34th St.; Flora, Atlan- 

Ave. : Lido. Court St., New Brighton 

ch ; Myrtle, Myrtle Ave. 

NORTH CAROLINA 
Changes in Ownership 

SON CITY — Swain, transferred to D. 

Wright by Boylin Bros. CHERRY- 
LLE — Strand (formerly New), traps- 
ed to C. D. Black by J. M. Black. 

NCORD— Cameo (formerly State), 
hsferred to Concord Amusement Co. by 
rry Martin. ENFIELD — Masonx. 
;' hsferred to L. P. Dunn bv Stelline- 
ilfdner. LOUISBURG — Louisburg, 
hsferred to R. Glenn Davis by E. L. 
(Jnson. PLYMOUTH — New. trans^r-.^ 

Dilday-Brinkley by C. Gordan. SAN- 
' RD — San Lee. transferred to R. P 
sser by D. Holt. STLER CITY— Gern, 
isferred to S. R. Rogers by Kennedv 

Thomas. MARSHVILLE— Majestic, 
nsferred to W. M. Williams by Wa.de 
wers. 

Openings 

SON CITY— Swain. ENFIELD— Ma- 



h 



sonic. MARSHVILLE— Majestic. MON- 
ROE— Lincoln (new theater). PLY- 
MOUTH— New. SANFORD— San Lee. 
SILER CITY— Gem. 

Closings 
CANTON — Imperial. MT. HOLLY— 
Paramount. 

NORTH DAKOTA 
Opening 

YELVA— Iris. 

Closings 

VALLEY CITY— Rex. WYNDEMERE— 
Post. 

OHIO 
Changes in Ownership 

COLUMBUS— Wilmar, transferred to Virgil 
Jackson by T. L. Snowden. 

Closings 

CINCINNATI — Strand. COLUMBUS— 
Auditorium and Steelton. MIDDLE- 
TOWN— Sorg. NELSONVILLE— Pas- 
time. 

OKLAHOMA 
Changes in Ownership 

CLINTON — Rex and Rialto, transferred to 
Griffith Amusement Co. by F. G. Roberts. 
CORDELL— Ritz, transferred to A. G'ur- 
lock by F. G. Roberts. WEWOKA— 
Key; transferred to John Terry. 

Openings 

CANTON— Grand, by Donald Bredbeck. 

HUGO — Erie, by Griffith Amusement Co. 

WILSON — Empress, by A. L. Means and 

H. L. Gilliam. 

Closings 
CHECOTAH— Cozy. HUGO— Hugo. OK- 
LAHOMA CITY— Midwest. TUTTLE— 

Tuttle. 

OREGON 
Changes in Ownership 

ALBANY — Venetian, transferred to Tri- 
State Theaters, Inc., by Horrigan and Adam- 
son. CORVALLIS — Oregon State, trans- 
ferred to Tri-State Theaters, Inc. by Hor- 
rigan and Adamson. ONTARIO — Dream- 
land, transferred to Ontarion Amusement 
Co. by Cowan & Murray. 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Changes in Ownership 

CURWENSVILLE— Strand, transferred to 
N. Notopoulos by Fred J. Thompson. NEW 
HOLLAND — Edison, transferred to John 
L. Davis. PORT CARBON— Three Links, 
transferred to Walter Rodgers by 
Three Link Club. PITTSBURGH— Pas- 
time, transferred to M. Steinberg by P. 
Alderman ; Washington, transferred to E. L. 
Barriet, Jr. by Cooper Amusement Co. 

Openings 

EXPORT— Liberty. NEW HOLLAND— 
Edison, by John L. Davis. PORT CAR- 
BON— Three Links, by Walter Rodgers. 
PITTSBURGH— Lowrie and New West 
End. SOUTH FORK— Palace. McCON- 
NELLSBURGH— Liberty (new theater), 
by W. M. Lodge. — 

Closings 

ANNVILLE— Astor. BLAWNOX— Mary- 
land. CARMICHAEL— Ross. CASTLE 
SHANNON— Pearl. COLUMBIA— Alto. 
DELTA— Fire Hall. EMAUS— Ptenlo. 
GLASSMERE — Liberty. HUGHES- 
VILLE— Tally-ho. MOHONON CITY— 
Elks. NAZARETH— Royal. PHILA- 
DELPHIA— Band Box; Bell; Capitol; 
Grant ; Harrowgate ; Keith's ; Keystone 
(South St.); Liberty (Tacony St.); Pearl; 
Walnut. READING— Park. SCRANTON 
— Pinebrook. SWOYERSVILLE— Strand. 
TOPTON — Palace. TREVORTON— 
Forrest. YORK — Rialto. 

SOUTH CAROLINA 
Changes in Ownership 

KERSHAW — Kershaw, transferred to C. 
M. Haynie by Mrs. R. Cooke. WHIT- 
MIRE— Mills, transferred to C. H. Al- 
brecht by M. Mills. YORK— New, trans- 
ferred to G. W. Griffin by H. B. Cooke.' 

Openings 

KERSHAW— Kershaw, by C. M. Haynie. 
YORK— New, by G. W. Griffin. 

Closing 

GREENWOOD— Liberty. 

SOUTH DAKOTA 
Change in Ownership 

HOWARD — Paradise, transferred to Wil- 
liam Klein by Harry Bender. 



Closings 

ALCESTER— Barrymore (damaged by fire). 
IPSWICH— State. ONIDA — Crystal. 
WILMOT— Wilmot. 

TENNESSEE 
Changes in Ownership 

DYER — Palace, transferred to R. L. New- 
man by W. G. Bonds. ERWIN— Lyric, 
transferred to Mrs. F. E. Perryman by C. 
T. Davis. MEMPHIS— Strand, trans- 

ferred to Malco Theaters, Inc. by Loew.'s, 
Inc. 

Openings 

MEMPHIS— Strand, by Malco Theaters, 
Inc. WEST MEMPHIS— Broadway Air- 
dome (new theater), by Mel Richards. 

Closing 

MEMPHIS— Chelsea. 

TEXAS 
Changes in Ownership 

BASTROP — Strand (formerly Dixie), trans- 
ferred to Mrs. L. I. Lederer. DALLAS— 
Avenue, transferred to J. B. Roberts. 
GORMAN — Liberty (formerly Ritz). trans- 
ferred to E. E. Perdue. GIRBYVILLE— 
Palace, transferred to W. W. Stoopleman. 
OLNEY — Palace, transferred to Curtis 
Richardson. PLANO — Palace, transferred 
to C. V. Wier. MIRANDO^ CITY— Trin- 
ity, transferred to K. F. Trim. 

Openings 

DENTON— Ritz. by E. L. Black. VAL- 
LEY MILLS— Lyric, bv George W. Cros- 
ley. FRIONA— Capitol. HOUSTON— 
Bluebonnet. GROVETON — Capitol. 
BENAVIDES— Empress. EL PASO— 
T.fexas Grand. PHARR — Valencia. 

MOODY— Palace. SOMERVILLE— Ma- 
jestic. THORNDALE— Gem. DALLAS 
—Central. OLNEY — Princess. GOR- 
MAN — Liberty (formerly Ritz). 

Closings 

CONROE— Palace (damaged by fire). 
GREENVILLE— Star. MONAHANS— 
Pen-Ell. YOAKUM— Grand. 

WASHINGTON 



CONCRETE- 



Openings 

-Concrete, by 



Charles 



White. POMEROY— Seeley by Mrs. A. 
Thompson. 

Closings 

SEATTLE— Stadium. TACOMA — Blue 
Mouse. 

WEST VIRGINIA 
Changes in Ownership 

PARSONS — Victoria, transferred to E. E. 
Ours by Earl Moore. WHEELING— 
Capitol, transferred to Chatfie'd Theaters 
by Wheeling Enterprise Co. ; State, trans- 
ferred to J. Velas by W. R. Collins and 
Reed. 

Openings 

FAIRMONT— Fairmont. THOMAS— Sut- 
ton. 

Closing 

GLEN JEAN— Opera House. 

WISCONSIN 
Changes in Ownership 

MARIENETTE— Rialto, transferred to T. 
Coffey by Fox Midwesco. PRAIRIE DU 
CHIEN — Regent, transferred to George 
Panka by M. Sheldon. SPRING VAL- 
LEY — Community, transferred to Helane 
Ritsey by D. E. Muhlolum. THORPE— 
Rialto. transferred to John Bogumil by F. 
J. Bogumil. 

Openings 

EAST TROY— Grand, by George Schroeder. 
OREGON— Opera House, by William An- 
tes. MARIENETTE— Rialto, by T. Cof-. 
fey. 

Closings 

BRODHEAD— Dorlvn. GALESVILLE 
— Marinuka. JANESVILLE — Jeffries. 
KENOSHA — Gateway; Lake; Majestic, 
MADISON — Palace. MILWAUKEE— 
Garfield ; Mirth ; Modjeska ; Plaza ; Prin- 
cess ; Savoy! Tivoli : Uptown. MUSCODA 
— Muscoda. OSHKOSH — Oshkosh. 

PRINCETON— Opera House. RACINE 
—State, Uptown. SHEBOYGAN— But- 
terfly. WEYAUWEGA— Opera House. 

WYOMING 
Closing 

SOUTH SUPERIOR— Crystal. 



FILM DAILY 
IS 1 5 YEARS 
OLD AND IS 
CELEBRATING 
ITS CRYSTAL 
ANNIVERSARY 
IN AUGUST 

WITH A BIG 
"NEW DEAL" 
NUMBER and 
PLANS A FEW 
INNOVATIONS 
FOR ALL OF 
ITS READERS 






ING 






The weather's hot— there's no cooling plant in the 
Criterion Theatre in New York — yet the fans are 
flocking — at $1.50 per— to see MARLENE DIETRICH 
in "THE SONG OF SONGS", A Rouben Mamoulian 
Production, A Paramount Picture. 



rm&mm. 



Hfi^^^WwmWil 






The Daily Newspaper 
Of Motion Pictures 
Now Fifteen Years Old 



t«r, TULRSDAy, JLLY 27, I^JJ 



<S CENTS 



IRA Urges 



actions to Get Together on Code 



IIJUNCTJi AGAINST SERVICE CHARGES REFUSED 

Lost Warner Salaries to Conform With Blanket Code 



"a Increases Going Into 
Effect Monday, Says 
H. M. Warner 

-ies of all Warner employes 

iving less than the minimum 

I ibed in the Administration's 

st code have been increased, 

| ve next Monday, to conform 

it the figure in code, it was an- 

.. ed yesterday by Harry M. 

i er. This action, which followed 

{Continued on Page 5) 



IUS1GALS IN WORK 

T M-G-M STUDIOS 



Itoast Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 
lywood — Five musicals are 
in work on the M-G-M lot. 
: are "The Hollywood Party," 
March of Time," "The Fire 
j," "The Big- Liar" and "Dane- 
Lady." 



to flshow Treatment 

For "Savage Gold" 

a result of the generally fa- 
e reception accorded "Savage 
on its premiere at the May- 
Jack Bellman of Hollywood 

(Continued on Page 5) 



Plenty of Sorrow 

Jnder the above caption, Welford 
ton in the current issue of his 
ectator" wails as follows: 

"I feel sorry for the exploitation 

partments in New York that have 
) sell exhibitors the kind of pic- 
ures that Hollywood is sending 
' em. 

"I feel sorry for the exhibitors 
ho have to sell them to their 

trons. 

"I feel sorry for the producers 
Hollywood who have to listen 

!> the advice of exploitation de- 
artments and exhibitors about the 
ind of pictures Hollywood should 
lake." 

Vill all those who feel sorry for 
Iford Beaton please repair to the 
ng department? 



Turning 'Em Away — In These Days 



Over at the Radio City Music Hall at 2:30 yesterday afternoon, the last day of 
the current show, a Film Daily scout found the cashiers refunding money to folks who 
couldn't wait in the long line that augmented the full house. Ann Harding and 
William Powell in RKO's "Double Harness" was the double-barreled screen attraction. 



No NIRA Interference With Strikes 
Until Code Submitted and Okayed 



"Lady for a Day" Set 
As Columbia Roadshow 

Thirty-five roadshows of "Lady 
for a Day" are planned by Columbia 
as one of its big opening guns early 
in the new season. It is a Frank 
Capra picture with a name cast in- 
cluding Warren William, May Rob- 
son, Guy Kibbee, Glenda Farrell, 
Ned Sparks, Walter Connolly and 
others. 



Washington Bureau of THE FILM DAILY 

Washington — No interference with 
the union strike in Hollywood or 
any other labor disputes is planned 
by the National Recovery Adminis- 
tration until codes have been sub- 
mitted and approved, it was stated 
yesterday after representatives of 
labor and a delegation of indepen- 
dent producers had conferred with 
officials. 

The code for legitimate theaters 
(Continued on Page 5) 



Further Discussions on MPTOA Code 
To Be Held by Kuykendall in New York 



After attending the St. Louis ex- 
hibitor meeting today and tomorrow, 
President Ed Kuykendall of the M. 
P. T. O. A. will come to New York 
on Aug. 1 to discuss with interested 
parties additional suggestions and 
objections regarding the proposed 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Higher Scales Retained 
After "Gold Diggers" Run 

Numerous exhibitors who raised 

their admissions for Warner's "Gold 

Diggers of 1933" have continued at 

the higher scale after this picture 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Agreement on Code Differences 
Urged by NIRA Before Hearing 



By WILLIAM SILBERBERG 
FILM DAILY Staff Correspondent 

Washington — In outlining his du- 
ties as assistant deputy administra- 
tor in the National Industrial Re- 
covery Administration, Saul A. Ro- 
senblatt, who will be in charge of 
all amusement codes, yesterday said 
to The Film Daily: 

"I think that all interests in the 



film industry large and small, inde- 
pendent or otherwise, should agree 
beforehand in so far as they can on 
as many points as possible and par- 
ticularly with reference to the la- 
bor phases of the codes." 

As re-employment and higher- 
wages are the principal objectives 
of the Administration's drive for 
(Continued on Page 5) 



Interchangeability and Re- 
placement Clauses 
Held Illegal 

By NORMAN M. MacLEOD 
FILM DAILY Staff Correspondent 

Wilmington, Del. — Denying a tem- 
porary injunction against servicing 
charges but granting preliminary 
orders against the interchangeability 
and replacement clauses in sound 
contracts, three decrees were filed 

(Continued on Page 5) 



COLUMBIA PLEDGES 
ROOSEVELT SUPPORT 



In response to President Roose- 
velt's radio appeal, Jack Cohn yes- 
terday telegraphed the President 
that Columbia would support the 
Administration drive 100 per cent. 
The company already has estab- 
lished a 40-hour week. Its increased 
production program and establish- 
ment of branch offices abroad will 
provide additional jobs for a con- 
siderable number. 



Paramount Will Release 
"Take a Chance" Musical 

Screen version of the stage mus- 
ical, "Take a Chance," to be made 
in the east by Rowland-Brice in as- 
sociation with Laurence Schwab, 
Broadway producer, will be released 
by Paramount. Universal originally 
was expected to get it. 



Studio Activity at 83% 

West Coast Bur., THE FILM DAILY 
HoJIywoojd — Studios worked at 83 
per cent of capacity yesterday, ac- 
cording to the producers. Twenty- 
three companies were said to be work- 
ing. I.A.T.S.E. officials here com- 
municated with President William El- 
liott in New York with regard to call- 
ing a general strike of projectionists 
throughout the country. Whether the 
walkout will be called depends on the 
decision of eastern union officials. 



THE 



-;%fr* 



DAILV 



Thursday, July 27, 




flHIW.Hl 11 Thurs., July 27. 1933 Price S Cints 



JOHN W. ALICOATE 



Editor and Publisher 



Published daily except Sundays and Holidays 
at 1650 Broadway, New York, N. Y .. 
by Wids's Films and Film Folk. Inc. J. W. 
Alicoate. President. Editor and Publisher; 
Donald M. Mersereau, Secretary-Treasurer 
snd General Manager; Arthur W. Eddy, Asso- 
ciate Editor; Don Carle Gillette, Managing 
Editor. Entered as second class matter, 
May 21, 1918, at the post-office at N«w York, 
N Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States outside 
of Greater New York $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00. Subscriber should remit with order. 
Address all communications to THE FILM 
DAILY, r650 Broadway, New York, N. Y.. 
Phone, Circle 7-4736, 7-4737, 7-4738, 7-4739. 
Cable address: Filmday, New York. Holly- 
wood, California— Ralph Wilk, 6425 Holly- 
wood Blvd., Phone Granite 6607. London- 
Ernest W. Fredman, The Film Renter, 89-91 
Wardour St., W. I. Berlin— Karl Wolffsohn. 
Lichtbildbuehne, Friedrichstrasse, 225. Paris 

p. A. Harle, La Cinematographic Francaise, 

Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, 19. 



FINANCIAL 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Net 

High Low Close Chg. 

Columbia Picts. vtc. 19'/g 19'/ 2 19Vi — 3 A 

Con. Fm. Ind. pfd.. 9 8% 8'/ 8 — Va 

East. Kodak 77'/ 2 763/ 8 77 + 2 

Fox Fm. "A" 33/ 8 3 3 — 'A 

Fox Fm. rts 2 1 Va 1 'A — % 

Loew's, Inc 24 23 24 + Va 

do pfd 73'/ 2 73'/ 2 73i/ 2 + 1 1/ 2 

Paramount ctfs. ... 1 3 A '% 1% 

Pathe Exch 1% 1% 1 3 A + Va 

do "A" 83/ 8 7i/ 8 8l/ 4 + iy 4 

RKO 3% 33/4 33/4 

Warner Bros 5 7 / 8 514 53A 

NEW YORK CURB MARKET 
Gen. Th. Eq. pfd. . 9-16 9-16 9-16 

Technicolor 8y 8 8V 8 814+ Va 

Trans-Lux 23/ 8 23/ 8 23/ 8 

NEW YORK BOND MARKET 
Gen. Th. Eq. 6s40. 61/2 5% 6V2 + Vi 
Gen. Th. Eq.6s40ctfs. 514 514 514 + 14 

Loew 6s 41 ww 7 9 1/4 79 79 1/4 + Va 

Par. By. 51 2 s51 . . . . 2614 26'/ 8 2614 

Par. 51/2S 50 2614 2514 26 1/4 — % 

Warner's 6s39 ... 34 32l/ 2 33% + 1 3/ 4 

NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE 
Para. Publix 1% 1 1/2 1 Vi + ' J /4 



THEATRE OWNERS 
ATTENTION! 



We have in stock 

over 50,000 yards 

CRESTWOOD & 

PREMIER CARPETS 

Largest variety of 

THEATRE PATTERNS 

ever assembled 



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Theatre Carpets Our Specialty 



Further Code Discussions 
Will Be Held in New York 

{Continued from Page 1) 
exhibition code. One of the princi- 
pal topics of the discussions will be 
double features, which will be gone 
into thoroughly. Kuykendall will 
remain in New York several days. 



Eleven Vitaphone Shorts 
Set for August Release 

Eleven Vitaphone short subjects 
will be released in August, Norman 
H. Moray, sales manager, announces. 

The two-reelers will be "20,000 
Cheers for the Chain Gang," with 
an all star cast and the Vitaphone 
beauties; "Nothing But the Tooth," 
a "Big V" comedy starring Jack 
Haley; and "The No Man," a Broad- 
way Brevities musical with Hugh 
O'Connell, Ann Greenway and the 
Vitaphone chorus of 14 dancers and 
singers. 

The eight single-reels will be: 
"Impact," No. 5 of the new series of 
shorts by Bobby Jones entitled "How 
to Break 90"; "Stuck Stuck Stucco," 
a one-reel Pepper Pot comedy; 
"Bosko's Mechanical Man," a Looney 
Tune cartoon; "That Goes Double," 
starring Russ Columbo in a Pepper 
Pot Musical; "Fine Points," No. 6 
in the Bobby Jones Golf Shorts; 
"The Top of the World," a World 
Adventures short by E. M. Newman; 
"The Dish Ran Away with the 
Spoon," one of the Morris Melodies 
comedy song cartoons; "Bosko the 
Musketeer," another of the Looney 
Tunes comedy cartoons; "In a Cas- 
tillian Garden," a Melody Master 
short featuring the Guatemala Mar- 
imba Band; "Seeing Samoa," a bur- 
lesque travel short; "Bosko's Picture 
Show," a Looney Tune cartoon; and 
"We're in the Money," a Merrie Mel- 
odies comedy song cartoon based 
upon the "Gold Diggers" song. 



A.M.P.A. MEETING TODAY 

A special luncheon meeting of the 
A. M. P. A. will be held at 12:45 
today in Sardi's. Hal Home will 
preside and some matters of parti- 
:ular importance are to be taken up. 



BOB MONTGOMERY IN PERSON 

Robert Montgomery will appear in 
person at the Capitol the week of 
Aug. 4 in conjunction with M-G-M's 
"Another Language" in which he co- 
stars with Helen Hayes. 



Higher Scales Retained 
After "Gold Diggers" Run 

(Continued from Page 1) 
ended its run, according to reports 
to the Warner offices. Grad Sears 
and Andy Smith, Warner sales exe- 
cutives who have been advocating 
higher b.o. scales, say that 90 per 
cent of the exhibitors took advan- 
tage of this picture to hike their 
scales from 5 to 10 cents, and to 
date they have not heard of any 
exhibitor being obliged to lower his 
prices after the picture closed. 



LARRY BAREN JOINS JAFA 

Herman Roth has engaged Larry 
Baren as sales manager of his newly 
formed company, JAFA, the Jewish 
American Film Arts, which will dis- 
tribute the new Jewish production, 
"The Wandering Jew," which has 
just been placed in production under 
the direction of George Roland at 
the Atlas sound studio. 



Howson to Analyze 

New Warner Stories 

Albert Howson again has been 
picked by Andy Smith, Warner 
sales executive, to analyze the stor- 
ies bought for 1933-34 at the first 
of the three round-table meetings 
to be held Monday at the Waldorf- 
Astoria Hotel. It will be the ninth 
year that Howson has fulfilled this 
function. 

At the Monday meeting Smith 
will divulge the title of an outstand- 
ing box-office attraction which War- 
ners plan to release about Sept. 1 
as one of their first 1933-34 offer- 
ings. 



"VOLTAIRE" PARTY A HIT 

An invited audience of swanky 
New Yorkers headed by no less than 
Al Smith attended the dinner and 
special preview showing of Warner's 
"Voltaire," starring George Arliss, 
aboard the He de France last night. 
Short addresses were made by Smith 
and H. M. Warner. Also among 
those present were Louis Wiley, 
business manager of the "New York 
Times"; H. B. Franklin, Mitzi May- 
fair, Harry Charnas, Paul Yawitz, 
and others. 



THE INDUSTRY'S 
DATE BOOK 



Today: M. P. T. O. of St. Louii, 

Mo. & Southern III. meeting at cl 
Hotel, St. Louis. 

July 28-29: Monogram western tales • 
San Francisco. 

July 28-31: Meeting of Independent 
Supply Dealers' Association at 
Hotel, Chicago. 

July 31 -Aug. 1: Federation of Motion 
Industry of America, Inc., conferc 
Hotel Astor, New York. 

July 31 -Aug. 1: Warner sales meeting, v.. 
Astoria Hotel, New York. 

Aug. 1: M. P. T. O. of Ohio m«i 
Deshler-Wallick Hotel, Columbus, 

Aug. 2: Outing at Bear Mountain und 
pices of Motion Picture Club. 

Aug. 2-3: Monogram Canadian sales • 
Tororto. 

Aug. 3: Adjourned meeting of Fox Metr 
Playhouses' creditors. 

Aug. 3-4: Warner sales meeting, Drike 
Chicago. 

Aug. 7-8: Warner sales meeting, Roy* 
Hotel, Toronto. 

Aug. 8: Third Annual Film Golf Tour 
of New England industry at Pint 
Valley Country Club, Weston, Mas 

Aug. 10: Adjourned meeting of Pub 
terprises creditors at office of I 
Henry K. Davis. 

Aug. 23-24: First annual convention of i 
pendent Motion Picture Owners Ass: i 
of Delaware and Eastern Shore of M a 
at Hotel Henelopen, Rehoboth, Del. 

Sept. 5-6-7: Allied Hew Jersey con i 
at Atlantic City. 

Sept. 13: A. M. P. A. holds annual dec 
officer} 

Sept. 28-29: Third Annual Miniature I 
Conference, New York. A. D. V. ( 
secretary. 



C. A. BAIN BURIED IN PHli 

Philadelphia — Funeral sei I 
for Cowan A. Bain, Unive I 
Charlotte branch manager whfl i 
Sunday after an illness of i 
weeks, were held here yesterda 



NED WAYBURI 

2IEGFELD FOLLIES PRODUCER 

Offers unusual opportunities for a carel 
on STAGE, SCREEN, RADIO, ot TEACHING DANC!l 



SOME OF THE STARS 

NED WAYBURN HAS 

HELPED TO FAME 

Al Jolson 

Marilyn Miller 

Eddie Cantor 

Jeanette McDonald 

Ed Wynn 

Mae West 

Will Rogers 

Ann Pennington 

Fred and Adele Astaire 

Hal Leroy 

Patricia Ellis 

and hundreds of others 



Note Dates for Fall Classes 



ADULT GIRLS' DANCING 
CLASSES 

Ages 16 years and over. Fall 
term starts MONDAY, SEP- 
TEMBER 11th. Also special 
one-hour evening classes, 1, 2, 
or 5 times weekly. Mondays 
to Fridays. 
CHILDREN'S CLASSES 
Boys and girls 3 to 16 years 
of age. Rounded training in 
all tvpes of dancing. Fall term 
starts SATURDAY, SEP- 
TEMBER 16th. Also special 
one-hour weekly classes after 
school hours. 

NED WAYBURN INSTITUTE OF DANCING AND R> 
BROADCASTING SCHOOL 
Dept. F, 625 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Between 58th and 59th Streets. Tel. Wlckersham I- 



BODY PROPORTIONING 

Have a beautiful body I 
Wayburn's famous al 
based on years of t 
celebrated stars of stag 
screen. Rates as low as 
weekly. 

BROADCASTING 
INSTRUCTION 

How to talk, sing, rec 
play before the micro] 
Class or private instru 
FREE tryouts gladly 
ranged. 



— 



WELCO 



LIST! 




1 
I 



The greatest male star list in the business made indisputably supreme 
by the addition of the screen's outstanding new romantic favorite! 

LESLIE HOWARD 

is going to do big things for Warner Bros. — and Warner Bros, 
will do big things for Leslie Howard. You'll see what we mean 
when you see his first contract production — coming Aug. 19 — 
the greatest mid-season attraction ever released in Summer 









A short title, so you'll have plenty of marquee space to advertise 

ALL 4 STARS— LESLIE HOWARD— DOUG. FAIRBANKS, Jr.— 

PAUL LUKAS — MARGARET LINDSAY (sensational beauty 

of "Cavalcade"). Directed by Roy Del Ruth. 

W A RJ E R BROS. 

THE J±aJL. COMPANY 

VITAGRAPH, INC., DISTRIBUTORS 




THE 



-%j£± 



DAILY 



Thursday, July 27 \\ 



SHORT SHOTS from] 
EASTERN STUDIOS 

- By CHAS. ALICOATE ^^= 



JAFA, Jewish Film Art Company, 
has begun work on "The Wander- 
ing Jew," the first of a series of 
talkies in Yiddish and English deal- 
ing with current problems of Jew- 
ish life in Germany. Shooting on 
the film, which was adopted from a 
story by Jacob Mestel, has started 
at the Atlas Sound Studios, Long 
Island, under the direction of George 
Roland, with Frank Zucker doing 
the camera work. The production 
is scheduled for release Aug. 15. 
Jacob Ben Ami, Jewish-American 
stage star heads the cast, which also 
includes Natalie Browning, M. B. 
Samuylow, Abraham Teitelbaum and 
Benjamin Adler. 

Magna Pictures, the Meyer 
Davis Company formerly called 
Progressive Pictures but renamed 
because of a coast company hav- 
ing the same title, will begin shoot- 
ing its first musical subject, "That's 
the Captain," aboard the steamship 
Peter Stuyvesant today, weather 
permitting, while on a trip up the 
Hudson. Alexander Leftwich will 
dirmct while Monroe Shaff will su- 
pervise production. 



The Blue Ribbon Boys, Harlem 
band now appearing nightly at the 
Cotton Club, have been signed up 
to do a short for Vitaphone by Sam 
Sax, production manager at the 
Brooklyn plant. A scenario is now 
in preparation for the band under 
Herman Ruby's supervision. Roy 
Mack will direct. 



The SCHOOLMASTER 



A LITTLE from "LOTS" 



By RALPH WILK 




To-Day's Lesson 

KNOW 
YOUR 
FILM 
SLANG 



SOFFIT LIGHTS — Lights on the under part 
of a theater marquee. 

DOLLY — A moving platform, with rubber- 
tired casters, on which the camera may 
be placed. 

COOKED— Over-developed. 

HIGH HAT — A very low camera stand. 

HOT— Electrically charged. 



HOLLYWOOD 
JOHN CROMWELL, now directing 
J "Ann Vickers" at RKO, has been 
signed on a one-picture contract by 
Twentieth Century Pictures. 

* * * 

Russell Mack will direct "Holly- 
wood Party," M-G-M musical. 

* * * 

Production will start Aug. 15 on 
Chesterfield's third 1933-34 film, "A 
Man of Sentiment," under the super- 
vision of George R. Batcheller. 

* * * 

"I Knew Her When" is the title 
under which Willard Robertson's or- 
iginal story, "The Unnamed Wo- 
man," will be filmed by 20th Cen- 
tury Pictures. Courtenay Terrett is 
preparing the script and Gregory La 
Cava will direct. 

* * * 

Earl Oxford, the juvenile who had 
a leading role with Ed Wynn in 
"The Laugh Parade," has been 
signed to a long-term contract by 
M-G-M. 



Alan Dinehart and Ada May have 
been cast in the leading roles of In- 
vincible's second feature, "Dance 
Girl Dance," which Maury M. Cohen 
is producing. Negotiations are 
under way to add Sari Maritza and 
Skeets Gallagher to the cast. 

%; %: % 

Garry Owen has been added to 
"Stage Mother," which Charles Bra- 
bin is directing at M-G-M. 

* * * 

Ruth Etting will play a featured 
feminine role in the next Wheeler 
and Woolsey comedy, according to 
the announcement of Merian C. 
Cooper, executive producer of RKO 
Radio Pictures. 

* * * 

Monogram has completed "Ran- 
gers' Code," last of a series of eight 
Bob Steele westerns. The cast in- 
cluded Doris Hill, Ernie Adams, 
George Nash, George Hayes, Ed 
Brady. Hal Price and Dick Dickin- 
son. R. N. Bradbury directed. 

* * * 

Robert Barrat has been added to 
the cast of Richard Barthelmess^s 
next starring picture for First Na- 
tional, "Shanghai Orchid," to which 
a final 's' has also been added, mak- 
ing the title "Shanghai Orchids." 

* * * 

Toshia Mori has been engaged for 
Columbia's "Fury of the Jungle," 
featuring Helen Twelvetrees and 
Victor Jory. Walter Connolly and 
Alan Dinehart will also be seen in 
prominent characterizations. R. Wil- 
liam Neill is directing. 

* * * 

Jack Barty, well known on the 
London variety stage, is expected in 
Hollywood some time next month to 
join Wakefield and Nelson in the 
series of Hal Roach's All-Star com- 
edies. 



Elinor Fair, who only a few years 
ago was a popular leading woman, 
is appearing on Paramount's "Torch 
Singer" set as an extra, supporting 
Claudette Colbert and Ricardo Cor- 

tez. 

* * * 

"Lady for a Day" has been se- 
lected as the final title for Colum- 
bia's "Madam La Gimp." 

* * * 

Leslie Banks, popular English ac- 
tor, will arrive in Hollywood about 
Sept. 1st for the leading role op- 
posite Irene Dunne in RKO's pic- 
turization of E. W. Hornung's 

"Stingaree." 

* * * 

Joan Macgowan, 18-year-old 
daughter of Kenneth Macgowan, will 
make her screen debut in RKO's 

"Little Women." 

* * * 

Sir Guy Standing and Baby Le- 
Roy have been added to Paramount's 

"Captain Jericho." 

* * * 

Dorothy Wilson and Robert Mc- 
Wade are cast additions to RKO's 
"A Chance at Heaven." 

^ =£ * 

Simile — As necessary as a photo- 
graph re-toucher. 

Irving Pichel, who abandoned act- 
ing for several months to co-direct 
for Radio, will return to the screen 
in Mae West's current Paramount 
picture, "I'm No Angel." 

Robert Hichens' unpublished nov- 
el, "The Paradine Case," for which 
Howard Estabrook is writing the 
screen version and dialogue, when 
typed recently by the M-G-M sten- 
ographic department, made three 
books each the thickness of the lo- 
cal telephone directory. 

* * * 

Lee Tracy has motored to his 
ranch near San Diego for a two- 
week rest after completing the star- 
ring role jn "Turn Back The Clock," 
which Edgar Selwyn directed for 
M-G-M. Tracy's next assignment 
hasn't been decided, two stories 
having been recently submitted to 

the star for consideration. 

* * # 

Lona Andre, one of the four win- 
ners of Paramount's Panther Wo- 
man contest, and a 1933 Wampas 
Baby Star, has been given a new 
long term contract. She recently 

finished a role in "Big Executive." 

* * * 

Although Gregory La Cava has 
not as yet started on "Gallant 
Lady," which he has contracted to 
direct for Twentieth Century Pro- 
ductions, chief executive Darryl 
Francis Zanuck is negotiating with 
him to sign to direct two pictures 
instead of the one. 

* * * 

Horace Jackson is writing an orig- 
inal story for the Jesse Lasky or- 



NEWS of the D 



Chicago — Duncan Kennedy 
erly assistant manager at 1 
ental is now at McVickers, 
& K. houses. 



Cleveland — Fred Mast ] 
Film Cleaner is in the Clinic 
ering from a nasal operation. 



New Orleans — Two maskc 
dits obtained $23 in a holdup 
cashier of the Prytania 1 
United Theaters neighborhood 
early in the evening. 



Cleveland — Budd Roger?! 
Division sales manager, will 
Thursday at which time he *l 
nounce the company's progn 1 
policy for the coming season 

Charlotte— J. E. Hobbs, Urj 
salesman, recently underwe 
operation for appendicitis. Th 
week, Joe Bishop, also with tl 
exchange, was operated upon 
pendicitis. 



ganization while abroad, i 
ing to word received from t 
thor-scenarist, who has beer 
ing Europe, he expects to se 
completed opus to Hollywood 
the next two weeks. 



Jamie Erickson has written 
Me Louise," the theme so 
"Waffles," produced by 
Mitchell, with Warren Millais 
ing. He also wrote 'Train- 
for the same picture and wi 
nish the numbers for "Dance C< 
which will be made by Hele 
chell. 



Emile Chautard will appe 
Paramount's "Design for Li\) 

* * * 

Gordon Wellesley, noted 
explorer and film producer, w, 
been writing for the films 
Hollywood this week, en ro» 
his home in Kuala Lumpur, 
ated Malay States. He 
"Shanghai Interlude" and ' 
River," for Universal, and 
hai Madness," for Fox. 



Coming and Goir 



ED KUYKENDALL, president of the M 
0. A., is expected in New York next T 

JOHN BLYSTONE, Fox director, lefti 
wood yesterday for New York on his ■ 
Europe for a vacation, returning sorneK 
October. 

NATHANIEL WEST, author signed by 
bia, left yesterday for the Coast. 

JACK COHN leaves New York for th 
Saturday. 



THE 



' h 



h ursday, July 27, 1933 

ERVIGING IS UPHELD 
NSTANLEY-ERPISUIT 



(Continued from Page 1) 

U. S. District Court here yester- 
y by Judge John P. Niefcls in the 
ti-monopoly suits of the Stanley 
of America, General Talking 
rtures Corp. and Duovac Corp. 
ainst Electrical Research Prod- 
ts, A. T. & T. and Western Elec- 
c. The preliminary injunction 
a directed against Erpi "and those 
active concert or participating 
th them." 

The decrees enjoin Erpi from en- 
ding or attempting to enforce, 
til further order of the court, that 
rt of its agreement with licensees 
ing its sound reproducing equip- 
■nt which obligates licensees to 
tain from Erpi all additional and 
lewal parts and assembled parts 

• operation of the equipment. The 
crees also enjoin Erpi from en- 
ding that part of its agreement 
rich obligates in practical effect 
oducer licensees to distribute 
and pictures produced thereunder 
ly for use on reproducing equip- 
! >nt provided by Erpi. Both of 
jse clauses are declared by the 
art to be in violation of the Clay- 
1 Act. 

Except in these two respects, the 
iition of the three plaintiffs for a 
eliminary injunction was denied 
i the court without prejudice to 
; right of any party to the suit 
raise any question with respect 
?reto on final hearing. 
Counsel for the plaintiffs _last 
ek asked that the court issue the 
eliminary injunction against all 
;:ee defendants and submitted a 
I'm of decree which would enjoin 
pi from assessing a weekly charge 

• servicing of its equipment in the 
Imley theaters, 47 in number. The 
ekly charges approximate $1,100. 
nilar charges have been assessed 
i Erpi against upwards of 5,000 
jier theaters using its equipment, 

was stated. The court's decrees 
iterday, however, did not refer to 
! service charge angle of the liti- 
:ion. This is one of several ques- 
ns which will be raised when a 
jiring is held on the application 
V a permanent injunction. 



>fEW HOUSE FOR GASTONIA 

ijastonia, N. C. — J. E. Simpson, 
rmerly manager of the Ideal, re- 
"itly destroyed by fire, has plans 
der way for a new theater. 



TOUNEY LEASES THEATER 

iVauseon, O. — P. L. Touney, form- 
' manager of the Capitol, Cleve- 
jid, has leased the Princess, form- 
y operated by J. S. Rex. 



Leo Joins Lion's Club 

Chicago — Leo the Lion, M-G-M trade 
mark, is now a full-fledged member of 
the Lions International. No initiation 
was held during the ceremonies when 
Leo was sworn in at the World's Fair 
during Lion's Day. 



■2&H 



DAILY 



IONCthe 



LlalkLriaffl 



R I ALTO 



PHIL M.DALY 



• • • RIGHT IN the height of the hot spell when it is 
traditional with the theater man to go easy on the hired help 
and himself the RKO boys in the metropolitan district 
are stepping on the gas as never before for Terry Tur- 
ner, exploitashe chief for the company, has 'em all steamed up 
with his Beauty Contest in a careless moment we wan- 
dered into his office to say howdy and remained for over 

an hour amazed, entranced and intrigued by the Mass 

of Evidence he unloaded on one of the greatest publicity 

stunts that has been maneuvered in this hamlet for, lo, these 

many years 

# * # * 

• • • IT MARKS the first time that the foreign language 
newspapers have ever been tied up by the film biz as a unit 
and didja know that there are exactly 71 foreign news- 
papers published in and around New York ? and Terry 

has grabbed every last one of 'em that's a record in 

itself they are getting their girl readers to send in their 

photos and sign the entry blanks at the rate of hundreds every 
day it has developed into a tense national rivalry be- 
tween these foreign newspaper editors to try and have 

one of their nationals cop the honor of being chosen "Miss 
New York City" to compete in the Atlantic City page- 
ant in September 

* * * * 

• • • TO DATE 5,000 entries have been received 

and the contest has 10 days to go it has been computed 

that 300,000 lines will have been given to the RKO gala event 
in the foreign press when the contest ends some line- 
age for nothin'! 



• • • THE SEMI-FINALS will be staged in 36 RKO 

theaters in the New York territory Aug. 7 to 17 

when it is estimated 10,000 girls will compete Mister 

Turner has established a zoning system on contestants 

the entries received from the newspapers will be allocated to 

the theaters nearest the girls' residences it takes a 

regular bookkeeping system to handle this detail alone 

36 girls will be picked to appear at Madison Square Garden 
where "Miss New York City" will be chosen in September 



• • • AND THAT will be some show at Madison Square 

Garden a de luxe vaude bill will precede the picking of 

the winner the RKO theaters have already sold 2,000 

tickets at prices ranging from a quarter to a berry the 

attendance will easily hit the 15,000 mark 



• • • A NEW slant on Judges at a Beauty Contest 

the usual pick of artist judges is out Terry claims the 

only practical judges are musical comedy producers who know 

what "showman beauty" calls for so the biggest in this 

line will be selected and they won't be announced till 

the day of the Contest so that there can be no possible charges 

of fenagling here is one Beauty Pageant that is on 

the up and up 



• • • AND DID Mister Turner promote Prizes! 

1,000 Zato hair wave sets worth 10 smackers each a 

Russian ermine coat a complete ensemble of morning, 

afternoon and evening gowns with luggage worth $1,000 

36 lingerie sets . . a loving cup from RKO and the "Daily 

Mirror" 36 wardrobes of shoes with stockings to match 

$1,000 in cash prizes zowie! Some Bally- 
hoo! 



« « « 



» » » 



AGREEMENTS ON CODE 
URGED BY N. I. R. A. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

codes, Rosenblatt's statement clari- 
fies the objectives to be reached. 
Doubtless all problems within the 
industry directly governing these 
two factors will have to be agreed 
upon. 

It is known that one of the main 
objectives will be the ironing out of 
factors that have led to so many 
theater closings and it is believed 
that any workable codes that would 
ultimately lead to theater re-open- 
ings and consequent re-employment 
within the industry would be receiv- 
ed favorably by the administration. 



Warner Salaries Up 

To Conform to Code 

(Continued from Page 1) 
on the heels of Warner's wire to 
President Roosevelt (pledging sup- 
port of the employment program, 
means that lowest salaries in New 
York will be $15 weekly, with $14.50 
and $14.00 in smaller cities. 



Roadshow Treatment 

For "Savage Gold" 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Film Elxchange announces the pic- 
ture will be given roadshow treat- 
ment in the New York, Philadelphia 
and Buffalo territories. Harold Au- 
ten is presenting the Amazon ad- 
venture feature. 



NIRA Not Interfering 
In Strike Before Code 

(Continued from Page 1) 
will not include movie houses play- 
ing vaudeville. Latter will be covered 
from the actors' and labor stand- 
point in the vaudeville code. Musi- 
cians in studios and movie houses 
also are to be included in code pro- 
visions. 



FILES BANKRUPTCY PETITION 

New Haven, Conn. — Theatrical 
Premium Co. of this city has filed a 
voluntary petition in bankruptcy, 
listing liabilities of $17,845.98, and 
assets of $8,252.40. 




MANY NAPPY PITU 



Best wishes are extended by 
THE FILM DAILY to the 
following members of the 
industry, who are celebrat- 
ing their birthdays: 



July 21 




Albert Wetzel 
Natalie Moorhead 
Charles Vidor 



Lawrence Gray 
Joseph Quillan 
Samuel Tulpan 



j] 



THE 



-SOW 



DAILY 



Thursday, July 27. 



Vilma Bjnky in 

THE REBEL" 

with Luis Trenker and Victor Varconi 
Universal 73 mins. 

PATRIOTIC MELODRAMA IN ALPINE 
SETTING IS STRONG ON SUSPENSEFUL 
ACTION AND MOUNTAIN WARFARE 
THRILLS. 

Marking the return of Vilma Bank), 
looking swell, this production made in the 
Tyrolean Alps is refreshingly off the beaten 
path in its pictorial mountain background, 
preponderance of fast-moving action over 
dialogue, spectacular mountain fighting and 
well-sustained suspense in spite of weak 
lines in story development. The central 
character is Luis Trenker, a medical stu- 
dent who comes home to his peaceful 
Tyrol to find the town laid waste and 
his mother and sister killed by the inva- 
sion of Napoleon's army. After killing two 
of the enemy soldiers, Luis makes his get- 
away to a mountain hideout, from which 
spot he organizes his loyal countrymen in 
a plan to disperse the invaders. Despite 
their ingenuity in preparation and heroic 
fighting, however, they are defeated by the 
much bigger Napoleonic army, with Luis 
and two others winding up before a firing 
squad. Miss Banky plays the role of Luis' 
sweetheart, who remains faithful to him. 
Victor Varconi is a French captain. 

Cast: Luis Trenker, Vilma Banky, Victor 
Varconi, Paul Bildt, Olga Engl, Erika Dann- 
hoff, Arthur Grosse, Reinhold Bernt, Em- 
merich Albert, Luis Gerold, Hans Jannig. 

Directors, Luis Trenker, Edw. H. Knopf; 
Authors, same; Cameramen, Albert Behnitz, 
Willi Goldberger, Sepp Algier; Editor, An- 
drew Marton. 

Direction, Good. Photography, Excep- 
tional. 



HOLLYWOOD 

PLAZA 









SUMMERS 
RATES, Now 

$2 per day single! 
$2.50 per day double I 

Special weekly and monthly rates 

All rooms with bath and 
shower. Every modern 
convenience. 
Fine foo It J.t reasonable 
prices in the Plaza's Rus- 
sian Eagle Garden Cafe. 

Look forthe"Doorway of Hofpltalitv" 
H Cke.iDanyait.Hat. eapemSietnUuL* 
VINE AT HOLLYWOOD BLVD. 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIPORKIA 



SHORT SUBJECT REVIEWS 



"Hook and Ladder Hokum" 

(Tom and Jerry Cartoon) 

RKO ' mins. 

Just Fair 

Not much sense or continuity to 
this one. The lads do the usual stuff 
of tumbling into their firemen's uni- 
forms, rushing to the fire, having 
trouble with the hose and making 
rescues. The time-worn stunt of 
holding a life net under a person 
about to jump and then moving 
away so that the character flops on 
the ground is worked into the car- 
toon. Not funny, but well drawn 
and synchronized. 



"Fannie in the Lion's Den" 
(Paul Terry-Toon) 
Educational-Fox 8 mins. 

Good Hoke Cartoon 
The second in the series of bur- 
lesque mellers concerning the adven- 
tures of Fannie the heroine pursued 
by the villain and rescued by her 
western hero. The cartoons are all 
of human characters, and get away 
from the usual animal subjects. Fan- 
nie is again kidnaped by the villain, 
and rescued from a den of lions by 
the brave western hero. The action 
is done to original operatic scoring 
by Philip A. Scheib, with the actors 
singing their "dramatic" lines. 
Plenty original, clever and carrying 
the laughs. 



"Broadway Gossip" Issue No. 9 

(Columnist News Reel) 

Educational-Fox 8 mins. 

Human Interest Stuff 

The inside stories of various celebs 
who were once in the money but are 
now more or less in the discard are 
presented with a very human and 
interesting slant. Good diversity of 
subject matter, with a running com- 
mentary that explains each in- 
dividual's past and present, with re- 
marks by the subjects in question. 



"The Chump" 

Miner-Skellv Productions 18 mins. 

Swell 

One of the niftiest shorts pro- 
duced in the East, that compares 
favorably with the best from Holly- 
wood. For it has a nicely paced 
and balanced story with a dash of 
music and song, done with a light, 
fine eomedy touch that is refresh- 
ing. It is essentially popular fare 



that will appeal universally. Hal 
Skelly does the part of a society 
boy and a spender who is a sap 
for the dames. Two hook him about 
the same time, get fat checks from 
him, and then he dines 'em at a 
swell nite club. The nayoff is that 
Hal appears like a "chump" through 
the footage, but in the final scene 
he has been brought back to a pri- 
vate sanitarium where he escaped. 
Just a natural nut. Lina Basquette 
and Sally Starr do good work. Hal 
gets credit for his own stage skit, 
directing and acting. And a swell 
job. He should make it a series. 



"Oriental Fantasy" 

Master Art 6 mins. 

Classy 

With a musical background of or- 
gan selections played by Lew White, 
several Oriental ballads rendered 
by Charles Carlisle, who has an un- 
usually fine tenor voice, and with a 
series of attractive trick photog- 
raphy effects, this short should be 
valuable on any program. Words 
for the songs are superimposed over 
the scenes which show some beauti- 
ful girls in Oriental dances and 
some silhouettes of desert riders. 



"Paris on Parade" 

(Magic Carpet of Movietone) 

Fox 9 mins. 

Dandy 

For a 9-minute sightseeing tour of 
Paris, you can't very easily beat 
this. With considerable camera 
artistry, the reel presents views of 
the French capital's high spots, 
from the Bourse to the Bois, show- 
ing activities from the early work 
hours in the business district to the 
late play hours among the night life 
resorts. 



Ethel Merman in 

"Be Like Me" 

Paramount 11 mins. 

Torch Singing Good 

Ethel Merman's rendition of a few 
torch numbers constitutes the most 
enjoyable part of this skit. Miss 
Merman was provided with a Mex- 
ican mining camp saloon back- 
ground, where a couple of rivals 
fight over her. The atmosphere is of 
no particular value, but Miss Mer- 
man's good singing voice is always 
a pleasure. Aubrey Scotto wrote 
and directed the subject. 



M-G-M CLEVELAND LUNCHEON 
Cleveland — W. F. Rodgers, Jack 
Flynn and Frank Drew, all of M- 
G-M were hosts to a group of Cleve- 
land exhibitors last week at lunch- 
eon at the Statler. Local exhibi- 
tion and distribution problems were 
discussed so as to obviate contro- 
versy before it arises. 



MANAGING CLEVELAND HOUSE 

Cleveland — J. S. Cagney has been 
appointed manager of the Dennison 
Square, an Associated Theater cir- 
cuit house. Cagney recently man- 
aged the Empire, San Antonio, for 
Duel Amusement Co. Frior to that 
he was with Warner Ohio theaters. 



I 

REMEMBER 
WHEN 



By 



fy WESLEY RUGGLES 

as told to 
RALPH WILK 

West Coast Manager, The Film Dai' 
• 'HIFTEEN years ago I was getting a 

r asa director at Mack Sennett s 
ing just graduated from the ranks of 
stone Kops," relates Wesley Ruggles. 

"My first assignment was to cod 
Sennett's first three-reeler, starring Sy-i 
Chaplin 'who co-directed with me 
The Submarine Pirate.' 

"The big sequence was shot outside 
breakwater at San Pedro Harbor, and I 
Sennett came down to watch the op • 
tions. For the big laugh of the story. ■ 
was supposed to stand on the submali 
deck, clad in full naval regalia. When < 
sub sank under the water, leaving I 
floundering in the water, we hoped to I 
the big 'be